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  • 101.
    Lindborg, PerMagnus
    Nanyang Technological University, Singapore.
    Singapore Voices: An interactive installation about languages to (re)(dis)cover the intergenerational distance2011In: IM Interactive Media, E-ISSN 1833-0533, no 6Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Singapore Voices is an interactive installation, integrating sound and image in aseries of touch-sensitive displays. Each display shows the portrait of an elderly person,standing with the hand turned outwards, as if saying: “I built this nation”. Two displayscan be seen in Figure 1 below. When the visitor touches the hand or shoulder, they heara recording of the speaker’s voice. Chances are that the visitor will not be able tounderstand the language spoken, but she or he will indeed grasp much of all that is, in amanner of speaking, “outside” of the words - elements of prosody such as phrasing andspeech rhythm, but also voice colour that may hint at the emotional state of the person.Then there is coughing, laughing, a hand clap and so forth. Such paralingual elements ofvocal communication are extremely important and furthermore, their meaning is quite universal.

  • 102.
    Lindström, Kati
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Classic and cute: Framing biodiversity in Japan through rural landscapes and mascot charactersManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 103.
    Lindström, Kati
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment. University of Tartu.
    Constructing agricultural and industrial heritage in Hida region, Japan2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The presentation analyses the tension between the construction of agricultural and industrial heritage in Japan. The nostalgic image of historical landscapes is increasingly penetrating into protection policies as a model of sustainability, focusing primarily on rice production landscapes. Yet Japan is an old industrial country. In a prevalent discourse of unique national harmony with nature, industrial heritage sites need to appeal to a different sense of uniqueness and value.

    This paper traces two UNESCO World Heritage sites, Tomioka Silk Mill (inscribed in 2014) and Historic Villages of Shirakawa-go and Gokayama (inscribed in 1995), and their reception and representation in relation to changing ideas on value, heritage and Japaneseness. Both of the sites are tightly related to silk industry, but while Tomioka is recognized as the cradle of industrial Japan, Hida region is increasingly interpreted as an isolated rural settlement and linked with traditional agricultural activities, including rice cultivation, which, however, is extremely recent for the area. In addition, both of the areas are tightly interconnected in 20th century Japanese literature and film through stories of serious exploitation of adolescent girls in early Japanese silk industry.

  • 104.
    Lindström, Kati
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Fuji. Fuji? Fuji! The community and the “universal value“ of the world heritage.2015Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 105.
    Lindström, Kati
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Internal and external perception in conceptualizing home landscapes: Japanese examples2014In: Geografiska Annaler. Series B, Human Geography, ISSN 0435-3684, E-ISSN 1468-0467, Vol. 96, no 1, p. 51-65Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Employing the conceptual pair external-internal, the present article traces how meanings and ideals are generated in landscapes. It analyses the dialectics between the firsthand landscape experiences acquired in the course of everyday life activities and externally created models of value and meaning that have been adopted by the locals, replacing or dominating over the former ones. With rice and reed fields at the banks of Lake Biwa in Central Japan as a backdrop, this phenomenon is described at personal, community and cultural level.

  • 106.
    Lindström, Kati
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Whose identity should World Heritage support2016Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 107.
    Lindström, Kati
    et al.
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Uchiyama, Junzo
    Mt Fuji World Heritage Research Centre.
    Fuji as a European Mountain? Universal heritage value, local identities and changing landscapes at a new world heritage site.2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mt. Fuji is a mountain that is visible from the whole world – as a symbol of the Japanese state or the great Orient, its images are featured in virtually every Japan-related brochure and merchandize well beyond  the geographical constraints of the Archipelago.

    The present paper asks several provocative questions: to what extent are the Western perceptions of Mt. Fuji  embedded into the constructed „universal heritage value“ in its UNESCO World Heritage nomination process; how does the defined universal value relate to the local identity value of Mt Fuji cultural landscape; and how does the contemporary perception of both universal and local value of the place relate to the evidence of its long-term  history of land use? To what extent can we claim that its nomination as a „sacred place and source of artistic inspiration“ casts the mountain in terms of European values and perception of the place, and how well does it accommodate different identities and uses on local level? And on the other hand, to what  extent are the present local identities related to historical land use before the rapid modernization?

    To answer these and related questions, we will use a variety of sources from interviews with people involved in world heritage nomination process, nomination materials, media sources, but also historical evidence of past landscape use, such as maps, historical documents and archaeological data. While the people involved in the construction of „universal value“ lament the excessive pressure by the Western experts, the local inhabitants express bewilderment about the nomination as a site of worship and art. How and by whom was the mountain used is a key question in addressing these claims. An additional theoretical issue involved in the discussion is how much should the present local identities and evaluations be included in the construction of heritage value in case of a massive landscape change that completely changes millenia-long practices? 

  • 108.
    Lindström, Kati
    et al.
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Uchiyama, Junzo
    Mt Fuji World Heritage Research Centre.
    Idealised landscapes and heritage: sustainability in mountain Japan2016Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 109.
    Ljunggren, Maria
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment.
    Collaborations effect on undergraduate education: a study of two policyprograms.2010Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    A shift has occurred in the traditional type of centralised government control to a more multilevel type of governing referred to as governance. The change from government to governance can be illustrated with an emphasis on networks and social capital enhancement. In higher education this is enveloped through a larger emphasis on institutionalisation of collaboration between the higher education institutions (HEI) and the surrounding environment. In lieu of large block grants come financial incentives through semi-governmental agencies embracing collaboration projects between industry and HEI as well as municipalities.`

    This licentiate thesis objective is to study the collaboration task’s practical implication on undergraduate education in terms of social capital enhancement and research and teaching links. This is reported in two articles that elaborate on social capital establishment through a policy program and whether policy programs focusing on research collaborations also have an effect on undergraduate education by improving research and teaching links. In general, the findings of this thesis indicate that semi-governmental policy programs have a positive effect on establishing new social capital between regional HEI, industry and municipalities, and that semi-governmentally financed research profiles also have a positive effect on undergraduate education by introducing a link to research outside and within the HEI.

