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  • 1. Cielemecka, Olga
    et al.
    Åsberg, CeciliaPhilosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Toxic Embodiment2019Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Special edited section on "Toxic Embodiment" of the journal Environmental Humanities (Duke University Press)

  • 2.
    Cielemecka, Olga
    et al.
    University of Turku, Finland.
    Åsberg, Cecilia
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment. Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, The Department of Gender Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences..
    Toxic Embodiment and Feminist Environmental Humanities Introduction2019In: Environmental humanities, ISSN 2201-1919, E-ISSN 2201-1919, Vol. 11, no 1, p. 101-107Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    With toxic pollutants as a rising threat, important questions about environmental justice, gender, and the sexual politics of environmental movements issue an urgent challenge to intersectional gender and science studies; to anticolonial, queer, and trans theory; as well as to environmental and human-animal studies at large. Taking up this challenge, this piece aims at attending to the ways toxic embodiment disturbs or aligns with multiple boundaries of sexes, generations, races, geographies, nation-states, and species and how toxicity has re-dynamized corporeality and the biochemical materiality of bodies.

  • 3. Lorenz, Dagmar
    et al.
    Åsberg, Cecilia
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Fredengren, Christina
    Sõrmus, Maris
    Treusch, Pat
    Vehviläinen, Marja
    Zekany, Eva
    Žeková, Lucie
    Anthropocene Ecologies: Biogeotechnical Relationalities in Late Capitalism2016In: New Materialism Cost ActionArticle in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This position paper outlines a multidirectional approach to what we call Anthropocene ecologies, its diverse genealogies, and methodological and conceptual foci. Under the heading of Anthropocene ecologies we seek to fertilize the sciences of ecology with approaches of queer and feminist new materialisms, and engage in multiple collaborations across the humanities, sciences, and everyday ecological practices. Specifically we draw on ecology as the object of analysis and the methodology, building on concepts and approaches from the sciences, material feminisms, science and technology studies, human/animal studies and material ecocriticism. Five modes of attention become particularly salient for our analysis of the Anthropocene ecologies of solar energy, humananimal relations, organic food production, wetlands, and human-robot relations. First we attend to how these ecologies are generated within and affect the webs of multispecies ecologies in late capitalism. Second we suggest the concept of biogeotechno-power to capture the entanglements of the biological, the geologic and the technological in new formations of power that invest, regulate, enhance, and dispose of (more-than-)human bodies in particular ecological relationalities. Third we examine the multiplicities of ecological temporalities, including the deep time of mineralisation, fossilisation and past and future species survival. Fourth we attend to affect as an entangling force in ecological relations. And fifth we investigate an affirmative posthuman ethics of concern and response-ability in relations with living and nonliving materialities that might not be close by (spatially and/or temporally). Anthropocene ecologies thereby include the technical, informational, temporal, affective, and ethical as integral parts of ecological intra-actions, and remain attuned to the differential, paradoxical and unexpected.

  • 4.
    Åsberg, Cecilia
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Feminist posthumanities2018In: Posthuman Glossary / [ed] Rosi Braidotti and Maria Hlavajova, London: Bloomsbury Academic, 2018, 1, p. 157-160Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In art, science, and the humanities we are now experiencing a "posthuman condition". Under the pressure of new dvelopments - such as neoliberal economics of global capitalism, migration, technological advances, environmental destruction on a mass scale, the perpetual war on terror and extensive security systems - the concept of the human as we had previously known it has undergone dramatic transformations. So has the humanities. This chapter explores feminist posthumanities, and its more-than-human focus on technoscience, environment and multispecies relationships. 

  • 5.
    Åsberg, Cecilia
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Feminist Posthumanities in the Anthropocene: Forays into the Postnatural2018In: Journal of Posthuman Studies: Philosophy, Technology, Media, ISSN 2472-4513, Vol. 1, no 2, p. 185-204Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the new planetary age of the Anthropocene or the Age of Man (as it were),humanity is cast as a single geological force, a major force of environmentaldestruction, and one folding in on itself. The Anthropocene is famously definedby human-induced climatic, biological, and geological transformations of ourplanet, by a profound anthropogenic environmental impact and mass speciesextinctions. However, the Anthropocene risk also, as pointed out by a widerange of feminist philosophers and critical scholars, hides troublesome differencesbetween humans, and also hides intimate relationships between technology,humans, and other animals. This totalization of humanity is a parallel risk insome posthuman theorizing also, and something postdisciplinary scholars ofthe critical humanities and feminist philosophers have paid attention to fordecades. In the posthuman context of the Anthropocene, I suggest and pointto postdisciplinary humanities research and theory–practices that pay carefulattention to the feminist theoretical work on our equally postnatural conditionas an experimental remedy.

