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  • 101. Keenan, Fiona
    et al.
    Pauletto, Sandra
    Design and evaluation of a digital theatre wind machine.2017In: The International Conference on New Interfaces for Musical Expression (NIME), 2017, p. 431-435Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 102. Keenan, Fiona
    et al.
    Pauletto, Sandra
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Evaluating a Continuous Sonic Interaction: Comparing a Performable Acoustic and Digital Everyday Sound2019Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 103. Keenan, Fiona
    et al.
    Pauletto, Sandra
    €˜Listening Back: Exploring the Sonic Interactions at the Heart of Historical Sound Effects Performance2017In: The New Soundtrack, Vol. 7, no 1, p. 15-30Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 104.
    Khan, Muhammad Sikandar Lal
    et al.
    Umea Univ, Dept Appl Phys & Elect, S-90187 Umea, Sweden..
    Halawani, Alaa
    Umea Univ, Dept Appl Phys & Elect, S-90187 Umea, Sweden.;Palestine Polytech Univ, Comp Engn Dept, Hebron 90100, Palestine..
    Rehman, Shafiq Ur
    Umea Univ, Dept Appl Phys & Elect, S-90187 Umea, Sweden..
    Li, Haibo
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Action Augmented Real Virtuality: A Design for Presence2018In: IEEE Transactions on Cognitive and Developmental Systems, ISSN 2379-8920, Vol. 10, no 4, p. 961-972Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper addresses the important question of how to design a video teleconferencing setup to increase the experience of spatial and social presence. Traditional video teleconferencing setups are lacking in presenting the nonverbal behaviors that humans express in face-to-face communication, which results in decrease in presence-experience. In order to address this issue, we first present a conceptual framework of presence for video teleconferencing. We introduce a modern presence concept called real virtuality and propose a new way of achieving this based on body or artifact actions to increase the feeling of presence, and we named this concept presence through actions. Using this new concept, we present the design of a novel action-augmented real virtuality prototype that considers the challenges related to the design of an action prototype, action embodiment, and face representation. Our action prototype is a telepresence mechatronic robot (TEBoT), and action embodiment is through a head-mounted display (HMD). The face representation solves the problem of face occlusion introduced by the HMD. The novel combination of HMD, TEBoT, and face representation algorithm has been tested in a real video teleconferencing scenario for its ability to solve the challenges related to spatial and social presence. We have performed a user study where the invited participants were requested to experience our novel setup and to compare it with a traditional video teleconferencing setup. The results show that the action capabilities not only increase the feeling of spatial presence but also increase the feeling of social presence of a remote person among local collaborators.

  • 105.
    Kort, Joke
    et al.
    TNO.
    Gullström, Charlie
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture.
    Nefs, H.T.
    TU Delft.
    Beyond Talking Heads – Towards Sharing Life2013In: Proceedings of the SIGCHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, Paris: SIGCHI, 2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this workshop position paper we briefly describe our current work in the fields of mediated presence, social user experience, audio/video communication and shared activities mediated by information and communication technology. We address developments encountered in our own work which we think are important for future application and better support for social interaction and communication for people separated by distance or time. We conclude with our plans for future research and our contribution to the workshop.

  • 106. Kousidis, Spyros
    et al.
    Pfeiffer, Thies
    Malisz, Zofia
    Wagner, Petra
    Schlangen, David
    Evaluating a minimally invasive laboratory architecture for recording multimodal conversational data2012In: Proc. of the Interdisciplinary Workshop on Feedback Behaviours in Dialogue, 2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 107. Kristoffersson, Annica
    et al.
    Coradeschi, Silvia
    Loutfi, Amy
    Severinson Eklundh, Kerstin
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Assessment of interaction quality in mobile robotic telepresence An elderly perspective2014In: Interaction Studies: Social Behaviour and Communication in Biological and Artificial Systems, ISSN 1572-0373, E-ISSN 1572-0381, Vol. 15, no 2, p. 343-357Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we focus on spatial formations when interacting via mobile robotic telepresence (MRP) systems. Previous research has found that those who used a MRP system to make a remote visit (pilot users) tended to use different spatial formations from what is typical in human-human interaction. In this paper, we present the results of a study where a pilot user interacted with ten elderly via a MRP system. Intentional deviations from known accepted spatial formations were made in order to study their effect on interaction quality from the local user perspective. Using a retrospective interviews technique, the elderly commented on the interaction and confirmed the importance of adhering to acceptable spatial configurations. The results show that there is a mismatch between pilot user behaviour and local user preference and that it is important to evaluate a MRP system from two perspectives, the pilot user's and the local user's.

  • 108.
    Lagerstedt, Marianne
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering.
    Mot nätverkssjukvård i komplex miljö: - behov av en vetenskaplig syn på ledning för säker vård och effektiv resursanvändning2016Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Since 2008 advanced home healthcare agencies (ASiH) in a larger Swedish county council has underwent a transformation, to become part of a coming concept: networked healthcare (NVS). NVS means that intermediate multi-organizational healthcare (IMV) will be produced often in the home, and from 2013 to an increasing number of patients in different age groups with different diagnoses and medical conditions - in large variability of needs. At the same time IMV has proved to be not simply practical to implement in a resource-efficient and patientsafe way. Based on theories from Command and Control Science the safetyproblem that arise in connection with IMV is a sign of the less known increasing need of the direction and coordination support that IMV requires.

    With a casestudy based research approach with interactive elements, different qualitative methods has been used in two phases between 2008 - 2013. The first phase is characterized by a phenomenological approach, while the second phase has a critical hermeneutic approach. Research methods includes fieldvisits with informal discussions, in-depth interviews, validation with respondents and two different methodologies for textanalysis.

    The main result shows that practical aggravating circumstances for safe care consists of lesser known and from 2013 increasing problems with direction and coordination, through expanded advanced IMV in the home as a part of NVS concept. This also as a result of inadequate and inappropriate direction and coordination support for IMV.

    The thesis concludes that the NVS represents a resource intensive health care concept, which requires a new view on the management issue and a network-related methodology for direction and coordination. This is to promote ethical, equitable, patientsafe and dignified advanced IMV so an optimized use of resources can be implemented, through shared responsibility and coordination in patientuniquely designed networkconstellations as a given work model.

