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  • 1.
    Finnveden, Göran
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Sustainability Assessment and Management.
    Bradley, Karin
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Klintman, Mikael
    Larsson, Jörgen
    Lehner, Matthias
    Mont, Oksana
    Nässén, Jonas
    Svenfelt, Åsa
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Strategic Sustainability Studies.
    Sustainable consumption – moving from niche to mainstream2023In: Conference Book of Abstracts, 2023Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Lindblad, Jenny
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    From ecosystem services to ecosystem carers: reorienting urban planning policy through soil practices2023Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Urban planning is undergoing an ecological turn in attempts to address climate and biodiversity crises. Ecosystem service (ES) assessments has gained influence in this turn, as a means to address environmental issues. The critique on ES stresses that these evaluations of nature’s value in terms of how well an ecological phenomena serves human well-being rely on anthropocentrism and fail to acknowledge for multi-species interdependencies. In this paper, we seek to resituate the human in ES by visiting urban gardeners’ work with soils. Soils, a bioinfrastructure invisible in ES assessments and approached in urban planning as an extractive resource, have proven generative for social sciences and humanities to rethink human-environment relations. Joining this line of work, we draw on our own and others’ ethnographic engagements with soil practitioners. Urban soil growers define themselves and their practices in terms of servicing (rather than merely receiving) and caring for local ecosystems. These care practices are informed by a concern for the environmental challenges that we are facing on different scales and unequal terms. To learn from and find ways to recognize these practices, we try out a reconceptualization of ES from a receiving position of services towards an ecosystem caring. This implies grappling with the notion of care as accommodating ambivalent human-environment relations beyond technoscientific management of bioinfrastructures.

  • 3.
    Rosén, Anders
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Learning, Learning in Stem.
    Peters, Anne-Kathrin
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Learning, Learning in Stem.
    Daniels, Mats
    Uppsala university.
    Danielson, Mats
    Stockholm university.
    Hemphälä, Jens
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Håkansson, Maria
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Sandström, Gunilla
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Transformation-Driving Education: Perspectives Emerging in a Dialogue between Teachers with Experiences from Challenge-Driven Education2022Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This Research Full Paper explores different implementations of and teachers’ experiences from challenge-driven education and similar learning approaches in engineering education and other higher education contexts. Through an action research approach key concerns among the teachers and similarities and differences between the studied courses can be identified. The study highlights the potential in these learning approaches, as means for breaking and going beyond the traditional boundaries of higher education, enhancing and cross-fertilizing engineering education with other disciplines, and empowering students both as professionals and humans. It also indicates potential barriers and in-built tensions that are crucial to handle for successful implementation. The study further shows on great opportunities for mutual learning and collaboration between teachers from diverse contexts and backgrounds. The findings are discussed in relation to research within domains such as sustainability education, transformative learning, and futures studies, and opportunities for further research and development are outlined.

  • 4. Scheepmaker, L.
    et al.
    Aal, T.
    Kender, K.
    Vallis, Stacy
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Aal, K.
    Smith, N.
    Melenhorst, M.
    Van Twist, A.
    Veenstra, M.
    Schuler, D.
    Müller, C.
    Wulf, V.
    Weibert, A.
    Ethical Future Environments: Engaging refugees in Smart City participation2022In: ACM International Conference Proceeding Series, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM) , 2022Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aiming to improve quality of life for their citizens, cities and environments regions are becoming increasingly smarter. Smart City research and practice has put emphasis on the importance of citizen-centric processes, collaborating with citizens and other stakeholders, as well as public values in Smart City projects. Nevertheless, cities and governmental organizations continue to adopt technology-push approaches, marginalized citizens such as refugees are often excluded in (urban) digitalization and decision-making processes. Despite their different and valuable perspectives, collaborating with marginalized citizens is not common practice, as it often requires a different approach than traditional citizen participation techniques. During this workshop, we will discuss with Smart City practitioners and refugees how we could broaden participation to include citizens who are still excluded, using a visual card-based game to discuss topics in the Smart City context that are relevant to participants. The expected outcomes of this workshop are an understanding of opportunities for involving marginalized citizens (in this workshop: refugees) in Smart City projects, different perspectives of stakeholders involved, and the setting up of a learning and caring community in which different stakeholders can share their insights and practices. 

  • 5.
    Rosén, Anders
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Learning, Learning in Stem.
    Peters, Anne-Kathrin
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Learning, Learning in Stem.
    Daniels, Mats
    Uppsala university.
    Danielson, Mats
    Stockholm university.
    Hemphälä, Jens
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Håkansson, Maria
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Sandström, Gunilla
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Transformation-Driving Education: Perspectives Emerging in a Dialogue between Teachers with Experiences from Challenge-Driven Education2022In: Proceedings: Frontiers in Education Conference, FIE, Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc. , 2022Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This Research Full Paper explores different implementations of and teachers’ experiences from challenge-driven education and similar learning approaches in engineering education and other higher education contexts. Through an action research approach key concerns among the teachers and similarities and differences between the studied courses can be identified. The study highlights the potential in these learning approaches, as means for breaking and going beyond the traditional boundaries of higher education, enhancing and cross-fertilizing engineering education with other disciplines, and empowering students both as professionals and humans. It also indicates potential barriers and in-built tensions that are crucial to handle for successful implementation. The study further shows on great opportunities for mutual learning and collaboration between teachers from diverse contexts and backgrounds. The findings are discussed in relation to research within domains such as sustainability education, transformative learning, and futures studies, and opportunities for further research and development are outlined.

