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  • 1.
    Banerjee, Indradumna
    et al.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology.
    Salih, Tagrid
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology.
    Ramachandraiah, Harisha
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Erlandsson, Johan
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Pettersson, Torbjörn
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation. KTH, Superseded Departments (pre-2005), Chemistry.
    Araújo, A. C.
    Karlsson, M.
    Russom, Aman
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Slipdisc: A versatile sample preparation platform for point of care diagnostics2017In: RSC Advances, ISSN 2046-2069, E-ISSN 2046-2069, Vol. 7, no 56, p. 35048-35054Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We report a microfluidic sample preparation platform called "Slipdisc" based on slipchip technology. Slipdisc is a rotational slipchip that uses a unique hand-wound clockwork mechanism for precise movement of specially fabricated polycarbonate discs. In operation, the microchannels and microchambers carved on the closely aligned microfluidic discs convert from continuous filled paths to defined compartments using the slip movement. The clockwork mechanism introduced here is characterised by a food dye experiment and a conventional HRP TMB reaction before measuring lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) enzyme levels, which is a crucial biomarker for neonatal diagnostics. The colorimetry based detection of LDH was performed with an unmodified camera and an image analysis procedure based on normalising images and observing changes in red channel intensity. The analysis showed a close to unity coefficient of determination (R2 = 0.96) in detecting the LDH concentration when compared with a standard Chemical Analyser, demonstrating the excellent performance of the slipdisc platform with colorimetric detection. The versatile point of care sample preparation platform should ideally be suited for a multitude of applications at resource-limited settings.

  • 2.
    Erlandsson, Johan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH).
    CONTROLLED ASSEMBLY AND FUNCTIONALISATION OF CELLULOSE-BASED MATERIALS2019Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The environmental effects caused by the use of fossil-based resources have intensified and driven society and research towards new materials and processes that utilise renewable resources. Within the development of new materials, wood has been identified as a raw-material from which high performing materials can be derived. One such material is cellulose nanofibrils (CNFs) which are capable of replacing several currently used fossil-based materials. However, for CNFs to exhibit the required material properties they need to be chemically or physically modified. This means that the properties of the CNFs can be specifically adapted to fit the demand in particular areas, for example electrical energy storage. In these applications it is the mechanical properties; the large, easily functionalised surface and ability to be moulded into 3D shapes that make CNFs a highly interesting raw material.

    This thesis explores the formation and functionalisation of CNF- and fibre-based materials and their novel use in applications such as energy storage. The wet stability of the materials was achieved by crosslinking and ice templating the fibrils by a novel freezing procedure, which makes it possible to avoid the use of freeze-drying and subsequent crosslinking. Using colloidal probe atomic force microscopy adhesion measurements, hemiacetals were shown to be formed between the aldehyde-containing fibrils when they are brought into molecular contact, for example during ice templating. Hemiacetal crosslinked aerogels have been shaped and functionalised to demonstrate their application as biomimetic structural composites, electrical circuits and electrical cells. In addition, crosslinked, light-weight 3D fibre networks were prepared with á similar chemistry by a self-assembly process of pulp fibres. These networks could be dried under ambient conditions and the materials formed were wet-stable due to the hemiacetal crosslinks formed in the fibre–fibre contacts, which provided the networks with excellent mechanical properties and shape recovery capacity in water.

    Finally, using a newly developed polyampholyte and mixing it with CNFs, heterofunctional composite films and aerogels could be prepared. By activating crosslinkable groups in these composite materials, they were able to undergo further water based chemical functionalisation. In this highly dispersed state, the composite could be irreversibly crosslinked by a hydrothermal treatment to create transparent, low solid content hydrogels.

