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  • 1.
    Berglund, Jennie
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Wood Chemistry and Pulp Technology. Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Wood Hemicelluloses - Fundamental Insights on Biological and Technical Properties2018Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Hemicelluloses are a group of heterogeneous polysaccharides representing around 30 % of wood where the dominating types are xylans, glucomannans and xyloglucans. Hemicelluloses complex molecular structure makes it difficult to understand the relationship between structure and properties entirely, and their biological role is not yet fully verified. Additionally, hemicelluloses are sensitive to chemical processing and are not utilized to their full potentials for production of value-added products such as materials, additives to food and pharmaceutical products, etc. Increased knowledge regarding their functions is important for the development of both processes and products. The aim with this work has therefore been to increase the fundamental understanding about how the structure and properties of wood hemicelluloses are correlated, and properties such as flexibility, interaction with cellulose, solubility, resistance to chemical-, thermal-, and enzymatic degradation have been explored.

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were used to, in detail, study the structures found in wood hemicelluloses. The flexibility was evaluated by comparing the impact of backbone sugars on the conformational space and also the impact of side groups was considered. Based on the conformational space of backbone glycosidic linkages the flexibility order of hemicelluloses in an aqueous environment was determined to be: xylan > glucomannan > xyloglucan. Additionally, the impact of xylan structure on cellulose interaction was evaluated by MD methods.

    Hemicelluloses were extracted from birch and spruce, and were used to fabricate different composite hydrogels with bacterial cellulose. These materials were studied with regards to mechanical properties, and it was shown that galactoglucomannans mainly contributed to an increased modulus in compression, whereas the most significant effect from xylan was increased strain under uniaxial tensile testing. Besides, other polysaccharides of similar structure as galactoglucomannans were modified and used as pure, well defined, models. Acetyl groups are naturally occurring decorations of wood hemicelluloses and can also be chemically introduced. Here, mannans with different degrees of acetylation were prepared and the influence of structure on solubility in water and the organic solvent DMSO were evaluated. Furthermore, the structure and water solubility influenced the interaction with cellulose. Acetylation also showed to increase the thermal and biological stability of mannans.

    With chemical pulping processes in mind, the degradability of spruce galactoglucomannans in alkaline solution were studied with regards to the structure, and the content of more or less stable structural regions were proposed.

    The full text will be freely available from 2019-12-31 20:00
  • 2.
    Berglund, Jennie
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Angles d’Ortoli, Thibault
    Vilaplana, Francisco
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Glycoscience. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Widmalm, Göran
    Bergenstråhle-Wohlert, Malin
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Lawoko, Martin
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Henriksson, Gunnar
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Lindström, Mikael
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Wohlert, Jakob
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    A molecular dynamics study of the effect of glycosidic linkage type in the hemicellulose backbone on the molecular chain flexibility2016In: The Plant Journal, ISSN 0960-7412, E-ISSN 1365-313XArticle in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The macromolecular conformation of the constituent polysaccharides in lignocellulosic biomass influences their supramolecular interactions, and therefore their function in plants and their performance in technical products. The flexibility of glycosidic linkages from the backbone of hemicelluloses was studied by evaluating the conformational freedom of the φ and ψ dihedral angles using molecular dynamic simulations, additionally selected molecules were correlated with experimental data by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Three types of β-(1→4) glycosidic linkages involving the monosaccharides (Glcp, Xylp and Manp) present in the backbone of hemicelluloses were defined. Different di- and tetrasaccharides with combinations of such sugar monomers from hemicelluloses were simulated, and free energy maps of the φ – ψ space and hydrogen-bonding patterns were obtained. The glycosidic linkage between Glc-Glc or Glc-Man (C-type) was the stiffest with mainly one probable conformation; the linkage from Man-Man or Man-Glc (M-type) was similar but with an increased probability for an alternative conformation making it more flexible, and the linkage between two Xyl-units (X-type) was the most flexible with two almost equally populated conformations. Glycosidic linkages of the same type showed essentially the same conformational space in both disaccharides and in the central region of tetrasaccharides. Different probabilities of glycosidic linkage conformations in the backbone of hemicelluloses can be directly estimated from the free energy maps, which to a large degree affect the overall macromolecular conformations of these polymers. The information gained contributes to an increased understanding of the function of hemicelluloses both in the cell wall and in technical products.