     

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  • 110.
    Ljunggren, Maria
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    No Researcher Is an Island: Collaboration in Higher Education Institutions2013Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The developing knowledge economy affects organizations within the innovation system where higher education institutions (HEI) are regarded as a significant part. There is a large amount of research that focus on different aspects of collaboration such as the outcome, the process and its infrastructure. To emphasize HEIs role in the national and regional innovation systems concepts such as Mode 2 and Triple helix, and the Knowledge triangle, have developed. These concepts have also heavily influenced Swedish innovation policy.

     

    This thesis is set to analyze collaboration work between Swedish HEIs and the public and private sectors, and to understand how collaboration: i) occurs in practice in research and undergraduate education; ii) is influenced by policy efforts, and; iii) influence HEI’s internal and external social capital building. Firstly, research and teaching links is analyzed to highlight the integration of collaboration, research and education within specific research profiles. This is because previous research has neglected collaboration and its effect on undergraduate education. Secondly, social capital theory is used as a framework for the analysis. Social capital theory is used to obtain a thorough understanding of individual researchers’ attitude to collaboration and participation in collaboration activities.

     

    The results indicate that short term projects had long-term effects since it established new education programs and projects. Collaboration also effects undergraduate education through research profiles with their integration of research and education in groups within as well as outside the HEI. The results also show that social capital building through top steered initiatives is complex. In the HEIs there was no relation between researchers expressing a positive attitude towards different forms of collaboration and a high participation level in collaboration activities. This suggests that building of external social capital within HEIs is not related to the nature of the internal social capital. There was interfaculty differences in both the researchers’ attitude to collaboration activities and participation in collaboration activities. As expected, professors had more opportunities and ability for collaboration. They also indicated a resistance to use a central infrastructure for collaboration to build external social capital. The opposite was demonstrated for professors from the humanities who had little experience of collaboration. They still did not to use the infrastructure to a large extent. Suggestively policy makers should encourage a more efficient external social capital building through earmarked funding for collaboration on a department level rather than on the HEIs’ central level.

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  • 111.
    Mack, Jennifer
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE).
    An awkward technocracy: Mosques, churches, and urban planners in neoliberal Sweden2019In: American Ethnologist, ISSN 0094-0496, E-ISSN 1548-1425, Vol. 46, no 1, p. 89-104Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In Sweden, an ostensibly secular-majority society, urban planners facilitate the construction of new churches and mosques for minority religious groups. In this work, they typically perceive themselves as neutral professionals relying on a technical education. But since the 1980s, Swedish civil servants, including planners, have transformed from experts to managers, and their interactions with clients for mosques and churches often reveal their opinions and preferences, including for modernism and secularism. These awkward encounters challenge the planners' technocratic understanding of their work, forcing them into a new kind of productive labor: as uncomfortable arbiters of difference and its public presence. This is a result of neoliberal governance, which has ambiguously expanded the types of European civil servants asked to manage minority groups, as well as the professional roles they must play. [urban planning, neoliberalism, secularism, mosques, churches, immigration, Sweden]

  • 112. Madantpour, A.
    et al.
    Cars, Göran
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE).
    Allen, J.
    Social exclusion in european cities: Processes, experiences and responses2012In: Social Exclusion in European Cities: Processes, Experiences and Responses, Taylor and Francis Inc. , 2012, p. 1-301Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Across Europe concern is rising over the disintegration of social relations and the growing number of people who are being socially excluded. social Exclustoin in European Cities, the first major study of this topic, provides a definition of social exclusion and looks at both the processes which cause it and the dimensions of the problem throughout Europe. The experiences of people living in areas or neighbourhoods with low rates of social integration are considered, illuminating the human impact of exclusion where it is most visible. Finally the contributors evaluate the various policy and community initiatives which are currently confronting the problem in a wide sample of European Cities on a variety of levels, from inform individual actions to supra-national European Union policy, and suggest new ways in which social exclusion could be tackled. With most large cities experiencing some degree of social exclusion, this is an important volume for all those working in the areas of regional policy, town planning, housing management, social work, community development, sociology, political science and urban studies.

  • 113.
    Milestad, Rebecka
    et al.
    Department of Urban and Rural Development, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences.
    Kratochvil, Ruth
    Division of Organic Farming, University of Natural Resources and Applied Life Sciences.
    Leitner, Heidrun
    Ökosoziales Forum Österreich.
    Axmann, Paul
    Division of Organic Farming, University of Natural Resources and Applied Life Sciences.
    Being close: the quality of social relationships in a local organic cereal and bread network in Lower Austria2010In: Journal of Rural Studies, ISSN 0743-0167, E-ISSN 1873-1392, Vol. 26, no 3, p. 228-240Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Experience of the drawbacks of a globalised and industrialised food system has generated interest in localised food systems. Local food networks are regarded as more sustainable food provision systems since they are assumed to have high levels of social embeddedness and relations of regard. This paper explores the social relations between food actors and how 'local' and 'organic' are expressed by detailing how actors describe qualities of their intra-network relationships, how they understand 'local' and how they are connected within the food system. A study from the province of Lower Austria in Austria, where organic cereals and bread are produced and marketed, serves to illuminate these issues. Actors agreed that geographical closeness contributed to the social closeness they experienced and that social relationships were a strong reason for being in the network. However, the meaning of 'local' was elastic depending on where inputs and consumers could be found. Furthermore, despite strong commitment to organic production methods and the local market, actors faced constraints that made them hybrids between organic and conventional, and between locally focused and globally dependent. Thus, the binary thinking along the local-global and organic-conventional divide does not hold. While it is important to not make a causal link between high quality of social relationships and local food networks, the case described here indicates the possibility of such a link.

  • 114.
    Mäkivierikko, Aram
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
    A Needs-Based Approach towards Fostering Long-term Engagement with Energy Feedback among Local Residents2019Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In order to reach the current climate goals, energy consumption needs to decrease in all sectors, including households, which produce 20% of the European emissions. However, it is difficult to increase residents’ engagement in their household electricity consumption as it is an ‘invisible’ form of energy, the monetary incentives are often too small and environmental incentives are not very effective. Building on the idea that an engagement mechanism should be based on user needs, and recent research showing that social influence can be an effective way to affect consumption behaviour, this thesis examines the potential of a neighbourhood-based digital local social network providing feedback on household electricity consumption as an engagement solution. By helping neighbours to know each other better, such a network could meet the basic human need of belonging to a group, while also taking advantage of the social influence between neighbours to increase the effectiveness of the energy feedback provided.