  • 6.
    Smeds, Emilia
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Municipal capacity for transformative experimentation: how much of a constraint is projectification?2022Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    How local autonomy is shaped by structuring of funding opportunities by higher-level government is a long-established research theme. Studies of experimentation in UK and European cities have found that reliance on short-term, project-based and competitive funding is a major constraint on local actors’ capacities (Ehnert et al. 2018, Schwanen 2015, Hodson et al. 2018). Hodson et al. (2013) have shown how this may lead to ‘piecemeal’, rather than ‘systemic’, modes of urban energy innovation. Recently, these debates have been recast as ‘projectification’ of urban experimentation (Smeds 2018, Torrens and von Wirth 2020): the increasing reliance on temporary organising within the public sector (Godenhjelm et al. 2015). 

    This paper engages this debate with a focus on municipal government capacity for experimenting with urban mobility innovations in ways that are transformative and may contribute to transitions towards post-car cities (Smeds 2021). We extend Hodson et al.’s (2013) framework by drawing on organisational studies literature (Lundin and Söderholm 1995). We argue for a distinction between two dimensions of projectification: 1) forms of organising experiments, e.g. as a fixed-term project; and 2) funding that is awarded on a project, short-term and/or competitive basis. Mobility funding landscapes are examined as a driver that may cause experimentation to be organised in project-based, piecemeal forms. 

    We ask: how much of a constraint is projectification on municipal capacity, compared to other constraints on local autonomy in the context of state restructuring and austerity urbanism (Peck 2012)? This is answered through a comparative analysis of Bristol City Council and New York City government from 1996-2016, as contrasting cases with high and low degrees of fiscal autonomy, and representative cases of UK and US multi-scalar governance contexts. The study draws on large-N databases on the outcomes of 108 experiments, 48 interviews, and analysis of funding and municipal budget data. 

  • 7.
    Lindblad, Jenny
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Holmstedt, Janna
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Soiling the City, Composting the Museum Soil Blindness and Soil Imaginaries in Urbanized Landscapes and Heritage Conservation2022In: Part of Workshop nr 3 Soils as sites of emergency and transformation, 2022Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Bast, Sigvard
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
    Mörtberg, Ulla
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Sustainability Assessment and Management.
    Högström, Johan
    Balfors, Berit
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Sustainability Assessment and Management.
    Suleiman, Lina
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Cortinovis, Chiara
    Adem Esmail, Blal
    Kato Huerta, Jarumi
    Pang, Xi-Lillian
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Sustainability Assessment and Management.
    Geneletti, Davide
    Albert, Christian
    (Re)Planning of green infrastructure and nature-based solutions for sustainable urban transition2022In: Book of abstracts / [ed] Wolski, Jacek Regulska, Edyta Affek, Andrzej, 2022, p. 338-Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Landscape approaches are important for planning of urban sprawl in peri-urban landscapes, continuously emerging in many metropolitan regions. In the case of Stockholm Region, land-take and incremental urbanisation is a continouous process, while the regional development plan has ambitions to steer the overall development in a sustainable direction. This plan contains a green infrastructure effort building on a set of green wedges, mainly serving as support to the needs of the city and suburbs and their citizens. This initiative differ from the later green infrastructure action plan provided by the county administrative board, related to the EU biodiversity strategy and guidelines. The latter has a different approach, mainly targeting biodiversity goals as well as ecosystem services. These approaches differ from each other in several ways while both have unclear roles when it comes to municipal planning on different levels. Furthermore, the municipalities have their own initiatives when it comes to green infrastructure and nature-based solutions and it is not clear how the different planning tiers are linked to each other, to planning and management, and to multifunctional landscapes. The aim of the REPLAN project is to investigate how the different green infrastructure initiatives are linked to planning, to each other on different scales, and whether they can serve multi-functional landscapes when it comes to biodiversity and different ecosystem services. The REPLAN project involves stakeholders and practitioners on different planning levels for co-producing knowledge, methods and strategies for green infrastructure and nature-based solutions to serve as tools for sustainable transition of metropolitan areas and their peri-urban landscapes.

  • 9.
    Lindblad, Jenny
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Contextualizing anticipation: planning for futures and the present in Bordeaux2021In: STS-CH Conference by the Swiss Association for the Studies of Science, Technology & Society, 15-17 February 2021, 2021Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    When the city of Bordeaux initiated a revision of its land use plan, essentially an anticipatory activity drawing on pasts, contemporary concerns and aspirations for the future, the planning department and politicians assured that it was to become ‘contextualized’. Inspired by Asdal and Moser’s (2012) proposition to elaborate on “contexting,” as a move that recognizes the overlapping presence of multiple contexts shaped through practices, I carry out a contextualization of what a ‘contextualized plan’ came to mean in Bordeaux. I do this based on fieldwork among planners, permit reviewers, local politicians and planning documents. The plan revision unfolded to the background of two interrelated shifts in France: the scaling of land use planning from municipalities towards larger metropoles, and reforms enhancing the flexibility of plans to ensure their adjustability towards unpredictable futures and unruly environments. By tracing the intentions that had been invested in the plan and how it operated in the realm of building permit reviewing, I show how the intersection of legal, technical and political temporalities was strategically made use of by different actors. Among these were local politicians’ uses of the increased flexibility to insure an authority over land use decisions in spite of the plan. The anticipatory activity of plan making, I argue, was as much about the future that it laid out, as it was a political struggle over capacity to act on planning decisions in an unfolding present.

