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  • 101.
    Sandberg, Fredrik
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, School of Design,SE-39182 Kalmar, Sweden.
    Westerlund, Bo
    Konstfack, LM Ericssons väg 14,Box 3601 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Widmark, Erik
    Transformator Design AB, Götgatan 19,11646 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Andersson, Sophie
    Transformator Design AB, Götgatan 19,11646 Stockholm, Sweden.
    The struggles of co-creation – The highs and lows of involving stakeholders into the service design process2013In: Collaborative Systems for Reindustrialization. 14th IFIP WG 5.5 Working Conference on Virtual Enterprises, PRO-VE 2013 Dresden, Germany, September/October 2013 Proceedings / [ed] Luis M. Camarinha-Matos ; Raimar J. Scherer, Heidelberg: Springer, 2013, p. 415-422Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents our experiences from a research project on how to co-develop new methods for idea generation within a service design practice. As an example the paper describes how service designers used two visual inquiry methods together with customers and employees in different service situations. The results show that that there is great potential in developing methods for co-design work based on design approaches. This project relies on a mindset where materials of different kinds, that can be organized and reorganized in different ways are used. This supports a way of creating knowledge that facilitates production of other results than the purely verbal. We have also realized that it requires a great amount of work to achieve a great result.

  • 102.
    Schalk, Meike
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE).
    Mazé, Ramia (Editor)
    Interview with Meike Schalk2011In: Design Act : socially and politically engaged design today: critical roles and emerging tactics, Berlin: Sternberg Press , 2011, p. 199-207Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 103.
    Schöggl, Josef-Peter
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center for ECO2 Vehicle design. University of Graz, Institute of Systems Sciences Innovation & Sustainability Research, Austria.
    O'Reilly, Ciarán J.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center for ECO2 Vehicle design.
    Göransson, Peter
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center for ECO2 Vehicle design.
    A design-theoretic review of Sustainable Product Development literature2019In: 22nd International Conference on Sustainable Innovation, 2019Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Improving the socio-ecological performance of products in the design stage is essential for achieving sustainable patterns of production and consumption in line with the aims of the UN Sustainable Development Goals or the EU Action Plan for a Circular Economy. However, the uptake of available methods for sustainable product development (SPD) in practice is still low. Therefore, this paper explores if and how the integration of such methods with theories and models of design can contribute to overcoming the lagging adoption of SPD practices. The systematic review that was conducted on the intersection SPD and design theory research reveals that out of 2849 peer-reviewed publications on SPD, only 27 have a design-theoretic foundation. In fact, only the Theory of Inventive Problem Solving (TRIZ) and Axiomatic Design were utilised in SPD methods. The majority of the reviewed publications address cross-functional conflicts and provide exemplary cases but mainly focus on environmental aspects. Adoptions on a large scale are not reported. We conclude that underpinning SPD methods with theories and models of design constitutes a considerable research gap and that the addressing of it has the potential to further advance their integration with conventional engineering and design tasks.

  • 104.
    Sjöman, Martin
    et al.
    Textilhögskolan vid Högskolan i Borås.
    Svengren Holm, Lisbeth
    Textilhögskolan vid Högskolan i Borås.
    Radón, Anita
    Textilhögskolan vid Högskolan i Borås.
    Entreprenörskap och kreativitet i framgångsrika svenska modeföretag2013In: Kreativt kapital: Om ledning och organisation i kulturella och kreativa näringar / [ed] Emma Senström och Lars Strannegård, Stockholm: 8tto - Volante , 2013, p. 117-155Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 105.
    Starostina, Alexandra
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment.
    Redevelopment of Skeppsbron quay in Stockholm, Sweden2017Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 15 credits / 22,5 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 106.
    Stojanovski, Todor
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Traffic and Logistics.
    Lundström, Mats
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Haas, Tigran
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Light Railways and Busways as Key Driver for Sustainable Urban Development The Swedish Experiences with Transit-Oriented Development (TOD)2012In: Sustaining the Metropolis: LRT and Streetcars for Super Cities, Washington, D.C: Transportation Research Board , 2012, p. 259-278, article id E-C177Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    TOD in a Swedish (European) perspective is by no means a new idea. Three cases of newer light railway and busway projects (Stockholm, Gothenbourg and Norrkoping) are explored in this article and they are seen through a historical overview of the TOD experiences in Sweden and around the world. We also investigate and draw attention to the values of placemaking and sustainable urbanism via the advantages and disadvantages of the urban and regional public transport systems and TOD principles.