    This thesis sought to: 1) Identify needs of residents that could be served by a local social network and explore whether such a network could provide a beneficial context for energy feedback; 2) identify and evaluate a set of design principles for energy feedback and use them to propose a prototype feedback design suitable for use in a local social network; and 3) design and implement a baseline study for measuring changes in aspects of social and environmental sustainability in a neighbourhood that introduction of a local social network can achieve, such as social cohesion, trust, safety, and energy attitudes and behaviour.

    In order to achieve these objectives, the Research Through Design methodology was used. This resulted in mixed methods research using quantitative (household survey) and qualitative (focus group interviews, stakeholder consultation workshop) methods. The research was conducted in two eco-districts in Stockholm, Sweden: Hammarby Sjöstad and Stockholm Royal Seaport.

    Regarding the first objective, results from the household survey indicated a need for increased interaction between neighbours in Stockholm Royal Seaport, while the focus group discussions revealed local communication needs that a local social network could meet. However, the possibility to use social influence between neighbours in increasing the intention to save energy was shown to be rather weak, possibly because of the current low level of connection between neighbours. Regarding the second objective, a set of design principles was identified using a literature study. They were used to create a design prototype of energy feedback that was presented to potential end-users in a stakeholder consultation workshop and then refined using suggestions given in the workshop. The workshop indicated support for many of the design principles as they were indirectly mentioned in the discussions. The design principle of fair feedback was further explored, suggesting use of typical household consumption as part of a fair comparison metric and when setting reduction goals.

    Regarding the third objective, an evaluation method with baseline survey and follow-up surveys was suggested. The household survey served as a baseline for measuring social and environmental sustainability aspects in a neighbourhood. Further research is needed on the effectiveness of a local social network as an engagement mechanism for energy feedback.

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    Mäkivierikko 2019 - A Needs-Based Approach towards Fostering Long-term Engagement with Energy Feedback among Local Residents
  • 115. Münster, Ursula
    et al.
    Satsuka, ShihoCederlöf, GunnelKTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Asian Environment: Connections across Borders, Landscapes, and Times2014Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This issue of RCC Perspectives offers insights into similarities and differences in the ways people in Asia have tried to master and control the often unpredictable and volatile environments of which they were part. In these histories, nonhuman actors such as capricious rivers, fluid delta regions, monsoon rains, and wild animals play an important role. In some instances, the power of nature facilitated colonial rule and exploitation; in others, it helped to subvert political control. The essays gathered here present new environmental scholarship that speaks across political boundaries, draws new connections between regions and time periods, and tells unexpected stories about the manifold relationships between nations, people, and their environment.

  • 116. Nohlberg, M.
    et al.
    Kowalski, Stewart
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Karlsson, K.
    Ask and you shall know: Using interviews and the SBC model for social-engineering penetration testing2008In: IMETI - Int. Multi-Conf. Eng. Technol. Innov., Proc., 2008, p. 121-128Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents the result of a case study where the SBC model was used as a foundation to perform semi-structured interviews to test the security in a medical establishment. The answers were analyzed and presented in an uncomplicated graph. The purpose was to study the feasibility of letting the users participate, instead of exploiting their weaknesses. It was found that the approach of interviewing the subjects rendered interesting, and relevant, results, making it an approach that should be studied further due to its apparent gains: less ethically troublesome penetration testing, increased awareness, improved coverage and novel information as added bonuses.

  • 117.
    Normark, Maria
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Numerical Analysis and Computer Science, NADA.
    Transforming field observations into functions: on the use of an ethnographic study in the design processManuscript (Other academic)
  • 118.
    Normark, Maria
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Numerical Analysis and Computer Science, NADA.
    Work and Technology Use in Centers of Coordination: Reflections on the relationship between situated practice and artifact design2005Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other scientific)
    Abstract [en]

    The research problem explored in this thesis is how technology and work practice are related in coordinative situations (collocated and over distance). Further, the problem of how this kind of research results can be transformed and used in the development of new technology is discussed.

    Air Traffic Control and Emergency Call Centers are the two domains where the complex process of coordination in a time and safety critical setting has been studied. The methodological approach taken in the field studies is ethnographic, a qualitative method with a descriptive outcome. Air traffic controllers focus on keeping the airspace organized so that the aircraft are separated at all times, as well as are given an economic route by e.g. slowing down so that they do not have to wait in the air for traffic ahead. In order to manage the control of the national airspace, it is divided into geographical sectors each of which is controlled by 1-2 controllers. The aircraft cross many sectors during one flight and each time they cross a sector border there is a handover of responsibility between the controllers. The controllers have a large number of tools that they orchestrate in order to maintain control and keep records of the orders given to the pilots. The situation in one sector has therefore been locally stored at their work position. It is shown in the thesis how the social interaction and the technology support are ordered to broadcast the locally stored information.

    Emergency call centers at SOS Alarm are in contrast to the ATC centers fully computerized. The operators use CoordCom, a system that is currently in the process of being renewed. When a telephone call to the emergency number 112 is received in one of the 20 local centers in Sweden, a receiving operator initiates the case by interviewing the caller in order to categorize the incident. Often, an incident consists of a number of conditions that together make an emergency. It is shown that accountability of decisions and local knowledge of the center’s responsibility area are two important parts of coordination at SOS Alarm.

    A question that has been of interest during the studies is what possibilities ethnographic observations provide when used as a starting point in a design project. The final study provided a description of how the ethnographic material from the emergency call center study was explored and transformed in order to create concrete functionality and design.

    The thesis contributes with examples from the workplace studies of how people interact with each other through the technology and how skills, local knowledge and professional concerns shape the interaction. It also contributes with reflections on how descriptions and experiences of work practice and technology use in the field can serve as a foundation in shaping and designing new ideas and new functionality for future systems.

    The papers included in this thesis shows results on four issues in relation to coordination and technology:

    -Coordinative work practice and implications in using video/audio in a distributed setting

    -Support for accountability in decision-making in a distributed setting

    -The role of local knowledge and combined expertise in a local collocated center

    -The transformation of ethnographic observations in the design process

    The thesis also shows the importance of a further definition of the dichotomy of collocated and distributed work in order to inform technology. An analysis of the dichotomy based on the field study results is presented in the thesis.