  • 109.
    Lantz, Ann
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Borg, Johan
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Johansson, Stefan
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Hilden, Anita
    Gulliksen, Jan
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Accessibility to electronic communication for people with cognitive Disabilities: A Review of grey literatureManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 110.
    Latupeirissa, Adrian
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    MusiCushions: Prototyping an E-Textile Interface for Music Interaction in Home Environment2018Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents MusiCushions, a set of interactive sofa cushions used as an interface to music. Built on physical affordances of sofa cushions and e-textile technology, the artefact is used to explore how an e-textile interface can be used for music interaction at home. Challenges in prototyping e-textile interfaces would also be identified. Three cushions are prototyped with off-the-shelf e-textile and electronic components: in one cushion, its case is explored as an interactive surface; another cushion explores the softness and how it can be easily pressed; and the last cushion explores its portability. The set is then mapped to music interaction in two scenarios: as a remote control to a music player and as a musical instrument to control a synthesizer. Evaluation is conducted in two focus group discussions involving students in Media Technology. It is concluded that MusiCushions could be received as a new way to control media such as music player at home, with broader possible use to interact with other services and objects. As a musical instrument, however, it might not be accepted due to the lack of precision control.

  • 111.
    Latupeirissa, Adrian Benigno
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Frid, Emma
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Bresin, Roberto
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Sonic characteristics of robots in films2019In: Proceedings of the 16th Sound and Music Computing Conference, Malaga, Spain, 2019, p. 1-6, article id P2.7Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Robots are increasingly becoming an integral part of our everyday life. Expectations on robots could be influenced by how robots are represented in science fiction films. We hypothesize that sonic interaction design for real-world robots may find inspiration from sound design of fictional robots. In this paper, we present an exploratory study focusing on sonic characteristics of robot sounds in films. We believe that findings from the current study could be of relevance for future robotic applications involving the communication of internal states through sounds, as well for sonification of expressive robot movements. Excerpts from five films were annotated and analysed using Long Time Average Spectrum (LTAS). As an overall observation, we found that robot sonic presence is highly related to the physical appearance of robots. Preliminary results show that most of the robots analysed in this study have “metallic” voice qualities, matching the material of their physical form. Characteristics of robot voices show significant differences compared to voices of human characters; fundamental frequency of robotic voices is either shifted to higher or lower values, and the voices span over a broader frequency band.

  • 112.
    Li, Xiaopeng
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), High Performance Computing and Visualization (HPCViz).
    Playful Advertising: In-Game Advertising for Virtual Reality Games2015Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    We present an early exploration of in-game advertising for virtual reality games. The study investigates what the impacts of interactivity and immersion on consumer learning and game experience are. First, we establish a theoretical grounding for understanding interactivity and immersion in virtual gaming environments. Then, we form a research framework and propose hypotheses around the research question. Next, we report the results of the field research, prototype design, and user study. The prototypes run in mobile browsers and are tested on virtual reality goggles with smartphones attached. Based on the results, we discuss the design of interactivity and immersion, the design’s impacts on consumer learning and game experience as well as the correlation between game experience and consumer learning. The main contributions of the work are an original research framework and a set of design considerations that can be utilized to evaluate and improve the effectiveness of in- game advertisements for virtual reality games.

  • 113.
    Lidén, Mattias
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    SL-Access idag och imorgon: En användarinriktad studie om mänsklig interaktion med ett vitalt samhällssystem2016Independent thesis Advanced level (professional degree), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The public transport of Stockholm, managed by SL, must work properly due to many people relying on

    its service to survive. One important condition for the public transport to work properly is a ticketing

    system that supplies the company with income and the travellers with the correct ticket for their

    journeys. Recently SL launched a new digital smartcard ticketing system that was design to be a copy

    to its previous analogue system. However the lookalike, the new system seem to have brought some

    confusion amongst its travelling users, whilst the previous did not. The purpose of this report is to

    examine the origin of this confusion by looking at the information flow sent from the system to the

    travelling users in a ticket buying situation to see if there is anything in particular that SL can do to help

    clarifying the system for its customers.

    The study will show that even though the system is designed as a replica, there are some important

    differences between the systems. While the previous system fulfils the demands of usability in EN-ISO

    9241-110 and the widely used Nielsen heuristics, the new systems Reskassa does not. The cause can

    be traced to the shift of where the selection of tickets is performed, the removal of the tickets

    themselves as an information channel and weakened error preventions. Previously the user told the

    system where to go and the system provided the user with a correct ticket. In the new system the user

    must tell the system which ticket is the correct one for the intended journeys. This shift of responsibility

    has been made without changing the information given from the system through its basic channels;

    the staff and the machinery. By making the tickets digitally stored without adapting the information

    flow to the new needs has created a system that doesn’t provide the user with its needed information

    when buying tickets and thus making the system difficult and prone to errors. There are however

    several strategies available to improve the systems information flow and to transform the system to a

    user-aiding design.

  • 114.
    Lind, Torbjörn
    et al.
    UsersAward AB.
    Walldius, Åke
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC).
    Certifieringsprotokoll User Certified 2006 Monitor Industriutveckling AB: Användarnas certifiering 20062007Report (Other academic)
  • 115. Lind, Torbjörn
    et al.
    Walldius, Åke
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC).
    Certifieringsprotokoll User Certified 2006 TakeCare Journalsystem: Användarnas certifiering 20062009Other (Other academic)
  • 116.
    Lindborg, PerMagnus
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Music Acoustics. Nanyang Technological University, Singapore.
    Interactive Sonification of Weather Data for The Locust Wrath, a Multimedia Dance Performance2016In: Leonardo: Journal of the International Society for the Arts, Sciences and Technology, ISSN 0024-094X, E-ISSN 1530-9282Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To work flexibly with the sound design for The Locust Wrath, a multimedia dance performance on the topic of climate change, we developed a software for interactive sonification of climate data. An open-ended approach to parameter mapping allowed tweaking and improvisation during rehearsals, resulting in a large range of musical expression. The sonifications represented weather systems pushing through South-East Asia in complex patterns. The climate was rendered as a piece of electroacoustic music, whose compositional form - gesture, timbre, intensity, harmony, spatiality - was determined by the data. The article discusses aspects of aesthetic sonification, reports the process of developing the present work, and contextualises the design decisions within theories of crossmodal perception and listening modes.

