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  • 1.
    Ahmadi Achachlouei, Mohammad
    et al.
    KTH, Skolan för arkitektur och samhällsbyggnad (ABE), Samhällsplanering och miljö, Miljöstrategisk analys. KTH, Skolan för datavetenskap och kommunikation (CSC), Centra, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Moberg, Åsa
    KTH, Skolan för arkitektur och samhällsbyggnad (ABE), Samhällsplanering och miljö, Miljöstrategisk analys. KTH, Skolan för datavetenskap och kommunikation (CSC), Centra, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Life cycle assessment of a magazine: part 2: A comparison of print and tablet editions2015Inngår i: Journal of Industrial Ecology, ISSN 1088-1980, E-ISSN 1530-9290, Vol. 19, nr 4Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The rapid development of information and communications technology (ICT) is providing new ways to access media content. Electronic media are sometimes more advantageous from an environmental perspective than paper-based media solutions, but ICT-based media can also bring environmental burdens. This study compared the potential environmental impacts in a life cycle perspective of a print edition of a magazine and that of its electronic edition read on a tablet device. Important objectives were to identify activities giving rise to the main environmental impacts for both the print and tablet editions, determine the key factors influencing these impacts, and address data gaps and uncertainties. A detailed assessment of the tablet edition is provided in a previous article (part 1), whereas this article compares it with the print edition. The methodology used was life cycle assessment and the environmental impacts assessed included climate change, cumulative energy/exergy demand, metal depletion, photochemical oxidant formation, particulate matter formation, terrestrial acidification, freshwater eutrophication, marine eutrophication, and fossil depletion. Use of different functional units to compare the print and tablet editions of the magazine resulted in different relative environmental impacts. In addition, emerging (low number of readers and low reading time per copy) and mature (higher number of readers and higher reading time per copy) tablet editions yielded varying results. The emerging tablet edition resulted in higher potential environmental impacts per reader than the print edition, but the mature tablet edition yielded lower impacts per reader in half the impact categories assessed. This illustrates the importance of spreading the environmental impacts over a large number of readers. The electricity mix used in product system processes did not greatly affect the results of tablet/print comparisons, but overall number of readers for the tablet edition, number of readers per copy for the print edition, file size, and degree of use of the tablet device proved crucial for the comparison results.

  • 2.
    Ahmadi Achachlouei, Mohammad
    et al.
    KTH, Skolan för arkitektur och samhällsbyggnad (ABE), Hållbar utveckling, miljövetenskap och teknik, Miljöstrategisk analys (fms). KTH, Skolan för datavetenskap och kommunikation (CSC), Centra, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Moberg, Åsa
    KTH, Skolan för arkitektur och samhällsbyggnad (ABE), Hållbar utveckling, miljövetenskap och teknik. KTH, Skolan för datavetenskap och kommunikation (CSC), Centra, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Hochschorner, Elisabeth
    KTH, Skolan för arkitektur och samhällsbyggnad (ABE), Hållbar utveckling, miljövetenskap och teknik, Miljöstrategisk analys (fms).
    Life Cycle Assessment of a Magazine: Part I: Tablet Edition in Emerging and Mature States2015Inngår i: Journal of Industrial Ecology, ISSN 1088-1980, E-ISSN 1530-9290, Vol. 19, nr 4Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Information and communication technology (ICT) is providing new ways to access media content. ICT has environmental benefits and burdens. The overall goal of the present study was to assess the environmental impacts of production and consumption of magazines read on tablets from a life cycle perspective. Important goals were to identify the activities giving rise to the main impacts and the key factors influencing the overall environmental impacts. Data gaps and uncertainties were also addressed. The results are compared against those for the print edition of the magazine in a separate article (part 2). The methodology used in the study was life cycle assessment. The environmental impacts assessed included climate change, cumulative energy/exergy demand, metal depletion, photochemical oxidant formation, particulate matter formation, terrestrial acidification, freshwater/marine eutrophication, fossil depletion, human toxicity, and ecotoxicity. The results indicate that content production can be the major contributor to environmental impacts if readers are few (as for the emerging version of the magazine studied). Assuming more readers (more mature version) or a larger file size for the tablet magazine, electronic storage and distribution may be the major contributor. Thus, in contrast to previous studies on electronic media, which reported a dominant impact of the use phase, this study found a higher impact for content production (emerging version) and electronic storage and distribution (mature version). However, with inefficient, low overall use of the tablet with a mature version of the tablet magazine, the greatest impact was shown to come from the reading activity (i.e., the use phase). In conclusion, the relative impacts of the tablet magazine would decrease considerably with high numbers of readers, their efficient use of the tablet (i.e., for many purposes over a long life of the device), and a smaller magazine file.

  • 3.
    André, Hampus
    KTH, Skolan för arkitektur och samhällsbyggnad (ABE), Hållbar utveckling, miljövetenskap och teknik, Hållbarhet, utvärdering och styrning.
    Opening the black box of the use phase in circular economy life cycle assessments: Environmental performance of shell jacket reuse2024Inngår i: Journal of Industrial Ecology, ISSN 1088-1980, E-ISSN 1530-9290Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Life cycle assessment (LCA) is highly needed and widely used to assess the environmental performance of circular economy (CE) measures such as reusing and sharing. However, the results of such LCAs are hampered by limited knowledge about the use phase of consumer products and oversimplification of important use phase aspects such as product functionality, user behavior, displacement, and rebound effects. This paper aims to validate the usefulness of a framework designed to assist practitioners in the generation and utilization of such knowledge in LCAs of circular measures. To validate the framework, a case study is used: reuse of shell jackets enabled by “premium secondhand” stores for outdoor equipment and clothing. The paper demonstrates that conclusions about the environmental performance of reuse can easily be altered depending on the functional unit definition, whether real user behavior data are used, and whether imperfect displacement and rebound effects are considered. For instance, shell jacket life cycles that include reuse and thus may be labeled “circular” have significantly higher environmental impact per use occasion than “linear” ones (used by one principal user the entire lifespan), since “circular” shell jackets are used less frequently, in particular during their first use span. Through facilitating the generation and utilization of environmentally relevant use phase data, which are otherwise often overlooked, the framework seems capable of supporting a better understanding of the environmental performance of CE measures.