  • 10.
    Stojanovski, Todor
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Role-playing planning games as educational tool Experiences of teaching with educational games in Sweden2020In: ECAADE 2020: ANTHROPOLOGIC - ARCHITECTURE AND FABRICATION IN THE COGNITIVE AGE, VOL 1 / [ed] Werner, LC Koering, D, ECAADE-EDUCATION & RESEARCH COMPUTER AIDED ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN EUROPE , 2020, p. 525-534Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Teaching about cities and planning involves complexities of understanding urban development in space and time, evolution and transformation of cities, urban politics, actors and stakeholders. Delivering efficient ways of teaching, is very important for educators, particularly among lecturers at universities who work with urban planning and design. Games can be used as educational tools and role-playing games can capture the political struggle of different actors and stakeholders involved in planning processes. Games can enable students to experience urban development and take roles of different actors and stakeholders in the planning and development processes and practice the art of negotiations in urban politics. Two educational games were written for the planning courses at KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden. Since 2011, 17 games were played in different courses. Data from the evaluation forms was collected on 14 games and 277 students answered questions. This paper analyses the evaluation forms and the comments of the students who took part in the games and discusses gaming as an educational tool. The experiences with role-playing planning games are very positive. These ratings occurs consistently in each game that was played with very small variations.

  • 11.
    Lindblad, Jenny
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Contextual temporalities: plans, planners and power in Bordeaux, France2020Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Urban planning in France is undergoing a shift. It is a shift in scale from plan-making in smaller municipalities towards larger metropoles, and a shift towards more flexibility to ensure that development plans are adjustable to unpredictable near-futures. When the city of Bordeaux revised its land-use plan towards the background of this shift, they sought to prepare a ‘contextualized’ plan. In this paper, I engage with the implications of this claim based on fieldwork among planners, bureaucrats, local politicians and planning documents in Bordeaux. In discussions among planning practitioners and theorists, context is a notion often sympathetically associated with bottom-up approaches and sensitivity to local communities. Rather than resonating with such assumptions, I show how the idea of a contextualized plan in Bordeaux was charged with manipulations of bureaucratic, legal and political temporalities in struggles over authority and democratic legitimacy. Local politicians seeing their decision power reduced following the shift of scales made use of the increased flexibility to influence in other stages of planning procedures, particularly reviewing of building permits. The call for a ‘contextualized’ plan was riddled with adverse relations between planners’ further-looking perspectives and local politicians’ strive for assuring authority over planning decisions in an unfolding presence, suggesting an importance to attend to diverse and conflicting temporalities embedded in calls for ‘context’. 

  • 12.
    Näsman, Per
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Real Estate and Construction Management, Real Estate Economics and Finance.
    Ceccato, Vania
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Langefors, Linda
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Sexual violence in public transportation in Stockholm, Sweden: The influence of individual and  environmental factors2019Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 13.
    Stojanovski, Todor
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Typo-morphology of transportation – Looking at historical development and multimodal futures of Swedish streets and roads2019Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper is a part of a book on historical development and envisioning streets multimodal futures of Swedish streets and roads. It discusses typo-morphological methodology to study streets, roads and streets layouts. It looks in the history of Swedish cities to analyze types of streets and roads and proposes futuristic (scenarios) for the typical Swedish streets and roads considering new trends towards multimodal transportation (a mix of walking, cycling and public transportation) and new transport technologies such as self-propelled cars and carpools. Swedish morphologists have classified streets according to historical periods. There is also international research about historical street development and types. Currently new planning trends and new patterns of mobility are emerging such as energy efficient mobilities (walking and cycling), shared automobiles and bicycles, hybrid and electric cars and self-driving vehicles. These new transportation technologies will change the way in which streets and roads are designed in the future. Urban morphology can help with conceptualizing typologies and design elements in a context of morphologically informed design.

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  • 14. Henriksson, M.
    et al.
    Witzell, Jacob
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Isaksson, Karolina
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    All Change or Business as Usual?: the Discursive Framing of Digitalized Smart Accessibility in Sweden2019In: Transportation Research Procedia, Elsevier BV , 2019, Vol. 41, p. 625-636Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In recent years, ideas related to digitalization have gained significance on the contemporary transport policy agenda. Based on discourse analysis of the digitalization agenda in Swedish transport policy, this paper investigates the ongoing formative phase of the emerging policy and planning area of digitalization and smart mobility. It examines and critically discusses the current discursive framing of digitalization in current transport policy and planning, and considers perspectives and meanings related to "smart" mobility and accessibility that are being established in strategic plans and policies for the Swedish transport sector. The empirical focus is on transport strategies and official reports developed at national level. The main findings indicate that digitalization is being framed as a rapid, unstoppable transformation process, which will lead to a range of positive outcomes such as reduced climate emissions, less congestion, improved accessibility, and a smoother and more resource-efficient transport system. According to the ideas and assumptions promoted in the current discourse, this transformation can only occur through stronger involvement of business enterprises. This governing strategy, or lack of governing strategy, makes it unclear how transport policy objectives are balanced against market and innovation interests. It also risks delegating the transition to sustainable mobility to less formalized and less transparent policy arenas that operate in parallel to, and partly outside, established planning and strategy-making processes.