  • 6.
    Åsberg, Cecilia
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE).
    The Posthumanities Hub: Feminist Posthumanities for a More-than-Human World2018In: In & Beyond Sweden: Journeys through an Art scene / [ed] Joa Ljungberg, Lena Malm, Johan Pousette, Santiago Mostyn, Stockholm: Idea Books , 2018Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In lieu of an abstract, this chapter introduces key features of the emerging field of feminist posthumanities at the intersections of art and science,

  • 7. Åsberg, Cecilia
    et al.
    Braidotti, Rosi
    Utrecht Universitet, Nederländerna.
    A Feminist Companion to the Posthumanities2018Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This companion is a cutting-edge primer to critical forms of the posthumanities and the feminist posthumanities, aimed at students and researchers who want to catch up with the recent theoretical developments in various fields in the humanities, such as new media studies, gender studies, cultural studies, science and technology studies, human animal studies, postcolonial critique, philosophy and environmental humanities. It contains a collection of nineteen new and original short chapters introducing influential concepts, ideas and approaches that have shaped and developed new materialism, inhuman theory, critical posthumanism, feminist materialism, and posthuman philosophy. A resource for students and teachers, this comprehensive volume brings together established international scholars and emerging theorists, for timely and astute definitions of a moving target – posthuman humanities and feminist posthumanities.

  • 8. Åsberg, Cecilia
    et al.
    Cielemecka, Olga
    Toxic Embodiment and Feminist Environmental Humanities2019In: Environmental humanities, ISSN 2201-1919, E-ISSN 2201-1919, Vol. 11, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Åsberg, Cecilia
    et al.
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Radomska, Marietta
    Linköping University.
    Doing Away with Life: On Biophilosophy, and Reimagining Ethics: On Biophilosophy, and Reimagining Ethics 2019In: Life as we Don’t Know It: 10th Anniversary Volume of the Bioart Society in Finland. / [ed] Berger, E., Mäki-Reinikka, K., O'Reilly, K. & Sederholm, H., Helsinki: Aalto ARTS Books , 2019, p. 8-Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Åsberg, Cecilia
    et al.
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Radomska, Marietta
    University of Helsinki.
    Why we need feminist posthumanities for a more-than-human world2019In: Transformative Humanities KTH Blog, Vol. 8Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Today, the environment is in us, and we humans are fully in the environment. That much is clear in this new planetary era of uncertainty some call the Anthropocene. Postdisciplinary practices and situated knowledges (Haraway again!) are of course especially salient in this regard: a brute necessity. The planet knows no disciplinary borders, it does not separate between nature and culture. Our planetary issues can not be solved by demarcations where sciences do nature and humanities do culture. In truth, our Anthropocene predicament belies the whole classical distinction between nature and culture! The needed efficacy of such postdisciplinary work is evidenced in many new, old and déja vu fields like feminist science studies and networked new materialisms, in bio-art and eco-art, in somatechnics, new media studies, post-continental philosophy, in anthropocene studies or transcorporeal theory, in multispecies- and medical humanities, in transgender studies, xenofeminism, cyborg- or techno-humanities, ecological or environmental humanities, queer death studies, critical veganism, and a mounting range of posthumanisms, inhumanisms and ahumanisms. Yes, critical and creative scholars in and around the humanities have not been lazy in the face of the many issues that face us today. Feminist posthumanities cover or converse with such postdisciplinary practices. It labels a wide-spread, multi-sited, evolving and growing effort to rework the role of the humanities and their relation to science, technology, art and contemporary society on the basis that our idea of the human is fundamentally reaching its limits, and changing. Feminist posthumanities thus responds to the need for more-than-human humanities.

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