  • 107.
    Ståhl, Anna
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. SICS.
    Designing for Interactional Empowerment2014Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis further defines how to reach Interactional Empowerment through design for users. Interactional Empowerment is an interaction design program within the general area of affective interaction, focusing on the users’ abil­ity to reflect, express themselves and engage in profound meaning-making.

    This has been explored through design of three systems eMoto, Affective Di­ary and Affective Health, which all mirror users’ emotions or bodily reactions in interaction in some way. From these design processes and users’ encoun­ters with the system I have extracted one experiential quality, Evocative Bal­ance, and several embryos to experiential qualities. Evocative Balance refers to interaction experiences in which familiarity and resonance with lived expe­rience are balanced with suggestiveness and openness to interpretation. The development of the concept of evocative balance is reported over the course of the three significant design projects, each exploring aspects of Interaction­al Empowerment in terms of representing bodily experiences in reflective and communicative settings. By providing accounts of evocative balance in play in the three projects, analyzing a number of other relevant interaction design experiments, and discussing evocative balance in relation to existing con­cepts within affective interaction, we offer a multi-grounded construct that can be appropriated by other interaction design researchers and designers.

    This thesis aims to mirror a designerly way of working, which is recognized by its multigroundedness, focus on the knowledge that resides in the design pro­cess, a slightly different approach to the view of knowledge, its extension and its rigour. It provides a background to the state-of-the-art in the design communi­ty and exemplifies these theoretical standpoints in the design processes of the three design cases. This practical example of how to extend a designer’s knowledge can work as an example for design researchers working in a similar way.

  • 108.
    Ståhl, Anna
    et al.
    SICS.
    Höök, Kristina
    SICS.
    Reflecting on the Design Process of the Affective Diary2008In: Proeedings NordiChi, October 20-22, 2008, ACM Press, 2008, p. 559-564Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Affective Diary is a digital diary that makes use of bio-sensors to add some reminiscence of bodily experiences. The design process behind Affective Diary was ‘sensitive’ to three design qualities extracted from a previous project; providing cues of emotional expressivity building on familiarity, making the design open for personal expressivity and be aware of contradictions between modalities. Through the design process of Affective Diary, with frequent user involvements during the process, these design qualities became further tested, developed and refi ned. By providing a fairly detailed and refl ected description of the design process behind Affective Diary, we aim to provide other designers with inspiration on several levels: both in terms of methods used, but also in why these three design qualities are important and how to realize them. Our aim is also to provide designers with knowledge in the form that makes sense to designers: the practical link between design qualities and fi nal results.

  • 109.
    Ståhl, Anna
    et al.
    SICS.
    Höök, Kristina
    SICS.
    Kosmack-Vaara, Elsa
    SICS.
    REFLECTING ON THE DESIGN PROCESS OF AFFECTIVE HEALTH2011In: Proceedings of IASDR2011, the 4th World Conference on Design Research / [ed] Roozenburg, Chen and Stappers, 2011, p. 1-12Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We describe the design process behind a bio-sensorbased wellness-system, named Affective Health, aimed to help users to get into biofeedback loops as well as find patterns in their bodily reactions over time. By discussing details of the design process, we provide a reflected account of the particular design we arrived at. Three design qualities are used to both generate and evaluate the different design sketches. They are, in short, (1) the design must feel familiar to users, mirroring their experience of themselves, (2) creating designs that leave space for users’ own interpretation of their body data, and (3) that the modalities used in the design does not contradict one-another, but instead harmonize, helping users to make sense of the representation. The final user encounter of the Affective Health system shows that those design qualities were indeed both useful and important to users’ experience of the interaction.

  • 110.
    Ståhl, Anna
    et al.
    SICS.
    Höök, Kristina
    KTH. SICS.
    Sundström, Petra
    SICS.
    A Foundation for Emotional Expressivity2005Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To express emotions to others in mobile text messaging in our view require designs that can both capture some of the ambiguity and subtleness that characterizes emotional interaction and keep the media specific qualities. Through the use of a body movement analysis and a dimensional model of emotion experiences, we arrived at a design for a mobile messaging service, eMoto. The service makes use of the sub-symbolic expressions; colors, shapes and animations, for expressing emotions in an open-ended way. Here we present the design process and a user study of those expressions, where the results show that the use of these sub-symbolic expressions can work as a foundation to use as a creative tool, but still allowing for the communication to be situated. The inspiration taken from body movements proved to be very useful as a design input. It was also reflected in the way our subjects described the expressions.

