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  • 101.
    Dahlberg, Leif
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    All Aboard the Louis Vuitton Train!2016In: Pólemos, ISSN 2036-4601, Vol. 10, no 1, p. 179-195Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The article discusses fashion advertising as a means to access and understand contemporary social imaginary significations of the body politic, focusing on an advertising for Louis Vuitton. The article suggest that one can read advertising as a form of continuous, running commentary that society makes of itself, and through which one can unearth the social imaginary. The article finds a plethora of meanings in the selected advertising for Louis Vuitton, but the central finding is that the fashion advertising represents community as an absence of community; in other words as a deficit that the brand somehow is able to rectify.

  • 102.
    Dahlberg, Leif
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Det akademiska samtalet2015In: Universitetet som medium / [ed] Matts Lindström & Adam Wickberg Månsson, Lund: Mediehistoria, Lunds universitet , 2015, p. 195-223Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Download full text (pdf)
    Det akademiska samtalet
  • 103.
    Dahlberg, Leif
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Pirater, partisaner och ekollon2010In: Efter The Pirate Bay / [ed] Jonas Andersson & Pelle Snickars, Stockholm: Kungliga biblioteket , 2010, p. 153-172Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 104.
    Dahlberg, Leif
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Spacing Law and Politics: The Constitution and Representation of the Juridical2016 (ed. 1)Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Examining the inherent spatiality of law, both theoretically and as social practice, this book presents a genealogical account of the emergence and the development of the juridical. In an analysis that stretches from ancient Greece, through late antiquity and early modern and modern Europe, and on to the contemporary courtroom, it considers legal and philosophical texts, artistic and literary works, as well as judicial practices, in order to elicit and document a series of critical moments in the history of juridical space. Offering a more nuanced understanding of law than that found in traditional philosophical, political or social accounts of legal history, Dahlberg forges a critical account of the intimate relations between law and politics that shows how juridical space is determined and conditioned in ways that are integral to the very functioning – and malfunctioning – of law.