    The full text will be freely available from 2020-10-11 10:00
  • 3.
    Erlandsson, Johan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Duran, Veronica Lopez
    Granberg, Hjalmar
    Innventia AB.
    Sandberg, Mats
    Acreo Swedish ICT AB.
    Larsson, Per A.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Macro- and mesoporous nanocellulose beads for use in energy storage devices2016In: APPLIED MATERIALS TODAY, ISSN 2352-9407, Vol. 5, p. 246-254Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Chemically cross-linked, wet-stable cellulose nanofibril (CNF) aerogel beads were fabricated using a novel procedure. The procedure facilitated controlled production of millimetre-sized CNF aerogel beads without freeze-drying or critical point drying, while still retaining a highly porous structure with low density. The aerogel beads were mechanically robust in the dry state, supporting loads of 1.3 N at 70% compression, even after being soaked in water and re-dried. Furthermore, they displayed both a good stability in water and a remarkably good shape recovery after wet compression. Owing to the stability in water, the entire surface of the highly porous aerogel beads could be successfully functionalized with polyelectrolytes and carboxyl-functionalized single-wall carbon nanotubes (CF-SWCNTs) using the Layer-by-Layer technique, introducing a significant electrical conductivity (1.6 mS/cm) to the aerogel beads. The functionalized, electrically conducting aerogel beads could carry as much as 2 kA/cm(2) and act as electrodes in a supercapacitor displaying a stabilized charge storage capacity of 9.8 F/g after 50 charging-discharging cycles.

  • 4.
    Erlandsson, Johan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Francon, Hugo
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Marais, Andrew
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Granberg, Hjalmar
    RISE Bioecon, Papermaking & Packaging, Box 5604, SE-11486 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Cross-Linked and Shapeable Porous 3D Substrates from Freeze-Linked Cellulose Nanofibrils2019In: Biomacromolecules, ISSN 1525-7797, E-ISSN 1526-4602, Vol. 20, no 2, p. 728-737Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Chemically cross-linked highly porous nano cellulose aerogels with complex shapes have been prepared using a freeze-linking procedure that avoids common post activation of cross-linking reactions and freeze-drying. The aerogel shapes ranged from simple geometrical three-dimensional bodies to swirls and solenoids. This was achieved by molding or extruding a periodate oxidized cellulose nanofibril (CNF) dispersion prior to chemical cross-linking in a regular freezer or by reshaping an already prepared aerogel by plasticizing the structure in water followed by reshaping and locking the aerogel into its new shape. The new shapes were most likely retained by new cross-links formed between CNFs brought into contact by the deformation during reshaping. This self-healing ability to form new bonds after plasticization and redrying also contributed to the mechanical resilience of the aerogels, allowing them to be cyclically deformed in the dry state, reswollen with water, and redried with good retention of mechanical integrity. Furthermore, by exploiting the shapeability and available inner structure of the aerogels, a solenoid-shaped aerogel with all surfaces coated with a thin film of conducting polypyrrole was able to produce a magnetic field inside the solenoid, demonstrating electromagnetic properties. Furthermore, by biomimicking the porous interior and stiff exterior of the beak of a toucan bird, a functionalized aerogel was created by applying a 300 mu m thick stiff wax coating on its molded external surfaces. This composite material displayed a 10-times higher elastic modulus compared to that of the plain aerogel without drastically increasing the density. These examples show that it is possible to combine advanced shaping with functionalization of both the inner structure and the surface of the aerogels, radically extending the possible use of CNF aerogels.