  • 117.
    Lindborg, PerMagnus
    Université de Paris IV Sorbonne.
    Le dialogue musicien-machine : Aspects des systèmes d'interactivité musicale2003Licentiate thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [fr]

    Ce texte a comme sujet la confluence entre la création musicale et les sciences cognitives. Le but principal du travail a été de faire de la reconnaissance sur le terrain. Le présent texte est donc forcément incomplet, et ne servira que de point de départ pour une recherche substantielle.

    J’ai choisi comme thématique l’interactivité musicale, qui sera définie comme le dialogue musicien–machine. Je vais tenter d’approcher ce phénomène par multiples chemins, qui se superposent. Le thème restera au centre, et autour de lui, j’esquisserai sa relation avec plusieurs faits et phénomènes liés, en particulier : les langages naturels et formels, la question de l’interface à la création, l’intelligence artificielle, et les notions de mémoire et de sens. Ces approches mises ensemble constitueront l’étude des aspects des systèmes d’interactivité.

    Le vaste sujet de l’interactivité musicale est incrusté dans l’histoire de la musique d’ordinateur, une histoire qui date déjà d’un demi-siècle au moins. Par conséquent il sera nécessaire de cerner le cœur du sujet et de parcourir des cercles concentriques ou en spirale, pour gagner des connaissances qui nous permettent de comprendre mieux le phénomène. La procédure est un peu comme quand on observe une étoile avec l’œil nu : si on la regarde tout droit elle disparaît… La rétine est plus sensible à la lumière dans les côtés. Le texte est donc fatalement un collage consistant de plusieurs études d’envergure limitée. Malgré cela, il faut respecter les aspects importants propres au sujet, essayer d’esquiver le superflu et faire le plus possible de liens. La recherche est guidée par trois thématiques. Quelle est la matière, en d’autres termes, les composants et les processus qui constituent le système de proprement dit, utilisé dans la situation de performance musicale ? Deuxièmement, quelle est la relation entre recherche cognitive et outils technologiques à disposition ? Troisièmement, quelles implications est-ce que les technologies ont eues et auront d’autant plus à l’avenir sur la créativité musicale ?

    Depuis plusieurs années, les concepts qui sous-tiennent ce texte ont influencé mon travail de compositeur et performeur. J’ai fait des expériences en la matière au travers d’œuvres employant des dispositifs électroacoustiques de configuration variable : “Beda+” (1995), “Tusalava” (1999), “Leçons pour un apprenti sourd-muet” (1998-9), “gin/gub” (2000), “Manifest”[1] (2000), “Project Time”[2] (2001), “sxfxs” (2001), “Extra Quality” (2001-2), ”D!sturbances 350–500”[3]… Ces morceaux de musique sont nés d'une curiosité pour le fondement théorique de la cognition et le fonctionnement du cerveau humain. En particulier, je me suis consacré à analyser la situation de jeu dans laquelle a lieu un échange d’informations et d’initiatives musicales entre musicien et machine, qui agissent sur un degré équivalent de participation dans un système complexe. J’éprouve que cette situation ludique peut également servir d’outil de recherche ; elle est un peu comme un laboratoire, ou un banc d’essai, pour tester des hypothèses, qu’elles soient des propos limités à la musique, ou bien plus étendues, élargissant vers des terrains inhabituels.

    Étant compositeur, j’ai essayé de rendre l’étude ni trop limitée, ni strictement descriptive. J’ai ressenti le besoin d’analyser des travaux contemporains, ayant des composants scientifiques : les trois projets étudiés sont effectivement en cours de développement. Il s’agissait dans cette étude de capter plutôt leur raison d’être que de montrer leurs formes respectives dans un état finalisé, qui de toute façon n’est pas leur destin. Si la musicologie se contentait de démontrer des structures dans des œuvres de répertoire connues depuis longtemps, ou si elle s’enfermait dans un académisme technocrate développant des modèles n’expliquant que des choses qui sont évidentes pour les musiciens, alors elle souffrirait d’anémie. En proposant une hypothèse, elle doit comporter des aspects prédictifs. Ce serait encore mieux si des modèles développés en support à l’hypothèse étaient facilement accessibles et pouvaient servir au développement de nouveaux outils innovants. Cela est souhaitable, non seulement pour stimuler la production créative, mais également pour aider à mieux comprendre le fonctionnement de la créativité lui-même.

    L’activité musicale, au sens général, pour ceux qui la produisent autant que pour ceux qui l’apprécient, est un exercice essentiellement non-verbal dont le but est l’émergence d'une compréhension de la créativité humaine d’un ordre autre que verbal ou écrit. En étudiant la créativité, et surtout sa formalisation, ne risquerait-on pas de la dénaturer ? Peut-être la créativité ne risque-t-elle pas de s’effondrer dans la recherche ? Que restera-t-il de la création musicale le jour où une machine aura composé une œuvre capable d’émouvoir les auditeurs ignorant tout de son mode de fabrication ? Néanmoins, en suivant l’appel de William Faulkner, “kill your darlings”, espérons transcender la créativité telle qu’on la connaît et aller vers des pays musicaux inouïs.

  • 118.
    Lindborg, PerMagnus
    Nanyang Technological University, Singapore.
    Leçons : an Approach to a System for Machine Learning, Improvisation and Music Performance2003In: Computer Music Modeling and Retreival: International Symposium, CMMR 2003, Springer-Verlag New York, 2003Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper aims at describing an approach to the music performancesituation as a laboratory for investigating interactivity. I would like to present“Leçons pour un apprenti sourd-muet” 1, where the basic idea isthat of two improvisers, a saxophonist and a computer, engaged in a seriesof musical questions and responses. The situation is inspired fromthe Japanese shakuhachi tradition, where imitating the master performeris a prime element in the apprentice’s learning process. Through listeningand imitation, the computer’s responses get closer to that of its master foreach turn. In this sense, the computer’s playing emanates from the saxophonist’sphrases and the interactivity in “Leçons” takes place on thelevel of the composition.