  • 3.
    Berglund, Jennie
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Azhar, Shoaib
    Lawoko, Martin
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Lindström, Mikael
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Vilaplana, Francisco
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Glycoscience. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Wohlert, Jakob
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Henriksson, Gunnar
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    The structure of galactoglucomannan impacts the degradation under alkaline conditions2018In: Cellulose (London), ISSN 0969-0239, E-ISSN 1572-882XArticle in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Galactoglucomannan (GGM) from sprucewas studied with respect to the degradation behavior inalkaline solution. Three reference systems includinggalactomannan from locust bean gum, glucomannanfrom konjac and the linear water-soluble carboxymethylcellulose were studied with focus onmolecular weight, sugar composition, degradationproducts, as well as formed oligomers, to identifyrelative structural changes in GGM. Initially allmannan polysaccharides showed a fast decrease inthe molecular weight, which became stable in the laterstage. The degradation of the mannan polysaccharidescould be described by a function corresponding to thesum of two first order reactions; one slow that wasascribed to peeling, and one fast that was connectedwith hydrolysis. The galactose side group wasstable under conditions used in this study (150 min,90 C, 0.5 M NaOH). This could suggest that, apartfrom the covalent connection to C6 in mannose, thegalactose substitutions also interact non-covalentlywith the backbone to stabilize the structure againstdegradation. Additionally, the combination of differentbackbone sugars seems to affect the stability of thepolysaccharides. For carboxymethyl cellulose thedegradation was linear over time which furthersuggests that the structure and sugar composition playan important role for the alkaline degradation. Moleculardynamics simulations gave details about theconformational behavior of GGM oligomers in watersolution, as well as interaction between the oligomersand hydroxide ions.

  • 4.
    Berglund, Jennie
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Bergenstråhle, Malin
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Vilaplana, Francisco
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Centres, Albanova VinnExcellence Center for Protein Technology, ProNova. KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Glycoscience.
    d'Ortoli, Thibault Angles
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Organ Chem, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Widmalm, Goran
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Organ Chem, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Lawoko, Martin
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Henriksson, Gunnar
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Lindström, Mikael
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Wohlert, Jakob
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    How the flexibility properties of hemicelluloses are affected by the glycosidic bonds between different backbone sugars - A molecular dynamics study2016In: Abstracts of Papers of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0065-7727, Vol. 251Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Berglund, Jennie
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Chen, Pan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Vilaplana, Francisco
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Wohlert, Jakob
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Computer modeling of the structure and dynamics of hemicelluloses2019In: Abstracts of Papers of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0065-7727, Vol. 257Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Berglund, Jennie
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Farahani, Saina Kishani
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    de Carvalho, Danila Morais
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Lawoko, Martin
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Wohlert, Jakob
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Henriksson, Gunnar
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Lindström, Mikael
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Vilaplana, Francisco
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Glycoscience. AlbaNova University Centre.
    The influence of acetylation and sugar composition on the (in)solubility of mannans, their interaction with cellulose surfaces and thermal propertiesManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Berglund, Jennie
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Kishani, Saina
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    de Carvalho, Danila Morais
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Lawoko, Martin
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Wohlert, Jakob
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Henriksson, Gunnar
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Lindström, Mikael
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Vilaplana, Francisco
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Glycoscience.
    The influence of acetylation and sugar composition on the (in)solubility of mannans, their interaction with cellulose surfaces and thermal properties.Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Berglund, Jennie
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Mikkelsen, Deirdre
    Univ Queensland, Queensland Alliance Agr & Food Innovat, Ctr Nutr & Food Sci, ARC Ctr Excellence Plant Cell Walls, Brisbane, Qld, Australia..
    Flanagan, Bernadine
    Univ Queensland, Queensland Alliance Agr & Food Innovat, Ctr Nutr & Food Sci, ARC Ctr Excellence Plant Cell Walls, Brisbane, Qld, Australia..
    Dhital, Sushil
    Univ Queensland, Queensland Alliance Agr & Food Innovat, Ctr Nutr & Food Sci, ARC Ctr Excellence Plant Cell Walls, Brisbane, Qld, Australia..
    Henriksson, Gunnar
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Lindström, Mikael
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Yakubov, Gleb
    Univ Queensland, Sch Chem Engn, ARC Ctr Excellence Plant Cell Walls, Brisbane, Qld, Australia..
    Gidley, Michael
    Univ Queensland, Queensland Alliance Agr & Food Innovat, Ctr Nutr & Food Sci, ARC Ctr Excellence Plant Cell Walls, Brisbane, Qld, Australia..
    Vilaplana, Francisco
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Glycoscience. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Hydrogels of bacterial cellulose and wood hemicelluloses as a model of plant secondary cell walls2019In: Abstracts of Papers of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0065-7727, Vol. 257Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Berglund, Jennie
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Mikkelsen, Deirdre
    University of Queensland, Australia.
    Flanagan, Bernadine M.
    University of Queensland, Australia.
    Dhital, Sushil
    University of Queensland, Australia.
    Henriksson, Gunnar
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Lindström, Mikael
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Yakubov, Gleb E.
    University of Queensland, Australia.
    Gidley, Michael J.
    University of Queensland, Australia.
    Vilaplana, Francisco
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Wood Hemicelluloses Exert Distinct Biomechanical Contributions in Bacterial Cellulose HydrogelsManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Bi, Ran
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Wood Chemistry and Pulp Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Berglund, Jennie
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Wood Chemistry and Pulp Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Vilaplana, Francisco
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Glycoscience. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    McKee, Lauren
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Glycoscience. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Henriksson, Gunnar
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Wood Chemistry and Pulp Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    The Degree Of Acetylation Affects The Microbial Degradability Of HemicellulosesManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 11.
    Bi, Ran
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Berglund, Jennie
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Vilaplana, Francisco
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Glycoscience. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    McKee, Lauren S.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Glycoscience. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Henriksson, Gunnar
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    The degree of acetylation affects the microbial degradability of mannans2016In: Polymer degradation and stability, ISSN 0141-3910, E-ISSN 1873-2321, Vol. 133, p. 36-46Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Hemicelluloses as major components of plant cell walls are acetylated to different extents. The biologicalfunctions of acetylation are not completely understood but suggested that one reason is to decrease themicrobial degradability of cell walls. Model seed galactomannan and glucomannan, which are structurallysimilar to an abundant class of wood hemicelluloses, were acetylated to various degrees and usedas sole carbon source on agar plates for microbial growth. When soil samples were inoculated on theplates, significantly fewer strains grew on the agar plates with highly acetylated mannans than withslightly acetylated or non-acetylated mannans. One filamentous fungus isolated and identified as aPenicillium species was shown to grow faster and stronger on non-acetylated than on highly acetylatedmannan. The data therefore support the hypothesis that a high degree of acetylation (DSac) can decreasethe microbial degradability of hemicelluloses. Possible mechanisms and the technological significance ofthis are discussed.

