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  • 101.
    Fontan, Angela
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Intelligent systems, Decision and Control Systems (Automatic Control).
    Cvetkovic, Vladimir
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Resources, Energy and Infrastructure.
    Johansson, Karl H.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Intelligent systems, Decision and Control Systems (Automatic Control).
    On behavioral changes towards sustainability for connected individuals: a dynamic decision-making approach2022In: IFAC: PapersOnLine, Elsevier BV , 2022, Vol. 55, no 41, p. 20-25Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the context of sustainable lifestyle it has been observed that, while expressing eco-positive attitudes, individuals often do not act accordingly in their habitual behavior. This gap, termed the "value-action" gap, has been explained in terms of desire to seek social approval or as a consequence of the presence of overriding conflicting goals, associated for instance with material costs. In this work, we study a two-scale networked model for dynamic decision-making in which interacting agents are able to exchange opinions and discuss the different reasons they produce their choices and, in addition, are able to observe the actions of their neighbors in the network and adjust their preferences. Coupling on the two scales leads to a reduced value-action gap, and ultimately to a consensus. A numerical example illustrates the effect that tradeoffs between goals and social pressure have on the behavior of the group.

  • 102.
    Forstorp, Per-Anders
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Human - Computer Interaction, MDI.
    Quantifying automobility: speed, 'Zero Tolerance' and democracy2006In: Against Automobility / [ed] Bohm, S; Jones, C; Land, C; Paterson, M, 2006, p. 93-112Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 103.
    Forstorp, Per-Anders
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Human - Computer Interaction, MDI.
    Science, social theory and public knowledge2005In: Acta Sociologica, ISSN 0001-6993, E-ISSN 1502-3869, Vol. 48, no 3, p. 272-273Article, book review (Refereed)
  • 104.
    Grange, Kristina
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Mellan skrå och profession: Om de svenska arkitekt- och ingenjörsutbildningarnas framväxt och hur ett dominerande kunskapsideal har tagit form2010In: FORMakademisk, E-ISSN 1890-9515, Vol. 3, no 2, p. 26-38Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    I denna artikel kommer utvecklingen från skråväsendets upplösning till de moderna arkitekt- och ingenjörsprofessionernas framväxt i slutet av 1800-talet att tecknas. I fokus för den i huvudsak empiriska framställningen står utvecklingen av det utbildningssystem som än i dag i hög grad bildar utgångspunkt för arkitekters och ingenjörers professionella identiteter. En teoretisk utgångspunkt hämtas från Foucault och föreställningen att makt och vetande förutsätter varandra. Med ett brett angreppssätt identifieras sedan ett antal yttre händelser som har bidragit till att producera ett tekniskt-vetenskapligt kunskapsideal. Detta kunskapsideal finns institutionaliserat i dagens utbildningssystem och fortsätter därigenom att produ-cera fältet av möjliga handlingar för arkitekter i dag.

  • 105. Grönvall, E.
    et al.
    Lundberg, Stefan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Ergonomics.
    PYCIPEDIA: Supporting local and remote collaboration between social workers2019In: Proceedings of the ACM Conference on Computer Supported Cooperative Work, CSCW, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM) , 2019, p. 195-199Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PYCIPEDIA is a web-based collaborative tool for social workers that support parents with intellectual disabilities taking care of their small children. These particular social workers have been certified in providing parenting-skills training and support for parents with intellectual disabilities or with learning difficulties. As only a relatively small number of social workers are certified in providing the relevant support, there may be few colleagues to discuss with and learn from, even in larger municipalities with many social workers. To support social workers in providing the best possible support, the web-based collaborative tool PYCIPEDIA has been co-designed with social workers from two Swedish municipalities. The tool allows social workers to log in, and independent from what municipality they work in, create, browse, edit and share material (e.g. text, images and video) that can support the parents. They can discuss cases, rate online material, and access a forum.

  • 106.
    Gudjonsdottir, Rosa
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Human - Computer Interaction, MDI.
    Personas and Scenarios in Use2010Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Personas are fictitious characters that represent the needs of the intended users, and scenarios complementing the personas describe how their needs can be met. The present doctoral thesis considers the usage of personas and scenarios and how they are used in system development projects. The study is motivated by the relative lack of empirical data on the persona method in actual use.

    The study was carried out in the context of a large international research project called Nepomuk and involved two conceptually dif­ferent field studies. On the one hand, field studies in user settings were conducted, which aimed at creating personas and scenarios, and for which a user-centered design approach was applied using partici­pant observation, contextual interviews, video brainstorming and proto­typing. On the other hand, a field study in the setting of the Nepomuk project itself was conducted, which aimed at observing how the per­sonas and scenarios were received and used in the project work. The work conducted in the project setting was a multi-sited ethnographic field study, which was documented through ethnographic writing.

    The project setting field study showed that the persona method was difficult to put into consistent use, and the support of persona advocates guiding usage would have been helpful. The method was used without much effort to communicate about the needs and desires of the intended users, but was less successful in compelling project members to use personas and scenarios during various design activities. The field study also revealed alternative usages of the method that can be supported and utilized.

    The contributions of the thesis include an account of the effect the storytelling aspect has on the creation as well as usage of personas and scenarios. Also, the essential elements of constructing personas and scenarios are discussed as well as the prerequisites for making personas and scenarios support the design process in system development projects. Lastly, the thesis describes how personas and scenarios can support the communication of user needs and desires to project members and stakeholders as well as support design activities in system development projects.

    Download full text (pdf)
    Dissertation_RosaGudjonsdottir
  • 107.
    Gullberg, Anders
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Det fängslande planeringstänkandet: och sökandet efter en verklighetsutväg1986 (ed. andra)Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this thesis I intended to deal with the problem: “what is plan­ning?” I especially planned to analyze the obvious, but in planning theory never the less foreseen fact that things (plans, projects) never become what they were intended to be. But, and in accordance with this, I found myself paying much more attention to another problem: “how to catch the effects of plans and reforms?”