  • 105. De Gelder, Pieter
    et al.
    Hessel, Philippe
    Holmberg, Jan-Erik
    VTT, Technical Research Centre of Finland, Espoo, Finlan.
    Lanore, Jeanne-Marie
    Macsuga, Geza
    Homma, Toshimitsu
    Muramatasu, Ken
    Sung, Key-Yong
    Lee, Chang-Ju
    Amri, Abdallah
    Pyy, Pekka
    Kovàcs, Zoltan
    Schoen, Gerhard
    Knochenhauer, Michael
    Chao, Chun-Chn
    Kao, Tsu-Mu
    Gomez-Cobo, Anna
    Monninger, John
    Siu, Nathan
    Probabilistic Risk Criteria and Safety Goals: NEA/CSNI/R(2009)16, OECD, Nuclear Energy Agency, Committee on the Safety of Nuclear Installations, Paris, 20092009Report (Other academic)
  • 106.
    de Vries, Marc J.
    et al.
    Eindhoven University of Technology, Eindhoven, Netherlands.
    Hansson, Sven Ove
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, Philosophy.
    Meijers, Antonie W. M.
    Eindhoven University of Technology, Eindhoven, Netherlands.
    Preface2013In: Norms in Technology, Springer Nature , 2013, p. v-Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 107. Delios, A.
    et al.
    Clemente, E. G.
    Wu, T.
    Tan, H.
    Wang, Y.
    Gordon, M.
    Viganola, D.
    Chen, Z.
    Dreber, A.
    Johannesson, M.
    Pfeiffer, T.
    Uhlmann, E. L.
    Al-Aziz, A. M. A.
    Abraham, A. T.
    Trojan, J.
    Adamkovic, M.
    Agadullina, E.
    Ahn, J.
    Akinci, C.
    Akkas, H.
    Albrecht, D.
    Alzahawi, S.
    Amaral-Baptista, M.
    Anand, R.
    Ang, K. F. U.
    Anseel, F.
    Aruta, J. J. B. R.
    Ashraf, M.
    Baker, B. J.
    Bao, X.
    Baskin, E.
    Bathula, H.
    Bauman, C. W.
    Bavolar, J.
    Bayraktar, S.
    Beckman, S. E.
    Benjamin, A. S.
    Brown, S. E. V.
    Buckley, Jeffrey
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Learning.
    Buitrago, R. E.
    Bution, J. L.
    Byrd, N.
    Carrera, C.
    Caruso, E. M.
    Chen, M.
    Chen, L.
    Cicerali, E. E.
    Cohen, E. D.
    Crede, M.
    Cummins, J.
    Dahlander, L.
    Daniels, D. P.
    Daskalo, L. L.
    Dawson, I. G. J.
    Day, M. V.
    Dietl, E.
    Domurat, A.
    Dsilva, J.
    Du Plessis, C.
    Dubrov, D. I.
    Edris, S.
    Elbaek, C. T.
    Elsherif, M. M.
    Evans, T. R.
    Fellenz, M. R.
    Fiedler, S.
    Firat, M.
    Freitag, R.
    Furrer, R. A.
    Gautam, R.
    Gautam, D. K.
    Gearin, B.
    Gerschewski, S.
    Ghasemi, O.
    Ghasemi, Z.
    Ghosh, A.
    Giani, C.
    Goldberg, M. H.
    Goswami, M.
    Graf-Vlachy, L.
    Rajeshwari, H.
    Griffith, J. A.
    Grigoryev, D.
    Gu, J.
    Hadida, A. L.
    Hafenbrack, A. C.
    Hafenbrädl, S.
    Hammersley, J. J.
    Han, H.
    Harman, J. L.
    Hartanto, A.
    Henkel, A. P.
    Ho, Y. -C
    Holding, B. C.
    Holzmeister, F.
    Horobet, A.
    Huang, T. S. -T
    Huang, Y.
    Huntsinger, J. R.
    Idzikowska, K.
    Imada, H.
    Imran, R.
    Ingels, M. J.
    Jaeger, B.
    Janssen, S. M. J.
    Jia, F.
    Jiménez, A.
    Jin, J. L.
    Johannes, N.
    Jolles, D.
    Jozefiakova, B.
    Kačmár, P.
    Kalandadze, T.
    Kalimeri, K.
    Kang, P.
    Kantorowicz, J.
    Karada, D.
    Karimi-Rouzbahani, H.
    Kee, D. M. H.
    Keller, L.
    Khan, H. A.
    Knutsson, M.
    Kombeiz, O.
    Korniychuk, A.
    Kowal, M.
    Leder, J.
    Liang, L. W.
    Liew, T.
    Lin, F.
    Liu, C.
    Liu, B.
    Longo, M. C.
    Lovakov, A.
    Low, M. P.
    Lucas, G. J. M.
    Lukason, O.
    Ly, A. L.
    Ma, Z.
    Mafael, A.
    Mahmoudkalayeh, S.
    Manheim, D.
    Marcus, A.
    Marsh, M. S.
    Martin, J. M.
    Martinez, L. E.
    Martinoli, M.
    Martončik, M.
    Masters-Waage, T. C.
    Mata, R.
    Mazloomi, H.
    Mccarthy, R. J.
    Millroth, P.
    Mishra, M.
    Mishra, S.
    Mohr, A.
    Moreau, D.
    Myer, A.
    Nadler, A.
    Nair, S.
    Nilsonne, G.
    Niszczota, P.
    O'Mahony, A.
    Oberhauser, M.
    Obloj, T.
    Orhan, M. A.
    Oswald, F.
    Otterbring, T.
    Otto, P. E.
    Padrón-Hernández, I.
    Pan, A. J.
    Paruzel-Czachura, M.
    Pfuhl, G.
    Pirrone, A.
    Porcher, S.
    Protzko, J.
    Qi, S.
    Rahal, R. -M
    Rahman, Md.S.
    Reina, M. L.
    Rentala, S.
    Riaz, Z.
    Ropovik, I.
    Röseler, L.
    Ross, R. M.
    Rotella, A.
    Roth, L. H. O.
    Roulet, T. J.
    Rubin, M. M.
    Sammartino, A.
    Sanchez, J.
    Saville, A. D.
    Schaerer, M.
    Schleu, J. E.
    Schmallenbach, L.
    Schnabel, L.
    Spüntrup, F. S.
    Schumpe, B. M.
    Senanayake, T.
    Seri, R.
    Sheng, F.
    Snider, R. E.
    Song, D.
    Song, V.
    Starnawska, S. E.
    Stern, K. A.
    Stevens, S. M.
    Strømland, E.
    Su, W.
    Sun, H.
    Sweeney, K. P.
    Takamatsu, R.
    Terskova, M.
    Tey, K. S.
    Tierney, W.
    Todorova, M. M.
    Tolstoy, D.
    Torkkeli, L.
    Tybur, J. M.
    Valderrey, F. J.
    Vallina-Hernandez, A. M.
    Vasudevan, R. P.
    Rao, G. V.
    Vernet, A.
    Vissak, T.
    Voss, H.
    Wahle, T.
    Wai, J.
    Wakabayashi, L. E. T.
    Wang, J.
    Wang, P.
    Warmenhoven, R. W.
    Wennberg, K.
    Wernicke, G.
    Woike, J. K.
    Wollbrant, C. E.
    Woodin, G.
    Wright, J. D.
    Xia, Q.
    Xie, Z.
    Yoon, S.
    Yuan, W.
    Yuan, L.
    Yucel, M.
    Zheng, Z.
    Zhou, H.
    Zogmaister, C.
    Zultan, R.
    Collaboration, Generalizability Tests Forecasting
    Examining the generalizability of research findings from archival data2022In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, ISSN 0027-8424, E-ISSN 1091-6490, Vol. 119, no 30, article id e2120377119Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This initiative examined systematically the extent to which a large set of archival research findings generalizes across contexts. We repeated the key analyses for 29 original strategic management effects in the same context (direct reproduction) as well as in 52 novel time periods and geographies; 45% of the reproductions returned results matching the original reports together with 55% of tests in different spans of years and 40% of tests in novel geographies. Some original findings were associated with multiple new tests. Reproducibility was the best predictor of generalizability-for the findings that proved directly reproducible, 84% emerged in other available time periods and 57% emerged in other geographies. Overall, only limited empirical evidence emerged for context sensitivity. In a forecasting survey, independent scientists were able to anticipate which effects would find support in tests in new samples. 