  • 119.
    Lindborg, PerMagnus
    Nanyang Technological University, Singapore.
    Reflections on aspects of music interactivity in performance situations2008In: eContact!, Vol. 10, no 4Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Music interactivity is a sub-field of human-computer interaction studies. Interactive situations have different degree of structural openness and musical “ludicity” or playfulness. Discussing music seems inherently impossible since it is essentially a non-verbal activity. Music can produce an understanding (or at least prepare for an understanding) of creativity that is of an order neither verbal nor written. A human listener might perceive beauty to be of this kind in a particular music. But can machine-generated music be considered creative and if so, wherein lies the creativity? What are the conceptual limits of notions such as instrument, computer and machine? A work of interactive music might be more pertinently described by the processes involved than by one or several instanciations. While humans spontaneously deal with multiple process descriptions (verbal, visual, kinetic…) and are very good at synthesising, the computer is limited to handling processes describable in a formal language such as computer code. But if the code can be considered a score, does it not make a musician out of the computer? As tools for creative stimulus, composers have created musical systems employing artificial intelligence in different forms since the dawn of computer music. A large part of music interactivity research concerns interface design, which involves ergonomics and traditional instrument maker concepts. I will show examples of how I work with interactivity in my compositions, from straight-forward applications as composition tools to more complex artistic work.

  • 120.
    Lindborg, PerMagnus
    Nanyang Technological University, Singapore.
    Singapore Voices: An interactive installation about languages to (re)(dis)cover the intergenerational distance2011In: National Academy of Screen and Sound, ISSN 1833-0538Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Singapore Voices is an interactive installation, integrating sound and image in aseries of touch-sensitive displays. Each display shows the portrait of an elderly person,standing with the hand turned outwards, as if saying: “I built this nation”. Two displayscan be seen in Figure 1 below. When the visitor touches the hand or shoulder, they heara recording of the speaker’s voice. Chances are that the visitor will not be able tounderstand the language spoken, but she or he will indeed grasp much of all that is, in amanner of speaking, “outside” of the words - elements of prosody such as phrasing andspeech rhythm, but also voice colour that may hint at the emotional state of the person.Then there is coughing, laughing, a hand clap and so forth. Such paralingual elements ofvocal communication are extremely important and furthermore, their meaning is quite universal.

  • 121.
    Lindborg, PerMagnus
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Music Acoustics. Nanyang Technological University, Singapore.
    Sound perception and design in multimodal environments2015Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This dissertation is about sound in context. Since sensory processing is inherently multimodal, research in sound is necessarily multidisciplinary. The present work has been guided by principles of systematicity, ecological validity, complementarity of  methods, and integration of science and art. The main tools to investigate the mediating relationship of people and environment through sound have been empiricism and psychophysics. Four of the seven included papers focus on perception. In paper A, urban soundscapes were reproduced in a 3D installation. Analysis of results from an experiment revealed correlations between acoustic features and physiological indicators of stress and relaxation. Paper B evaluated soundscapes of different type. Perceived quality was predicted not only by psychoacoustic descriptors but also personality traits. Sound reproduction quality was manipulated in paper D, causing two effects on source localisation which were explained by spatial and semantic crossmodal correspondences. Crossmodal correspondence was central in paper C, a study of colour association with music. A response interface employing CIE Lab colour space, a novelty in music emotion research, was developed. A mixed method approach supported an emotion mediation hypothesis, evidenced in regression models and participant interviews. Three papers focus on design. Field surveys and acoustic measurements were carried out in restaurants. Paper E charted relations between acoustic, physical, and perceptual features, focussing on designable elements and materials. This investigation was pursued in Paper F where a taxonomy of sound sources was developed. Analysis of questionnaire data revealed perceptual and crossmodal effects. Lastly, paper G discussed how crossmodal correspondences facilitated creation of meaning in music by infusing ecologically founded sonification parameters with visual and spatial metaphors. The seven papers constitute an investigation into how sound affects us, and what sound means to us.

  • 122.
    Linger, Oscar
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Designing a User-Centered Music Experience for the Smartwatch2018Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    With a rapid growth in smartwatch and smartwatch audio technologies, there is a lack of knowledge regarding user needs for smartwatch audio experiences and how those needs can be satisfied through user-centered design. Previous smartwatch user behavior studies suggest that audio app usage is not a primary use case for the smartwatch. However, audio applications are increasingly incorporated into smartwatches, which leads to the question of the apps’ purpose, validity, overlooked contexts and use cases. This thesis aims to understand what kind of audio experience(s) a user-centered design process might generate for the smartwatch.

    The design process generated insights from smartwatch users of audio applications, that were used as design guidelines for Context Awareness, Micro-interactions, and Device Ecosystem. The resulting prototype HeartBeats considers Context Awareness with heart rate music recommendations, Micro-interactions with one-handed song skipping and Quickplay music, and Device Ecosystem with speaker access and phone battery support.

  • 123.
    Liu, Hongyi
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Sustainable production development.
    Fang, Tongtong
    KTH.
    Zhou, Tianyu
    KTH.
    Wang, Yuquan
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Sustainable production development.
    Wang, Lihui
    Deep Learning-based Multimodal Control Interface for Human-Robot Collaboration2018In: 51st CIRP Conference on Manufacturing Systems, Elsevier, 2018, Vol. 72, p. 3-8Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In human-robot collaborative manufacturing, industrial robot is required to dynamically change its pre-programmed tasks and collaborate with human operators at the same workstation. However, traditional industrial robot is controlled by pre-programmed control codes, which cannot support the emerging needs of human-robot collaboration. In response to the request, this research explored a deep learning-based multimodal robot control interface for human-robot collaboration. Three methods were integrated into the multimodal interface, including voice recognition, hand motion recognition, and body posture recognition. Deep learning was adopted as the algorithm for classification and recognition. Human-robot collaboration specific datasets were collected to support the deep learning algorithm. The result presented at the end of the paper shows the potential to adopt deep learning in human-robot collaboration systems.