  • 15.
    Sundborg, Bengt
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Making the most of daylight in town planning2018In: 24TH ISUF INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE: CITY AND TERRITORY IN THE GLOBALIZATION AGE / [ed] Colomer, V, UPV Universitat Politècnica de València , 2018, p. 649-655Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Making the most of daylight in town planning is one of the important ingredients in the attempts for the sustainable city. Exactly 150 years ago Ildefons Cerda presented his great work "Teoria General de la Urbanization" including methods for taking care of sunlight. However, with modern software, the possibilities to do comprehensive preparations are much better. This paper presents an urban typology considering daylight with basic geometric forms, shapes and patterns. Later this will be elaborated more in detail. The research includes three steps; choosing typical alternatives for settlements and designing some new principle urban solutions, calculations and evaluations of the alternatives considering especially energy saving. The quality and the quantity of daylight are dependent of the geometry of the urban spaces. That means the volumes for the buildings as well as the empty spaces in between. The accessibility for diffuse daylight from the sky and for direct rays from the sun is measurable by computer calculations where the sun angles and the skylight from the hemisphere are simulated. Relevant parameters are height, width and length. In a settlement with a high urban density it is more difficult to distribute daylight than in a settlement with low density. However, the economy for exploitations is also worse with lower density. Therefore, the comparisons between different settlements are with the same density. The orientation of the settlements according to the compass is of crucial importance looking to the direct sunlight and the shadows. How the local environment with parks, water, mountains and specific landmarks in the surroundings also affects the daylight distribution is included.

  • 16.
    Stojanovski, Todor
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    What explains neighborhood type statistically? Mixing typo-morphological and spatial analytic approaches in urban morphology2018In: 24TH ISUF INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE: CITY AND TERRITORY IN THE GLOBALIZATION AGE / [ed] Colomer, V, Univ Politecnica Valencia , 2018, p. 1265-1282Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Society creates architectural styles and neighborhood types to communicate and promote values. Accordingly, geographers and architects working within the typo-morphological tradition classify neighborhoods by historical periods, urban design, planning paradigms and plan elements, building types and architectural detail. This paper juxtaposes typo-morphological (historical emergence of urban forms through urban elements and pattern typologies) and spatial analytic (city defined by urban form factors and formulas) approaches in urban morphology to assess what explains neighborhood type statistically. The analyses of variance show that many urban form factors (residential and employment density, Floor Space Indexes (FSI), location, income, etc.) are statistically significant in neighborhood type (as a nominal composite variable). Neighborhood typologies can be applied to enrich spatial analyses and urban modelling. The approach can be used in typo-morphological tradition to offer quantitative description to the persistent problem of type' and enrich the classification methodology.

  • 17.
    Stojanovski, Todor
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    City Information Modelling (CIM) and Urban Design: Morphological Structure, Design Elements and Programming Classes in CIM2018In: Computing for a better tomorrow -: Proceedings of the 36th eCAADe Conference / [ed] Kepczynska-Walczak, A, Bialkowski, S (eds.),, Lodz, Poland: Education and research in Computer Aided Architectural Design in Europe , 2018, Vol. 1, p. 507-516Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In architecture, there was an evolution from Computer-Aided Design (CAD) to Building Information Modelling (BIM), but in urban planning and design, where the Geographic Information Systems (GIS) are often used, there is no such analogy. This paper reviews research in typo-morphology, a branch of urban morphology, procedural modelling of buildings and cities and 3D city modelling and visualizations. It present a generic morphological structure of urban elements and discusses them as programming classes in City Information Modelling (CIM) and the application of CIM in urban design practice. Urban design can be understood as art of juxtaposing and arranging urban design elements such as streets, sidewalks, buildings, building façades, landscaping, etc. Designing implies experimentation and play for design elements within design worlds. CIM should integrate procedural modelling, urban morphological research with toolboxes of design elements and rules of combinations. CIM should serve as digital design worlds where urban designers can play with design elements, model and analyse urban scenarios with generative procedures, rules and typological processes. 

  • 18.
    Lindblad, Jenny
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Shifting planning rationalities: investments of hope in the land-use plan of Bordeaux, France2018In: 15th European Association of Social Anthropologists (EASA) Biennial Conference, 2018, 2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper explores the work invested in the production of a land-use plan in Bordeaux, France. Itinquires how, besides manifesting desired routes for future developments, the plan provokes emotionsamong politicians, civil servants and planners, and hosts hope for shifting planning rationalities.

  • 19.
    Wretling, Vincent
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Balfors, Berit
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Gunnarsson-Östling, Ulrika
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies. KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Strategic Sustainability Studies.
    Hörnberg, Christina
    Impact Assessment in municipal energy planning: Current trends and pathways forward2018Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 20.
    Stojanovski, Todor
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Multimodal transportation performance certificate (MTPC) for buildings and neighborhoods – a model for benchmarking the effect of the built environment on the modal split in geographic information systems (gis)2017In: Simulation Series, The Society for Modeling and Simulation International , 2017, no 11, p. 240-247Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Unsustainable mobility is a major challenge in many cities. To provide information about sustainable transportation, this paper proposes instituting Multimodal Transportation Performance Certificates (MTPC) as assessment method and performance measure for multimodality of buildings and neighborhoods. MTPC measures the Level of Integration (LoI) of the built environment with walking, cycling, public transportation and private car and estimates the modal split in Geographic Information Systems (GIS) based on urban design elements. The benchmarking procedure for MTPC is applied and tested in a suburban neighborhood in Stockholm.