  • 108.
    Ding, Qian
    Dalian Maritime University, Environmental Science and Engineering College, Institution of Philosophy.
    The Distribution of Heavy Metal Pollution in Jinzhou Bay2009In: Fisheries Science, ISSN 0919-9268, E-ISSN 1444-2906, Vol. 28, no 12, p. 801-804Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 109.
    Ding, Qian
    et al.
    Dalian Maritime University, Environmental Science and Engineering College, Institution of Philosophy.
    Schenk, Linda
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, Philosophy.
    Malkiewicz, Katarzyna
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, Philosophy.
    Hansson, Sven Ove
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, Philosophy.
    A comparison of occupational exposure limits in Asia and Europe2011Report (Refereed)
  • 110.
    Ding, Qian
    et al.
    Dalian Maritime University, Environmental Science and Engineering College, Institution of Philosophy.
    Wang, X.Y.
    Li, Q.B.
    Luo, Y.M.
    Characteristics and sources of atmospheric polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in Shanghai, China2010In: Environmental Monitoring & Assessment, ISSN 0167-6369, E-ISSN 1573-2959, Vol. 165, no 1-4, p. 295-305Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A field campaign was conducted to measure and analyze 13 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in six major zones in the city of Shanghai, P.R. China from August 2006 to April 2007. Ambient air samples were collected seasonally using passive air samplers, and gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy was used in this field campaign. The results showed that there was a sequence of 13 PAHs at Phen > FA > Pyr > Chr > Fl > An > BaA > BbFA > BghiP > IcdP > BkFA > BaP > DahA and the sum of these PAHs is 36.01 ± 10.85 ng/m3 in gas phase. FL, Phen, FA, Pyr, and Chr were the dominant PAHs in gas phase in the city. They contributed 90% of total PAHs in the gas phase. Proportion of measured PAHs with three, four, five, and six rings to total PAHs was 53%, 42%, 3%, and 2%, respectively. The highest concentration of ∑PAHs (the sum of 13 PAHs) occurred in the wintertime and the lowest was in the summer. This investigation suggested that traffic, wood combustion, and metal scrap burn emissions were dominant sources of the concentrations of PAHs in six city zones compared with coal burning and industry emissions. Further, the traffic emission sources of PAHs in the city were attributed mostly to gasoline-powered vehicles compared with diesel-powered vehicles. It was revealed that the seasonal changes in PAHs in the city depended on different source types. Metal scrap burn was found to be the major source of PAHs during the autumn, while the PAH levels in the atmosphere for winter and spring seasons were mainly influenced by wood and biomass combustion. Comparisons of PAHs among different city zones and with several other cities worldwide were also made and discussed.

  • 111.
    Ding, Qian
    et al.
    Dalian Maritime University, Environmental Science and Engineering College, Institution of Philosophy.
    Wang, Z.
    Ma, X.
    Na, G.
    Lin, Z.
    Yao, Z.
    Correlations between physicochemical properties of PAHs and their distribution in soil, moss and reindeer dung at Ny-Ålesund of the Arctic2009In: Environmental Pollution, ISSN 0269-7491, E-ISSN 1873-6424, Vol. 157, no 11, p. 3132-3136Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Concentrations of 16 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in soil, moss and reindeer dung collected at Ny-Alesund of the Arctic were measured to investigate their accumulation trends and distribution in the three compartments. Compared with the other regions, the proportions of 2 + 3 ring PAHs to the total PAHs were higher, whereas the proportions of 5 + 6 ring PAHs were lower in the three compartments at Ny-Alesund. Significant log/log-linear relationship was observed between the sub-cooled liquid vapor pressure (p) and the soil/moss quotient (Q(SM)). The relation was similar to the relationship between the gas/particle partition coefficient (K(P)) and p(L)degrees of PAHs, implying Q(SM) would be a "mirror image" of K(P). Excellent log/log-linear relationships were observed between Q(SM) and K(OA) as well as between the moss/dung quotient (Q(MD)) and K(OW). The results presented here indicate the physicochemical properties are suitable for characterizing the distribution of PAHs in soil, moss and reindeer dung.

  • 112.
    Doorn, Neelke
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, Philosophy.
    Hansson, Sven Ove
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, Philosophy.
    Should safety factors replace probabilistic design?2011In: Philosophy and Technology, ISSN 2210-5433, Vol. 24, no 2, p. 151-168Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Safety is a concern in almost all branches of engineering. Whereas safety was traditionally introduced by applying safety factors or margins to the calculated maximum load, this approach is increasingly replaced with probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) as a tool for dimensioning safety measures. In this paper, the two approaches are compared in terms of what they aim at and what they can, in fact, achieve. The outcome of this comparison suggests that the two approaches should be seen as complementary rather than mutually exclusive. PRA is particularly useful for priority setting and for the effect evaluation of safety measures; however, in most applications, uncertainties prevent PRA from providing an objective probability of failure or value of damage. Safety factorsare indispensible for dealing with dangers that cannot be assigned meaningful probabilities.