  • 124.
    Lopes, José
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH.
    Lexical Entainment in Spoken Dialog Systems2013Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 125. Lopes, José
    et al.
    Eskenazi, Maxine
    Trancoso, Isabel
    Incorporating ASR information in Spoken Dialog System confidence score2012In: Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics), 10th International Conference on Computational Processing of Portuguese, PROPOR 2012, Springer, 2012, p. 403-408Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The reliability of the confidence score is very important in Spoken Dialog System performance. This paper describes a set of experiments with previously collected off-line data, regarding the set of features that should be used in the computation of the confidence score. Three different regression methods to weight the features were used and the results show that the incorporation of the confidence score given by the speech recognizer improves the confidence measure.

  • 126.
    Lopes, José
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH.
    Trancoso, Isabel
    Abad, Alberto
    A nativeness classifier for TED Talks2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents a nativeness classifier for English. The detector was developed and tested with TED Talks collected from the web, where the major non-native cues are in terms of segmental aspects and prosody. The first experiments were made using only acoustic features, with Gaussian supervectors for training a classifier based on support vector machines. These experiments resulted in an equal error rate of 13.11%. The following experiments based on prosodic features alone did not yield good results. However, a fused system, combining acoustic and prosodic cues, achieved an equal error rate of 10.58%. A small human benchmark was conducted, showing an inter-rater agreement of 0.88. This value is also very close to the agreement value between humans and the best fused system.

  • 127. Lopes, José
    et al.
    Trancoso, Isabel
    Correia, Rui
    Pellegrini, Thomas
    Meinedo, Hugo
    Mamede, Nuno
    Eskenazi, Maxine
    Multimedia learning materials2010Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper describes the integration of multimedia documents in the Portuguese version of REAP, a tutoring system for vocabulary learning. The documents result from the pipeline processing of Broadcast News videos that automatically segments the audio files, transcribes them, adds punctuation and capitalization, and breaks them into stories classified by topics. The integration of these materials in REAP was done in a way that tries to decrease the impact of potential errors of the automatic chain in the learning process.

  • 128.
    Luis, Ivett Flores
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH.
    Bresin, Roberto
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Music Acoustics.
    Influence of expressive music on the perception of short text messages2006In: Proceedings of the 9th International Conference on MusicPerception & Cognition (ICMPC9) / [ed] Baroni, M.; Addessi, A. R.; Caterina, R.; Costa, M., Bologna: Bonomia University Press (abstract) , 2006, p. 739-Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 129.
    Lundström, Anders
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Bogdan, Cristian
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    COPE1 – Incorporating Coping Strategies into the Electric Vehicle Information System2012In: Adjunct Proceedings of the 6th International Conference on Automotive User Interfaces and Interactive Vehicular Applications (AutomotiveUI '12) / [ed] ACM, ACM , 2012, p. 17-19Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sales of Electric vehicles (EVs) are estimated by the industry to increase in the future, as they are an important step towards more energy efficient transportation and to lower CO2 emissions. A problem is that available battery technologies for EVs limit the driving range and might cause range anxiety, and as technology stands now, this problem will be present for many years to come. As a result, it is important to re-design the electric vehicle information system (EVIS) to include tools that could easily help users overcome range anxiety issues. Design of such technology can take advantage of the experience accumulated by drivers who have already coped with this problem for many years. In this paper, we describe a coping strategy observed among some more experienced EV drivers, describe why this strategy is powerful, and demonstrate a first attempt to utilize it in design. 

  • 130.
    Lundström, Anders
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Hellström, Fredrik
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Getting to Know Electric Cars Through an App2015In: Proceedings of the 7th International Conference on Automotive User Interfaces and Interactive Vehicular Applications, ACM Digital Library, 2015, p. 289-296Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Electric cars are a promising alternative to combustion engine cars to lower emissions and fossil fuel dependencies. However, many are skeptical to this unfamiliar technology and the limited driving range of these vehicles. Therefore, people disregard this option without properly knowing if it is a good practical alternative. This is unfortunate, as electric cars according to studies should cover most people’s needs. In this paper, we will share our results from a real-world study where 8 participants used an app designed to simulate the battery of electric cars using a regular combustion engine car. In this way it is intended to let people assess their real needs in their real context. Our results show that this might be an effective tool to overcome psychological barriers associated with electric cars, as they do not only assess electric cars and infrastructure, but also their own needs and habits. We also suggest a shift from a kWh and bar perspective to a percentage-perspective as our users easily could work with percentage to figure out the driving range and plan ahead. Our study also elevated a number of uncertainties causing unnecessary worries among our participants.

  • 131. Malisz, Zofia
    et al.
    Włodarczak, Marcin
    Buschmeier, Hendrik
    Kopp, Stefan
    Wagner, Petra
    Prosodic characteristics of feedback expressions in distracted and non-distracted listeners2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In a previous study (Buschmeier et al., INTERSPEECH-2011) we investigated properties of communicative feedback produced by attentive and non-attentive listeners in dialogue. Distracted listeners were found to produce less feedback communicating understanding. Here, we assess the role of prosody in differentiating between feedback functions. We find significant differences across all studied prosodic dimensions as well as influences of lexical form and phonetic structure on feedback function categorisation. We also show that differences in prosodic features between attentiveness states exist, e.g., in overall intensity.

  • 132. Mancini, Maurizio
    et al.
    Pelachaud, Catherine
    Bresin, Roberto
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Music Acoustics.
    Greta Listening to Expressive Music2005In: / [ed] Ruttkay, Z., 2005Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The synthetic head Greta reacts with emotional facial expressions to music, based on studies on the expressivity of music performance.