  • 21.
    Lindblad, Jenny
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Scaling the urban: land use planning in Bordeaux2017In: Swedish Anthropology Association annual conference, Stockholm, Sweden, 2017, 2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    During the last six years, the inter-municipal administration Bordeaux Métropole has revised itsland-use plan. It has been fabricated through translations from strategical document framed asaiming at sustainable development. Graphically, the plan is a myriad of signs, colors, letters,numbers, lines, and boxes. Hull (2012: 5) writes that “a planning map is not only an ideologicalprojection of a bureaucratic vision of the city; this vision is embedded in the technical andprocedural processes that link a map to roads, streams, and documents”. In a similar vein, Ielaborate on the politics embedded in the land-use plan by inquiring its material qualities andhow it is employed in building permit procedures. I draw on my ongoing fieldwork of encounterswith public servants, councilors, urbanists and residents in various ways involved with themaking and employing of the plan. Conceived through the ambition to enhance theagglomeration’s attractivity on European level (l’échelle européenne), the plan has been madethrough interaction between two administrative levels (la double échelle); metropole and local.While the multiple scales corresponding to various actors’ interests and desires are constantlynegotiated in land-use issues, scales are generated through the existing and envisioned urbanpractices and environments which the plan mediates. I intend with this presentation to shedattention to the multiplicity of a ‘city scale’ which has become nominated a setting in whichglobal climate change concerns are to be dealt with.

  • 22.
    Fröidh, Oskar
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Transport Planning, Economics and Engineering.
    Ceccato, Vania
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Determinants of passengers’ perceived security at railway stations2017Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    A survey has been performed on departing middle- and long-distance train passengers on a selection of 14 since 1990 new or rebuilt railway stations in Sweden. The passengers’ rating of security was one of the questions included in the survey, which dealt with several aspects on localization of the station. A linear regression analysis (OLS) revealed that the Perceived Station Security (PSS) Index is explained by a number of physical factors in the station environment. Individual or socio-economic factors are however too vague to be significant. The model is significant but the model fit is low and the results should be interpreted as preliminary. Examples of environmental factors that increase the PSS are if the station has built-in stairs between station building and platforms and if there is a café or restaurant with seating in the station, while reconstruction in progress decreases the PSS. The distance to the city or local centre has an effect, and peripheral stations in general have a lower PSS than centrally located.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 23.
    Adolphson, Marcus
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Jonsson, Daniel
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Transport Planning, Economics and Engineering.
    The theory practice gap in regional (transport) planning2016In: RSA Annual Conference Graz 2016, Regional Studies Association , 2016Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 24.
    Lindblad, Jenny
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Tomorrow’s cities in the making: an ethnographic approach2016In: Proceedings of the IV World Planning Schools Congress, 2016, p. 752-754Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 25. Dahlberg, Johan
    et al.
    Moritz, Marcel
    Rosenqvist, Moa
    Mörtberg, Ulla
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Jönsson Strandberg, Kristin
    Brokking, Peter
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Berggren, Eva
    Engberg, Tobias
    Södertörnsanalysen (The Sodertorn Analysis)2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 26.
    Aguiar Borges, Luciane
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Education and Health in ICT-futures: Scenarios and sustainability impacts of ICT societies2015In: PROCEEDINGS OF ENVIROINFO AND ICT FOR SUSTAINABILITY 2015, Atlantis Press , 2015, p. 213-220Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study explores the performance of the education and health sectors in relation to five ICT futures for Sweden in 2060. The accessibility, affordability, quality and efficiency of these sectors influence the creation and maintenance of essential collective values such as democracy and justice; consequently both education and health are fundamental to a sustainable society. Exploring the performance of these sectors in different futures enables the identification of barriers and undesirable developments, and encourages a debate on how ICT can be used to reinforce inclusive, and counteract unwanted, futures.

  • 27.
    Stojanovski, Todor
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    The Morphological Effect of Public Transportation Systems on Cities: Urban Analysis of Transit-Oriented Development (TOD) in Swedish Cities2015Conference paper (Other academic)
    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 28.
    Larsen, Katarina
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Nilsson, Susanne
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Blaus, Johan
    KTH.
    Snickars, Folke
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Impact and beyond in research centres: university-industry collaboration in material sciences2015In: Proceedings XIII Triple Helix conference, Beijing, August 2015. Panel session: University-Industry relationships, Beijing, China, 2015, Vol. Panel 5, p. 158-177Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study is concerned with the role of research centres in realising universities‟ impact strategy. From the university management‟s perspective, this raises questions about how a university more systematically can organize and manage effective environments to stimulate both academic excellence and societal impact. The analysis draws on experiences from a centre in the area of material sciences with an explicit ambition to generate impact through engaging in research and education activities together with industry. The study aims to build knowledge on what type of impact goals these centres are targeting and what impact mechanisms that are considered important in order to achieve these goals. The results show that the centre has established mechanisms for close-knitted collaborative research, which also create an in-depth understanding among collaborators about areas of application of new materials and the diverse range of research work in the centre. This facilitates translation activities to form more fundamental research questions from industry‟s practical needs. Four areas of impact are identified: 1) tools and methods saving time, money and materials 2) skilled people 3) solutions of theoretical problems; and 4) development of absorptive capacity and science-signalling trough co-publications between industry partners and centre researchers. Conclusions about scope of impact, in the Swedish case, are presented in relation to recent university policy in UK, also discussing key themes of centres as impact creators.