    Fulltekst (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 4.
    André, Hampus
    et al.
    KTH, Skolan för arkitektur och samhällsbyggnad (ABE), Hållbar utveckling, miljövetenskap och teknik.
    Björklund, Anna
    KTH, Skolan för arkitektur och samhällsbyggnad (ABE), Hållbar utveckling, miljövetenskap och teknik.
    A framework to open the black box of the use phase in circular economy life cycle assessments: The case of shell jacket reuse2023Inngår i: Journal of Industrial Ecology, ISSN 1088-1980, E-ISSN 1530-9290Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Life cycle assessments of circular economy measures (CE LCA) of consumer products have been criticized for oversimplifying important aspects of the use phase such as user behavior and rebound effects, limiting our understanding of the environmental performance of circular economy measures. This study tests the usefulness of a framework designed to facilitate accounting for such aspects, by applying the framework to a case study of reuse of shell jackets enabled by “premium secondhand” outdoor stores. Methods for collecting use phase data were user surveys and interviews with store managers. Using the framework on this case study generated several novel insights which are interesting in themselves and as inputs to CE LCA. For instance, secondhand shell jackets have a significantly lower frequency of use during their first use span compared to the second and to shell jackets in the linear reference scenario. This implies that reuse in this case does not function as a mere use extension of otherwise similar use phases as is commonly assumed. The generation of such insights, which hitherto have been lacking in CE LCAs, points to the usefulness of the framework as a tool for opening the “black box” of the use phase in CE LCAs to improve understanding of the environmental performance of circular economy measures.

  • 5.
    Björklund, Anna
    et al.
    KTH, Tidigare Institutioner (före 2005), Kemiteknik.
    Bjuggren, Charlotte
    Dalemo, Magnus
    Sonesson, Ulf
    Planning Biodegradable Waste Management in Stockholm1999Inngår i: Journal of Industrial Ecology, ISSN 1088-1980, E-ISSN 1530-9290, Vol. 3, nr 4, s. 43-58Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The environmental impact of the management of biodegradable waste in Stockholm, based mainly on incineration and landfilling, was compared to systems with significant nutrient recycling; large-scale composting, anaerobic digestion, and separate collection and utilization of urine. The systems' emissions, residual products, energy turnover, and resource consumption were evaluated from a life-cycle perspective, using a computerized model, ORWARE (ORganic WAste REsearch model).

    Transportation was of relatively low importance to overall environmental impact, even at high rates of nutrient recycling. This is remarkable considering the geographical setting of Stockholm, with high population density and little nearby farmland. Ancillary systems, such as generation of electricity and district heating, were crucial for the overall outcome.

    Increased recycling of nutrients in solid biodegradable waste in Stockholm can reduce net environmental impact, whereas separation of human urine to be spread as fertilizer cannot yet be introduced without increased acidification. Increased nutrient recycling from solid biodegradable waste inevitably increases spreading of metals on arable land. Urine is by far the least contaminated residual product. Spreading of all other residuals would be limited by their metal content.

  • 6. Bocken, Nancy M. P.
    et al.
    Olivetti, Elsa A.
    Cullen, Jonathan M.
    Potting, José
    KTH, Skolan för arkitektur och samhällsbyggnad (ABE), Hållbar utveckling, miljövetenskap och teknik.
    Lifset, Reid
    Taking the Circularity to the Next Level A Special Issue on the Circular Economy2017Inngår i: Journal of Industrial Ecology, ISSN 1088-1980, E-ISSN 1530-9290, Vol. 21, nr 3, s. 476-482Artikkel i tidsskrift (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 7.
    Brick, Karolina
    et al.
    KTH, Skolan för industriell teknik och management (ITM), Industriell ekologi.
    Frostell, Björn
    KTH, Skolan för industriell teknik och management (ITM), Industriell ekologi.
    Svanberg, Cecilia
    KTH, Skolan för industriell teknik och management (ITM), Industriell ekologi.
    Barriers and opportunities for increased use of LCA-based tools for the built environment: Stakeholder responses2008Inngår i: Journal of Industrial Ecology, ISSN 1088-1980, E-ISSN 1530-9290Artikkel i tidsskrift (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 8. Carlsson-Kanyama, Annika
    et al.
    Engström, Rebecka
    KTH, Skolan för arkitektur och samhällsbyggnad (ABE), Samhällsplanering och miljö.
    Kok, Rixt
    Indirect and Direct Energy Requirements of City Households in Sweden: Options for Reduction, Lessons from Modeling2005Inngår i: Journal of Industrial Ecology, ISSN 1088-1980, E-ISSN 1530-9290, Vol. 9, nr 1-2, s. 221-235Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The objective of this article is to explore the potential for lowering household energy use given existing local support systems, in this case in the Stockholm inner city with the aid of the Dutch energy analysis program (EAP) that was adapted to Swedish conditions and that portrays total energy use for 300 consumption categories. Previously such modeling for Sweden was carried out using only Dutch databases. Our case-study area is well equipped with food stores, local markets, public transportation, and entertainment, facilitating some energy-efficient consumption choices. With maintained expenditure levels but changed consumption patterns, current reduction potentials are on the order of 10-20%. Options concerning diet can lower food indirect energy use by up to 30%, whereas options in other areas have a lower potential. Further reductions will require enhanced local support systems, external as well as internal. The results indicate that it is risky not to use nationally adapted figures for energy efficiency in the production sectors when modeling household energy use, because potential for change may be overlooked. Future work should include foreign energy intensities when modeling imported goods; otherwise, results may be less reliable. The Swedish EAP needs further work before it can be put to use as a modeling tool for everyday behavior but it is already generating important possibilities for producing reliable data that can be used by local energy counselors.

  • 9.
    Corvellec, Hervé
    et al.
    Lund University .
    Stowell, Alison
    Lancaster University .
    Johansson, Nils
    KTH, Skolan för arkitektur och samhällsbyggnad (ABE), Hållbar utveckling, miljövetenskap och teknik, Strategiska hållbarhetsstudier.
    Critiques of the circular economy2021Inngår i: Journal of Industrial Ecology, ISSN 1088-1980, E-ISSN 1530-9290Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents a reasoned account of the critiques addressed to the circular econ-omy and circular business models. These critiques claim that the circular economy hasdiffused limits, unclear theoretical grounds, and that its implementation faces struc-tural obstacles. Circular economy is based on an ideological agenda dominated by tech-nical and economic accounts, which brings uncertain contributions to sustainabilityand depoliticizes sustainable growth. Bringing together these critiques demonstratesthat the circular economy is far from being as promising as its advocates claim it to be.Circularity emerges instead as a theoretically, practically, and ideologically question-able notion. The paper concludes by proposing critical issues that need to be addressedif the circular economy and its business models are to open routes for more sustainableeconomic development.