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  • 119.
    Odhage, John
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Otraditionella lösningar med traditionella medel: Åtgärdsvalstudien som planeringsfenomen2017Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis aims to understand the method of strategic choice (MSC, Sw. metodik för åtgärdsvalsstudier) in Swedish transport planning as a planning phenomenon. Based on a normative interpretative approach and critical theory, underlying ideas and thinking that surround the context of MSC and how they are expressed in practice, in the guidelines and in concrete planning situations were investigated. The starting point was that changing conditions in society have necessitated reform of the transport sector and a new method has been introduced. It aims to enable a broader grip on transport issues by opening them up together with other actors, thus increasing scope and spreading responsibility for more sectors and activities, enabling new and unconventional solutions to transport problems for a sustainable future. MSC is described and interpreted here as a manifold phenomenon that reveals a tension between different perspectives and mindsets, but also leads to certain aspects being more often expressed which complicates wider and deeper perspectives on complex societal problems. More concretely, it was found that the collaboration in MSC is limited prematurely and is often limited at an early stage of the process, and that this leads to a more narrow understanding of the problem to be solved than would otherwise be the case. Furthermore, one specific perspective, namely the transport system perspective, is proposed explicitly as the basis for assessments. The study has also identified challenges related to the consideration of conflicting and contradictory knowledge claims in the process. Assessments of the effects of actions are assumed to be based upon logical premises, and not on judgments in dialogue and argumentation. However, the analysis suggested that the functional instrumental reasoning of success-oriented action does not seem to take normative and political issues into consideration in order to better address sustainable development issues in the complex, democratic and pluralist society. In conclusion, the analysis identifies the need for these processes in addressing a sustainable future to be kept open in a more inclusive and diverse way, drawing on more and different possible futures.

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  • 120. Ostrom, Marcia
    et al.
    Kjeldsen, Chris
    Kummer, Susanne
    Milestad, Rebecka
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
    Schermer, Markus
    What’s going into the box? An inquiry into the social and ecological embeddedness of large-scale EU and US box schemes2017In: International Journal of Sociology of Agriculture and Food, ISSN 0798-1759, Vol. 24, no 1, p. 113-134Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Food distribution systems referred to as box schemes have gained a foothold in organic markets across Europe and North America. This model has the potential to scale up direct-marketing strategies by aggregating products from multiple producers and efficiently assembling and delivering them on a regular basis to large networks of consumers. Box scheme organizers generally seek to attract regular customers based on the distinctive attributes and values associated with their products and their unique business model that attempts to build long-term relationships between consumers and farmers. This article explores the organizational dynamics of five large, multi-farm box schemes in relation to their stated values and organizational strategies using cases from Sweden, Denmark, Austria, and the United States.

    Different aspects of ecological and social embeddedness are considered and analysed for the five cases based on their stated values and their organizational strategies, including to what degree non-economic values are identified, communicated, and applied throughout the supply chain. The value of geographical proximity is examined with respect to the tension created by consumer demand for variety throughout the seasons and the spatial organization of sourcing and distribution that such a system entails. Additionally, the organizational challenges encountered by box schemes during periods of rapid growth are compared and contrasted with respect to the different organizational strategies employed across the five cases. This article seeks to contribute to the research literature by analysing box schemes as an institutional innovation that can potentially bridge the interests shared by producers and consumers in harnessing market relationships to accomplish larger social and environmental goals.

  • 121. Pinheiro, Rómulo
    et al.
    Geschwind, Lars
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Ramirez, Francisco O.
    Vrangbaek, Karsten
    The value in comparing organizational fields and forms2016In: Towards A Comparative Institutionalism: Forms, Dynamics And Logics Across The Organizational Fields Of Health Care And Higher Education / [ed] Pinheiro, R., Geschwind, L., Ramirez, F., Vrangbaek, K., Emerald Group Publishing Limited, 2016, Vol. 45, p. 9-32Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Following the spirit of an earlier volume in the series focusing on ’Comparative Approaches to Organizational Research’, the mandate of the current volume is to provide a comparative account of dynamics across two organizational fields - health care and higher education - and, subsequently, two specific types of organizational forms - hospitals and universities. In so doing, we take a broader perspective encompassing various conceptual and theoretical points of departure emanating from, mostly, the institutional literature in the social sciences (and its various perspectives), but also from public policy and administration literatures - of relevance to scholars and the communities of practice working within either field. In this introductory paper to the volume, we provide a brief overview of developments across the two organizational fields and illuminate on the most important scholarly traditions underpinning the study of both system dynamics as a whole as well as universities and hospitals as organizations and institutions. We conclude by reflecting on the implication of the volume’s key findings in regards to comparative research within organizational studies.

  • 122.
    Raptis, Vasilios Ingvar
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Urbanism in the making: A handbook of survival2017Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Urbanization is increasing uncontrollably with accelerating speed and the problems this is causing can be seen at the symptoms they produce. Gentrification, sprawl, slums, ecological disasters, psychological effects on people are some of many problems having to do with cities. Majority of the problems appeared after industrialization and most have not been dealt with and many more are emerging. As this situation continues, urbanism is gaining a lot of attention from theorists, scholars, and people around the world, as the field that studies the phenomenon of urbanization and the urban environment. However, urbanism, as a concept, is not clearly determined and as developed as the pace in which urbanization grows and the theories seem to lack awareness of the size of the issue. Urbanism remains passive to the contemporary problems that are appearing, because by the time a theory is providing strategies to solve existing problems, new ones are emerging. Adding to this, what urbanism is and how it is implemented are still vague questions with even more vague answers. Through my research, I did not find a clear, and acceptable by all, definition of urbanism and that shows the complexity of the subject. This is an issue that has contributed, together with the magnificent speed that cities have grown with, to the borders between urban and rural disappearing. The result is a situation that cannot be described yet, but must become a source of research within urbanism, in the upcoming decades.