  • 29.
    Jing, Jing
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Haas, Tigran
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment.
    The Built Environment for Children: Stockholm Experience2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The enjoyment of, and impact on children from the built environment is a very significant aspect of “social sustainability”, but it is relatively underrepresented in the discourse on sustainable development. Despite significant advancements in the understanding of the relationship between the built environment and child health and development made over the past several decades, many argue that contemporary urban (and sub-urban) environments in developed countries are having negative repercussions on child health and development.

     

    Stockholm, featuring both advancements as child-friendly city which reflects Sweden’s national branding as “child-friendly” nation (Swedish Institute, 2012) and challenges as to its radical urban transformation which in combination with a relative shortage of housing that places great pressure on city planning. The paper draws importance to the phenomenon of public space regeneration, with particular focus on understanding how public spaces can be built and adapted to provide children with environments that stimulate their social, educational and physical development. The high levels of activities to modify, expand, and build new areas in the city to accommodate more people, including more children, provides a dynamic and robust setting for case study.  This paper reviews the built environment for pre-school aged children (age 0-6) in the city of Stockholm and investigate how planners, architects and designers account for children as users of the spaces and places that they plan and design. A series of case studies on child-friendly design are provided in order to produce learning materials for architects, planners and policy makers based upon the Stockholm experience.

  • 30.
    Zhou, Guanghong
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Industrial Ecology.
    Liu, Hongling
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Industrial Ecology.
    Yin, Ying
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Frostell, Björn
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Industrial Ecology.
    Towards low-carbon cities in China: integrating greenhouse gas management in urban planning2014In: Resilience – The New Research Frontier, Trondheim: Norwegian University of Science and Technology , 2014, p. 150-164Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Low-carbon development has been proposed as one of the key national environmental strategies by the central government of China. There are hundreds of Chinese cities that have set low-carbon goals and there are many types of plan within the urban planning system. However, these plans face great challenges. For example, the current urban planning approach focuses on spatial arrangements while it has difficulties in recognising the complexity of GHG metabolism. As another example, urban planning lacks stakeholder involvement and cooperation which contributes to the failure to monitor GHG emissions. This study compares the situation in China with that experienced in Stockholm, Sweden and proposes an approach to improve low-carbon planning. This approach involves integrating GHG accounting into urban planning based on Industrial Ecology knowledge. Using lessons learnt from the Eco-Cycle Model 2.0 in Stockholm, the study highlights the intimate relationship between energy consumption and GHG emissions in Chinese cities, which requires integrating energy systems thinking and GHG thinking into the urban planning process. A life cycle perspective is needed in urban planning to integrate parallel energy consumption and GHG emissions budgeting in different urban sectors. Furthermore, a GHG metabolic approach may become a broad platform for communicating low-carbon development among different stakeholders in a city.

  • 31.
    Haas, Tigran
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Troglio, Elisabetta
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies. KTH - Royal Institute of Technology.
    Sustainable Urban Cells and the Energy Transect Modeling: Reconciling the Green and the Urban2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 32.
    Haas, Tigran
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Troglio, Elisabetta
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies. KTH - Royal Institute of Technology.
    What can we learn from Eco-city projects?: A case studies comparison of European cities2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 33.
    Hasselgren, Björn
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Pricing Principles, Efficiency Concepts and Incentive Models in Swedish Transport Infrastructure Policy2013In: VTI Transportforum 2013 – Granskade artiklar: VTI rapport 787 / [ed] Göran Blomqvist, Linköping: VTI , 2013, p. 22-35Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article the shift of the Swedish goverment´s policies for the financing through taxation, fees and prices paid for the use of roads and railroads from 1945 until the 2010s is discussed. It is argued that the shift from a full-cost coverage principle to a short term social marginal cost principle can be seen in the light of the controversy between a Coasean and a Pigovian perspective.

    The Coasean perspective furthers an institutional view where organizations and dynamic development matters while the Pigovian perspective furthers a welfare economic equilibrium view where organizations are less focused. It is argued that the shift in policies coincided with less interest and focus on the organizational perspective and incentives for organizational efficiency, which can be seen in the public documents from the time.

    The government seems to have been guided by a mar ket failure stance since the 1970s which has motivated growing intervention, following a mar ket-economy stance in the first 25 years after the nationalization of roads and railroads. A current opening in transport infrastructure policies with more room for alternative financing, user charges and fees might, even though also consistent with short term social marginal cost principles, signal a revival of a perspective more in line with the Coasean view.

    Download full text (pdf)
    Pricing Principles Efficiency Concepts and Incentive Models in Swedish Transport Infrastructure Policy
  • 34.
    Eriksson, Inga-Maj
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Urban Structure and transport related impacts2013Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 35.
    Schalk, Meike
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Critical Studies in Architecture.
    Bradley, Karin
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Gunnarsson Östling, Ulrika
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Eco-Feminist Futures II: Critical Spatial Practices2013In: Rethinking the Social in Architecture, 2013, p. 105-108Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 36.
    Haas, Tigran
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Littke, Helene
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Locke, Ryan
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Taking the High Line: Elevated parks, evolving neighborhoods and the ever changing relationship between urban and nature2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 37.
    Vestbro, Dick Urban
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Saving by Sharing – Collective Housing for Sustainable Lifestyles in the Swedish Context2012In: 3rd International Conference on Degrowth for Ecological Sustainability and Social Equity, Venice, 19 – 23 September 2012, University of Venice, 2012Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In Swedish cohousing one of the goals is to increase access to attractive indoor space by abstaining from some private space in favour of common rooms. Therefore cohousing consti­tutes an example of saving by sharing. Facilities shared are common meals, playrooms for children, hobby rooms, guest rooms, saunas and exercise rooms. Space may be saved both by reducing the normal apartment and by accepting fewer private rooms than in non-collective living. The paper shows how cohouses may be designed to promote both a sense of community and saving through the sharing of resources. Common spaces should be connected to apart­ments through indoor communication, located where residents pass frequently and provided with glazed walls in order to stimulate spontaneous use. Spatial organisation may influence the level of social control, which in turn may constitute a determining factor for pro-environ­ment behaviour. In the paper examples are given of communal activities in various types of cohouses in Sweden. The question is raised how to promote cohousing in a society dominated by neo-liberal doctrines, and how to save by sharing more generally in the urban landscape. The main methods used to write this paper are analysis of literature and practical experi­ence of the author. The author has carried out research on collective housing since 1964. Since 1996 he lives in a cohouse in Stockholm and since 2006 he has been the chairman of the national Swedish organization Cohousing NOW, which keeps regular contact with 50 cohouses and 10 starter groups for cohousing.