  • 12.
    Henriksson, Gunnar
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Berglund, Jennie
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Wohlert, Jakob
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Lawoko, Martin
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Aminzadeh, Selda
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Lindström, Mikael
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Vilaplana, Francisco
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Glycoscience.
    Non-cellulose wood polysaccharides - a need for a stricter structural and functional classification?2018In: Abstract of Papers of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0065-7727, Vol. 255Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 13.
    Martinez-Abad, Antonio
    et al.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Glycoscience.
    Berglund, Jennie
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Wood Chemistry and Pulp Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Toriz, Guillermo
    Gatenholm, Paul
    Henriksson, Gunnar
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Lindström, Mikael
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Wohlert, Jakob
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Vilaplana, Francisco
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Glycoscience. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Regular Motifs in Xylan Modulate Molecular Flexibility and Interactions with Cellulose Surfaces2017In: Plant Physiology, ISSN 0032-0889, E-ISSN 1532-2548, Vol. 175, no 4, p. 1579-1592Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Xylan is tightly associated with cellulose and lignin in secondary plant cell walls, contributing to its rigidity and structural integrity in vascular plants. However, the molecular features and the nanoscale forces that control the interactions among cellulose microfibrils, hemicelluloses, and lignin are still not well understood. Here, we combine comprehensive mass spectrometric glycan sequencing and molecular dynamics simulations to elucidate the substitution pattern in softwood xylans and to investigate the effect of distinct intramolecular motifs on xylan conformation and on the interaction with cellulose surfaces in Norway spruce (Picea abies). We confirm the presence of motifs with evenly spaced glycosyl decorations on the xylan backbone, together with minor motifs with consecutive glucuronation. These domains are differently enriched in xylan fractions extracted by alkali and subcritical water, which indicates their preferential positioning in the secondary plant cell wall ultrastructure. The flexibility of the 3-fold screw conformation of xylan in solution is enhanced by the presence of arabinofuranosyl decorations. Additionally, molecular dynamic simulations suggest that the glycosyl substitutions in xylan are not only sterically tolerated by the cellulose surfaces but that they increase the affinity for cellulose and favor the stabilization of the 2-fold screw conformation. This effect is more significant for the hydrophobic surface compared with the hydrophilic ones, which demonstrates the importance of nonpolar driving forces on the structural integrity of secondary plant cell walls. These novel molecular insights contribute to an improved understanding of the supramolecular architecture of plant secondary cell walls and have fundamental implications for overcoming lignocellulose recalcitrance and for the design of advanced wood-based materials.

  • 14.
    Martinez-Abad, Antonio
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Glycoscience.
    Quero, Amparo Jimenez
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Glycoscience.
    Berglund, Jennie
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Giummarella, Nicola
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Henriksson, Gunnar
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Lindström, Mikael
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology. Wallenberg Wood Sci Ctr, Stockholm, Sweden.;KTH Royal Inst Technol, Fibre & Polymer Technol, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Wohlert, Jakob
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Lawoko, Martin
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Vilaplana, Francisco
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Glycoscience. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Influence of the molecular structure of wood hemicelluloses on the recalcitrance of lignocellulosic biomass2018In: Abstract of Papers of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0065-7727, Vol. 255Article in journal (Other academic)
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