  • 5.
    Erlandsson, Johan
    et al.
    KTH.
    Granberg, Hjalmar
    Innventia AB, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Sandberg, Mats
    Acreo Swedish ICT AB, Norrkoping, Sweden..
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Nanocellulose aerogel beads: Structurable and printable energy storage2017In: Abstract of Papers of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0065-7727, Vol. 253Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Erlandsson, Johan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Granberg, Hjalmar
    Innventia AB, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Macro- and mesoporous spherical nanocellulose beads for use in energy storage devices2016In: Abstracts of Papers of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0065-7727, Vol. 251Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Erlandsson, Johan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Pettersson, Torbjörn
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Ingverud, Tobias
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Granberg, H.
    Larsson, Per A.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation.
    Malkoch, Michael
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    On the mechanism behind freezing-induced chemical crosslinking in ice-templated cellulose nanofibril aerogels2018In: Journal of Materials Chemistry A, ISSN 2050-7488, Vol. 6, no 40, p. 19371-19380Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The underlying mechanism related to freezing-induced crosslinking of aldehyde-containing cellulose nanofibrils (CNFs) has been investigated, and the critical parameters behind this process have been identified. The aldehydes introduced by periodate oxidation allows for formation of hemiacetal bonds between the CNFs provided the fibrils are in sufficiently close contact before the water is removed. This is achieved during the freezing process where the cellulose components are initially separated, and the growth of ice crystals forces the CNFs to come into contact in the thin lamellae between the ice crystals. The crosslinked 3-D structure of the CNFs can subsequently be dried under ambient conditions after solvent exchange and still maintain a remarkably low density of 35 kg m-3, i.e. a porosity greater than 98%. A lower critical amount of aldehydes, 0.6 mmol g-1, was found necessary in order to generate a crosslinked 3-D CNF structure of sufficient strength not to collapse during the ambient drying. The chemical stability of the 3-D structure can be further enhanced by converting the hemiacetals to acetals by treatment with an alcohol under acidic conditions.

  • 8.
    Ingverud, Tobias
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Erlandsson, Johan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Malkoch, Michael
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    The combination of a dendritic polyampholyte and cellulose nanofibrils – a new type of functional materialManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Kaldéus, Tahani
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    Nordenström, Malin
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Erlandsson, Johan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Malmström, Eva
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    Redispersibility properties of dried cellulose nanofibrils - influence on structure and mechanical propertiesManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Kaldéus, Tahani
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    Nordenström, Malin
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Erlandsson, Johan
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Malmström, Eva
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    Redispersibility properties of dried cellulose nanofibrils - influence on structure and mechanical properties2019In: Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 11.
    Larsson, Per
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation.
    Erlandsson, Johan
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Lopez Duran, Veronica
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation.
    Henschen, Jonatan
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Tchang Cervin, Nicholas
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. Innventia AB, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Al-Ansari, Zeinab
    Univ Copenhagen, Dept Pharm, Copenhagen, Denmark..
    Svagan, Anna Justina
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Crosslinking as a facilitator for novel (nano)cellulose-based applications2017In: Abstract of Papers of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0065-7727, Vol. 253Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 12.
    López Durán, Veronica
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation.
    Erlandsson, Johan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation.
    Larsson, Per A.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Novel, Cellulose-Based, Lightweight, Wet-Resilient Materials with Tunable Porosity, Density, and Strength2018In: ACS SUSTAINABLE CHEMISTRY & ENGINEERING, ISSN 2168-0485, Vol. 6, no 8, p. 9951-9957Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Highly porous materials with low density were developed from chemically modified cellulose fibers using solvent-exchange and air drying. Periodate oxidation was initially performed to introduce aldehydes into the cellulose chain, which were then further oxidized to carboxyl groups by chlorite oxidation. Low-density materials were finally achieved by a second periodate oxidation under which the fibers self-assembled into porous fibrous networks. Following a solvent exchange to acetone, these networks could be air-dried without shrinkage. The properties of the materials were tuned by mechanical mixing with a high intensity mixer for different times prior to the second periodate oxidation, which resulted in porosities between 94.4% and 96.3% (i.e., densities between 54 and 82 kg/m(3)). The compressive strength of the materials was between 400 and 1600 kPa in the dry state and between 20 and 50 kPa in the wet state. It was also observed that in the wet state the fiber networks could be compressed up to 80% while still being able to recover their shape. These networks are highly interesting for use in different types of absorption products, and since they also have a high wet integrity, they can be modified with physical methods for different high-value-added end-use applications.