  • 111.
    Ståhl, Anna
    et al.
    SICS.
    Höök, Kristina
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. SICS.
    Svensson, Martin
    SICS.
    Taylor, Alex
    Combetti, Marco
    Experiencing the Affective Diary2009In: Journal of personal and ubiquitous computing, ISSN 1617-4917, Vol. 13, no 5, p. 365-378Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A diary is generally considered to be a book in which one keeps a regular record of events and experiences that have some personal significance. As such, it provides a useful means to privately express inner thoughts or to reflect on daily experiences, helping in either case to put them in perspective. Taking conventional diary keeping as our starting point, we have designed and built a digital diary, named Affective Diary, with which users can scribble their notes, but that also allows for bodily memorabilia to be recorded from body sensors and mobile media to be collected from users’ mobile phones. A premise that underlies the presented work is one that views our bodily experiences as integral to how we come to interpret and thus make sense of the world.

    We present our investigations into this design space in three related lines of inquiry: (i) a theoretical grounding for affect and bodily experiences; (ii) a user-centred design process, arriving at the Affective Diary system; and (iii) an exploratory end-user study of the Affective Diary with 4 users during several weeks of use. Through these three inquiries, our overall aim has been to explore the potential of a system that interleaves the physical and cultural features of our embodied experiences and to further examine what media-specific qualities such a design might incorporate. Concerning the media-specific qualities, the key appears to be to find a suitable balance where a system does not dictate what should be interpreted and, at the same time, lends itself to enabling the user to participate in the interpretive act. In the exploratory end-user study users, for the most part, were able to identify with the body memorabilia and together with the mobile data, it enabled them to remember and reflect on their past. Two of our subjects went even further and found patterns in their own bodily reactions that caused them to learn something about themselves and even attempt to alter their own behaviours.

  • 112.
    Søndergaard, Marie Louise Juul
    et al.
    Department of Digital Design and Information Studies, Aarhus University, Denmark.
    Hansen, Lone Koefoed
    Intimate Futures: Staying with the Trouble of Digital Personal Assistants Through Design Fiction2018In: Proceedings of the 2018 Designing Interactive Systems Conference, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2018, p. 869-880Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    While digital personal assistants (DPAs) are moving into our homes, managing our everyday lives and providing help in the household, we have barely begun to understand them. Design fiction can be a method for contextualizing the social and cultural implications for adoption of future technologies like DPAs. In this paper, we present an analytical perspective on gender issues arising when a DPA moves into our home. Through a critical and feminist design methodology, the design fiction project "Intimate Futures" focuses on how a DPA's character and functions are often gendered and what it means for the design and adoption of a DPA. We argue that the gender issues of DPAs are interwoven with our collective imaginings of DPAs, and that design fiction is a method to explore and "trouble" our collective imaginings of DPAs. The paper contributes with an analysis of gender issues of DPAs, and a methodological way of "staying with the trouble" of future technologies through design fiction.

  • 113.
    Timrota, Madara
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture.
    Nighttime use luminaire for babies and parents Designed with awareness of circadian rhythm2017Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 114.
    Tripsa, Silvia Casandra
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Lightning Design.
    The Value of Light in Contemporary Memorials: Understanding the needs of contemporary memorials and how they can be accomplished with light. Proposal of a light installation for commemorating the 1989 acticommunist Revolution in Timisoara.2018Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The master thesis is a research about the relationship between memorials and light. It first studies the characteristics of cultural memories and tries to find what the advantages of using lighting as a means of commemoration are. The nowadays memorials are very different compared to the traditional monuments and they should include a changing narrative, treating local and universal messages. They should involve the public.A contemporary memorial is ephemeral and continuously changing- the same as light is.A series of contemporary memorials have been selected to understand the tools that makes them successful. Furthermore, it was analyzed how these parameters could be achieved through light. 12 memorials that use light as an eloquent tool have been interpreted according to certain criteria.The second part of the thesis is an applied project related to the events that happened in Timisoara, Romania, in 1989 during the anticommunist Revolution. The process of creating memorials for Timisoara is a key focus of the study. The development is equally important as the end result. It searches for the significant messages and lessons of the event. Testimonials of the participants to the revolution have been studied. Interviews and questionnaires have been developed. Following this, significant places in the city and messages were chosen. The research will conclude with a lighting installations project proposal.