    Fulltekst (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 10. Hellweg, S.
    et al.
    Doka, G.
    Finnveden, Göran
    KTH, Skolan för arkitektur och samhällsbyggnad (ABE), Samhällsplanering och miljö.
    Hungerbuhler, K.
    Assessing the eco-efficiency of end-of-pipe technologies with the environmental cost efficiency indicator - A case study of solid waste management2005Inngår i: Journal of Industrial Ecology, ISSN 1088-1980, E-ISSN 1530-9290, Vol. 9, nr 4, s. 189-203Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The concept of eco-efficiency is increasingly being applied to judge the combined environmental and economic performance of product systems, processes, and/or companies. Eco-efficiency is often defined as the ratio of economic value added to environmental impact added. This definition is not appropriate for end-of-pipe treatment technologies because these technologies aim at improving the environmental performance of technical processes at the cost of financial expense. Therefore, an indicator for the assessment of end-of-pipe technologies has been proposed. This indicator, called environmental cost efficiency (ECE), is defined as the ratio of net environmental benefits to the difference in costs. ECE is applied to four end-of-pipe technologies for the treatment of municipal solid waste: sanitary landfill, mechanical-biological treatment, modern grate incineration, and a staged thermal process (pyrolysis and gasification). A life-cycle assessment was performed on these processes to quantify the net environmental benefit. Moreover, the approximate net costs (costs minus benefits) were quantified. The results show that, relative to grate incineration, sanitary landfills and mechanical-biological treatment are less costly but environmentally more harmful. We calculated the ECE for all combinations of technologies. The results indicate that the staged thermal process may be the most environmentally cost-efficient alternative to all other treatment technologies in the long run, followed by mechanical-biological treatment and grate incineration.

  • 11.
    Johansson, Jan
    et al.
    KTH, Skolan för industriell teknik och management (ITM), Maskinkonstruktion (Inst.).
    Björklund, Anna
    KTH, Skolan för arkitektur och samhällsbyggnad (ABE), Samhällsplanering och miljö, Miljöstrategisk analys.
    Reducing Life Cycle Environmental Impacts of Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment Recycling: Case Study on Dishwashers2010Inngår i: Journal of Industrial Ecology, ISSN 1088-1980, E-ISSN 1530-9290, Vol. 14, nr 2, s. 258-269Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Collection and treatment of waste from electrical and electronic equipment (WEEE) is regulated in the European Union by the WEEE Directive. Producers are responsible for take-back and recycling of discarded equipment. Valuable materials are, however, at risk of "getting lost" in current processes. Thus, strategies to minimize losses are sought after. The material hygiene (MH) concept was introduced to address this issue. Structural features, which are important for the outcome of reuse, recovery, and recycling, were investigated in an earlier field study of discarded dishwashers. It was proposed that a prestep, manual removal of copper prior to shredding could increase the purity of recovered material fractions. This article builds on the field study and theoretical reasoning underlying the MH concept. Dishwashers are assumed to be designed for disassembly when the prestep is introduced. A limited life cycle assessment was performed to determine whether the proposed prestep may be environmentally beneficial in a life cycle perspective. Two alternatives were analyzed: Case 1: the current shredding process. Case 2: prestep removal of copper before shredding. Targeted disassembly prior to shredding may reduce the abiotic depletion and global warming potential in a life cycle perspective. The prestep results in increased copper recovery, but, more important, copper contamination of the recovered steel fractions is reduced. The results also highlight the importance of minimizing energy consumption in all process stages.

  • 12.
    Johansson, Nils
    et al.
    KTH, Skolan för arkitektur och samhällsbyggnad (ABE), Hållbar utveckling, miljövetenskap och teknik, Strategiska hållbarhetsstudier.
    Krook, Joakim
    Linköpings universitet.
    How to handle the policy conflict between resource circulationand hazardous substances in the use of waste?: Three countries’ regulations on contaminants in waste and their implications forresource circulation2021Inngår i: Journal of Industrial Ecology, ISSN 1088-1980, E-ISSN 1530-9290Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    A circular economy creates a policy conflict between increased resource circulationand decreased dispersal of hazardous substances. On the basis of three case studiesin the EU, we have therefore identified various regulatory questions that can be posedto address the occurrence of hazardous substances in the use of waste. For each ofthese questions, we have proposed two possible responses influencing the design ofthe regulation and analyzed their consequences both f rom a circularity and from a tox-icity perspective.Currently, the regulations focus on reducing the dispersal of hazardous substancesrather than stimulating resource circulation. The allowable contamination levels in thewaste are typically regulated in relation to its mass rather than its content of valuableresources. The regulation of hazards in waste can be further developed in two gen-eral ways, by emphasizing either the risk of exposure to hazards or the total contentof hazards. A risk approach is beneficial for short-term circularity and waste produc-ers. A hazard approach is beneficial for long-term circularity and waste users. In orderto improve the balancing of the policy conflict in question, values, underlying assump-tions, and the effects of hazardous substances and resource circulation need to be bet-ter understood

    Fulltekst (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 13.
    Joyce, Peter James
    et al.
    KTH, Skolan för arkitektur och samhällsbyggnad (ABE), Hållbar utveckling, miljövetenskap och teknik, Hållbarhet, utvärdering och styrning.
    Björklund, Anna
    KTH, Skolan för arkitektur och samhällsbyggnad (ABE), Hållbar utveckling, miljövetenskap och teknik, Hållbarhet, utvärdering och styrning.
    Futura: A new tool for transparent and shareable scenario analysis in prospective life cycle assessment2022Inngår i: Journal of Industrial Ecology, ISSN 1088-1980, E-ISSN 1530-9290, Vol. 26, nr 1, s. 134-144Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    While it may be impossible to accurately predict what the world will look like in the future, we can be certain that it will be different from the world of today. By extension, we know that using today's data in life cycle assessment (LCA) studies claiming to represent future scenarios is problematic. For the future impact of products to be estimated in a consistent and meaningful manner in LCA, the background system, most commonly the ecoinvent database, needs to be projected into the future alongside the foreground system modeled in a given study. Futura is a new piece of open-source software which allows LCA practitioners to create and share novel background databases representing arbitrary scenarios. It allows users to import a base database and then start making targeted changes. These changes take three main forms—adding new technologies, regionalizing new or existing technologies, and altering market compositions. All changes made are automatically added to a "recipe." This recipe file can be shared publicly. This recipe can be imported by other users and used to exactly recreate the modified database. The additive and transparent nature of this system means that initially simple scenarios can be built upon by others to progress toward more comprehensive scenarios in a stepwise manner. The inability to build on the work of others is a serious barrier to the progress of the LCA field. Futura goes some way to reduce this barrier in the field of prospective LCA.