  • 133. Marujo, Luís
    et al.
    Lopes, José
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH.
    Mamede, Nuno
    Trancoso, Isabel
    Pino, Juan
    Eskenazi, Maxine
    Baptista, Jorge
    Viana, Céu
    Porting REAP to European Portuguese2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 134. Michie, L.
    et al.
    Balaam, Madeline
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    McCarthy, J.
    Osadchiy, T.
    Morrissey, K.
    From her story, to our story: Digital storytelling as public engagement around abortion rights advocacy in Ireland2018In: CHI '18 Proceedings of the 2018 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2018, Vol. 2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite the divisive nature of abortion within the Republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland, where access to safe, legal abortion is severely restricted, effecting legislative reform demands widespread public support. In light of a building pro-choice counter-voice, this work contributes to a growing body of HCI research that takes an activist approach to design. We report findings from four design workshops with 31 pro-choice stakeholders across Ireland in which we positioned an exploratory protosite, HerStoryTold, to engender critical conversations around the use of sensitive abortion narratives as a tool for engagement. Our analysis shows how digital storytelling can help reject false narratives and raise awareness of the realities of abortion laws. It suggests design directions to curate narratives that provoke empathy, foster polyvocality, and ultimately expand the engaged community. Furthermore, this research calls for designers to actively support community mobilization through providing 'stepping stones' to activism.

  • 135.
    Moll, Jonas
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Sallnäs Pysander, Eva-Lotta
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    A haptic tool for group work on geometrical concepts engaging blind and sighted pupils2013In: ACM Transactions on Accessible Computing, ISSN 1936-7228, Vol. 4, no 4Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    General Terms: Design, Experimentation, Human Factors In the study presented here, two haptic and visual applications for learning geometrical concepts in group work in primary school have been designed and evaluated. The aim was to support collaborative learning among sighted and visually impaired pupils. The first application is a static flattened 3D environment that supports learning to distinguish between angles by means of a 3D haptic device providing touch feedback. The second application is a dynamic 3D environment that supports learning of spatial geometry. The scene is a room with a box containing geometrical objects, which pupils can pick up and move around. The applications were evaluated in four schools with groups of two sighted and one visually impaired pupil. The results showed the support for the visually impaired pupil and for the collaboration to be satisfying. A shared understanding of the workspace could be achieved, as long as the virtual environment did not contain movable objects. Verbal communication was crucial for the work process but haptic guiding to some extent substituted communication about direction. When it comes to joint action between visually impaired and sighted pupils a number of interesting problems were identified when the dynamic and static virtual environments were compared. These problems require further investigation. The study extends prior work in the areas of assistive technology and multimodal communication by evaluating functions for joint haptic manipulation in the unique setting of group work in primary school.

  • 136.
    Nilsson, David
    et al.
    Nepa, Stockholm.
    Sahlgren, Magnus
    Gavagai, Stockholm.
    Karlgren, Jussi
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Theoretical Computer Science, TCS.
    Dead Man Tweeting2016In: RE-WOCHAT Workshop on Collecting and Generating Resources for Chatbots and Conversational Agents: Development and Evaluation, 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents a prototype — Dead Man Tweeting — of a system that learns semantic avatars from (dead) people’s texts, and makes the avatars come alive on Twitter. The system includes a language model for generating sequences of words, a topic model for ensuring that the sequences are topically coherent, and a semantic model that ensures the avatars can be productive and generate novel sequences. The avatars are connected to Twitter and are triggered by keywords that are significant for each particular avatar. 

  • 137.
    Nilsson, Susanna
    et al.
    Swedish Defence Research Agency.
    Brynielsson, Joel
    Swedish Defence Research Agency.
    Granåsen, Magdalena
    Swedish Defence Research Agency.
    Hellgren, Charlotte
    Swedish Defence Research Agency.
    Lindquist, Sinna
    Swedish Defence Research Agency.
    Lundin, Mikael
    Swedish Defence Research Agency.
    Narganes Quijano, Maribel
    Tecnalia Research and Innovation.
    Trnka, Jiri
    Swedish Defence Research Agency.
    Making use of New Media for pan-European Crisis Communication2012In: Proceedings of the Ninth International Conference on Information Systems for Crisis Response and Management (ISCRAM 2012), ISCRAM , 2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Social or new media have over the past years become an integrated part of human communication, both as a means to establish and maintain social relationships, but also as a means of sharing and co-creating information. New media comes with an array of possibilities for individuals as well as organisations, corporations and authorities. Within the field of crisis communication new media possibilities, such as online sharing and social networking, has had an impact on the way crisis information is disseminated and updated. This paper addresses the issues related to using new media as a means of communicating crisis information and broadcasting alerting messages to the general population, and also discusses the role of new media in future pan-European alerting. It focuses on current and on-going research on social media for crisis communication. An extensive systematic literature review was done to identify factors that affect the use of social media for alerting and warning. These factors were mirrored in experiences, collected through interviews, in crisis communication organisations in three European regions (Sweden, Czech Republic and Spain). The factors finally form the basis for suggestions regarding the design of technological tools for both communication and information collection as part of a pan-European alerting system.

  • 138.
    Noé, Estelle
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    3D layered articulated object from a single 2D drawing2017Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Modeling articulated objects made of rigid layered parts used to populate 3D scenes in video games or movie production is a complex and time-consuming task for digital artists. This work proposes a sketch-based approach to efficiently model 3D layered articulated objects, such as animals with rigid shells and armors, in annotating a single 2D photo manually, and eventually fabricate it from automatically computed 2D patterns. In considering symmetrical objects seen under a 3/4 view, and an- notating salient features such as extremities of the rigid articulated parts as a mix of circular and Bézier curve, this approach is able to retrieve depth information, hidden parts, and rotation-articulated structure. The resulting shape consists of a set of quadrangulated polygons that may be flattened in 2D. Details such as ears, tails, and legs were further models using dedicated annotations. The accuracy of the reconstruction has been validated on synthetic cylindrical examples, and its ro- bustness in reconstructing a 3D model of armor, armadillo, and shrimp. The latter was finally fabricated using paper. 

  • 139.
    Oertel, Catharine
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH.
    Jonell, Patrik
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH.
    Haddad, K. E.
    Szekely, Eva
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH.
    Gustafson, Joakim
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH.
    Using crowd-sourcing for the design of listening agents: Challenges and opportunities2017In: ISIAA 2017 - Proceedings of the 1st ACM SIGCHI International Workshop on Investigating Social Interactions with Artificial Agents, Co-located with ICMI 2017, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2017, p. 37-38Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we are describing how audio-visual corpora recordings using crowd-sourcing techniques can be used for the audio-visual synthesis of attitudinal non-verbal feedback expressions for virtual agents. We are discussing the limitations of this approach as well as where we see the opportunities for this technology.