  • 113.
    Doorn, Neelke
    et al.
    Delft University of Technology, Delft, The Netherlands.
    Nihlén Fahlquist, Jessica
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, Philosophy.
    Responsibility in Engineering: Towards a New Role for Engineering Ethicists2010In: Bulletin of Science, Technology & Society, ISSN 0270-4676, E-ISSN 1552-4183, Vol. 30, no 3, p. 222-230Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Traditionally, the management of technology has focused on the stages before or after development of technology. In this approach the technology itself is conceived as the result of a deterministic enterprise; a result that is to be either rejected or embraced. However, recent insights from Science and Technology Studies (STS) have shown that there is ample room to modulate technology during development. This requires technology managers and engineering ethicists to become more involved in the technological research rather than assessing it from an outsider perspective. Instead of focusing on the question whether or not to authorize, approve, or adopt a certain technology or on the question of who is to blame for potential mistakes, the guiding question in this new approach is how research is to be carried out.

  • 114.
    Dubois, Mikael
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    A contractarian jusification of social insurance with income maintenanceManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 115.
    Dubois, Mikael
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, Philosophy.
    An Argument for Social InsuranceManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 116.
    Dubois, Mikael
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, Philosophy.
    Justification and LegitimacyManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 117.
    Dubois, Mikael
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, Philosophy.
    Practical acceptance and Cooperative schemesManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 118.
    Dubois, Mikael
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology.
    Prevention and social insurance: conceptual and ethical aspects2007Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other scientific)
  • 119.
    Dubois, Mikael
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology.
    Prevention as a relative product?: a new approach to the analysis of preventionManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 120.
    Dubois, Mikael
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, Philosophy.
    Social insurance and the argument from autonomy2013In: Public Reason, ISSN 2065-7285, E-ISSN 2065-8958, Vol. 5, no 1, p. 1-17Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In recent decades politicians and policy-makers have emphasised the need to shift from a "passive" to an "active" welfare state. This has resulted in policies that reduce compensation rates in social insurance or make compensation conditional on different requirements such as participation in rehabilitation or vocational training. This article argues that such policies are justified if they tend to ensure an adequate level of personal autonomy. To that effect, a 'thick' conception of personal autonomy is spelled out based on Norman Daniels' extension of the principle of fair equality of opportunity. Some objections to policies limiting entitlement to social insurance are discussed. It is argued that although the objections fail to show that limited entitlement to social insurance is always unjustified, they identify considerations that must be taken into account for an overall assessment of such policies.

  • 121.
    Dubois, Mikael
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology.
    The individual or the institution?: ethics and behavioural responses to social insurance2007In: Journal of Applied Philosophy, ISSN 0264-3758, E-ISSN 1468-5930, Vol. 24, no 3, p. 316-328Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Individuals tend to change their behaviour as a response to insurance. Such behavioural responses to insurance are commonly seen as ethically and morally problematic.This is especially true of effects on behaviour from social insurance. These effects have beenseen as an ethical problem, associated with irresponsibility, fraud and an immoral character.This article discusses the relevance of four different types of reasons for claims that behaviouralresponses to social insurance are immoral. These reasons are (1) independent reasons (2) contractrelated reasons (3) reasons related to fraud and (4) reasons related to justice. I arguethat reasons related to justice are most relevant, but that this type of reason does not render theindividual morally blameworthy. Hence, insofar as behavioural responses to social insurance are an ethical problem it is a problem that concerns the institution, i.e. what incentives socialinsurance exhibits, rather than the individual, i.e. the morality of the individual responding toit. Insofar as behavioural responses to social insurance are an ethical problem it is a problemfor political philosophy rather than individual ethics.

  • 122.
    Dubois, Mikael
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History, Philosophy.
    The justification and legitimacy of the active welfare state: some philosophical aspects2015Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis has two aims. The first aim is to set out an argument for social insurance in the form of compulsory income insurance in the event of sickness or unemployment, and to explore two lines of arguments for social insurance policies that are commonly associated with an active welfare state that seeks to prevent or reduce reliance on social insurance. The second aim is to outline and defend an account of legitimacy that takes moral autonomy seriously by making legitimacy partly dependent on our entrenched values and preferences.

    The first aim is relevant for articles I-VI. In article I it is argued that the extent to which behavioural responses to social insurance is seen as ethically problematic, it is primarily a problem that concerns the institution rather than the morality of the individual whose behaviour is influenced by social insurance. Thus, insofar as behavioural responses to social insurance are an ethical problem, it is a problem for political philosophy rather than individual ethics. In article II an argument for social insurance in the form of compulsory income insurance in the event of sickness or unemployment is presented, viz. the argument from autonomy. It is based on a concern for the protection of our identity according to what is called a “thick” conception of the person, which holds that our identities as separate persons are constituted by our central aims and commitments. It is also argued that contrary to what has been claimed by its opponents; social insurance needs not lead to the bad risks exploiting the good risks, or be head-on in conflict with individual freedom. Article III identifies normative issues that deserve attention in relation to in relation to a general introduction of prevention policies in social insurance and market insurance. It is argued that the importance of these issues suggests that arguments and distinctions drawn from moral and political philosophy should play a more prominent role both in the debate on the shift towards an active welfare state and the use of prevention policies in market insurance. Article IV is a response to comments from Professor David Buchanan initiated by article III. Article V explores what is called the argument from autonomy for reduced compensation rates in social insurance or making compensation from such insurance conditional on different kinds of requirements such as participation in rehabilitation or vocational training. It is argued that such policies are justified if they tend to ensure an adequate level of autonomy, where autonomy is understood in the sense of a “thick” conception of personal autonomy based on Norman Daniel’s extension of the principle of fair equality of opportunity. Article VI discusses the objection that arguments pertaining to the principle of fairness often are irrelevant since the principle of fairness is based on the acceptance of the relevant benefits. It is argued that this objection from non-acceptance fails because we can – and do – accept the benefits form such institutions on a practical level and this is enough to ground obligations pertaining fairness. The implications of this argument for policies associated with the active welfare state are explored, taking a reform of the Swedish sickness insurance as an example.