  • 14.
    Lapko, Yulia
    et al.
    KTH, Skolan för industriell teknik och management (ITM), Industriell ekonomi och organisation (Inst.), Hållbarhet och industriell dynamik. Department of Management, Economics and Industrial Engineering, Politecnico di Milano, Milan, Italy.
    Trianni, Andrea
    Nuur, Cali
    KTH, Skolan för industriell teknik och management (ITM), Industriell ekonomi och organisation (Inst.), Hållbarhet och industriell dynamik.
    Donato, Masi
    In pursuit of closed-loop supply chains for critical materials:: An exploratory study in the green energy sector2019Inngår i: Journal of Industrial Ecology, ISSN 1088-1980, E-ISSN 1530-9290, Vol. 23, nr 1, s. 182-196Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    A closed-loop supply chain (CLSC) is considered not only an important solution for ensuring sustainable exploitation of materials, but also a promising strategy for securing long-term availability of materials. The latter is especially highlighted in the materials criticality discourse. Critical raw materials (CRMs), being exposed to supply disruptions, create an uncertain operational environment for many industries, particularly for green energy technologies that employ multiple CRMs. However, recycling rates of CRMs are very low and engagement of companies in CLSC for CRM is limited. This study examines factors influencing CLSC for CRM development in photovoltaic panels and wind turbine technologies. The aim is to analyze how the factors manifest themselves in different companies along the supply chain and to identify enabling and bottleneck conditions for implementation of CLSC for CRM. The novelty of the study is twofold: the focus on material rather than product flows, and examination of factors from a multiactor perspective. The evidence obtained suggests that the manufacturing companies and reverse supply-chain operators engaged in the study take different perspectives (product vs. material) regarding development of CLSC for CRM and thus emphasize different factors. The findings underline the need for interactions between supply-chain actors, a sound competitive environment for recycling processes, and investment in technologies and infrastructure development if CLSC for CRM is to be developed. The paper provides implications for practitioners and policy makers for implementation of CLSC for CRM, and suggests prospects for further research.

  • 15.
    Laurenti, Rafael
    et al.
    KTH, Skolan för industriell teknik och management (ITM), Maskinkonstruktion (Inst.), Integrerad produktutveckling. KTH, Skolan för arkitektur och samhällsbyggnad (ABE), Hållbar utveckling, miljövetenskap och teknik.
    Redwood, Michael
    Puig, Rita
    Frostell, Bjorn
    KTH, Skolan för arkitektur och samhällsbyggnad (ABE), Hållbar utveckling, miljövetenskap och teknik, Industriell ekologi.
    Measuring the Environmental Footprint of Leather Processing Technologies2017Inngår i: Journal of Industrial Ecology, ISSN 1088-1980, E-ISSN 1530-9290, Vol. 21, nr 5, s. 1180-1187Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The selection of materials and manufacturing processes often determines most of the environmental impact that a product will have during its life cycle. In directing consumption toward products with the least impact on the environment, measuring and comparing material alternatives with site-specific data is a fundamental prerequisite. Within the apparel and footwear industry, some famous brands have recently been basing their advertising on the claim that vegetable-tanned leather is more environmentally friendly than chromiumtanned leather. However, there is a lack of scientific research assessing and comparing vegetable-and chromium-tanned leather in a wider context than the toxicity of chromium. To fill this gap, this study measured and compared the carbon, water, and energy footprint of vegetable and chromium leather processing technology and intermediate processing stages in 12 selected tanneries in seven different countries worldwide. Each tannery proved to be very individual, and therefore attempting to perform this type of analysis without simply producing meaningless generalities is a challenge for companies, researchers, and regulators. The variability in results demonstrates that secondary data for the tanning phase should be utilized with caution in a decision-making context. The use of primary data would be advisable for life cycle assessment studies of leather goods. No significant differences were found in the footprint of vegetable and chromium leather processes, but these are only indicative findings and need confirmation in further studies. An important area needing investigation is then how a fair comparison can be made between renewable natural materials and nonrenewable materials used in both leather-processing technologies.

  • 16.
    Malmodin, Jens
    et al.
    KTH, Skolan för datavetenskap och kommunikation (CSC), Centra, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC. Ericsson Research, Stockholm, Sweden .
    Lundén, Dag
    KTH, Skolan för datavetenskap och kommunikation (CSC), Centra, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC. TeliaSonera, Stockholm, Sweden .
    Moberg, Åsa
    KTH, Skolan för arkitektur och samhällsbyggnad (ABE), Hållbar utveckling, miljövetenskap och teknik, Miljöstrategisk analys (fms). KTH, Skolan för datavetenskap och kommunikation (CSC), Centra, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Andersson, Greger
    KTH, Skolan för datavetenskap och kommunikation (CSC), Centra, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC. TeliaSonera, Stockholm, Sweden .
    Nilsson, Mikael
    KTH, Skolan för datavetenskap och kommunikation (CSC), Centra, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC. TeliaSonera, Stockholm, Sweden .
    Life Cycle Assessment of ICT: Carbon Footprint and Operational Electricity Use from the Operator, National, and Subscriber Perspective in Sweden2014Inngår i: Journal of Industrial Ecology, ISSN 1088-1980, E-ISSN 1530-9290, Vol. 18, nr 6, s. 829-845Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The use of information and communication technology (ICT) is growing throughout society, and new products and solutions are developed at an increasing rate. To enable environmental assessment of specific ICT products and other products that rely on ICT in some way, a more complete, detailed, and up-to-date study based on real measurements is needed. To date, similar studies have not been readily available or fully comprehensive. This study assessed the overall operational electricity use and life-cycle-based carbon footprint (CF) relating to ICT in Sweden, including activities not commonly addressed previously, such as shared data transport networks and data centers and manufacturing of network infrastructure. Specific, detailed inventory data are presented and used for assessment of the Internet Protocol core network, data transmission, operator activities, and access network. These specific data, in combination with secondary, more generic data for end-user equipment, allow a comprehensive overall assessment. The majority of the ICT network CF is the result of end-user equipment, mainly personal computers, followed by third-party enterprise networks and data centers and then access networks. The parts closest to the user proved to be clearly responsible for the majority of the impact. The results are presented for Swedish ICT networks and for ICT networks in general based on a global average electricity mix.