    This research first tackles the questions of what urban and urbanism is, to later proceed to what urbanism is concerned with. The goal is to orient oneself to the making of urbanism. A detailed cataloging of all the theories that have emerged through the years in a historical and thematic context shows what the trend has been through the decades and which problems urbanism as a broad term has decided to work with. The hope is that there will appear a pattern that can teach all new urbanists about the history of the profession and the mistakes that have been made, so that in the future the discourse about urbanism can be made on more solid grounds and on pragmatic problem solution rather than futuristic hopes and assumptions. This research will reach contemporary years so that it can be understood where the field is headed to. Successively, it is an insight into where cities might be headed, if solution finding tackles problems that appeared in the past, up to contemporary ones and the possible ones that might appear in the future.

    Urbanism is a field of research and is in constant movement and in evolution. Therefore, this research is aware that by the time of its publication it will already be outdated. Nevertheless, the goal for this research is to provide a stepping stone to further research within the field.

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    fulltext
  • 123.
    Rauhut, Daniel
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Den besvärliga fattigdomen2006Book (Other academic)
  • 124.
    Rauhut, Daniel
    FoU-enheten, Stockholms stad.
    Samhörighet och generositet: Om socialbidrag och krav på motprestationer2007In: Vägen till arbete. Om Stockholms stads arbete med olika grupper av arbetslösa socialbidragstagare / [ed] Daniel Rauhut, Stockholm: Fou-enheten, Stockholms stad , 2007Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 125.
    Rauhut, Daniel
    FoU-enheten, Stockholms Stad.
    Vägen till arbete. Om Stockholms stads arbete med olika grupper av arbetslösa socialbidragstagare.2007Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 126.
    Rauhut, Daniel
    FoU-enheten, Stockholms Stad.
    Vägen till Sverige. Om Stockholms stads integrationsarbete.2007Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 127.
    Rauhut, Daniel
    et al.
    FoU-enheten, Stockholms stad.
    Alander, Nina
    FoU-enheten, Stockholms stad.
    Invandrarföretagande och integration: om främjande kommunala insatser2007In: Vägen till Sverige, Stockholm: Fou-enheten, Stockholms stad , 2007Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 128.
    Rauhut, Daniel
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Hatti, NeelambarDept. of Economic History, University of Lund.Olsson, Carl-AxelDept. of Economic History, University of Lund.
    Economists and Poverty: From Adam Smith to Amartya Sen2005Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 129.
    Rauhut, Daniel
    et al.
    FoU-enheten, Stockholms stad.
    Lingärde, Svante
    FoU-enheten, Stockholms stad.
    Alander, Nina
    FoU-enheten, Stockholms stad.
    Om barnfattigdom: Ansvar, insatser och orsaker2006Book (Other academic)
  • 130.
    Salö, Linus
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Regimenting academic discourse: Additional-language summaries as an equivocal remedy for  Anglophone scienceManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The dominance of English in scientific production raises issues in relation to certain responsibilities of Swedish universities, linked to the dissemination of knowledge and the development of the Swedish language. In light of this, the current paper deals with Swedish-language summaries (SLSs) in English-language doctoral theses. It treats the SLS as an instrument of language regimentation, deliberately aimed at limiting the near-total dominance of English. Drawing on language policy documents at the national and university level, along with scholarly accounts and interview data, the paper discusses the SLS as conceived by advocates in language policy and planning, university policymakers, and practitioners, that is, active researchers. It is shown that the SLS is aimed at counteracting negative effects pertaining to knowledge outreach as well as register formation. I argue that there is a contradiction between these two aims: on the one hand, an SLS that is simple enough to bridge the gap between science and society is not likely to contribute to expanding advanced registers of Swedish; on the other hand, an SLS that takes seriously the task of expanding Swedish registers will be unintelligible for the wider audience. Yet, it may still serve as a reminder that languages other than English are worthy of consideration and use.

  • 131.
    Salö, Linus
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment. Stockholm University.
    The Sociolinguistics of Academic Publishing: Language and the Practices of Homo Academicus2017 (ed. 1)Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This book presents a sociolinguistics of academic publishing from an historical and contemporary perspective. Using Swedish academia as a case study, it focuses on publishing practices within history and psychology. The author demonstrates how new regimes of research evaluation and performance-based funding are impinging on university life. His central argument, following the French sociologist Bourdieu, is that the trend towards publishing in English should be understood as a social strategy, developed in response to such transformations. Thought-provoking and challenging, this book will interest students and scholars of sociolinguistics, language planning and language policy, research policy, sociology of science, history and psychology.

  • 132.
    Salö, Linus
    et al.
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment. Stockholm University.
    Ganuza, Natalia
    Stockholm University.
    Hedman, Christina
    Stockholm University .
    Karrebæk, Martha
    Mother tongue instruction in Sweden and Denmark: Language policy, cross-field effects, and linguistic exchange rates2018In: Language Policy, ISSN 1568-4555, E-ISSN 1573-1863, Vol. 17, no 4, p. 591-610Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

     This article investigates mother tongue instruction (MTI) in Sweden and Denmark in a historical, comparative perspective, with a view to accounting for key differences in language policy enacted in educational fields. Whereas in Sweden, MTI is offered to linguistic minority children irrespective of their linguistic and ethnic backgrounds, in Denmark the right to state-sponsored MTI has been abolished for children of non-European descent. Moreover, while the policies of both states devalue skills in mother tongues other than the legitimate language of each society, this position is more pronounced in the Danish context. The article explores the two state’s position on MTI, as expressed in policy as well as in discourse produced in the political and academic field of each state. It subscribes to Pierre Bourdieu’s framework, within which state policy is conceived as the product of historical struggle and cross-field effects. The analysis shows that the national differences in MTI exist because of the differing ways in which agents from the academic vis-à-vis the political field have succeeded in imposing their visions in the bureaucratic field from which policies are produced. Ultimately, this circumstance explains why the Swedish discussion on MTI may be characterized as having been academically founded, while the Danish discussion has remained a matter of political consideration. In the latter case, we argue, it is particularly tangible that MTI is a politicized object of struggle, where agents seek to control the exchange rate of linguistic resources and, in effect, the social worth of different speakers.