    The second aim is relevant for article VII. In article VII it is argued that an account of legitimacy should satisfy three conditions. The justification thesis and the legitimacy thesis are presented as accounts of justification and legitimacy respectively. It is argued that the proposed accounts satisfy these conditions. An account of political obligations is also given.

     

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    Thesis
  • 123. Duncan, S. Y.
    et al.
    Pitt, Christine
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Ferguson, S. L.
    Grant, P.
    What Makes the Difference? Employee Social Media Brand Engagement: An Abstract2020In: AMSAC 2019: Marketing Opportunities and Challenges in a Changing Global Marketplace, Springer Nature , 2020, p. 531-532Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Through the employee lens of business-to-business (B2B) firms, we explore word use through brand engagement and social media interaction to understand what makes the difference of those employees who rate their employer brands highly on social media, and those who do not. This content becomes a valuable source of information for marketing decision makers, as well as an interesting and rich new source of data for B2B marketing scholars. Fortunately, the recent past has not only seen a significant rise in the amount of unstructured textual data available to researchers, but also a noteworthy increase in the number and sophistication of tools available to perform textual content analysis using computers. One of the major computerized text analysis tools in use today is LIWC (Linguistic Inquiry and Word Count), the development of which is described by Pennebaker and his colleagues (Pennebaker et al. 2001). We conducted a textual content analysis of social media job evaluation site glassdoor.com using the LIWC software package to analyze 30 of the top 200 B2B brands listed on Brandwatch using four variables, namely, analytical thinking, clout, authenticity, and emotional tone. The results show that employees who rate their employer’s brand low use significantly more words, are significantly less analytic, and write with significantly more clout because they focus more on others than themselves. Employees who rate their employer’s brand highly, write with significantly more authenticity, exhibit a significantly higher tone, and display far more positive emotions in their reviews. Brand engagement drives brand equity. Brand equity is not only a significant indicator of marketing effectiveness, it is also a fundamental driver of firm value. This research demonstrates that B2B brand managers and B2B branding scholars should treat social media data disseminated by individual stakeholders, like the variables used in this study (tone, word count, and frequency), as an opportunity to tap a rich source of data with powerful automated text analysis tools to better understand and manage brand insight, brand engagement, and brand equity now and over time. 

  • 124.
    Edvardsson Björnberg, Karin
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, Philosophy.
    Bör vi sätta utopiska mål?2005In: Filosofins nya möten / [ed] Edvardsson, K., Hansson, S. O. and J. Nihlén Fahlqvist, Hedemora: Gidlunds förlag , 2005, p. 211-219Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 125.
    Edvardsson Björnberg, Karin
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, Philosophy.
    Environmental policy for sustainable cities: The Swedish environmental quality objective ‘A good built environment’2006Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 126.
    Edvardsson Björnberg, Karin
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, Philosophy.
    Ethics and Public Policy: A Philosophical Inquiry2012In: Theoria, ISSN 0040-5825, E-ISSN 1755-2567, Vol. 78, no 3, p. 261-267Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 127.
    Edvardsson Björnberg, Karin
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, Philosophy.
    Fyller miljömålen sitt syfte?2006In: Vägar till ett effektivt miljöarbete / [ed] Edvardsson, K. and S. O. Hansson, Umeå: Borea Bokförlag , 2006Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 128.
    Edvardsson Björnberg, Karin
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, Philosophy.
    Klimatförändringar och kön: sitter vi alla i samma båt?2013In: Miljötidningen, ISSN 0282-2113, no 3Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
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  • 129.
    Edvardsson Björnberg, Karin
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, Philosophy.
    Rational environmental goals and sustainable planning2005In: The Sustainable City IV: Urban Regeneration and Sustainability / [ed] Mander, U., Brebbia, C. A. and E. Tiezzi, Southampton, Boston: WIT Press, 2005Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 130.
    Edvardsson Björnberg, Karin
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, Philosophy.
    Rational goals and sustainable development: An example from the Swedish system of environmental objectives2006In: Science for sustainable development: starting points and critical reflections / [ed] Björn Frostell, Uppsala: VHU , 2006, , p. 97-104p. 97-104Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 131.
    Edvardsson Björnberg, Karin
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, Philosophy.
    Rational Goals for the Urban Environment: A Swedish Example2009In: European Planning Studies, ISSN 0965-4313, E-ISSN 1469-5944, Vol. 17, no 7, p. 1007-1027Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In Sweden, the government's aim to create sustainable urban environments is expressed through the environmental quality objective A good built environment. The objective embraces seven sub-goals and is designed to guide central, regional and local authorities' planning towards urban sustainability. However, for objectives concerning the urban environment, such as the Swedish objective A good built environment, to form a solid basis for decision-making, two types of rationality (functionality) conditions ought to be met. First, the objectives should guide and motivate those who are responsible for their implementation. This is applicable when the goals satisfy the criteria of precision, evaluability, approachability and motivity. Second, when the goals are parts of larger goal systems, the goal systems should be coherent. Using the objective A good built environment as an empirical basis, this article gives a few examples of how environmental goals can fail to guide and motivate action towards improved urban sustainability.