  • 13. López Durán, Verónica
    et al.
    Erlandsson, Johan
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, Superseded Departments (pre-2005), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Larsson, Per A.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation.
    Novel cellulose-based light weight, wet resilient materials with tunable porosity, density and strengthManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 14. Naderi, A.
    et al.
    Koschella, A.
    Heinze, T.
    Shih, K. C.
    Nieh, M. P.
    Pfeifer, A.
    Chang, C. C.
    Erlandsson, Johan
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Corrigendum to “Sulfoethylated nanofibrillated cellulose: Production and properties” [Carbohydr. Polym. 169 (2017) 515–523] (S0144861717304101) (10.1016/j.carbpol.2017.04.026))2018In: Carbohydrate Polymers, ISSN 0144-8617, E-ISSN 1879-1344, Vol. 179Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The author Ali Naderi regrets the wrong information given with regard to his affiliation. The author would like to apologise for any inconvenience caused.

  • 15. Naderi, Ali
    et al.
    Erlandsson, Johan
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Sundstrom, Jonas
    Lindstrom, Tom
    Enhancing the properties of carboxymethylated nanofibrillated cellulose by inclusion of water in the pre-treatment process2016In: Nordic Pulp & Paper Research Journal, ISSN 0283-2631, E-ISSN 2000-0669, Vol. 31, no 3, p. 372-378Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Well-delaminated carboxymethylated nanofibrillated cellulose (NFCCarb) systems are prerequisites for many industrial applications. In this study it was shown that addition of water, in a narrow range, not only improves the efficiency of the carboxymethylation process, but also enhances the degree of delamination of NFCCarb, which leads to improved properties. The observations were proposed to be due to a more homogeneous distribution of the charged groups, brought about by the higher swelling of fibers with inclusion of water.

  • 16.
    Naderi, Ali
    et al.
    Innventia AB, Drottning Kristinasv 61, S-11486 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Larsson, Per Tomas
    Innventia AB, Drottning Kristinasv 61, S-11486 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Stevanic, Jasna S.
    Innventia AB, Drottning Kristinasv 61, S-11486 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Lindström, Tom
    Innventia AB, Drottning Kristinasv 61, S-11486 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Erlandsson, Johan
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Effect of the size of the charged group on the properties of alkoxylated NFCs2017In: Cellulose (London), ISSN 0969-0239, E-ISSN 1572-882X, Vol. 24, no 3, p. 1307-1317Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The impact of the size of the charged group on the properties of alkoxylated NFC was studied by two chloroalkyl acid reagents. It was found that the employment of the larger 2-chloropropionic acid reagent leads to improved properties, e.g. higher fraction of nano-sized materials, and significantly better redispersion as compared to when the smaller monochloroacetic acid was employed. The differences in the impacts of the different reagents were hypothesized to be due to a more efficient disruption of the cohesion between the nanofibrils when a larger charged group was employed.

  • 17.
    Naderi, Ali
    et al.
    Innventia AB, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Larsson, Tomas
    Innventia AB, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Srndovi, Jasna Stevanic
    Innventia AB, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Lindström, Tom
    Innventia AB, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Erlandsson, Johan
    KTH. Royal Inst Technol, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Effect of the size of the charged group on the properties of alkoxylated NFCs2017In: Abstract of Papers of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0065-7727, Vol. 253Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 18. Naderi, Ali
    et al.
    Lindstrom, Tom
    Erlandsson, Johan
    Sundstrom, Jonas
    Flodberg, Goran
    A comparative study of the properties of three nanofibrillated cellulose systems that have been produced at about the same energy consumption levels in the mechanical delamination step2016In: Nordic Pulp & Paper Research Journal, ISSN 0283-2631, E-ISSN 2000-0669, Vol. 31, no 3, p. 364-371Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The viscosity, tensile strength-and barrier properties of enzymatically pre-treated-(NFCEnz), carboxymethylated-(NFCCarb) and carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) modified (NFCCMC) nanofibrillated cellulose systems (NFC) that have been produced at about the same energy consumption levels in the mechanical delamination step in the manufacturing of the different NFCs are reported. It was found that NFCEnz and NFCCMC are characterized by low degrees of fibrillation. Carboxymethylated NFC displayed superior tensile strength properties, lower fiber fragment content and a higher viscosity when compared to NFCEnz and NFCCMC. Interestingly, NFCEnz displayed equal or better barrier properties compared to the highly fibrillated NFCCarb.