  • 133.
    Singh, Nandita
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering (moved 20130630), Water Management.
    Equitable gender participation in local water governance: An insight into institutional paradoxes2008In: Water resources management, ISSN 0920-4741, E-ISSN 1573-1650, Vol. 22, no 7, p. 925-942Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The participation of local stakeholders in governance of water resources is regarded as inalienable for ensuring efficiency, effectiveness and sustainability. To enhance gender balance in the water governance process, institutions are being designed and executed globally to elicit enhanced participation of women. This paper contends that in the context of local communities, the new institutional framework is divorced from the traditional social institutions that in turn operationalize their resource management systems. Based upon empirical evidence from rural Indian setting, the paper deciphers the paradoxes between the two sets of institutional paradigms and illustrates how these paradoxes at the 'interface' between the local community context and the development strategy lead to problems with effective women's participation. On the basis of the findings, it argues that the institutional paradigm for achieving equitable gender participation in local water governance does not represent a truly 'bottom-up' approach. It further raises the concern that if the institutional paradigm for participation is contradictory to local institutions, then how can the objectives of participation founded thereupon be seen as achievable? The paper proposes the need to design participatory paradigms that are more realistically rooted in community-based institutional frameworks so as to enhance effectiveness of the endeavors.

  • 134.
    Singh, Nandita
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Gender concern in water resources management: Rethinking gender initiatives in India2004Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Gender concern in water resources management is globally seen as instrumental in achieving greater efficiency, effectiveness and equity in the sector. Working within the global framework, in recent years, the state in India has drafted and designed gender-based initiatives in the sector at policy as well as program levels. Most of these concern the water users in local communities, primarily the women. Beginning with a concern for women as ‘beneficiaries’, the state’s initiatives have been expanded to enhance the scope of their participation in the sector as ‘actors’. This is reflected in the initial designing of water supply programs aiming at unburdening women in the task of water procurement, to be succeeded by formulation of new interventions promoting their participation in decision-making within domestic as well as irrigation water management arenas. The paper seeks to analyse the effectiveness of these gender-based initiatives in India, looking for the situational factors influencing the achievement of the underlying goals. It argues that the localised social and cultural context interplay in the process of effective implementation of the interventions. The conceptualisation of the gender, gender needs, gender roles and relationships with respect to water resources management within the local context may not necessarily match the constructions underlying the gender initiatives designed and promoted by the state. Consequently, the paper argues for the need to rethink the content and strategy of these initiatives so that the aspirations of the local community and its members are fulfilled in a way that buffers the state’s interests and efforts.

    Download full text (pdf)
    Gender & WRM in India
  • 135.
    Singh, Nandita
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering (moved 20130630), Water Management.
    Indigenous water management systems: Interpreting symbolic dimensions in common property resource regimes2006In: Society & Natural Resources, ISSN 0894-1920, E-ISSN 1521-0723, Vol. 19, no 4, p. 357-366Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Water is a natural resource subject to management in many small-scale societies as common property. A dominant approach to understanding the sustainability of such common property resource (CPR) management regimes is the rational action model, which assumes that their successful governance is achieved through collective action based on a rationally constructed set of working rules. By presenting a holistic study of indigenous water management system in small-scale community setting in India, this article argues that the relationship between water resources and society extends beyond a materialistic mundane relationship, to incorporate a ''symbolic'' orientation. It concludes that rooted in the cosmology of the society, the indigenous water management system represents a mechanism to reinforce the symbolic constructions and also to fulfill water-related needs that cut across material and nonmaterial realms. The outcomes of the article enhance the understanding of management of CPRs, adding an alternate perspective concerning beliefs and values associated with such resources.

  • 136.
    Singh, Nandita
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering, Water Management.
    Total sanitation efforts in India: Problems and prospects2008In: Abstract Volume, World Water Week in Stockholm, August 17–23, 2008: Progress and Prospects on Water:For a Clean and Healthy Worldwith Special Focus on Sanitation, Stockholm: Stockholm International Water Institute, SIWI , 2008, p. 331-332Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 137.
    Singh, Nandita
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Traditional water management practices and their implications in contemporary policy context2004In: Proceedings of the Xth International Symposium on Society and Resource Management, Colorado, USA, June, 2004, University of Minnesota , 2004Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In recent times, there has been much concern with designing of new ‘management’ regimes for efficient, effective and sustainable use of water as a natural resource basic to life. The common pool resource (CPR) theory provides a valid conceptual paradigm within which issues related to management of water in local communities may be approached and interpreted. It is recognized that the use of CPRs have been traditionally regulated by local communities without recourse to any centralized coercion. This presentation will seek to understand how water is traditionally managed as a CPR and how can the traditional water management practices be understood within the framework of the existent CPR theory. It will also attempt to explore the implications of the findings concerning traditional water management practices with respect to the new co-management regimes proposed within the contemporary water policy context. The presentation will argue that traditional water management regimes may be interpreted as conforming to the design principles underlying CPR management systems, though not necessarily ‘visible’ as formalized structural forms with independent existence. Further, these systems need to be seen as comprising human and non-human elements, the latter being further constituted in ‘ideational’ and ‘operational’ dimensions. Finally, discussing on the implications of the traditional water management systems within the contemporary policy context, the presentation will argue upon the need to rethink the new water management strategies based upon the concept of co-management by replacing exogenously developed universal designs by ones that are built upon existing traditional templates.

  • 138.
    Singh, Nandita
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Water management traditions in rural India: Valuing the unvalued2004Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Achieving effective and efficient management of water as the key to human survival and development has emerged as an urgent global concern. The realization of the limited availability of water in space and time under conditions of ever-increasing pressures has caused designing of ‘modern’ water management initiatives that are globally manufactured but implementable in local communities, India being no exception. It is perhaps universally assumed that water management, as an integrated system based upon local knowledge & practices, is either ‘non-existent’ or ‘irrational’, ‘narrowly pragmatic’ and ‘in the process of disappearance’. If water is a basic resource necessary for sustaining all human activities, its provision in the desired quantity and quality and at the right time and place through a workable local water management system must be regarded as an omnipresent  phenomenon.