    Download full text (pdf)
    WS_13FP_VESTBRO.pdf
  • 38.
    Yin, Ying
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Feng, Xiaoxing
    A Comparative study with Swedish and China’s Eco-cities: From planning to implementation, taking the Hammarby Sjöstad, Sweden, and Wuxi Sino-Swedish Eco-City, China, as cases2012In: Natural Resources And Sustainable Development II, Pts 1-4, Trans Tech Publications Inc., 2012, Vol. 524-527, p. 2741-2750Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper targets to improve understanding and explain influential factors of different planning and implementing process of two eco-cities, Hammarby Sjöstad, Sweden, and Sino-Swedish Low-carbon Eco-city, China. The study is approached by examining and comparing the two eco-cities in perspectives of plans formulation, policy and regulations foundation, planning management and implementing mechanisms. Lessons from Hammarby Sjöstad are that integrative planning and management, follow-up and evaluations of implementing results, and lifestyle transitions all need to be concerned, as well as environmental technologies. In Sino-Swedish lowcarbon eco-city, lack of local technologies, supporting policies and regulations, inactive cross-sector cooperation and public participation are summarized as main obstacles. To approach these, efforts are made on formulating local regulations, government documents, and coordinating cross-sector cooperation, promoting mutual learning. Finally, concluding that, besides environmental technologies, the foundation of legislations, policies and environmental objectives, integrative approaches, public awareness are key areas need to be promoted for popularizing sustainability in China.

  • 39.
    Stojanovski, Todor
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Traffic and Logistics.
    Lundström, Mats Johan
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Haas, Tigran
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Tram and light railway as key driver for sustainable urban development: The Swedish experiences with transit-oriented development (TOD)2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sustainable urbanism and good placemaking revolve around creating and maintaining sustainable and attractive places, by reviving planning and urban design paradigms, by experimenting and innovating and by building synergies between the old and the new. The expectations for wide accessibility and networking are very high and the challenge today is to integrate and improve the efficiency and effectiveness of urban and transport systems. The transports have to fulfil the ongoing demands for enhanced efficiency, comfort, safety and speed, as well as the environmental factors in the light of global climate change and energy crisis. One accent in the last 20 years has been on transit-oriented development (TOD), compact cities and urbanity-empowering public transports like light railways or light rail transit (LRT) or bus rapid transit (BRT) with its busways as key drivers for sustainable neighbourhoods.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 40.
    Ceccato, Vania
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Understanding the nature of outdoor rape2012In: Women, Crime and Criminal Justice Practice, Cambridge, UK, 2012Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    What can we learn about women’s mobility and urban environments from cases of outdoor rape? Are there ‘typical places’ for rape? How do they look like? How do victims relate to the rape place? To what extent do these places relate to women´s overall fear of crime? These are some of the questions to be answered in the research project entitled “Putting women in their place: city environment and female mobility, lessons from cases of outdoor rapes” using cases of outdoor rapes in Stockholm, Sweden. The objective of the study is to two-fold. First, it contributes to better understanding of the urban environment and the spatial dynamics in which outdoor rapes take place. Second, it uncovers how crime place is recalled and perceived by the victim and by doing that, the study searches for insights on how victim’s immediate mobility pre and post rape relates to current patterns of women’s fear of crime in city environments. One of the novelties of this research is to incorporate accurate knowledge of places where one third of all rapes in Sweden take place. In this presentation we will focus on preliminary results of the study by discussing the nature of these places in relation to overall city environment.

  • 41.
    Svane, Örjan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Lundqvist, Per
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology.
    Wangel, Josefin
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment.
    Jonsson, R. Daniel
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment.
    Kliatsko, Aleh
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology.
    Negotiated outcomes - Actor-oriented modelling of energy efficiency in a Stockholm city district renewal2012In: Proceedings of the 6th Biennial Meeting of the International Environmental Modelling and Software Society, 2012, p. 1768-1775Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    "What if the renewal of Rinkeby-Kista, Stockholm, were to make it part of a 2 kW Society?" Renewal of the city district's 25 000 flats from the 1970s is due and a network organisation, "Järva Boost" is established. A cross-disciplinary team of KTH researchers develop a computerised model to simulate energy efficiency gains resulting from actors' decisions. Inputs are measures that building owners, energy providers, residents, planners etc. might propose. They can be technical institutional or socio-cultural. Outputs are energy use in kW/person and CO2 emissions. To guide model development, an "ideal type" usage situation is outlined. The energy system is modelled "upstream" from end use, to identify larger efficiency potentials. The model interface is designed to enable the "staging" of actors' negotiations: The manager influences the properties of the climate shell, the residents the energy used for cooking, and the energy provider the primary energy mix. The concepts of "Household Activities System" and "Energy Usage Systems" give theoretical framework for modelling. The former conceptualises residents' activities, the latter the technology providing services to the activity. Simulations give contrasting outcomes: "business as usual" vs. "most favourable". Used in practice, simulations might simplify negotiations and coming to agreement.