    In my analysis of planning theory and planning thought I have tried to demonstrate 1. the aprioristic/rationalistic basis for this mode of thinking; 2. that it deals with problems central to the human fate; and 3. that it is unavoidable in a world modernized in a western way.

    The search for a point outside this mode of thinking led me to scrutinize the possibilities of answering the empirical question: “what difference does planning make?” Two prob­lems are identified: 1. separating the effects of a certain plan­ning activity from the influ­ences of all other circum­stances; and 2. avoiding destruction of the knowledge-producing process by interested parts. The distinction between causality and correlation is crucial for the first problem. Methods such as experiment, quasi-experiment and ”natural” experi­ment are found to be of limited capacity in this respect and the regularity theory of causality does not solve the problem. The counter factual approach to causality is shown to be dependent on that of regularity. A program called transcendental realism (Bhaskar) I found much more promising in evaluation tasks, but many problems remain. Still more problematic is the second question which I don’t even attempt to answer.

    Scientific thinking belongs to the same rationalistic tradition as planning thought. I therefore doubt if there can be any such thing as scientific liberation of planning idiosyncrasies. But I discern, nevertheless, some emancipating potential in the quest for truth.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 108.
    Gulliksen, Jan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Junqueira Barbosa, Simone Diniz
    Joshi, Anirudha
    Lawson, Shaun
    Palanque, Philippe
    Role of Conferences in Shaping the Field of HCI2015In: HUMAN-COMPUTER INTERACTION - INTERACT 2015, PT IV, Springer Berlin/Heidelberg, 2015, p. 637-639Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The panel will discuss the role various conferences have played in developing the field of HCI in academic research and industrial practice. It is composed of people who have experience in organising HCI conferences in different parts of the world. It provides a platform to the participants to think and reflect about what they are doing when attending a conference, what their expectations are and how it impacts positively their knowledge, work and career.

  • 109.
    Haas, Tigran
    KTH, Superseded Departments (pre-2005), Infrastructure.
    Ethnic Conflict and the Right to Return of Limbo Disaporas: Multifaceted Reflections on the Case of BiH2004In: Migration and Ethnic Studies (Migracijske i Etničke Teme), ISSN 1333-2546, Vol. 20, no 1, p. 29-51Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper examines the phenomenon of refugees and resettled persons in the process of forcedmigrations in the aftermath of man-made disasters. Although some of the ideas presented here couldhave wider application, the focus is on post-conflict zones within the former Yugoslavia, namely BiH.The paper uses the questions of ethnicity and nationalism within resettlement, dislocation and immigrationas a backdrop, into which the issue of globalization is also briefly reflected. The intention hereis not to cover a wide range of pressing topics, but simply to relate a number of issues arising in contemporarylarge-scale forced migrations to a resurgence of cultural specificity and ethnicized nationalismas counterpoints to globalization. The paper introduces the concept of “limbo diasporas” in the caseof Bosnian refugees in Sweden through reflection and linkage with the aforementioned concepts. Thepaper ends with some recommendations and open questions on social rehabilitation and ethnic healingas well as some general conclusions.

  • 110.
    Haas, Tigran
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    New Urbanism and Beyond: Designing Cities for the Future2008 (ed. 1)Book (Refereed)
  • 111.
    Haas, Tigran
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    The Best of New Urbanism: Selected Articles & Essays 2002-2012: Celebrating the 20th Anniversary of Congress for New Urbanism2012Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This unique book brings together, for the first time ever, a collection of probably the best papers & essays written on the international phenomena known as new urbanism. The range of articles spans different tenets of the movement, its theories and principles, methods & tools, contributions & critique and much more. The authors originate from variety of disciplines such as, sociology, public policy, human geography, economics, urban planning, urban design, architecture, real estate development and urban studies. It is a unique and timely collection of new and older works, freshly complied for the 20th anniversary of congress of new urbanism and the new urbanism movement. This volume is a limited release printed only for academia, faculty and students

  • 112.
    Haas, Tigran
    et al.
    KTH, Superseded Departments (pre-2005), Infrastructure.
    Roberts, Andrew
    Hifab International AB.
    Opportunities for Sustaining Human Settlements in a Post-Conflict War Zone: The Case of Bosnia and Herzegovina1999In: Open House International, ISSN 0168-2601, Vol. 24, no 1, p. 54-65Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 113.
    Hagbert, Pernilla
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Thörn, Håkan (Editor)
    Gothenburg University.
    Wasshede, Cathrin (Editor)
    Gothenburg University.
    Contemporary Co-housing in Europe: Towards Sustainable Cities?2020Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This book investigates co-housing as an alternative housing form in relation to sustainable urban development. Co-housing is often lauded as a more sustainable way of living. The primary aim of this book is to critically explore co-housing in the context of wider social, economic, political and environmental developments. This volume fills a gap in the literature by contextualising co-housing and related housing forms. With focus on Denmark, Sweden, Hamburg and Barcelona, the book presents general analyses of co-housing in these contexts and provides specific discussions of co-housing in relation to local government, urban activism, family life, spatial logics and socio-ecology. This book will be of interest to students and researchers in a broad range of social-scientific fields concerned with housing, urban development and sustainability, as well as to planners, decision-makers and activists.

  • 114.
    Hall, Daniel
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial marketing.
    Pitt, L.
    Wallström, A.
    The secrets of secret societies: The case of wine2015In: Business Horizons, ISSN 0007-6813, E-ISSN 1873-6068, Vol. 58, no 6, p. 651-658Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Secret societies have intrigued humanity since earliest times. In this article we explore secret societies in the context of wine and how these institutions might be insightful in formulating marketing strategies. We contrast the characteristics of secret societies with those of existing secret wine societies such as The Wine Society and La Confrérie. Yet while some of these functions and characteristics transfer well, many ’secret’ wine societies aren’t actually that secret. Some of the characteristics of secret societies are also found in consumer brand communities. Armed with this knowledge, wine marketers can exploit the characteristics of secret societies to target market segments with precision and to gain the benefits of focused distribution opportunities.