  • 140.
    Palmberg, Robin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, System Analysis and Economics.
    Gidofalvi, Gyözö
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Geoinformatics.
    Susilo, Yusak
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Transport Studies, CTS. KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Traffic Research, CTR. KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, System Analysis and Economics.
    Enabling Technologies to Serve the Ageing Urban Society Better (ENTRUST)2018Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The life span of the inhabitants of Sweden is increasing and with this comes age related cognitive diseases such as those related to dementia. Our society is not prepared to accommodate for the needs of the people who are affected by this.

    The diseases related to dementia often affect the person’s ability to localize themselves and to remember previous and upcoming events. A common issue that occurs is a state called “elopement”.

  • 141.
    Palmberg, Robin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, System Analysis and Economics.
    Susilo, Yusak
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Transport Studies, CTS. KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Traffic Research, CTR. KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, System Analysis and Economics.
    Gidofalvi, Gyözö
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Geoinformatics.
    Developing and trialling an implicit interaction platform to monitor and aiding dementia travellers2019Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Age related cognitive diseases are becoming a growing problem in Sweden. With the fast ageing population and lowered mortality rate comes the spread of cognitive diseases related to dementia. In order to accommodate this growing target group in transport and the built environment, it is important to understand the mobility and travel behaviour of patients suffering from these diseases. One subset of this target group is travellers suffering from age induced illnesses related with dementia, which most often have fluctuating symptoms that are affecting the cognitive skills of the traveller. This makes it hard to use standardized forms and survey-based information that would require the traveller to actively respond retroactively, either in oral or written form, since the traveller might have forgotten or mixed up their past experiences, among other things, it becomes very hard to gain confidence in the results as it might be hard to tell in which condition the patient is during the collection.

    We propose an automated collection of biometric data such as heart rate in combination with position. Since the validity of the information collected in this manner is directly related to the quality of the sensors used it means that the precision and accuracy of the results could be virtually endlessly improved by upgrading the hardware and optimizing the software. To take a first step towards a solution like this we have started developing a smart watch application which is utilizing PPG technology to collect heart rate and combine it with positions collected through GPS technology.

    Early testing has shown the possibility to correlate the heart rate of a traveller to their specific location. The implications of this must be validated through data labelling as we wish to utilize machine learning algorithms to analyse the data collected.

  • 142.
    Palmberg, Robin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, System Analysis and Economics. KTH Royal Institute of Technology.
    Susilo, Yusak
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, System Analysis and Economics. KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Transport Studies, CTS. KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Traffic Research, CTR.
    Gidofalvi, Gyözö
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Geoinformatics.
    Uncovering Effects of Spatial and Transportation Elements on Travellers Using Biometric Data2019In: TOWARDS HUMAN SCALE CITIES - OPEN AND HAPPY / [ed] Tuuli Toivonen, Karst Geurs, Elias Willberg, Helsinki: Department of Geosciences and Geography, University of Helsinki , 2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Travel surveys has been used for decades to observe the patterns, locations, and choices, which travellers chose and do during the given observed period. This information can be utilized as background for informed planning decisions. Despite the progress in the travel survey technologies, the applications mostly focus on more traditional travel parameters. With programmable smart watches now, we can also collect real time data that is not solely pertaining to position and travel mode choices, but also to users’ biometric data. Such an application would open another level of possibilities in dynamically integrating land use and transport planning with public health research.

    Utilising a smart watch platform, we are aiming to develop a tool that will collect biometric data, in combination with spatial context, such as position, spatial features and objects in the built environment, and by utilizing machine learning algorithms, try to detect how travellers are affected by their choice of transport mode, the built environment in general as well as how the public transport is operated.

    Early testing reveals the possibility to find correlations between heart rate and position, which in turn could reveal the effect of spatial and transportation elements on the traveller. By targeting widely available hardware, the scalability for this tool is virtually endless, making it possible to collect large amounts of data and utilizing machine learning algorithms to analyse it.

  • 143.
    Palmér, Matthias
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media technology and interaction design, MID.
    Learning Applications based on Semantic Web Technologies2012Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The interplay between learning and technology is a growing field that is often referred to as Technology Enhanced Learning (TEL). Within this context, learning applications are software components that are useful for learning purposes, such as textbook replacements, information gathering tools, communication and collaboration tools, knowledge modeling tools, rich lab environments that allows experiments etc. When developing learning applications, the choice of technology depends on many factors. For instance, who and how many the intended end-users are, if there are requirements to support in-application collaboration, platform restrictions, the expertise of the developers, requirements to inter-operate with other systems or applications etc.

    This thesis provides guidance on a how to develop learning applications based on Semantic Web technology. The focus on Semantic Web technology is due to its basic design that allows expression of knowledge at the web scale. It also allows keeping track of who said what, providing subjective expressions in parallel with more authoritative knowledge sources. The intended readers of this thesis include practitioners such as software architects and developers as well as researchers in TEL and other related fields.

    The empirical part of the this thesis is the experience from the design and development of two learning applications and two supporting frameworks. The first learning application is the web application Confolio/EntryScape which allows users to collect files and online material into personal and shared portfolios. The second learning application is the desktop application Conzilla, which provides a way to create and navigate a landscape of interconnected concepts. Based upon the experience of design and development as well as on more theoretical considerations outlined in this thesis, three major obstacles have been identified:

    The first obstacle is: lack of non-expert and user friendly solutions for presenting and editing Semantic Web data that is not hard-coded to use a specific vocabulary. The thesis presents five categories of tools that support editing and presentation of RDF. The thesis also discusses a concrete software solution together with a list of the most important features that have crystallized during six major iterations of development.

    The second obstacle is: lack of solutions that can handle both private and collaborative management of resources together with related Semantic Web data. The thesis presents five requirements for a reusable read/write RDF framework and a concrete software solution that fulfills these requirements. A list of features that have appeared during four major iterations of development is also presented.