  • 17.
    Malmodin, Jens
    et al.
    KTH, Skolan för datavetenskap och kommunikation (CSC), Centra, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Moberg, Åsa
    KTH, Skolan för arkitektur och samhällsbyggnad (ABE), Samhällsplanering och miljö, Miljöstrategisk analys. KTH, Skolan för datavetenskap och kommunikation (CSC), Centra, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Lundén, Dag
    KTH, Skolan för datavetenskap och kommunikation (CSC), Centra, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Finnveden, Göran
    KTH, Skolan för arkitektur och samhällsbyggnad (ABE), Samhällsplanering och miljö, Miljöstrategisk analys. KTH, Skolan för datavetenskap och kommunikation (CSC), Centra, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Lövehagen, Nina
    KTH, Skolan för datavetenskap och kommunikation (CSC), Centra, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Greenhouse gas emissions and operational electricity use in the ICT and entertainment & media sectors2010Inngår i: Journal of Industrial Ecology, ISSN 1088-1980, E-ISSN 1530-9290, Vol. 14, nr 5, s. 770-790Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The positive and negative environmental impacts of information and communication technology (ICT) are widely debated. This study assesses the electricity use and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions related to the ICT and entertainment & media (E&M) sectors at sector level, including end users, and thus complements information on the product level. GHGs are studied in a life cycle perspective, but for electricity use, only the operational use is considered. The study also considers which product groups or processes are major contributors. Using available data and extrapolating existing figures to the global scale for 2007 reveals that the ICT sector produced 1.3% of global GHG emissions in 2007 and the E&M sector 1.7%. The corresponding figures for global electricity use were 3.9% and 3.2%, respectively. The results indicate that for the ICT sector, operation leads to more GHG emissions than manufacture, although impacts from the manufacture of some products are significant. For the E&M sector, operation of TVs and production of printed media are the main reasons for overall GHG emissions. TVs as well as printed media, with the estimations made here, led to more GHG emissions on a global level in 2007 than PCs (manufacture and operation). A sector study of this type provides information on a macro scale, a perspective easily lost when considering, for example, the product-related results of life cycle assessments. The macro scale is essential to capture changes in total consumption and use. However, the potential of the ICT sector to help decrease environmental impacts from other sectors was not included in the assessment.

  • 18. Manoochehri, John
    Comment on "What Is Resource Consumption and How Can It Be Measured?"2009Inngår i: Journal of Industrial Ecology, ISSN 1088-1980, E-ISSN 1530-9290, Vol. 13, nr 4, s. 638-639Artikkel i tidsskrift (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 19. Moll, Henri C
    et al.
    Noorman, Klaas Jan
    Kok, Rixt
    Engström, Rebecka
    KTH, Skolan för arkitektur och samhällsbyggnad (ABE), Samhällsplanering och miljö, Miljöstrategisk analys.
    Trone-Holst, Harald
    Clark, Charlotte
    Pursuing More Sustainable Consumption by Analyzing Household Metabolism in European Countries and Cities2005Inngår i: Journal of Industrial Ecology, ISSN 1088-1980, E-ISSN 1530-9290, Vol. 9, nr 1-2, s. 259-275Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Bringing about more sustainable consumption patterns is an important challenge for society and science. In this article the concept of household metabolism is applied to analyzing consumption patterns and to identifying possibilities for the development of sustainable household consumption patterns. Household metabolism is determined in terms of total energy requirements, including both direct and indirect energy requirements, using a hybrid method. This method enables us to evaluate various determinants of the environmental load of consumption consistently at several levels - the national level, the local level, and the household level. The average annual energy requirement of households varies considerably between the Netherlands, the United Kingdom, Norway, and Sweden, as well as within these countries. The average expenditure level per household explains a large part of the observed variations. Differences between these countries are also related to the efficiency of the production sectors and to the energy supply system. The consumption categories of food, transport, and recreation show the largest contributions to the environmental load. A comparison of consumer groups with different household characteristics shows remarkable differences in the division of spending over the consumption categories. Thus, analyses of different types of households are important for providing a basis for options to induce decreases of the environmental load of household consumption. At the city level, options for change are provided by an analysis of the city infrastructure, which determines a large part of the direct energy use by households (for transport and heating). At the national level, energy efficiency in production and in electricity generation is an important trigger for decreasing household energy requirements

  • 20.
    Nilsson, Astrid
    et al.
    KTH, Skolan för kemi, bioteknologi och hälsa (CBH). KTH, Centra, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Shabestary, Kiyan
    KTH, Skolan för kemi, bioteknologi och hälsa (CBH), Proteinvetenskap, Systembiologi. KTH, Centra, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Brandao, Miguel
    KTH, Skolan för arkitektur och samhällsbyggnad (ABE), Hållbar utveckling, miljövetenskap och teknik.
    Hudson, Elton P.
    KTH, Centra, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. KTH, Skolan för kemi, bioteknologi och hälsa (CBH), Proteinvetenskap, Systembiologi.
    Environmental impacts and limitations of third-generation biobutanol: Life cycle assessment of n-butanol produced by genetically engineered cyanobacteria2020Inngår i: Journal of Industrial Ecology, ISSN 1088-1980, E-ISSN 1530-9290, Vol. 24, nr 1Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Photosynthetic cyanobacteria have attracted interest as production organisms for third-generation biofuels, where sunlight and CO2 are used by microbes directly to synthesize fuel molecules. A particularly suitable biofuel is n-butanol, and there have been several laboratory reports of genetically engineered photosynthetic cyanobacteria capable of synthesizing and secreting n-butanol. This work evaluates the environmental impacts and cumulative energy demand (CED) of cyanobacteria-produced n-butanol through a cradle-to-grave consequential life cycle assessment (LCA). A hypothetical production plant in northern Sweden (area 1 ha, producing 5-85 m(3) n-butanol per year) was considered, and a range of cultivation formats and cellular productivity scenarios assessed. Depending on the scenario, greenhouse gas emissions (GHGe) ranged from 16.9 to 58.6 gCO(2)eq/MJ(BuOH) and the CED from 3.8 to 13 MJ/MJ(BuOH). Only with the assumption of a nearby paper mill to supply waste sources for heat and CO2 was the sustainability requirement of at least 60% GHGe savings compared to fossil fuels reached, though placement in northern Sweden reduced energy needed for reactor cooling. A high CED in all scenarios shows that significant metabolic engineering is necessary, such as a carbon partitioning of >90% to n-butanol, as well as improved light utilization, to begin to displace fossil fuels or even first- and second-generation bioethanol.