  • 115. Hallonsten, Olof
    A classic laboratory study in science policy clothing2011In: Science and Public Policy, ISSN 0302-3427, E-ISSN 1471-5430, Vol. 38, no 1, p. 79-80Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 116.
    Hallonsten, Olof
    Department of Business Administration, Lund University, Lund, Sweden .
    Big science transformed: Science, politics and organization in Europe and the United States2016Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This book analyses the emergence of a transformed Big Science in Europe and the United States, using both historical and sociological perspectives. It shows how technology-intensive natural sciences grew to a prominent position in Western societies during the post-World War II era, and how their development cohered with both technological and social developments. At the helm of post-war science are large-scale projects, primarily in physics, which receive substantial funds from the public purse. Big Science Transformed shows how these projects, popularly called ‘Big Science’, have become symbols of progress. It analyses changes to the political and sociological frameworks surrounding publicly-funding science, and their impact on a number of new accelerator and reactor-based facilities that have come to prominence in materials science and the life sciences. Interdisciplinary in scope, this book will be of great interest to historians, sociologists and philosophers of science.

  • 117.
    Hallonsten, Olof
    University of Gothenburg.
    How scientists may ‘benefit from the mess’: A resource dependence perspective on individual organizing in contemporary science2014In: Social Science Information, ISSN 0539-0184, E-ISSN 1461-7412, Vol. 53, no 3, p. 341-362Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is general consensus in the study of science, and especially research policy studies, that a wave of profound change has struck academic science in the past decades. Central parts of this change are increased competition, growing demands of relevance and excellence, and managerialism reforms in institutions and policy systems. The underpinning thesis of this article is that, if seen from the perspective of individual scientists, these changes are exogenous and lead to greater environmental complexity and uncertainty, which in turn induces or forces individuals towards strategic planning and organizing in order to maintain control over their own research programs. Recent empirical studies have made various worthy contributions to the understanding of the macro-level (institutions, policy and funding systems, and broader epistemic developments) and the micro-level (individual and group behavior) developments of the social system of science, but there is a lack of comprehensive conceptual tools for analysis of change and its effect on individual scientists. This article takes the first steps towards developing a conceptual scheme for use in empirical studies of the (strategic) response of individual scientists to exogenous change, based on an adaptation of Resource Dependence Theory (RDT). The intended theoretical contribution builds on conceptualization of the individual researcher as crucially able to act rationally and strategically in the face of potentially conflicting demands from a growingly unpredictable environment. Defining a basic framework for a broad future research program, the article   adds to the knowledge about the recent changes to the academic research system and calls for renewed interest in organizing in science and an analysis of the complex social system of science from the perspective of its smallest performing units: individuals.

  • 118.
    Hallonsten, Olof
    Department of Education and Social Sciences, Wuppertal University, Germany.
    Unpreparedness and risk in Big Science policy: Sweden and the European Spallation Source2015In: Science and Public Policy, ISSN 0302-3427, E-ISSN 1471-5430, Vol. 42, p. 415-426Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The politics of European collaborative Big Science are inherently uncertain. The European Spallation Source (ESS) for materials science, planned to be built in Sweden with a collaborative European funding solution that was recently finalized is the most recent example. Sweden has so far invested around one billion SEK (&E110 million), taking a significant risk given these uncertainties and given Sweden’s complete lack of experience in hosting such big labs. Tracing the Swedish government’s investments in the ESS project, this article shows that so far, the Swedish ESS bid seems to be generally well funded, but that a long-term plan for the funding and a contingency plan for increased costs seem to be absent. This adds to the seeming unprepared- ness of Sweden and elevates the already quite high level of risk for Swedish science and science policy of investing in the ESS. 

  • 119.
    Hallonsten, Olof
    et al.
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Heinze, Thomas
    Formation and Expansion of a New Organizational Field in Experimental Science2015In: Science and Public Policy, ISSN 0302-3427, E-ISSN 1471-5430, Vol. 42, no 6, p. 841-854Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper examines the formation and expansion of a new organizational field in experimental science: synchrotron radiation laboratories. These labs were once peripheral servants of some specialisms of solid-state physics, but over the 40 years studied they have grown into a worldwide generic resource for tens of thousands of users in a broad spectrum of disciplines. The paper uses insights primarily from historical institutionalism, but also neo-institutional theory, to analyze the formation and expansion of the organizational field of synchrotron radiation laboratories, and thus contributes to the analysis of the rather dramatic growth of this tool for experimental science from a small-scale lab curiosity to a generic research technology. But the key contribution of the paper is to provide insights into multi-level and multi-dimensional change in science systems by analyzing the emergence and expansion of a new organizational field in experimental science, which has implications not least for science policy.

  • 120.
    Hallonsten, Olof
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Heinze, Thomas
    Bergische Universität Wuppertal.
    From particle physics to photon science: Multi-dimensional and multi-level renewal at DESY and SLAC2013In: Science and Public Policy, ISSN 0302-3427, E-ISSN 1471-5430, Vol. 40, no 5, p. 591-603Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Studies of institutional transformation in science have largely overlooked Big Science installations, despite far-reaching changes to the roles and functions of such large labs in the past decades. Here, we present and analyze two Big Science labs that have undergone profound transformations from single-purpose particle physics labs to multi-purpose centers for so-called photon science: SLAC in the USA and DESY in Germany. We provide brief historic accounts of the labs and an analysis of the processes of change on different levels and from different aspects informed by a theoretical framework of institutional change in science. Thus, we describe the relevance of the study of Big Science labs from the perspective of institutional change and in terms of science policy/management. We also prove the aptness of the framework used and pave the way for a detailed analysis of particular forces of change and their interrelatedness.