    How is water management traditionally organized in rural Indian localities so that the community’s needs are met through generations? What implications do such systems based in local situated knowledge & practices hold for the global water management context? The paper seeks answers to these questions through an ethnographic study in rural India. It concludes that traditional water management system in rural Indian localities is pragmatic, rational and functional even in contemporary times. As found in central and central-eastern parts of the country, the system may be resolved into human and non-human components, the latter further lying within two different analytical domains, namely, the ‘ideational’ and the ‘operational’. Traditional knowledge informs each of these domains that is translated as practice in day-to-day life. The paper argues that the study of such systems is important not only for the sake of enhancing the understanding of traditional resource management  systems as situated knowledge systems and situated action locales, but also for appreciating their practical value in designing of more workable, socio-culturally viable, community-based solutions to the resource management problems encountered in recent times.

    Download full text (pdf)
    Water management Traditions
  • 139.
    Singh, Nandita
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering (moved 20130630), Water Management.
    Women, Society and Water Technologies: Lessons for Bureaucracy2006In: Gender, Technology and Development, ISSN 0971-8524, E-ISSN 0973-0656, Vol. 10, no 3, p. 341-360Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Water technologies are increasingly regarded as pivotal to the process of societal development. One arena of importance is the delivery of water to society through  comprehensive water supply programs that aim at ensuring ‘safe’ water for all. The principal target group in these programs is women, whose development is believed to be promoted through improved water facilities offering them greater convenience, better health and  enhanced socio-economic opportunities. These programs can be seen as having three essential aspects, namely technology, people and institutions. Of these, the responsibilities of designing technologies for supplying water, creating institutional frameworks for their execution and implementing the program at the people’s end for their benefit all lie with development bureaucracies. But the extent to which these bureaucracies can be sensitive to the socio-cultural contexts of the communities and the women for whom the program interventions are designed and implemented remains problematic. This article explores the gender dimensions of the socio-cultural context of water and how this may play a role in the adoption and management of improved water technologies. A perspective on the lessons for planning bureaucracies is offered to make the concerned technologies more efficient, effective and sustainable.

  • 140.
    Singh, Nandita
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering (moved 20130630), Water Management.
    Women’s participation in local water governance: Understanding institutional contradictions2006In: Gender, Technology and Development, ISSN 0971-8524, E-ISSN 0973-0656, Vol. 10, no 1, p. 61-76Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The participation of women in local water governance is currently envisaged as necessary for achieving sustainable management of water resources. Towards this end, institutions are being created in many developing countries enabling the participation of local people in the use and management of resources. How effective is the participation of women as  makers and shapers within local water governance institutions—and how does their participation translate into benefits for their communities? How realistic is this participatory strategy in the traditional rural contexts of the developing world? Based on empirical evidence from rural India, where women do not constitute a homogenous group, this article seeks to explore how social and power differences among them thwart the beneficial effects of water governance in communities. The findings underscore the need to develop a holistic understanding of the institutional factors that differentiate among women and the implications of these on mechanisms of water governance put in place at the local level.

  • 141.
    Singh, Nandita
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering (moved 20130630), Water Management.
    Jacks, G.
    Bhattacharya, Prosun
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering (moved 20130630), Environmental Geochemistry and Ecotechnology.
    Women and community water supply programmes: An analysis from a socio-cultural perspective2005In: Natural resources forum (Print), ISSN 0165-0203, E-ISSN 1477-8947, Vol. 29, no 3, p. 213-223Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Community water supply programmes are seen as instrumental in achieving the goal of 'safe' water for all. Women, a principal target group of these programmes, are to be benefited with greater convenience, enhanced socio-cultural opportunities and better health for themselves and their families, provided through improved water facilities. Water supply programmes largely consist of three essential components, namely: technology, people and institutions. Although such programmes are intended to benefit women members of local communities, scant attention is paid to the impacts of the socio-cultural context of the community on these programmes. This article explores the influence of social and cultural intricacies on the implementation of community water supply programmes, and assesses their effectiveness. The article offers important lessons for the design and implementation of this type of programme. It concludes that the local sociocultural context sets the stage for programme implementation, being a dynamic factor that determines actual access to water sources, more so than mere physical availability, which is often used as a criterion for programme performance. The article stresses the urgent need to integrate socio-cultural factors as a fourth dimension in designing community water supply programmes, and suggests practical measures for enhancing the effectiveness of such programmes.

  • 142.
    Singh, Nandita
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
    Singh, Om Prakash
    Climate change, water and gender: Impact and adaptation in North-Eastern Hills of India2015In: International Social Work, ISSN 0020-8728, E-ISSN 1461-7234, Vol. 58, no 3, p. 375-384Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Water resources in India are projected to face severe climate-induced stress. In the North-Eastern Hill region, where lifestyles are closely connected to nature, this holds great implications for human development. While scientific knowledge regarding climate change and water is growing at global and regional scales, an equally diverse body of knowledge on the human dimensions of the same at local levels is weak. This article attempts to bridge this knowledge gap by presenting micro-level evidence on the gendered impact of increasing water stress and the innovative gendered local adaptive strategies in this region. It urges for the need to re-think on adaptation planning, basing it on local templates for greater sustainability.

  • 143. Siragusa, Laura
    et al.
    Arzyutov, Dmitry V.
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Nothing Goes to Waste: Sustainable Practices of Re-Use among Indigenous Groups in the Russian North2020In: Current Opinion in Environmental Sustainability, ISSN 1877-3435, E-ISSN 1877-3443, Vol. 43, p. 41-48Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 144.
    Skoglund, Annika
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Biopolitics within business risk management2010In: Sentient Creatures - Transforming biopolitics and life matters, 2010Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Animals have with accelerating discussions on climate change come to be presented as sentient creatures to be respected and protected and hence an item for company risk management. How does biopolitics optimize vitality as regards the cow, polar bear and chicken, through a large Swedish utility company? With governmentality theory (Foucault, 1997/2008), this article illustrates how these animals are politicized in the perimeter of carbon capture and storage technology, renewable energy and strategic communication. The mechanisms of business risk management are thus scrutinized regarding their production of links between governing and governed. The analysis shows how the animals are differently intertwined in power relations, which opens up for new possibilities to regulate life.