  • 21. Palm, Viveka
    et al.
    Wadeskog, Anders
    Finnveden, Göran
    KTH, Skolan för arkitektur och samhällsbyggnad (ABE), Samhällsplanering och miljö.
    Swedish experience using environmental accounts data for integrated product policy issues2006Inngår i: Journal of Industrial Ecology, ISSN 1088-1980, E-ISSN 1530-9290, Vol. 10, nr 3, s. 57-72Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    This article quantifies and ranks the environmental pressure caused by different product groups consumed in Sweden. This is done using information from economic and environmental statistics. An analysis for the year 1998 is performed for approximately 50 product groups using input-output analysis. This type of analysis has some major advantages for integrated product policy (IPP) purposes: the underlying data are regularly updated, the data systems are being harmonized by international standards, and the connection between environmental goals and IPP goals can be investigated. This article summarizes two Swedish reports, one for the Producer Responsibility Committee and one for the Swedish Environmental Protection Agency The results show that the volume of consumption is an important factor in environmental pressure from products as well as impact intensities. The most important product categories for private consumption are petroleum products, electricity, construction, and food and beverages, as well as transport. Possibilities of building indicators for IPP are also discussed.

  • 22.
    Papageorgiou, Asterios
    et al.
    KTH, Skolan för arkitektur och samhällsbyggnad (ABE), Hållbar utveckling, miljövetenskap och teknik, Resurser, energi och infrastruktur.
    Sinha, Rajib
    KTH, Skolan för arkitektur och samhällsbyggnad (ABE), Hållbar utveckling, miljövetenskap och teknik.
    Frostell, B.
    Sundberg, Cecilia
    KTH, Skolan för arkitektur och samhällsbyggnad (ABE), Hållbar utveckling, miljövetenskap och teknik, Resurser, energi och infrastruktur.
    A new physical accounting model for material flows in urban systems with application to the Stockholm Royal Seaport District2019Inngår i: Journal of Industrial Ecology, ISSN 1088-1980, E-ISSN 1530-9290Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Sustainable urbanization requires streamlining of resource management in urban systems which in turn requires understanding of urban metabolism (UM). Even though various methods have been applied for UM analysis, to date there is no standardized method for comprehensive accounting of material flows in urban systems. Moreover, the accounting of material flows is rarely implemented with a bottom-up approach that can provide a thorough analysis of UM. This article presents the Urban Accounting Model (UAM) which aims to allow comprehensive accounting of urban material flows based on a bottom-up approach. The model comprises two interlinked sub-models. The first was developed by integrating a new physical input output table (PIOT) framework for urban systems into a three-dimensional structure. The second comprises a set of physical accounts for systematic accounting of material flows of each economic sector in the system in order to support the compilation of the PIOTs. The functions of the UAM were explored through its application to two urban neighborhoods in the Stockholm Royal Seaport district. The application highlighted that the UAM can describe the physical interactions between the urban system and the environment or other socioeconomic systems, and capture the intersectoral flows within the system. Moreover, its accounts provide information that allow an in-depth analysis of the metabolism of specific sectors. Overall, the UAM can function as a useful tool for UM analysis as it systematizes data collection and at the same time depicts the physical reality of the urban system.

  • 23.
    Pechsiri, Joseph Santhi
    et al.
    KTH, Skolan för arkitektur och samhällsbyggnad (ABE), Hållbar utveckling, miljövetenskap och teknik, Vatten- och miljöteknik.
    Gröndahl, Fredrik
    KTH, Skolan för arkitektur och samhällsbyggnad (ABE), Hållbar utveckling, miljövetenskap och teknik, Vatten- och miljöteknik.
    Assessing energy return on investment for harvest of wild Nodularia spumigena during blooms in the Baltic Sea2021Inngår i: Journal of Industrial Ecology, ISSN 1088-1980, E-ISSN 1530-9290Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Recurring summer cyanobacteria blooms in the Baltic Sea has gained academic interests for decades. The harvest of wild cyanobacteria, for example, Nodularia spumigena, during summer blooms in the Baltic Sea has been studied in the past but lacked evaluation for environmental and economic performances. This study provides a first-hand assessment of environmental and economic performance from an energy perspective, using energy return on investment (EROI) as evaluation method where harvest of biomass and the downstream conversion of biomass to biogas and biofertilizer are considered for Gotland, Sweden. Energy analysis results indicate fuel consumption during harvest and transport operations to be the major energy consumer. Traditional sailing boats have been suggested as an alternative. Overall, when considering only biogas yield and usage of sailing boats, a break-even EROI of 1 is achieved. When including biofertilizer as product, a breakeven EROI of 1 is also achieved. Depending upon the biomass concentration in the Baltic Sea at the time of harvest, an EROI > 6 is possible, surpassing the economic viability EROI benchmark of 3, indicating the importance of nutrient recovery as the driver for harvest of wild cyanobacteria biomass during blooms in the Baltic Sea. This article met the requirements for a gold-gold JIE data openness badge described at http://jie.click/badges. 

  • 24.
    Shahrokni, Hossein
    et al.
    KTH, Skolan för arkitektur och samhällsbyggnad (ABE), Hållbar utveckling, miljövetenskap och teknik, Industriell ekologi.
    Årman, Louise
    KTH, Skolan för arkitektur och samhällsbyggnad (ABE), Hållbar utveckling, miljövetenskap och teknik, Industriell ekologi.
    Lazarevic, David
    KTH, Skolan för arkitektur och samhällsbyggnad (ABE), Hållbar utveckling, miljövetenskap och teknik, Industriell ekologi.
    Nilsson, Anders
    KTH, Skolan för arkitektur och samhällsbyggnad (ABE), Hållbar utveckling, miljövetenskap och teknik, Industriell ekologi.
    Brandt, Nils
    KTH, Skolan för arkitektur och samhällsbyggnad (ABE), Hållbar utveckling, miljövetenskap och teknik, Industriell ekologi.
    Implementing Smart Urban Metabolism in the Stockholm Royal Seaport: Smart City SRS2015Inngår i: Journal of Industrial Ecology, ISSN 1088-1980, E-ISSN 1530-9290, Vol. 19, nr 5, s. 917-929Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    For half a century, system scientists have relied on urban metabolism (UM) as a pragmatic framework to support the needed transition toward sustainable urban development. It has been suggested that information and communication technology (ICT) and, more specifically, smart cities can be leveraged in this transition. Given the recent advances in smart cities, smart urban metabolism (SUM) is considered a technology-enabled evolution of the UM framework, overcoming some of its current limitations. Most significantly, the SUM framework works at high temporal (up to real-time) and spatial (down to household/individual) resolutions. This article presents the first implementation of SUM in the Smart City Stockholm Royal Seaport R&D project; it further analyzes barriers and discusses the potential long-term implications of the findings. Four key performance indicators (KPIs) are generated in real time based on the integration of heterogeneous, real-time data sources. These are kilowatt-hours per square meter, carbon dioxide equivalents per capita, kilowatt-hours of primary energy per capita, and share of renewables percentage. These KPIs are fed back on three levels (household, building, and district) on four interfaces, developed for different audiences. The most challenging barrier identified was accessing and integrating siloed data from the different data owners (utilities, building owners, and so forth). It is hard to overcome unless a significant value is perceived. A number of long-term opportunities were described in the SUM context; among those, it is envisioned that SUM could enable a new understanding of the causalities that govern urbanism and allow citizens and city officials to receive feedback on the system consequences of their choices.