  • 19. Naderi, Ali
    et al.
    Lindstrom, Tom
    Weise, Christoph F.
    Flodberg, Goren
    Sundstrom, Jonas
    Junel, Kristina
    Erlandsson, Johan
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Runebjork, AnneMarie
    Phosphorylated nanofibrillated cellulose: production and properties2016In: Nordic Pulp & Paper Research Journal, ISSN 0283-2631, E-ISSN 2000-0669, Vol. 31, no 1, p. 20-29Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Phosphate functionalized nanofibrillated cellulose (NFC) was produced through an industrially attractive process, by reacting wood pulp with a phosphate containing salt, followed by mechanical delamination through microfluidization. The degrees of delamination of the phosphorylated NFCs (judged by among others AFM-imaging, rheological studies and tensile strength measurements on NFC films) were found to improve with increasing functionalization of the pulp and number of microfluidization-passes. The NFC systems were found to display similar characteristics as other well-known NFC systems. Interestingly, however, the sufficiently delaminated phosphorylated NFCs exhibited significantly lower oxygen permeability values (at RH 50%) than the published values of several well-known highly delaminated NFC systems. The potential application of the phosphorylated NFC in packaging applications can hence be envisaged.

  • 20. Naderi, Ali
    et al.
    Lindström, Tom
    Sundström, Jonas
    Pettersson, Torbjörn
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Flodberg, Göran
    Erlandsson, Johan
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Microfluidized carboxymethyl cellulose modified pulp: a nanofibrillated cellulose system with some attractive properties2015In: Cellulose (London), ISSN 0969-0239, E-ISSN 1572-882X, Vol. 22, no 2, p. 1159-1173Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A method (Ankerfors and Lindstrom in Method for providing nanocellulose comprising modified cellulose fibers, 2009) was employed to physically attach anionic carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) chains onto wood pulp, upon which it was fibrillated by a microfluidizer-type homogenizer at high applied pressures and at dilute conditions [< 3 % (w/w)]. It was found that the CMC-modified pulp can be fibrillated at the same consistencies as many of the commercially available NFC products. The NFC manufacturing process was also deemed to be energy efficient, as it lacked the need for mechanical pre-treatment, which is often a prerequisite for the production of many existing NFC systems. The CMC-based NFC was studied with respect to the rheological characteristics, and was also characterized using AFM-imaging. Further, The NFC was made into films, and its tensile strength was determined together with its barrier properties. In general, the rheological characteristics (viscosity and storage modulus) together with the tensile strength and oxygen barrier properties of the films were improved with increasing the number of passes through the microfluidizer. The fibrillated CMC-modified pulp was found to be as efficient as other NFC systems when employed as dry strength additive. The employment of the investigated material, which can be produced at acceptable costs and through environmentally benign and industrially relevant processes can, hence, potentially lead to significant future savings in the energy consumption levels in the paper and cardboard manufacturing processes, which have been recognized as major application areas of NFC products.