  • 145.
    Skoglund, Annika
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Börjesson, Mats
    Stockholms Universitet, Institutionen för barn och ungdomsvetenskap.
    ”Juvenocracy” – the politicization of children in climate change2011In: Politics and Popular Culture 4, 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In April 2008, a possibility to ‘save the world at home’ was presented at the back of milk cartoons produced by Arla, purchased across Sweden. Coupled with various stories and tips on how to change the everyday practices of the family, this ambitious objective called upon children to look after their parents in climate change. ‘See through that your parents check the air pressure in the tires of the car’, exemplifies one of the typical statements that turn the relation between breeder and bred around. In this paper we present how children are empowered to exercise their potential power through technologies of responsibilization and various Internet-related technical solutions enhancing self-reflexivity and connectivity by fostering calculative capabilities. We also trace how these power relations have evolved from personnel management and the prohibition of child labour in factories during the 19th and 20th century, to the 1970s Swedish family legislation portraying children as ‘equal individuals’, ending in an ecological system’s networked society. The analysis illustrates how children are politicized in climate change to produce a ‘juvenocratic’ governmental rationality. This governmental rationality is increasingly operationalized through climate change risk politics, but can also be observed in more general biopolitics, as when pre-schoolers are brought to homes for elderly people to sing traditional songs and have common fruit pauses to ‘make the elderly eat more and healthier’ (June, 21st , 2011). While adults are incapacitated to work upon their self without children or the child within themselves, children are predicted to have the ability to foster everyday activities. This discourse produces the child as an authority and relay of expertise with capacity to stabilize the consumption of adults, by providing ethical guidelines intragenerationally, disseminated through what we conceptualize as ‘juvenocracy’.

  • 146.
    Smedberg, Åsa
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Double-loop learning conversations in an online community on overweight2005In: IADIS International Conference on Cognition and Exploratory Learning in Digital Age, 2005, p. 383-386Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The members of online health-communities are growing in number. One type of health-community is the one for people who suffer from overweight, who want to change behavior to lose weight. Learning a new behavior calls for investigating patterns of events, to question the way events are presented, and to create new mental models. This paper presents the results from a study of learning conversations held in an online community on overweight. In the conversations on learning, the most frequently used type of response was the one sympathizing with the ideas and beliefs of the sender, while the least used type of response was the one that rejected the ideas presented by the sender. Furthermore, there were more examples of members who presented counter-ideas in the conversations on obstacles and incentives than in the conversations on personal setbacks.

  • 147.
    Sommerfeldt, Nelson
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Applied Thermodynamics and Refrigeration.
    Muyingo, Henry
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Real Estate and Construction Management, Building and Real Estate Economics.
    Lessons in community owned PV from swedish multi-family housing cooperatives2015In: 31st European Photovoltaic Solar Energy Conference and Exhibition, 2015, p. 2745-2750Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    With increasing population shifts to urban areas and demands for post-war energy efficient renovationsacross Europe, solar photovoltaic (PV) deployment in multi-family housing will play an increasingly important roletowards meeting renewable energy, climate, and sustainability goals. This paper describes the stories of threeSwedish residential cooperatives who have installed large-scale PV systems across multiple buildings on their estates.In all cases, reduced operating costs were the original primary motivator; however unforeseen cost increases, changesin policy, and excess supply in the electricity market have made economic success less likely than originallyexpected. Regardless, the owners consider their projects a success due in part to short term social and long-termenvironmental benefits, which were originally less important and difficult to quantify. We can conclude thatcommunity owned PV offers more than just economic benefits, and Sweden’s unique ownership and managementstructure of residential cooperatives can offer insights towards increased deployment in other nations in Europe.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 148. Stenberg, Una
    et al.
    Cvancarova, Milada
    Ekstedt, Mirjam
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Systems Safety and Management.
    Olsson, Mariann
    Ruland, Cornelia
    Family Caregivers of Cancer Patients: Perceived Burden and Symptoms During the Early Phases of Cancer Treatment2014In: Social work in health care, ISSN 0098-1389, E-ISSN 1541-034X, Vol. 53, no 3, p. 289-309Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigated levels of symptoms, caregiver burden, and changes over time in 278 family caregivers (FC) of cancer patients. FCs experienced high levels of depressive symptoms and sleep disturbance, low levels of fatigue, and low to moderate levels of caregiver burden, yet these symptoms remained relatively stable over time. Being female and not being employed were factors associated with an increased risk of symptoms and caregiver burden. The understanding evolving from this study can enhance social- and health care professionals' awareness of FCs' challenging situation and the potential impact this has on the FCs' ability to provide care to the patient.

  • 149.
    Swyngedouw, Erik
    et al.
    Univ Manchester, Geog, Manchester, Lancs, England..
    Ernstson, Henrik
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment. University of Manchester, United Kingdom.
    Interrupting the Anthropo-obScene: Immuno-biopolitics and Depoliticizing Ontologies in the Anthropocene2018In: Theory, Culture and Society. Explorations in Critical Social Science, ISSN 0263-2764, E-ISSN 1460-3616, Vol. 35, no 6, p. 3-30Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper argues that the Anthropocene' is a deeply depoliticizing notion. This de-politicization unfolds through the creation of a set of narratives, what we refer to as AnthropoScenes', which broadly share the effect of off-staging certain voices and forms of acting. Our notion of the Anthropo-obScene is our tactic to both attest to and undermine the depoliticizing stories of the Anthropocene'. We first examine how various AnthropoScenes, while internally fractured and heterogeneous, ranging from geo-engineering and earth system science to more-than-human and object-oriented ontologies, place things and beings, human and non-human, within a particular relational straitjacket that does not allow for a remainder or constitutive outside. This risks deepening an immunological biopolitical fantasy that promises adaptive and resilient terraforming, an earth system management of sorts that permits life as we know it to continue for some, while turning into a necropolitics for others. Second, we develop a post-foundational political perspective in relation to our dramatically changing socio-ecological situation. This perspective understands the political in terms of performance and, in an Arendtian manner, re-opens the political as forms of public-acting in common that subtracts from or exceeds what is gestured to hold socio-ecological constellations together. We conclude that what is off-staged and rendered obscene in the AnthropoScenes' carries precisely the possibility of a return of the political.

  • 150.
    Sörlin, Sverker
    KTH, Superseded Departments, History of Science and Technology.
    Tsunamin - en klassfråga: Fattiga har drabbats värst2004In: Dagens nyheter, ISSN 1101-2447, no 2004-12-30Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
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