  • 132.
    Edvardsson Björnberg, Karin
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, Philosophy.
    Rational goals in engineering design: The Venice dams2013In: Norms in Technology / [ed] MJ de Vries, SO Hansson, AWM Meijers, Dordrecht: Springer Science+Business Media B.V., 2013, p. 83-99Chapter in book (Refereed)
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    fulltext
  • 133.
    Edvardsson Björnberg, Karin
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, Philosophy.
    Rational Goal-Setting in Environmental Policy: Foundations and Applications2008Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other scientific)
    Abstract [en]

     The overall aim of this thesis is to present a model for rational goal-setting and to illustrate how it can be applied in evaluations of public policies, in particular policies concerning sustainable development and environmental quality. The contents of the thesis are divided into two sections: a theoretical section (Papers I-IV) and an empirical section (Papers V-VII). Paper I identifies a set of rationality criteria for single goals and discusses them in relation to the typical function of goals. It is argued that goals are typically set to enhance goal achievement. A goal that successfully furthers its achievement is “achievement-inducing”. It holds for each of the identified criteria that, ceteris paribus, improved satisfaction of a criterion makes a goal better in the achievement-inducing sense.Paper II contains an analysis of the notion of goal system coherence. It is argued that the coherence of a goal system is determined by the relations that hold among the goals in the system, in particular the relations of operationalization, means and ends, support, and conflict. Paper III investigates the rationality of utopian goals. The paper analyzes four arguments that support the normative criterion of attainability: that utopian goals are (1) too imprecise and (2) too far-reaching to guide action effectively, (3) counterproductive, and (4) morally objectionable. A tentative defence of utopian goal-setting is built on counter-arguments that can be put forward to weaken each of the four objections. Paper IV investigates the nature of self-defeating goals. The paper identifies three types of situations in which self-defeating mechanisms obstruct goal achievement: (1) situations in which the goal itself carries the seeds of its own non-fulfilment (self-defeating goals), (2) situations in which the activity of goal-setting contributes to goal failure (self-defeating goal-setting), and (3) situations in which disclosure of the goal interferes with progress (self-defeating goal disclosure). Paper V provides a brief description of the Swedish system of environmental objectives and a preliminary inventory of the management difficulties that attach to this goal system.Paper VI contains an investigation into the rationality of five Swedish environmental objectives through an application of the rationality criteria identified in Papers I-II. The paper identifies and discusses some difficulties that are associated with management by objectives and the use of goals in environmental policy. Paper VII analyses the rationality of the Swedish environmental quality objective A good built environment. Among the conclusions drawn in the paper are that some of the sub-goals to the objective are formulated in terms that are unnecessarily vague from an action-guiding standpoint and that others are problematic from the viewpoint of evaluability.

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  • 134.
    Edvardsson Björnberg, Karin
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History, Philosophy.
    Setting and Revising Goals2016In: Log. Argum. Reason., Springer Science and Business Media B.V. , 2016, p. 171-188Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    If goals are to fulfil their typical function of regulating action in a way that contributes to an agent’s long-term interests in getting what he or she wants, they need to have a certain stability. At the same time, it is not difficult to imagine situations in which the agent could have a reason to revise his or her goals; goals that are entirely impossible to achieve or approach to a meaningful degree appear to warrant some modification. This chapter addresses the question of when it is rationally justified to reconsider one’s prior goals. In doing so, it enriches the strictly instrumental conception of rationality. Using Bratman’s (1992; 1999) theory of intention and Edvardsson and Hansson’s (2005) theory of rational goal-setting, the chapter critically analyses the steps in the argumentative chain that ought to be considered before it can be concluded that a decision maker has sufficient reason to reconsider her goals. Two sets of revision-prompting considerations are identified: achievability- and desirability-related considerations. It is argued that changes in the agent’s beliefs about the goal’s achievability and/or desirability could give her a prima facie reason to reconsider the goal. However, whether there is sufficient reason—all things considered—to revise the goal hinges on additional factors. Three such factors are discussed: pragmatic, moral and symbolic factors.

  • 135.
    Edvardsson Björnberg, Karin
    KTH, Superseded Departments (pre-2005), History of Science and Technology.
    Using Goals in Environmental Management: The Swedish System of Environmental Objectives2004In: Environmental Management, ISSN 0364-152X, E-ISSN 1432-1009, Vol. 34, no 2, p. 170-180Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In Sweden, environmental policy is essentially carried out through a system of environmental objectives adopted by Parliament in the late 1990s. This system contains principles, objectives, interim targets, strategies, and follow-up mechanisms, which together provide a solid ground for increased efficiency and improved prioritization in environmental policies. Despite the ambitious approach of the Swedish Parliament, the system of environmental objectives suffers from certain shortcomings. Some of the objectives are imprecise and difficult to evaluate, and there are no rules or principles that may be used to solve goal conflicts and to prioritize between different objectives. As a consequence, the environmental objectives tend to differ in their degrees of operationalizability, and the priority-setting between different objectives is often unclear.