  • 25.
    Song, Xingqiang
    et al.
    Arctic Univ Norway, Fac Biosci Fisheries & Econ, Tromso, Norway.;Ecoloop AB, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Liu, Ying
    Dalian Ocean Univ, Sch Marine Sci & Environm Engn, Dalian 116023, Peoples R China..
    Pettersen, Johan Berg
    Arctic Univ Norway, Fac Biosci Fisheries & Econ, Tromso, Norway.;Norwegian Univ Sci & Technol, Ind Ecol Programme, Trondheim, Norway..
    Brandao, Miguel
    KTH, Skolan för arkitektur och samhällsbyggnad (ABE), Hållbar utveckling, miljövetenskap och teknik.
    Ma, Xiaona
    Chinese Acad Sci, Inst Oceanol, Qingdao, Shandong, Peoples R China..
    Roberg, Stian
    Arctic Univ Norway, Fac Biosci Fisheries & Econ, Tromso, Norway..
    Frostell, Björn
    KTH, Skolan för arkitektur och samhällsbyggnad (ABE), Hållbar utveckling, miljövetenskap och teknik.
    Life cycle assessment of recirculating aquaculture systems: A case of Atlantic salmon farming in China2019Inngår i: Journal of Industrial Ecology, ISSN 1088-1980, E-ISSN 1530-9290, Vol. 23, nr 5, s. 1077-1086Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Recirculating aquaculture systems (RAS) are an alternative technology to tackle the major environmental challenges associated with conventional cage culture systems. In order to systematically assess the environmental performance of RAS farming, it is important to take the whole life cycle into account so as to avoid ad hoc and suboptimal environmental measures. So far, the application of life cycle assessment (LCA) in aquaculture, especially to indoor RAS, is still in progress. This study reports on an LCA of Atlantic salmon harvested at an indoor RAS farm in northern China. Results showed that 1 tonne live-weight salmon production required 7,509 kWh farm-level electricity and generated 16.7 tonnes of CO2 equivalent (eq), 106 kg of SO2 eq, 2.4 kg of P eq, and 108 kg of N eq (cradle-to-farm gate). In particular, farm-level electricity use and feed product were identified as primary contributors to eight of nine impact categories assessed (54-95% in total), except the potential marine eutrophication (MEU) impact (dominated by the grow-out effluents). Among feed ingredients (on a dry-weight basis), chicken meal (5%) and krill meal (8%) dominated six and three, respectively, of the nine impact categories. Suggested environmental improvement measures for this indoor RAS farm included optimization of stocking density, feeding management, grow-out effluent treatment, substitution of feed ingredients, and selection of electricity generation sources. In a generic context, this study can contribute to a better understanding of the life cycle environmental impacts of land-based salmon RAS operations, as well as science-based communication among stakeholders on more eco-friendly farmed salmon.

  • 26.
    Susur, Ebru
    et al.
    KTH, Skolan för industriell teknik och management (ITM), Industriell ekonomi och organisation (Inst.). Department of Industrial Engineering, Business Administration and Statistics, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Madrid, Spain.
    Engwall, Mats
    KTH, Skolan för industriell teknik och management (ITM), Industriell ekonomi och organisation (Inst.).
    A transitions framework for circular business models2023Inngår i: Journal of Industrial Ecology, ISSN 1088-1980, E-ISSN 1530-9290, Vol. 27, nr 1, s. 19-32Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The concepts “circular business models” and “transitions towards a circular economy” have become modern-day buzzwords. Yet, an understanding of the interplay between these two concepts remains unclear. This paper proposes a conceptual framework that illustrates the innovation mechanisms enhancing circular business models emerging within the context of transitions towards a circular economy. The paper follows a two-step methodology. First, a theoretical framing is proposed by adopting insights from transitions studies. Second, a systematic literature review is employed. The review synthesizes the selected literature tracing the proposed framing in the previously published research. Finally, a transitions framework for circular business models is proposed. This framework suggests future lines of research to support its plausibility. Moreover, it offers prescriptive help to managers, entrepreneurs, policymakers, and other social actors enabling them to make informed decisions about and take innovative actions for circular business models in specific contexts.

  • 27. Thiebaud (Mueller), Esther
    et al.
    Hilty, Lorenz M.
    KTH, Skolan för datavetenskap och kommunikation (CSC), Centra, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC. University of Zürich, Switzerland.
    Schluep, Mathias
    Widmer, Rolf
    Faulstich, Martin
    Service Lifetime, Storage Time, and Disposal Pathways of Electronic Equipment A Swiss Case Study2018Inngår i: Journal of Industrial Ecology, ISSN 1088-1980, E-ISSN 1530-9290, Vol. 22, nr 1, s. 196-208Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Product lifetime is an essential aspect of dynamic material flow analyses and has been modeled using lifetime distribution functions, mostly average lifetimes. Existing data regarding the lifetime of electronic equipment (EE) are based on diverging definitions of lifetime as well as different temporal and regional scopes. After its active use, EE is often not disposed of immediately, but remains in storage for some time. Specific data on the share of EE that is stored and the time they remain in storage are scarce. This article investigates the service lifetime, storage time, and disposal pathways of ten electronic device types, based on data from an online survey complemented by structured interviews. We distinguish between new and secondhand devices and compute histograms, averages, and medians of the different lifetimes and their change over time. The average service lifetime varies from 3.3 years for mobile phones to 10.8 years for large loudspeakers, the average storage time from 0.8 years for flat panel display televisions to 3.6 years for large loudspeakers. Most service lifetime histograms are positively skewed and show substantial differences among device types. The storage time histograms, being more similar to one another, indicate that the storage behavior is similar for most device types. The data on disposal pathways show that a large proportion of devices are stored and reused before they reach the collection scheme.