  • 121.
    Hallonsten, Olof
    et al.
    Department of Philosophy, Linguistics, and Theory of Science, University of Gothenburg.
    Heinze, Thomas
    Department of Education and Social Sciences, Wuppertal University.
    Institutional persistence through gradual organizational adaptation: Analysis of national laboratories in the USA and Germany2012In: Science and Public Policy, ISSN 0302-3427, E-ISSN 1471-5430, Vol. 39, no 4, p. 450-463Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper discusses the institutional persistence of systems of national laboratories (SNLs) that unlike other public and private research organizations appear to have experienced only minor institutional shifts in recent years. Although national laboratories started as time-limited mission-oriented projects, most of them have remained in operation as continuously renewed multi-purpose organizations. By comparing the SNLs in Germany and the USA, this paper discusses the relationship between the system and the organizational level and concludes that incremental organizational rearrangements have enabled the institutional persistence of SNLs despite considerable changes in their political and funding environments. The paper applies recent advances in institutional theory and thus contributes to a better understanding of institutional change in path-dependent public R&D systems.

  • 122.
    Hallonsten, Olof
    et al.
    Wuppertal Univ, Dept Educ & Social Sci, D-42119 Wuppertal, Germany.
    Hugander, Olof
    Knowledge Fdn, SE-11121 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Supporting ‘future research leaders’ in Sweden: Institutional isomorphism and inadvertent funding agglomeration2014In: Research Evaluation, ISSN 0958-2029, E-ISSN 1471-5449, Vol. 23, no 3, p. 249-260Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The most recent fashion in the policy-level promotion of excellence in academic research seems to be the launching of funding programs directed to young and promising (postdoc level) researchers with the purpose of assisting them in establishing their own research profile at this allegedly crucial and fragile career stage. In the Swedish public research funding system, which is rather diversified and also quite recently has been recast, a number of such programs have been launched in recent years by public and private actors alike, all with the stated ambition of providing funding to those typically in lack of the same. In this article, we discuss the rather striking uniformity of these programs on the basis of the concept of institutional isomorphism from neoinstitutional theory, which is a powerful conceptual tool with capacity to explain why organizations in the same field grow alike in their practices despite preconditions that would suggest otherwise. Analyzing qualitatively the stated purposes of the programs and the discursive shift that accompanies them in policy, and analyzing quantitatively the 130 recipients of funding from the programs, we show that there are agglomeration effects that are unintended but also expectable, given the nature of the funding landscape in Sweden and the institutional isomorphism among the organizations in the field.

  • 123. Hansson, K.
    et al.
    Cars, Göran
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Ekenberg, L.
    Danielson, M.
    The importance of recognition for equal representation in participatory processes: Lessons from Husby2013In: Footprint, ISSN 1875-1504, E-ISSN 1875-1490, no 13, p. 81-98Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite the ambition to involve people on more equal terms, participation often still means that the audience is involved in clearly demarcated parts of the process and attempts to develop more deliberative democratic processes in urban planning often fail due to unequal representation in the participatory process. While sharing the general idea of the value of participatory processes, we will investigate some problematic features involved and suggest how some of these can be remedied. We employ the concept of recognition to analyse the conditions for public participation in a recent case of urban planning in the Stockholm suburb of Husby. This case is particularly interesting as it clearly demonstrates the impact of globalisation on local participatory processes. The results show the importance of broad recognition for equal representation in participatory processes, and the need for a plurality of public spheres to support long-term participation in the development of the common urban space.

  • 124.
    Healey, P.
    et al.
    United Kingdom.
    Cars, Göran
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE).
    Madanipour, A.
    United Kingdom.
    De Magalhães, C.
    United Kingdom.
    Transforming governance, institutionalist analysis and institutional capacity2017In: Urban Governance, Institutional Capacity and Social Milieux, Taylor & Francis, 2017, p. 6-28Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 125. Heidler, Richard
    et al.
    Hallonsten, Olof
    Department of Business Administration, Lund University, Sweden.
    Qualifying the performance evaluation of Big Science beyond productivity, impact and costs2015In: Scientometrics, ISSN 0138-9130, E-ISSN 1588-2861, Vol. 104, no 1, p. 295-312Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The use of quantitative performance measures to evaluate the productivity, impact and quality of research has spread to almost all parts of public R&D systems, including Big Science where traditional measures of technical reliability of instruments and user oversub- scription have been joined by publication counts to assess scientific productivity. But such performance assessment has been shown to lead to absurdities, as the calculated average cost of single journal publications easily may reach hundreds of millions of dollars. In this article, the issue of productivity and impact is therefore further qualified by the use of additional measures such as the immediacy index as well as network analysis to evaluate qualitative aspects of the impact of contemporary Big Science labs. Connecting to previous work within what has been called ‘‘facilitymetrics’’, the article continues the search for relevant biblio- metric measures of the performance of Big Science labs with the use of a case study of a recently opened facility that is advertised as contributing to ‘‘breakthrough’’ research, by using several more measures and thus qualifying the topic of performance evaluation in contem- porary Big Science beyond simple counts of publications, citations, and costs. 

  • 126.
    Hemphälä, Jens
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    An Empirical Test of the Importance of Knowledge Exchange for new Service Development in Swedish Pharmacies.2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 127.
    Hemphälä, Jens
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Feedback and Sustainable Competitive Advantage2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 128.
    Hemphälä, Jens
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    The Influence of Internal Channels of Communication on Incremental and Radical Innovation in Swedish PharmaciesIn: Creativity and Innovation Management, ISSN 0963-1690, E-ISSN 1467-8691Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 129.
    Henriksson, Greger
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms). KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Börjesson Rivera, Miriam
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC. KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Why do we buy and throw away electronics?2014In: ISDRC 2014: Resilience - The New Research Frontier, Trondheim: Paper 6d7 in Electronically published full papers , 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Download full text (pdf)
    Henriksson et al 2014 Why electronics
  • 130.
    Henriksson, Greger
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Börjesson Rivera, Miriam
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Åkesson, Lynn
    Lund University.
    Environmental Policy Instruments Seen as Negotiations2012In: Negotiating Environmental Conflicts: Local communities, global policies / [ed] Gisela Welz, Franziska Sperling, Eva Maria Blum, Frankfurt am Main: Institut für Kulturanthropologie und Europäische Ethnologie , 2012, p. 83-105-Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 131.
    Henriksson, Greger
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms). KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Kupersmidt, Judith
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms). KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Räsänen, Minna
    Södertörn University / School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies.
    A Day at the School of Opera: Less Travel throug Distance Education2013In: Nachhaltigkeit in der Wirtschaftskommunikation / [ed] Martin Nielsen, Iris Rittenhofer, Marianne Grove Ditlevsen, Sophie Esmann Andersen, Irene Pollach, Wiesbaden: Springer VS, Springer Fachmedien , 2013, p. 191-214Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    .