  • 42.
    Stojanovski, Todor
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Traffic and Logistics.
    Lundström, Mats
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Haas, Tigran
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Light Railways and Busways as Key Driver for Sustainable Urban Development The Swedish Experiences with Transit-Oriented Development (TOD)2012In: Sustaining the Metropolis: LRT and Streetcars for Super Cities, Washington, D.C: Transportation Research Board , 2012, p. 259-278, article id E-C177Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    TOD in a Swedish (European) perspective is by no means a new idea. Three cases of newer light railway and busway projects (Stockholm, Gothenbourg and Norrkoping) are explored in this article and they are seen through a historical overview of the TOD experiences in Sweden and around the world. We also investigate and draw attention to the values of placemaking and sustainable urbanism via the advantages and disadvantages of the urban and regional public transport systems and TOD principles.

  • 43.
    Haas, Tigran
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Locke, Ryan
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE).
    Sustainable Urbanism Solutions for Breaking the Bonds of Concentrated Poverty in Public Housing2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Historically, public housing in the US and Europe has concentrated poverty and isolated residents. This paper investigates the demolition of public housing in the US through HOPE VI grants, and the rebuilding of mixed-use neighborhoods. The qualitative mixed-methods approach to the analysis examines project sites in three US cities to see if the Sustainable Urbanist paradigm offers an alternative to the failed suburban-alienated type of living in major European cities. In the US, demolition and rebuilding anew has altered the urban form and produced overall improved living environments; while Europe may be inclined to refurbish and retrofit public housing instead. Few studies exist concerning transferability of ideas and lessons learned from the American HOPE VI effort into a European context. Applying Sustainable Urbanist concepts to European housing areas could be a way forward. This paper proposes new approaches for socially and ethnically excluded European suburbs.

  • 44.
    Falck, Simon
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Human Capital and FDI Location: The Swedish Experience2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigates the relationship between different types of human capital (HC) and the location of inward foreign direct investment (FDI) in Sweden, over the period 2002-2009. The purpose is to examine how firm-specific, industrial-specific, and occupational-specific HC influence the location of FDI in high technology industries and knowledge based services, among other factors that featured prominently in preceding FDI location work. Conditional logit estimates indicate that all types of HC are important but that occupational-specific HC appears to be key in attracting foreign firms in knowledge intensive production. This result emphasise the importance of highly skilled professionals, whose knowledge is relatively easily transferred across industry and firm settings. Other results largely uphold the basic tenets and empirical results in prior FDI location work.

  • 45.
    Johansson, Mats
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Rauhut, Daniel
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    European Urban-Rural Relations – A Multifaceted Concept.2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 46.
    Werner, Inga Britt
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Urban Density: measuring spatial dispersion of activities and affordances2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is a consensus among planners and politicians that dense cities are better for the environment than sprawling urban landscapes. The aim of the project is to analyse how urban density affects people’s actions and choices of residential location.

    The study employs theories and concepts from planning research and environmental psychology. Urban density is a key concept. Range and variety of urban functions are then important additions to measurement of physical densities. Another key concept is ‘affordance‘. ’Affordance’ is a quality or asset within a specific environment, which can be perceived and used by an individual for carrying out a certain activity.

    The main method is a survey covering a stratified randomised sample of 4500 individuals in stratified within the Stockholm area. The stratified study areas were selected on criteria of physical density, mix of functions and accessibility within the region. The survey covers important ‘affordances’ inherent in the physical environment of the household, such as place of work, shops, schools and social networks. The data are analysed with statistical methods.

    The paper concentrates on perceived affordances regarding workplaces. Preliminary results show that respondents’ perceived number of alternative workplaces within 1 kilometre from home has a positive correlation to both physical density and mix of urban functions. Any further away from home than 1 km, increasing perceived affordances had a stronger correlation to accessibility.

    Preliminary conclusions are that physical density as such seems to increase the amount of perceived affordances only within a very close environment of the home. The range of affordances widens considerably with increasing accessibility. Probably accessibility outweighs physical density as a factor for influencing people’s choices of residential location.

  • 47.
    Dall Schmidt, Torben
    et al.
    University of Southern Denmark.
    Kangasharju, Aki
    VATT, Helsinki.
    Rauhut, Daniel
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Future labour supply in regions of the Nordic countries:  A method to forecast and test spatial patterns of future labour supply2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 48.
    Rauhut, Daniel
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Kahila, Petri
    Nordregio.
    The Nordic Labour Market Policy Response to Demographic Ageing2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 49.
    Rauhut, Daniel
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Doomsday Demography: Myths and Reality2011In: Proceedings from the 10th International Conference Partnership of Business and Education in the Regional Innovation Development / [ed] Galina Yu. Assorina & Olga S. Kompaniets, 2011, p. 34-44Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 50.
    Rader Olsson, Amy
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Westlund, Hans
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Measuring political entrepreneurship: an empirical study of Swedish Municipalities2011Conference paper (Refereed)
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