  • 28.
    Thomas, Jean-Baptiste
    et al.
    KTH, Skolan för arkitektur och samhällsbyggnad (ABE), Hållbar utveckling, miljövetenskap och teknik, Vatten- och miljöteknik. KTH Royal Institute of Technology Department of Sustainable Development, Environmental Science and Engineering Stockholm Sweden.
    Sinha, Rajib
    KTH, Skolan för arkitektur och samhällsbyggnad (ABE), Hållbar utveckling, miljövetenskap och teknik.
    Strand, Åsa
    IVL Svenska Miljöinstitutet/IVL Swedish Environmental Research Institute Kristineberg Sweden.
    Söderqvist, Tore
    Anthesis Enveco AB Stockholm Sweden;Holmboe & Skarp AB Sorunda Sweden.
    Stadmark, Johanna
    IVL Svenska Miljöinstitutet/IVL Swedish Environmental Research Institute Gothenburg Sweden.
    Franzén, Frida
    Tyrens AB Stockholm Sweden.
    Ingmansson, Ida
    Tyrens AB Stockholm Sweden.
    Gröndahl, Fredrik
    KTH, Skolan för arkitektur och samhällsbyggnad (ABE), Hållbar utveckling, miljövetenskap och teknik.
    Hasselström, Linus
    KTH, Skolan för arkitektur och samhällsbyggnad (ABE), Hållbar utveckling, miljövetenskap och teknik.
    Marine biomass for a circular blue‐green bioeconomy? A life cycle perspective on closing nitrogen and phosphorus land‐marine loops2021Inngår i: Journal of Industrial Ecology, ISSN 1088-1980, E-ISSN 1530-9290, artikkel-id jiec.13177Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    A blue-green bioeconomy revolution is underway in Europe, with particular attention being paid to the development of new or underutilized marine biomass resources. The wild harvest and mariculture of low-trophic non-fed species of marine biomass may be contributing to circular economies, the mitigation of environmental problems such as eutrophication and climate change through the uptake of nutrients and carbon, while also recovering finite phosphorus from marine coastal environments, thus contributing to food security. The present study provides a cradle-to-gate life cycle perspective on seven established or innovative/emerging marine biomass utilization cases in Sweden: mariculture of sugar kelp, blue mussels, and ascidians and the harvest of invasive Pacific oysters along the Skagerrak coast, the mariculture of blue mussels in the Baltic sea, the harvest of common reed in the Stockholm archipelago, and the harvest of beach-cast seaweed in Gotland. Results showed that the mariculture cases were found to contribute to eutrophication and climate impact mitigation (at gate). All cases were found to contribute to closing the loop on phosphorus by enabling recovery from marine or coastal environments, bridging marine–land flows, all while performing well from an environmental perspective with a relatively low cumulative energy demand and low carbon and nutrient footprints. This highlights the potential of low-trophic biomass to contribute to phosphorus security in the future, and demonstrates the value of industrial ecology tools such as LCA in support of this imminent Decade of Ocean Science for Sustainable Development. 

    Fulltekst (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 29.
    Toller, Susanna
    et al.
    KTH, Skolan för arkitektur och samhällsbyggnad (ABE), Samhällsplanering och miljö, Miljöstrategisk analys.
    Wadeskog, A
    Finnveden, Göran
    KTH, Skolan för arkitektur och samhällsbyggnad (ABE), Samhällsplanering och miljö, Miljöstrategisk analys.
    Malmqvist, Tove
    KTH, Skolan för arkitektur och samhällsbyggnad (ABE), Samhällsplanering och miljö, Miljöstrategisk analys.
    Carlsson, Annica
    KTH, Skolan för arkitektur och samhällsbyggnad (ABE), Samhällsplanering och miljö, Miljöstrategisk analys.
    Energy Use and Environmental impacts of the Swedish Building and Real Estate Management Sector2011Inngår i: Journal of Industrial Ecology, ISSN 1088-1980, E-ISSN 1530-9290, Vol. 15, nr 3, s. 394-404Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    One of the key features of environmental policy integration in Sweden is sectorresponsibility. The National Board of Housing, Building and Planning is responsible for the building and real estate management sector and should, as a part of this responsibility, assess the environmental impacts of this sector. The aim of this study is to suggest and demonstrate a method for such an assessment. The suggested method is a life cycle assessment, based on an input-output analysis. The method can be used for regular monitoring and for prioritization between different improving measures. For the assessment to sufficiently cover the Swedish Environmental Quality Objectives, complementary information is needed, in particular with respect to the indoor environment. According to the results, the real estate management sector contributes between 10% and 40% of Swedish energy use; use of hazardous chemical products; generation of solid waste; emissions of gases contributing to climate change; and human toxicological impacts, including nitrogen oxides (NOx) and particulates. Transport and production of nonrenewable building materials contribute significantly to several of the emissions. Heating of buildings contributes more to energy use than to climate change, due to the use of renewable energy sources. To reduce climate change, measures should therefore prioritize not only heating of buildings but also the important upstream processes.

  • 30.
    Weidema, Bo
    et al.
    Aalborg Univ, Aalborg, Denmark..
    Brandao, Miguel
    KTH, Skolan för arkitektur och samhällsbyggnad (ABE), Hållbar utveckling, miljövetenskap och teknik.
    Life Cycle Assessment: Theory and Practice2020Inngår i: Journal of Industrial Ecology, ISSN 1088-1980, E-ISSN 1530-9290, Vol. 24, nr 3, s. 726-730Artikkel, omtale (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 31.
    Zapico, Jorge L.
    et al.
    KTH, Skolan för datavetenskap och kommunikation (CSC), Medieteknik och interaktionsdesign, MID. KTH, Skolan för datavetenskap och kommunikation (CSC), Centra, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Brandt, Nils
    KTH, Skolan för industriell teknik och management (ITM), Industriell ekologi.
    Turpeinen, Marko
    KTH, Skolan för datavetenskap och kommunikation (CSC), Medieteknik och grafisk produktion, Media.
    Environmental Metrics The Main Opportunity from ICT for Industrial Ecology2010Inngår i: Journal of Industrial Ecology, ISSN 1088-1980, E-ISSN 1530-9290, Vol. 14, nr 5, s. 703-706Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
1 - 31 of 31
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