  • 132. Hessling, O.
    et al.
    Fogelström, J. B.
    Kojola, N.
    Sichen, Du
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering. Research & Innovation, Hybrit Development AB, Klarabergsviadukten 70, 111 64, Stockholm, Sweden.
    The Effect of the Endothermic Reaction Nature on the Iron Ore Pellet Reduction Using Hydrogen2022In: Metallurgical and materials transactions. B, process metallurgy and materials processing science, ISSN 1073-5615, E-ISSN 1543-1916, Vol. 53, no 2, p. 1258-1268Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A novel experimental setup for simultaneous weight, surface temperature, and center temperature tracking of a single iron ore pellet under reducing conditions has been utilized. Studies conducted in the setup indicate that the reduction of iron ore pellets in a pure hydrogen atmosphere is controlled by several transport steps inside the pellet. It is further shown that for a period of time during reduction, the reduction rate is limited by the heat transfer inside the sample. Any attempt to make accurate and robust models of the hydrogen based iron ore reduction process must therefore consider heat transfer in the pellet. The reduction is observed to take place in a reduction zone extending along the pellet radius, consisting of a mix of different phases. The amount of the different phases varies with radial position and time, as does the observed temperature gradient between the surface and the center of the pellet. Representative literature data on actual transfer coefficients of this system is therefore not available. Apparent thermal conductivities for the different experimental temperatures are evaluated based on the experimental data and found to be significantly lower than the corresponding value for dense iron.

  • 133.
    Holgersson, Charlotte
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Accounting, finance, economics and organization (AFEO).
    Holter, Oystein GullvågUniversity of Oslo.Lindgren, MonicaKTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Accounting, Finance & Changes.Packendorff, JohannKTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.Snickare, LottaUniversity of Oslo.Vänje, AnnikaUniversity of Dalarna.Wahl, AnnaKTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Accounting, finance, economics and organization (AFEO).Williamson, SueUNSW Canberra.
    Call for abstracts/paper submissions: Men in focus - Exploring homosocial cultures and sexual harassment in organizations2022Conference proceedings (editor) (Refereed)
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  • 134.
    Holgersson, Charlotte
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    Tienari, J.
    Meriläinen, S.
    Bendl, R.
    Executive search as ethnosociality: A cross-cultural comparison2016In: International Journal of Cross Cultural Management, ISSN 1470-5958, E-ISSN 1741-2838, Vol. 16, no 2, p. 153-169Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article, we explore how executive search consultants in Austria, Finland and Sweden address ethnicity. Our findings suggest that while consultants working in these different sociocultural settings may attribute different meanings to ethnicity, they share a tendency to evade questions of ethnicity with regard to the search process. We specify three discursive practices that serve to eliminate questions of ethnicity from executive search: constructing whiteness as self-evident, constructing varieties of whiteness (articulating deficiency and lack for those not belonging to Us), and distancing responsibility for the current situation to clients and society. In view of these findings, we argue that executive search can be understood as an arena for ethnosociality that stops cultural diversity at the door of management suites and serves to undermine efforts to promote cross-cultural understanding in organizations. Our study indicates that sustaining whiteness as a privileged ethnicity takes multiple forms. While executive search consultants play an important role in these processes, it is suggested that they inherit a more fundamental problem in society and they have few opportunities to change the ethnic status quo at the top.

  • 135.
    Jing, Jing
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Dahlberg, Lena
    School of Health and Welfare, Dalarna University, Falun Sweden; Aging Research Center, Karolinska Institutet and Stockholm University, Stockholm Sweden.
    Canter, David
    Liverpool Hope University, Liverpool UK.
    Plater-Zyberk, Elizabeth
    School of Architecture, University of Miami, Coral Gables, FL USA.
    The Role of Third Place concerning Loneliness in the Context of Ageing in Place: Three Neighbourhoods in Stockholm2024In: Health & Social Care in the Community, ISSN 0966-0410, E-ISSN 1365-2524, Vol. 2024, article id 4172682Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is an increasing recognition of the impact of built environment in the neighbourhood on healthy ageing, especially in the context of ageing in place. This study examines perceptions of third place and its potential value for mitigating loneliness in older adults. Thirty participants aged 65-89, living in ordinary housing across three neighbourhoods in the city of Stockholm, Sweden, conducted the interview-based sorting procedures, namely, Multiple Sorting Tasks (MST). In each individual MST procedure, the participant was asked to sort twenty pictures into groups using his or her own categories. The data were analysed using Multidimensional Scalogram Analysis, integrating qualitative data input and quantitative statistical analysis of the categorisations. Accessible local third places, which facilitate physical activities (especially walking) and community building (meaningful social connections) and provide options for food (a medium for social interactions), were seen as vital resources to combat loneliness. Thus, these places are supportive built environment elements of healthy ageing and ageing in place. The management aspect in third places operated by municipalities, including designing diverse public programs and services, and the service mentality of the staff members play an important role in making these places feel safe, at home, and potentially lessen the experience of loneliness to some extent. This study adds an urban design and planning perspective that can be integrated into environmental approaches to combat loneliness among older adults living in the community.

  • 136. Kan, Sergei
    et al.
    Arzyutov, Dmitry
    The Saga of The L.H. Morgan Archive, or How an American Marxist Helped Make a Bourgeois Anthropologist the Cornerstone of Soviet Ethnography2016In: Local Knowledge, Global Stage, University of Nebraska Press, 2016, Vol. 10, p. 149-220Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 137.
    Karakaya, Emrah
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Sustainability and Industrial Dynamics.
    Diffusion of dynamic innovations: A case study of residential solar PV systems2015Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In the literature on diffusion of innovations, it is widely known that the characteristics and socio-environmental settings of adopters do evolve in space and time. What about innovations themselves? During the diffusion process, don’t some innovations continuously alter in space and time? If so, how does the dynamic character of an innovation influence the diffusion process? In previous research, it has been often assumed that innovations do not continuously alter or get modified when diffusing from a source to potential adopters. This assumption may mean that the innovation is invariant as it diffuses in time and space—i.e., the innovation does not have a continuously dynamic character. Is it always the case in practice?   