  • 21.
    Petrou, Georgia
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Glycoscience.
    Jansson, Ronnie
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Protein Engineering.
    Hogqvist, Mark
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH).
    Erlandsson, Johan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Hedhammar, My
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Protein Technology.
    Crouzier, Thomas
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Glycoscience.
    Genetically Engineered Mucoadhesive Spider Silk2018In: Biomacromolecules, ISSN 1525-7797, E-ISSN 1526-4602, Vol. 19, no 8, p. 3268-3279Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mucoadhesion is defined as the adhesion of a material to the mucus gel covering the mucous membranes. The mechanisms controlling mucoadhesion include nonspecific electrostatic interactions and specific interactions between the materials and the mucins, the heavily glycosylated proteins that form the mucus gel. Mucoadhesive materials can be used to develop mucosal wound dressings and noninvasive transmucosal drug delivery systems. Spider silk, which is strong, biocompatible, biodegradable, nontoxic, and lightweight would serve as an excellent base for the development of such materials. Here, we investigated two variants of the partial spider silk protein 4RepCT genetically engineered in order to functionalize them with mucoadhesive properties. The pLys-4RepCT variant was functionalized with six cationically charged lysines, aiming to provide nonspecific adhesion from electrostatic interactions with the anionically charged mucins, while the hGal3-4RepCT variant was genetically fused with the Human Galectin-3 Carbohydrate Recognition Domain which specifically binds the mucin glycans Gal beta 1-3GlcNAc and Gal beta 1-4GlcNAc. First, we demonstrated that coatings, fibers, meshes, and foams can be readily made from both silk variants. Measured by the adsorption of both bovine submaxillary mucin and pig gastric mucin, the newly produced silk materials showed enhanced mucin binding properties compared with materials of wild-type (4RepCT) silk. Moreover, we showed that pLys-4RepCT silk coatings bind mucins through electrostatic interactions, while hGal3-4RepCT silk coatings bind mucins through specific glycan-protein interactions. We envision that the two new mucoadhesive silk variants pLys-4RepCT and hGal3-4RepCT, alone or combined with other biofunctional silk proteins, constitute useful new building blocks for a range of silk protein-based materials for mucosal treatments.

  • 22.
    Pettersson, Torbjörn
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Erlandsson, Johan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Larsson, Per
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    On the mechanism of freeze-induced crosslinking of aerogels made from periodate-oxidised cellulose nanofibrils2018In: Abstracts of Papers of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0065-7727, Vol. 255Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 23.
    Reid, Michael S.
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Erlandsson, Johan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology. KTH Royal Inst Technol, Fibre & Polymer Technol, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Incorporation of cellulose nanocrystals into polyamide nanocomposites with controlled architecture via interfacial polymerization2019In: Abstracts of Papers of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0065-7727, Vol. 257Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 24.
    Tian, Weiqian
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    VahidMohammadi, Armin
    Auburn Univ, Dept Mech & Mat Engn, Auburn, AL 36849 USA..
    Reid, Michael S.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Wang, Zhen
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Ouyang, Liangqi
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Erlandsson, Johan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Pettersson, Torbjörn
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Beidaghi, Majid
    Auburn Univ, Dept Mech & Mat Engn, Auburn, AL 36849 USA..
    Hamedi, Mahiar
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Multifunctional Nanocomposites with High Strength and Capacitance Using 2D MXene and 1D Nanocellulose2019In: Advanced Materials, ISSN 0935-9648, E-ISSN 1521-4095, article id 1902977Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The family of two-dimensional (2D) metal carbides and nitrides, known as MXenes, are among the most promising electrode materials for supercapacitors thanks to their high metal-like electrical conductivity and surface-functional-group-enabled pseudocapacitance. A major drawback of these materials is, however, the low mechanical strength, which prevents their applications in lightweight, flexible electronics. A strategy of assembling freestanding and mechanically robust MXene (Ti3C2Tx) nanocomposites with one-dimensional (1D) cellulose nanofibrils (CNFs) from their stable colloidal dispersions is reported. The high aspect ratio of CNF (width of approximate to 3.5 nm and length reaching tens of micrometers) and their special interactions with MXene enable nanocomposites with high mechanical strength without sacrificing electrochemical performance. CNF loading up to 20%, for example, shows a remarkably high mechanical strength of 341 MPa (an order of magnitude higher than pristine MXene films of 29 MPa) while still maintaining a high capacitance of 298 F g(-1) and a high conductivity of 295 S cm(-1). It is also demonstrated that MXene/CNF hybrid dispersions can be used as inks to print flexible micro-supercapacitors with precise dimensions. This work paves the way for fabrication of robust multifunctional MXene nanocomposites for printed and lightweight structural devices.