  • 136.
    Edvardsson Björnberg, Karin
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, Philosophy.
    Utopian Goals: Four Objections and a Cautious Defence2008In: Philosophy in the Contemporary World, ISSN 1077-1999, Vol. 15, no 1, p. 139-154Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 137.
    Edvardsson Björnberg, Karin
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, Philosophy.
    What Relations Can Hold among Goals, and Why Does It Matter?2009In: Critica-Revista Hispanoamericana de Filosofia, ISSN 0011-1503, Vol. 41, no 121, p. 47-66Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Goals are often set as part of Clusters of goals. On the assumption that goals are set because we want to achieve them it is interesting to study not only the conditions tinder which individual goals are rational (functional) but also the factors that combine to determine the rationality of a goal system. This paper argues that to be rational goal systems ought to be coherent, at least to some degree. The paper provides an analysis of goal system coherence and discusses to what. extent goal conflicts are problematic from an action-guiding viewpoint.

  • 138.
    Edvardsson Björnberg, Karin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, Philosophy.
    Cantwell, John
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, Philosophy.
    Hansson, Sven Ove
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, Philosophy.
    Self-Defeating GoalsArticle in journal (Other academic)
  • 139.
    Edvardsson Björnberg, Karin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, Philosophy.
    Finnveden, Göran
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies.
    Sundqvist, Johan
    KTH.
    KTH-toppar attackerar miljömålarbetet – ”Långsamt och otillräckligt”2011In: Miljöaktuellt, ISSN 1402-7577Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 140.
    Edvardsson Björnberg, Karin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, Philosophy.
    Hansson, Sven Ove
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, Philosophy.
    Five areas of value judgement in local adaptation to climate change2012In: Local Government Studies, ISSN 0300-3930, E-ISSN 1743-9388, Vol. 37, no 6, p. 671-687Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Climate change has generated several new theoretical and policy challenges, many of which concern how local communities ought to adapt to a warmer climate. This paper identifies and analyses a number of value judgements that come to the fore as local authorities adapt to climate change. Five categories of judgements are discussed: evaluation (how should the consequences of adaptation be evaluated?), timing (when should adaptive action be taken?), distribution (how should the benefits and burdens of adaptation be distributed?), procedures (who should be involved in adaptation decision making?), and goal conflicts (how should goal conflicts in adaptation be dealt with?). For each category, further research is needed to assist decision making at the local level.

  • 141.
    Edvardsson Björnberg, Karin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, Philosophy.
    Hansson, Sven Ove
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, Philosophy.
    Förord2006In: Vägar till ett effektivt miljöarbete / [ed] Karin Edvardsson & Sven Ove Hansson, Umeå: Boréa Bokförlag, 2006Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 142.
    Edvardsson Björnberg, Karin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, Philosophy.
    Hansson, Sven Ove
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, Philosophy.
    Gendering local climate adaptation2013In: Local Environment: the International Journal of Justice and Sustainability, ISSN 1354-9839, E-ISSN 1469-6711, Vol. 18, no 2, p. 217-232Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Empirical evidence suggests that climate change will hit women disproportionately hard. Lack of political power, small economic resources, gender-bound patterns in the division of labour, entrenched cultural patterns and possibly biological differences in heat sensitivity combine to make women and girls particularly vulnerable to extreme weather and other climate-related events. Adaptation responses will likely reduce some of these vulnerabilities. However, just as climate change is likely to impact more severely on women than men, the costs and benefits of adaptation could be unevenly distributed between the sexes. Unless adaptation measures are carefully designed from a gender perspective, they may contribute to preserving prevailing gender inequalities and reinforce women's vulnerability to climate change. Institutions and decision-making processes need to be remodelled so as to guarantee that gender issues are adequately targeted within adaptation. This article identifies a number of methodologies and decision tools that could be used to mainstream gender in local adaptation planning.

  • 143.
    Edvardsson Björnberg, Karin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, Philosophy.
    Hansson, Sven OveKTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, Philosophy.
    Vägar till ett effektivt miljöarbete2006Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 144.
    Edvardsson Björnberg, Karin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, Philosophy.
    Hansson, Sven Ove
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, Philosophy.
    When Is a Goal Rational?2005In: Social Choice and Welfare, ISSN 0176-1714, E-ISSN 1432-217X, Vol. 24, no 2, p. 343-361Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In decision theory goals are usually taken as given inputs to the analysis, and the focus is on finding the most efficient means to achieve the goals. But where goals are set with the purpose of achieving them, it is important to know what properties they should possess in order to be successful (or achievement-inducing). Four such properties (or rationality criteria) are discussed, namely that goals should be precise, evaluable, approachable and motivating. Precision and evaluability are epistemic properties that concern what the agent may know. Approachability is an ability-related property that concerns what the agent can do. Motivity is a volitional property that concerns what the agent wants to do. Goals may satisfy the rationality criteria to a greater or lesser extent. Some goals are achievement-inducing mainly because they guide action towards the end-state well, others mainly because they motivate the agent to act towards the realization of the end-state.