    A single form of an innovation is not always necessarily compatible with the preferences, limitations, and residential settings of adopters. The innovation might appear in different forms when it diffuses in space and time, i.e., it is “dynamic”. This PhD thesis aims to explore how dynamic innovations diffuse in space and time—a relatively understudied topic in research. In doing so, it distinguishes between the diffusion of dynamic innovations and other kinds of innovations. Anchored on the case of diffusion of residential solar photovoltaic (PV) systems, this thesis is composed of a cover essay and six appended papers. The first two appended papers are systematic literature reviews, aiming at understanding the state of the art of the theoretical and contextual research domains. The third paper is based on a case study in southern Germany and explores the diffusion of a dynamic innovation at adopter level. The fourth paper is empirically focused on a local firm’s business model, which is assumed to be a key to understanding the mechanism behind the diffusion of dynamic innovations. The fifth paper is based on lead market hypothesis and tries to explore the diffusion of innovations at the regional level. The sixth paper studies a semi-hypothetical case and offers an innovative method to forecast the diffusion of innovations in general.

    The contribution of this PhD thesis lies in three research dimensions: context, method, and theory. Firstly, the thesis takes the existing theories (e.g., diffusion of innovations theory and lead market hypothesis) and methods (e.g., case study) and applies them in different contexts of the diffusion of residential solar PV systems: the individual, sub-national, and national level. Secondly, it proposes a new research method, namely the finite element method for forecasting the diffusion of innovations, based on an existing theory (e.g., wave-like diffusion of innovations in time and space) and context (e.g., solar PV systems). Last but not least, the cover essay of this thesis takes the findings of the appended papers and employs an extension of theory of diffusion of innovations. In doing so, it includes the role of the dynamic characteristic of innovations that do alter in time and space during the diffusion process.

    Overall, the findings of this thesis indicate that the diffusion of dynamic innovations is different in nature, and continuous efforts of change agents are critical for enhancing the diffusion of such innovations. Change agents are especially important to help potential adopters to find out and develop the form of innovation that best fits their needs, limits, and preferences, which are heterogeneous in space and time. 

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    karakayaPhDthesis
  • 138.
    Karakaya, Emrah
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Sustainability and Industrial Dynamics. Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, Spain.
    Finite Element Method for Forecasting the Diffusion of Photovoltaic Systems: Why and How?2016In: Applied Energy, ISSN 0306-2619, E-ISSN 1872-9118, Vol. 163, p. 464-475Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Finite Element Method (FEM) has been used in the broad field of continuum mechanics in engineering disciplines for several decades. However, recently, some scholars have attempted to apply the method to social science phenomena. What is the scope of using FEM in social science-related fields?  Anchored in the literature on social sciences, this paper, firstly, reviews the scope of using FEM in social science phenomena, and then applies FEM to a semi-hypothetical case study on the diffusion of solar photovoltaic systems in southern Germany.  By doing so, the paper aims to shed light on why and how the Finite Element Method can be used to forecast the diffusion of solar photovoltaic systems in time and space. Unlike conventional models used in diffusion literature, the computational model considers spatial heterogeneity. The model is based on a partial differential equation that describes the diffusion ratio of photovoltaic systems in a given region over time. The results of the application show that the FEM constitutes a powerful tool by which to study the diffusion of an innovation as a simultaneous space-time process.

  • 139.
    Karakaya, Emrah
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Sustainability and Industrial Dynamics.
    Nuur, Cali
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Sustainability and Industrial Dynamics.
    Barbara, Breitschopf
    Hidalgo, Antonio
    Lead markets at sub-national levelManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The literature on lead markets has long argued that the global diffusion of innovations is often driven by country-specific attributes of a lead country. However, less attention has been paid to the sub-national level. Can region-specific attributes of a lead region drive the national diffusion? The paper takes the lead market model and applies it in a sub-national context.  Based on spatiotemporal data and an extensive case study on diffusion of solar photovoltaic systems in Germany, this paper identifies the presence of both lead and lag markets at the sub-national level. Our findings indicate that the lead market model of the international diffusion of innovations is also applicable in a national context. 

  • 140.
    Karlsson Wickman, Lisa
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE).
    Karlsson Wickman, Maja
    The Square’s Social role in Society: Karlstad: A Study focused on Social Sustainability around Stora torget and Våxnäs torg2023Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this work is to investigate how the urban planning in Karlstad worksand to study how they work with common areas, specifically squares. To investigatethis and how the square contributes to social sustainability, two case studies havebeen done on two selected squares, Stora torget and Våxnäs torg. A literature studyhas also been done to achieve the purpose of the work. The literature study describesdifferent theories that focus on sustainable public spaces, including important aspectsregarding the design of the square.

    In our case studies two methods were used: On-site observations and an online survey.The survey was also partly answered by the people who were on the square. Duringthe observation the design of the square was analyzed and also how the square wasused by the people. Many people were waiting for the bus at Stora torget, but somepeople were also sitting down on the benches around the fountain having their lunch.At Våxnäs torg some people were sitting on the benches, but in general it was very fewpeople at the square.

    Our on-site observations at Stora torget and Våxnäs torg showed that many peopleseem to pass the square on their way to other things. However, our survey showed thatmany people want to use the square environment in several different ways, forexample for events and as a marketplace. Further more, based on the survey, it wasconsidered that the most important aspects for creating a functioning square areseating, lighting, greenery and market trade, which is something that both Stora torgetand Våxnäs torg partially fullfill but it is also somehing that can be improved.