  • 25.
    Tian, Weiqian
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    VahidMohammadi, Armin
    Auburn Univ, Dept Mech & Mat Engn, Auburn, AL 36849 USA..
    Reid, Michael S.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Wang, Zhen
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH Royal Inst Technol, Dept Fibre & Polymer Technol, Tekn Ringen 56, S-10044 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Ouyang, Liangqi
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Erlandsson, Johan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Pettersson, Torbjörn
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Beidaghi, Majid
    Auburn Univ, Dept Mech & Mat Engn, Auburn, AL 36849 USA..
    Hamedi, Mahiar
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Multifunctional Nanocomposites with High Strength and Capacitance Using 2D MXene and 1D Nanocellulose2019In: Advanced Materials, ISSN 0935-9648, E-ISSN 1521-4095, article id 1902977Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The family of two-dimensional (2D) metal carbides and nitrides, known as MXenes, are among the most promising electrode materials for supercapacitors thanks to their high metal-like electrical conductivity and surface-functional-group-enabled pseudocapacitance. A major drawback of these materials is, however, the low mechanical strength, which prevents their applications in lightweight, flexible electronics. A strategy of assembling freestanding and mechanically robust MXene (Ti3C2Tx) nanocomposites with one-dimensional (1D) cellulose nanofibrils (CNFs) from their stable colloidal dispersions is reported. The high aspect ratio of CNF (width of approximate to 3.5 nm and length reaching tens of micrometers) and their special interactions with MXene enable nanocomposites with high mechanical strength without sacrificing electrochemical performance. CNF loading up to 20%, for example, shows a remarkably high mechanical strength of 341 MPa (an order of magnitude higher than pristine MXene films of 29 MPa) while still maintaining a high capacitance of 298 F g(-1) and a high conductivity of 295 S cm(-1). It is also demonstrated that MXene/CNF hybrid dispersions can be used as inks to print flexible micro-supercapacitors with precise dimensions. This work paves the way for fabrication of robust multifunctional MXene nanocomposites for printed and lightweight structural devices.

  • 26.
    Wang, Zhen
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Ouyang, Liangqi
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Tian, Weiqian
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Erlandsson, Johan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Marais, Andrew
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Tybrandt, Klas
    Linkoping Univ, Dept Sci & Technol, Lab Organ Elect, S-60174 Norrkoping, Sweden.;Linkoping Univ, Dept Sci & Technol, Lab Organ Elect, Wallenberg Wood Sci Ctr, S-60174 Norrkoping, Sweden..
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Hamedi, Mahiar
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Layer-by-Layer Assembly of High-Performance Electroactive Composites Using a Multiple Charged Small Molecule2019In: Langmuir, ISSN 0743-7463, E-ISSN 1520-5827, Vol. 35, no 32, p. 10367-10373Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Layer-by-layer (LbL) assembly is a versatile tool for fabricating multilayers with tailorable nanostructures. LbL, however, generally relies on polyelectrolytes, which are mostly insulating and induce large interlayer distances. We demonstrate a method in which we replace polyelectrolytes with the smallest unit capable of LbL self-assembly: a molecule with multiple positive charges, tris(3-aminopropyl)amine (TAPA), to fabricate LbL films with negatively charged single-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs). TAPA introduces less defects during the LbL build-up and results in more efficient assembly of films with denser micromorphology. Twenty bilayers of TAPA/CNT showed a low sheet resistance of 11 k Omega, a high transparency of 91% at 500 nm, and a high electronic conductivity of 1100 S/m on planar substrates. We also fabricated LbL films on porous foams with a conductivity of 69 mS/m and used them as electrodes for supercapacitors with a high specific capacitance of 43 F/g at a discharging current density of 1 A/g.

  • 27.
    Wågberg, Lars
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Hamedi, Max
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Marais, Andrew
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology. Stanford Univ, Stanford, CA 94305 USA..
    Nyström, Gustav
    Swiss Fed Inst Technol, Dept Hlth Sci & Technol, Zurich, Switzerland..
    Francon, Hugo
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Granberg, Hjalmar
    RISE Bioecon, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Erlandsson, Johan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology. KTH, Fibre & Polymer Technol, Stockholm, Sweden..
    The use of the layer-by-layer technology and low density networks of cellulose nanofibrils for preparing new materials for energy storage2018In: Abstract of Papers of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0065-7727, Vol. 255Article in journal (Other academic)
1 - 27 of 27
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