  • 145.
    Edvardsson Björnberg, Karin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, Philosophy.
    Hansson, Sven OveKTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, Philosophy.Nihlén Fahlquist, JessicaKTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, Philosophy.
    Filosofins nya möten2005Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 146.
    Edvardsson Björnberg, Karin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, Philosophy.
    Svenfelt, Åsa
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies.
    Adapting cities to climate change: goal conflicts and methods of conflict resolution2009In: Fifth Urban Research Symposium 2009, 2009Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Decision-making concerning adaptation to climate change ofteninvolves choosing between different options, each of which can have importantimplications for the achievability of other goals and policies. In this article,adaptation measures and goal conflicts are investigated using the City ofStockholm as an empirical basis. The investigation shows that goal conflicts inadaptation are common phenomena. This points to the need for assessing andpredicting the environmental, social and economic impacts of adaptation measures,strategies and policies at an early stage in the decision-making process. To ensurethe coherence with other policy goals, there is a need for tools to assess and predictoutcomes, but also to balance those outcomes in situations where they are noteasily reunited.

  • 147.
    Edvardsson Björnberg, Karin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, Philosophy.
    Svenfelt, Åsa
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Goal Conflicts in Adaptation to Climate Change. An inventory of goal conflicts tn the Swedish sectors of the built environment, tourism and outdoor recreation, and human health2009Report (Other academic)
  • 148.
    Edvardsson Björnberg, Karin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History, Philosophy.
    Zetterberg, Charlotta
    Hansson, Sven Ove
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History, Philosophy.
    Andreasson, Erik
    Zhu, Li-Hua
    Consistent risk regulation? Differences in the European regulation of food crops2019In: Journal of Risk Research, ISSN 1366-9877, E-ISSN 1466-4461, Vol. 22, no 12, p. 1561-1570Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the EU legal system, there is a large difference between the procedures and requirements for the introduction of crops that are classified as genetically modified (GM) and crops not so classified. In order to investigate whether this regulatory divide is compatible with real risks two cases of GM crops and two cases of non-GM crops are scrutinized. It is concluded that the regulatory divide cannot be justified from the viewpoint of risk assessment, since the GM/non-GM dichotomy is not an accurate indicator of either health risk or environmental risk. Much better such indicators are available and should form the basis of a legislation aimed at preventing the introduction of crops that are harmful for human health or the environment. If the legislator has other reasons to regulate GM crops differently than conventional crops, then those reasons should be stated in the legislation and determine the types of measures that it prescribes.

  • 149.
    Edvardsson, Karin
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology.
    How to Set Rational Environmental Goals: theory and applications2006Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other scientific)
    Abstract [en]

    Environmental goals are commonly set to guide work towards ecological sustainability. The aim of this thesis is to develop a precise terminology for the description of goals in terms of properties that are important in their practical use as decision-guides and to illustrate how it can be used in evaluations of environmental policy.

    Essay I (written together with Sven Ove Hansson) identifies a set of rationality criteria for individual goals and discusses them in relation to the typical function of goals. For a goal to perform its typical function, i.e., to guide and induce action, it must be precise, evaluable, approachable (attainable), and motivating.

    Essay II argues that for a goal system to be rational it must not only satisfy the criteria identified in Essay I but should also be coherent. The coherence of a goal system is made up of the relations that hold among the goals, most notably relations of support and conflict, but possibly also relations of operationalization. A major part of the essay consists in a conceptual analysis of the three relations.

    Essay III contains an investigation into the rationality of five Swedish environmental objectives through an application of the rationality criteria identified in Essays I-II. The paper draws the conclusion that the objectives are not sufficiently rational according to the suggested criteria. It also briefly points at some of the difficulties that are associated with the use of goals in environmental policy and managemen

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  • 150.
    Edvardsson, Karin
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, Philosophy.
    Setting Rational Environmental Goals: Five Swedish Environmental Quality Objectives2007In: Journal of Environmental Planning and Management, ISSN 0964-0568, E-ISSN 1360-0559, Vol. 50, no 2, p. 297-316Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Goals and performance targets are commonly used as tools in the policy-implementation process. In Sweden, environmental policy is operationalized through a system of environmental quality objectives that were adopted by the Swedish Riksdag in the late 1990s. The objectives describe what level of environmental quality Sweden should aim for within a generation, and are designed to guide decision making in all sectors of society. However, to guide decision making toward improved environmental quality, these objectives should satisfy a set of rationality (functionality) criteria; they should be precise, evaluable, approachable, motivating and coherent. In this paper, five Swedish environmental quality objectives are investigated through an application of the suggested criteria: (1) a balanced marine environment, flourishing coastal areas and archipelagos; (2) a magnificent mountain landscape; (3) a non-toxic environment; (4) natural acidification only; and (5) a good built environment. The aim of the paper is to bring the rationality of the objectives up for discussion, and to illustrate the range of issues and difficulties that are involved in choosing and assessing environmental policy goals.

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