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  • 141.
    Katzeff, Cecilia
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Strategic Sustainability Studies.
    Hedin, Björn
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Nyström, Sofie
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
    Börjesson Rivera, Miriam
    Hemmens berättelser om smarta elnät: Avslutande webbinarium 24 maj 20222022Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 142.
    Kautsky, Matilde
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture.
    Spatial characteristics and configuration of schoolyards – where do interaction occur?: An exploration study of public schoolyards in Stockholm2022In: Proceedings 13th International Space Syntax Symposium, SSS 2022, Western Norway University of Applied Sciences (HVL) , 2022, article id 513Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Starting from experiences of social interaction and co-presence at two different schoolyards, this paper elaborates on if and how the space of the schoolyard relates to the interaction between parents. Schoolyards are everyday spaces, where parents are co-present regularly, potentially meeting over differences. This study aims to answer two questions about the spatial characteristics and configuration of the schoolyards through case studies of public compulsory schools in Stockholm. The questions are: Where do interactions occur? How do the schoolyard and school building spaces enable co-presence and social interaction between parents? To point to the complexity of the questions, three methods are combined to map the schoolyards. First, we analyse the local context and spatial configuration of a bigger sample, then we map characteristics at a selection of ten schoolyards. Finally, we look closer at the micro-scale of the yard through site visits and qualitative observations at four of the schools. The sample selection is based on four criteria; one is the possible diversity of persons belonging to a variety of income groups at the school. The findings show that there is a co-presence and some interaction between parents in schoolyards and the hypothesis is that the size of the yard, the number of co-present persons, and available waiting niches further interaction. Implications of this ongoing research can approach the importance of the built environment of schoolyards as one part of building a community.

  • 143.
    Kimari, Wangui
    et al.
    University of Cape Town.
    Ernstson, Henrik
    University of Cape Town.
    Imperial Remains and Imperial Invitations: Centering Race within the Contemporary Large-Scale Infrastructures of East Africa2020In: Antipode, ISSN 0066-4812, E-ISSN 1467-8330, Vol. 3, no 52, p. 1-22Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we combine infrastructure studies and black radical traditions to foreground how imperial remains deeply inform the logics that bring forth contemporary large-scale infrastructures in Africa. The objective, prompted by the ongoing avid promotion of such architectures on the continent, is to contribute to an analysis that centres race in these projects. Our argument is that these initiatives have to be understood in relation to inherited material and discursive scaffoldings that remain from the colonial period, through what we refer to as imperial remains and imperial invitations. These remains and invitations demonstrate how recent mega infrastructures inhere, in their planning, financing and implementation, a colonial racialism, despite rhetorical claims to the opposite. Empirically, we draw, principally, on China built and financed infrastructure projects from Kenya, and theoretically upon black radical traditions in order to foreground a longer genealogy of black pathologizing and resistance to it on the continent.

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  • 144.
    Kimari, Wangui
    et al.
    University of Cape Town.
    Ernstson, Henrik
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Strategic Sustainability Studies.
    The invisible labor of the “New Angola”: Kilamba’s domestic workers2022In: Urban geography, ISSN 0272-3638, E-ISSN 1938-2847, p. 1-18Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Kilamba, the first of the new centralities in Angola, is increasingly visible in recent urban scholarship about Luanda, further establishing it as the symbol of both this “new” post-war city and the “New Angola.” Within local discourses of progress, its emergence from within “petro-urbanism,” and its size and modern aesthetics are emphasized, while little attention has been directed towards understanding the actual contributions of its workers, particularly the women who spend a significant part of their day cleaning Kilamba’s apartments. In this paper, we combine a social reproduction framework with infrastructure studies to trace the labor of Kilamba’s female domestic workers, in order to demonstrate how their everyday practices uphold the status and materiality of this centrality, even as their work is invisibilized. In doing so, we understand their commentaries about this space, often refracted through descriptions of their homes, as critiques of the infrastructural priorities of the “New Angola.”

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  • 145. Kings, Lisa
    et al.
    Dahlstedt, Magnus
    Tahvilzadeh, Nazem
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Platskamp: inledande reflektioner2018In: ARKIV. Tidskrift för samhällsanalys, ISSN 2000-6225, E-ISSN 2000-6217, no 9, p. 7-25Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Det här specialnumret är ett temanummer om hur kampen om förorten förs i vår samtid. Genom att uppmärksamma förorten som en politisk företeelse, skapad i spänningsfältet mellan reproduktion och motstånd, försöker författarna fånga den komplexa dynamik mellan olika intressen som präglar den urbana periferin. Med texter av Magnus Dahlstedt, Christophe Foultier, James Frempong, Lisa Kings, René León Rosales, Vanja Lozic, Nazem Tahvilzadeh och Aleksandra Ålund. Bidragens skilda perspektiv på förorten som skådeplats för politisk kamp och de ”platskamper” som utspelar sig där öppnar upp för spännande samtal om detta ständigt återkommande tema: förorten, levd som föreställd.

  • 146. Kings, Lisa
    et al.
    Åhlund, Aleksandra
    Tahvilzadeh, Nazem
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Contesting Urban Management Regimes: The Rise Of Urban Justice Movements In Sweden2016In: Solidarity without Borders: Gramscian perspectives on migration and civil society alliances / [ed] Agustín, Ó. G. & Jörgensen, M. B., Pluto Press, 2016, p. 186-202Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 147.
    Kjellgren, Björn
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Learning.
    Fluid Modernity: Wine in China2019In: The Globalization of Wine / [ed] David Inglis & Anna-Mari Almila, London: Bloomsbury Academic, 2019, 1Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 148.
    Kjellgren, Björn
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Learning.
    Richter, Tanja
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Learning.
    Redesigning international student mobility for global competence development2022In: 2022 IEEE Global Engineering Education Conference (EDUCON): Digital Transformation for Sustainable Engineering Education / [ed] Ilhem Kallel, Habib M. Kammoun, Lobna Hsairi, 2022, p. 1104-1112Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Engineering graduates are increasingly expected to possess a certain level of global competence to work in the diverse and intercultural collaborations of the modern profession. With stringent programme curricula and educators being technical – and not global learning – experts, higher education institutions (HEIs) often look at international student mobility as the solution for preparing students for culturally diverse working environments. Nevertheless, literature and widely shared experience have identified two major shortcomings of international mobility: low degree of participation, and lack of insights into actual learning outcomes of international student mobility. Our work aims to address these issues by exploring students’ perspectives on international mobility experiences. A student survey collecting the voices of 639 students from more than 30 countries provides insights into the motivation for (and against) participation, support received, as well as the challenges encountered by students on their way to international mobility experiences, and also reveals the students’ perceptions of opportunities for global competence development in their host countries. Based on the students’ experiences, we can provide suggestions for how international student mobility could be redesigned in order to better support and enhance global competence development among students.