    The third obstacle is: lack of recommendations for how to build learning applications based on Semantic Web technology. The thesis presents seven recommendations in terms of architectures, technologies, frameworks, and type of application to focus on.

    In addition, as part of the preparatory work to overcome the three obstacles, the thesis also presents a categorization of applications and a derivation of the relations between standards, technologies and application types.

  • 144.
    Paloranta, Jimmie
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Lundström, Anders
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Elblaus, Ludvig
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Bresin, Roberto
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Frid, Emma
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Interaction with a large sized augmented string instrument intended for a public setting2016In: Sound and Music Computing 2016 / [ed] Großmann, Rolf and Hajdu, Georg, Hamburg: Zentrum für Mikrotonale Musik und Multimediale Komposition (ZM4) , 2016, p. 388-395Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we present a study of the interaction with a large sized string instrument intended for a large installation in a museum, with focus on encouraging creativity,learning, and providing engaging user experiences. In the study, nine participants were video recorded while interacting with the string on their own, followed by an interview focusing on their experiences, creativity, and the functionality of the string. In line with previous research, our results highlight the importance of designing for different levels of engagement (exploration, experimentation, challenge). However, results additionally show that these levels need to consider the users age and musical background as these profoundly affect the way the user plays with and experiences the string.

  • 145.
    Panariello, Claudio
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Sköld, Sköld
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. KMH Royal College of Music.
    Frid, Emma
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Bresin, Roberto
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    From vocal sketching to sound models by means of a sound-based musical transcription system2019In: Proceedings of the 16th Sound and Music Computing Conference, Malaga, Spain, 2019, p. 1-7, article id S2.5Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper explores how notation developed for the representation of sound-based musical structures could be used for the transcription of vocal sketches representing expressive robot movements. A mime actor initially produced expressive movements which were translated to a humanoid robot. The same actor was then asked to illustrate these movements using vocal sketching. The vocal sketches were transcribed by two composers using sound-based notation. The same composers later synthesized new sonic sketches from the annotated data. Different transcriptions and synthesized versions of these were compared in order to investigate how the audible outcome changes for different transcriptions and synthesis routines. This method provides a palette of sound models suitable for the sonification of expressive body movements.

  • 146.
    Pang, Xiaodan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Communication Systems, CoS, Optical Network Laboratory (ON Lab).
    Van Kerrebrouck, J.
    Belgium.
    Ozolins, O.
    Sweden.
    Lin, Rui
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Communication Systems, CoS, Optical Network Laboratory (ON Lab).
    Udalcovs, A.
    Sweden.
    Zhang, Lu
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Communication Systems, CoS, Optical Network Laboratory (ON Lab).
    Spiga, S.
    Germany.
    Amann, M. C.
    Germany.
    Van Steenberge, G.
    Belgium.
    Gan, L.
    China.
    Tang, M.
    China.
    Fu, S.
    China.
    Schatz, Richard
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Photonics.
    Jacobsen, G.
    Sweden.
    Popov, Sergei
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Photonics.
    Liu, D.
    China.
    Tong, W.
    China.
    Torfs, G.
    Belgium.
    Bauwelinck, J.
    Belgium.
    Yin, X.
    Belgium.
    Chen, Jiajia
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Communication Systems, CoS, Optical Network Laboratory (ON Lab).
    High-speed SDM interconnects with directly-modulated 1.5-μm VCSEL enabled by low-complexity signal processing techniques2018In: Optics InfoBase Conference Papers, OSA - The Optical Society , 2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We report on our recent work in supporting up to 100 Gbps/λ/core transmissions with a directly modulated 1.5-μm single mode VCSEL and multicore fiber, enabled by low-compleixty pre- and post- digital equalizations.

  • 147.
    Pauletto, Sandra
    Department of Theatre, Film and Television, University of York, United Kingdom.
    Film and theatre-based approaches for sonic interaction design2014In: Digital Creativity, ISSN 1462-6268, E-ISSN 1744-3806, Vol. 25, no 1, p. 15-26Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sonic interaction design studies how digital sound can be used in interactive contexts to convey information, meaning, aesthetic and emotional qualities. This area of research is positioned at the intersection of sound and music computing, auditory displays and interaction design. The key issue the designer is asked to tackle is to create meaningful sound for objects and interactions that are often new. To date, there are no set design methodologies, but a variety of approaches available to the designer. Knowledge and understandingofhow humans listen and interpret sound is the first step toward being able to create such sounds.This article discusses two original approaches that borrow techniques from film sound and theatre. Cinematic sound highlights how our interpretation of sounddependson listening modes and context, while theatre settings allow us to explore sonic interactions from the different perspectives of the interacting subject, the observer and the designer.

  • 148. Pauletto, Sandra
    et al.
    Cambridge, HowardSusini, Patrick
    Data sonification and sound design in interactive systems2015Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 149.
    Pauletto, Sandra
    et al.
    The University of Huddersfield, Queensgate; The University of York, Heslington, York.
    Hunt, Andy
    Interacting with sonifications: An evaluation2007In: Proceedings of the 13th International Conference on Auditory Display, Montréal, Canada, June 26-29, 2007, 2007Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 150.
    Pauletto, Sandra
    et al.
    Department of Theatre, Film and Television, The University of York, Heslington, York, YO10 5DQ, United Kingdom.
    Hunt, Andy
    Interactive sonification of complex data2009In: International journal of human-computer studies, ISSN 1071-5819, E-ISSN 1095-9300, Vol. 67, no 11, p. 923-933Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we present two experiments on implementing interaction in sonification displays: the first focuses on recorded data (interactive navigation) and the second on data gathered in real time (auditory feedback). Complex synthesised data are explored in the first experiment to evaluate how well the known characteristics present in the data are distinguished using different interaction methods, while real medical data (from physiotherapy) are used for the second. The addition of interaction to the exploration of sonified recorded data improves the system usability (efficiency, effectiveness and user satisfaction), and the real-time sonification of complex physiotherapy data can produce sounds with timbral characteristics that audibly change when important characteristics present in the data vary.

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