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  • 1.
    El-Seedi, Hesham R.
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry. Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Azeem, Muhammad
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry. COMSATS Institute of Information Technology, Pakistan.
    Khalil, Nasr S.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry. Agricultural Research Centre, Egypt.
    Sakr, Hanem H.
    Khalifa, Shaden A. M.
    Awang, Khalijah
    Saeed, Aamer
    Farag, Mohamed A.
    AlAjmi, Mohamed F.
    Pålsson, Katinka
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry.
    Borg-Karlson, Anna-Karin
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry.
    Essential oils of aromatic Egyptian plants repel nymphs of the tick Ixodes ricinus (Acari: Ixodidae)2017In: Experimental & applied acarology, ISSN 0168-8162, E-ISSN 1572-9702, Vol. 73, no 1, p. 139-157Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Due to the role of Ixodes ricinus (L.) (Acari: Ixodidae) in the transmission of many serious pathogens, personal protection against bites of this tick is essential. In the present study the essential oils from 11 aromatic Egyptian plants were isolated and their repellent activity against I. ricinus nymphs was evaluated Three oils (i.e. Conyza dioscoridis L., Artemisia herba-alba Asso and Calendula officinalis L.) elicited high repellent activity in vitro of 94, 84.2 and 82%, respectively. The most active essential oil (C. dioscoridis) was applied in the field at a concentration of 6.5 A mu g/cm(2) and elicited a significant repellent activity against I. ricinus nymphs by 61.1%. The most repellent plants C. dioscoridis, C. officinalis and A. herba-alba yielded essential oils by 0.17, 0.11 and 0.14%, respectively. These oils were further investigated using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis. alpha-Cadinol (10.7%) and hexadecanoic acid (10.5%) were the major components of C. dioscoridis whereas in C. officinalis, alpha-cadinol (21.2%) and carvone (18.2%) were major components. Artemisia herba-alba contained piperitone (26.5%), ethyl cinnamate (9.5%), camphor (7.7%) and hexadecanoic acid (6.9%). Essential oils of these three plants have a potential to be used for personal protection against tick bites.

  • 2. El-Seedi, Hesham R.
    et al.
    El-Shabasy, Rehan
    Sakr, Hanem
    Zayed, Mervat
    El-Said, Asmaa M. A.
    Helmy, Khalid M. H.
    Gaara, Ahmed H. M.
    Turki, Zaki
    Azeem, Muhammad
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Organic Chemistry.
    Ahmed, Ahmed M.
    Boulos, Loutfy
    Borg-Karlson, Anna-Karin
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Organic Chemistry.
    Göransson, Ulf
    Anti-schistosomiasis triterpene glycoside from the Egyptian medicinal plant Asparagus stipularis2011In: REV BRAS FARMACOGN, ISSN 0102-695X, Vol. 22, no 2, p. 314-318Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Bioassay-guided isolation using an in vitro assay testing for anti-schistosomiasis yielded a novel triterpene saponin, asparagalin A, from the n-butanol extract of the roots of Asparagus stipularis Forssk., Asparagaceae. The structure was elucidated by spectroscopic analysis and chemical transformations. Administration of asparagalin A resulted in a retardation of worm growth and locomotion at the first day and showed a significant activity of egg-laying suppression at 200 mu g/mL concentration.

  • 3.
    El-Shabasy, Rehan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry.
    Yosri, Nermeen
    Menoufia Univ, Fac Sci, Dept Chem, Shibin Al Kawm 32512, Egypt..
    El-Seedi, Hesham R.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry.
    Shoueir, Kamel
    Kafrelsheikh Univ, Inst Nanosci & Nanotechnol, Kafrelsheikh 33516, Egypt..
    El-Kemary, Maged
    Kafrelsheikh Univ, Inst Nanosci & Nanotechnol, Kafrelsheikh 33516, Egypt..
    A green synthetic approach using chili plant supported Ag/Ag2O@P25 heterostructure with enhanced photocatalytic properties under solar irradiation2019In: Optik (Stuttgart), ISSN 0030-4026, E-ISSN 1618-1336, Vol. 192, article id UNSP 162943Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As the environmental pollution is a global, catastrophic occurrence, green synthesis of different catalysts has long been pursued. Herein, Capsicum annuum L (chili) extract-based catalysts were used for the fabrication of Ag/Ag2O nanoparticles (NPs) without harsh conditions. The prepared Ag/Ag2O NPs were uniform with an average size of 11.4 nm. The Ag/Ag2O was smoothly coupled with P25 to produce Ag/Ag2O@P25 photocatalyst which had effective electron-hole pair separation and active sites for high photocatalytic activity. The catalyst degraded 98.7% of the model pollutant methylene blue (MB) and catalytic conversion of 100% 2,4-dinitroaniline (2,4-DNA) within 60 s were realized under energy saving solar-light illumination, matching the rules of "green chemistry". In addition, the prepared photocatalyst exhibited superior stability and reusability, and the hot filtration test proved the heterogeneity of the catalyst.

  • 4.
    Patel, Seema
    et al.
    San Diego State Univ, Bioinformat & Med Informat Res Ctr, 5500 Campanile Dr, San Diego, CA 92182 USA..
    Homaei, Ahmad
    Univ Hormozgan, Fac Marine Sci & Technol, Dept Marine Biol, Bandar Abbas, Iran.;Univ Hormozgan, Dept Biol, Fac Sci, Bandar Abbas, Iran..
    El-Seedi, Hesham R.
    Uppsala Univ, Biomed Ctr, Dept Med Chem, Div Pharmacognosy, Box 574, SE-75123 Uppsala, Sweden.
    Akhtar, Nadeem
    Univ Guelph, Dept Anim Biosci, Guelph, ON N1G 2W1, Canada..
    Cathepsins: Proteases that are vital for survival but can also be fatal2018In: Biomedicine and Pharmacotherapy, ISSN 0753-3322, E-ISSN 1950-6007, Vol. 105, p. 526-532Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The state of enzymes in the human body determines the normal physiology or pathology, so all the six classes of enzymes are crucial. Proteases, the hydrolases, can be of several types based on the nucleophilic amino acid or the metal cofactor needed for their activity. Cathepsins are proteases with serine, cysteine, or aspartic acid residues as the nucleophiles, which are vital for digestion, coagulation, immune response, adipogenesis, hormone liberation, peptide synthesis, among a litany of other functions. But inflammatory state radically affects their normal roles. Released from the lysosomes, they degrade extracellular matrix proteins such as collagen and elastin, mediating parasite infection, autoimmune diseases, tumor metastasis, cardiovascular issues, and neural degeneration, among other health hazards. Over the years, the different types and isoforms of cathepsin, their optimal pH and functions have been studied, yet much information is still elusive. By taming and harnessing cathepsins, by inhibitors and judicious lifestyle, a gamut of malignancies can be resolved. This review discusses these aspects, which can be of clinical relevance.

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