  • 149.
    Kumar, Manish
    et al.
    Univ Petr & Energy Studies, Sch Engn, Sustainabil Cluster, Dehra Dun 248007, Uttarakhand, India..
    Jiang, Guangming
    Univ Wollongong, Sch Civil Min & Environm Engn, Wollongong, NSW, Australia.;Univ Wollongong, Illawarra Hlth & Med Res Inst IHMRI, Wollongong, NSW, Australia..
    Thakur, Alok Kumar
    Indian Inst Technol Gandhinagar, Discipline Earth Sci, Gandhinagar 382355, Gujarat, India..
    Chatterjee, Shreya
    Encore Insoltech Pvt Ltd, Gandhinagar 382307, Gujarat, India..
    Bhattacharya, Tanushree
    Birla Inst Technol, Dept Civil & Environm Engn, Mesra 835215, India..
    Mohapatra, Sanjeeb
    Natl Univ Singapore, NUS Environm Res Inst, Singapore, Singapore..
    Chaminda, Tushara
    Univ Ruhuna, Dept Civil & Environm Engn, Matara, Sri Lanka..
    Tyagi, Vinay Kumar
    Indian Inst Technol Roorkee, Dept Civil Engn, Environm BioTechnol Grp EBiTG, Roorkee, Uttarakhand, India..
    Vithanage, Meththika
    Univ Petr & Energy Studies, Sch Engn, Sustainabil Cluster, Dehra Dun 248007, Uttarakhand, India.;Univ Sri Jayewardenepura, Fac Appl Sci, Ecosphere Resilience Res Ctr, Nugegoda 10250, Sri Lanka..
    Bhattacharya, Prosun
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Water and Environmental Engineering.
    Nghiem, Long D.
    Univ Technol Sydney, Ctr Technol Water & Wastewater, Ultimo 2007, Australia..
    Sarkar, Dibyendu
    Stevens Inst Technol, Dept Civil Environm & Ocean Engn, Hoboken, NJ 07030 USA..
    Sonne, Christian
    Univ Petr & Energy Studies, Sch Engn, Sustainabil Cluster, Dehra Dun 248007, Uttarakhand, India.;Aarhus Univ, Dept Ecosci, DK-4000 Roskilde, Denmark..
    Mahlknecht, Jurgen
    Tecnol Monterrey, Escuela Ingn & Ciencias, Campus Monterey, Monterrey 64849, Nuevo Leon, Mexico..
    Lead time of early warning by wastewater surveillance for COVID-19: Geographical variations and impacting factors2022In: Chemical Engineering Journal, ISSN 1385-8947, E-ISSN 1873-3212, Vol. 441, article id 135936Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The global data on the temporal tracking of the COVID-19 through wastewater surveillance needs to be comparatively evaluated to generate a proper and precise understanding of the robustness, advantages, and sensitivity of the wastewater-based epidemiological (WBE) approach. We reviewed the current state of knowledge based on several scientific articles pertaining to temporal variations in COVID-19 cases captured via viral RNA predictions in wastewater. This paper primarily focuses on analyzing the WBE-based temporal variation reported globally to check if the reported early warning lead-time generated through environmental surveillance is pragmatic or latent. We have compiled the geographical variations reported as lead time in various WBE reports to strike a precise correlation between COVID-19 cases and genome copies detected through wastewater surveillance, with respect to the sampling dates, separately for WASH and non-WASH countries. We highlighted sampling methods, climatic and weather conditions that significantly affected the concentration of viral SARS-CoV-2 RNA detected in wastewater, and thus the lead time reported from the various climatic zones with diverse WASH situations were different. Our major findings are: i) WBE reports around the world are not comparable, especially in terms of gene copies detected, lag-time gained between monitored RNA peak and outbreak/peak of reported case, as well as per capita RNA concentrations; ii) Varying sanitation facility and climatic conditions that impact virus degradation rate are two major interfering features limiting the comparability of WBE results, and iii) WBE is better applicable to WASH countries having well-connected sewerage system.

  • 150.
    Kuoppamäki, Sanna
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Health Informatics and Logistics.
    Hänninen, Riitta
    University of Jyväskylä, Jyväskylä, Finland.
    Taipale, Sakari
    University of Jyväskylä, Jyväskylä, Finland; University of Ljubljana, Ljubljana, Slovenia.
    Enhancing Older Adults’ Digital Inclusion Through Social Support: A Qualitative Interview Study2022In: Vulnerable People and Digital Inclusion: Theoretical and Applied Perspectives, Springer Nature , 2022, p. 211-230Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    A lack of social support can hinder older adults’ digital inclusion. This chapter examines the connection between social and digital inclusion by focusing on the process of acquiring social support for digital technology use among older adults in Finland. Building on the concept of warm expert, the chapter shows that acquiring support for digital technology use is a reciprocal process that both enhances and requires digital inclusion. A qualitative analysis of 22 participant-induced elicitation interviews was conducted with older adults aged between 57 and 89. The chapter shows that social support reinforces digital inclusion by (a) ensuring older adults’ access to technology, (b) catering for their positive approach towards technology and (c) improving their skills to use technology independently. The connection between social and digital inclusion also operates the other way round. Digital inclusion is required to gain social support that is more readily at hand in a technology-mediated manner.

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