  • 115.
    Tsaknaki, Vasiliki
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Elblaus, Ludvig
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    A wearable nebula material investigations of implicit interaction2019In: TEI 2019 - Proceedings of the 13th International Conference on Tangible, Embedded, and Embodied Interaction, Association for Computing Machinery, Inc , 2019, p. 625-633Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we present the Nebula, a garment that translates intentional gestures and implicit interaction into sound. Nebula is a studded cloak made from a heavy fabric that envelopes the wearer with pendulous folds and has strong experiential qualities that were especially appreciated by performing artists. We describe the design process in detail, and highlight three material investigations that show material connections that were fundamental to the experience of the garment: How the draping and construction of the garment allowed for implicit interaction, how the studs were used both as a computational sensing material and a strong visual component, and how the sound design exploited tangible material qualities in the garment. We offer these three material investigations as contributions and discuss how material investigations more broadly can produce evocative connections in the materials available in design work, but also as a way to extract legible design intentions for other designers and researchers.

  • 116.
    Vaara, Elsa
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. SICS, Swedish ICT.
    Akner Koler, Cheryl
    Höök, Kristina
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Boudet, Sebastien
    Felt Time, From Sourdough Baking to Interaction Design2017Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 117.
    Vaara, Elsa
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. SICS, Swedish ICT.
    Harper, Richard
    School of Computing and Communications (SCC).
    Höök, Kristina
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Hagnell, Fredrik
    Clapping Time, Reading Time, Time in Interaction2017Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 118.
    Vaara, Elsa
    et al.
    Mobile life centre, Sweden .
    Silvasan, Iuliana
    Technical University of Cluj N{apoca, Romania.
    Ståhl, Anna
    Mobile life centre, Sweden .
    Höök, Kristina
    Mobile life centre, Sweden .
    Temporal Relations in Affective Health2010In: In Proceedings of the 6th Nordic Conference on Human-Computer Interaction:: Extending Boundaries / [ed] ACM, ACM Press, 2010, p. 833-838Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the Affective Health project we explore possibilities of how to, through biofeedback support users in making sense of the relationship between their stress and their behavior in everyday life. Affective Health is a tool for visualizing patterns and trends of bodily and contextual information. It is particularly important that the design reflects changes over time as this is how people start recognizing patterns in their own behavior and connect it to their bodily reactions. We spent substantial effort sketching and testing ways of portraying time that would move us away from more mathematically inspired representations such as for example graphs and calendars. Instead, we want users to see the signals our bodies emit as part of themselves, of their own ways of being in the world, alive, acting and reacting to their environment. We have explored many possible, alternative ways of visualizing biofeedback over time. For example as the relation between different places and with time as different layers of history in a concept inspired from ecology. The latest and most developed concept is a cyclic repetition of biodata mapped on a spiral shape.

  • 119.
    Valdivia, Sharon
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Lightning Design.
    Daylight Control System For Windows: How can sun shading for individual offices be designed to prevent glare at the same time preserve daylight and a view out2018Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Daylight is an important factor to offices, but it is not utilized to its full extent today when it comes to the occupant’s comfort and well-being. A big problem with daylight is the glare that wants to be eliminated from these environments. Even if there are a vast variety of products and solutions to prevent the glare, other qualities as daylight and a view out are eliminated or reduced too. As both daylight and a view out provide significant psychological advantages for occupants in office environment, a study of existing daylight control systems and humans comfort preferences was investigated. The investigation was developed and led to a strong concept, an artefact. With the capability to preserve both daylight and a view out, even when glare is prevented. SmartFilm was found as a technique with best control over the material, when it comes to flexibility of choose from transparent to opaque. But this technique is today used more as a privacy system. With the study based on visual comfort preferences, the form and the function behind the material is interpreted differently to allow it to be a daylight control system. Studies shows that the most important characteristic of a view is its horizontal stratification and how it, by dividing the view into three layers: the sky, the city/landscape and the ground, provides with the functions we need for well-being and productivity (see chapter 2). The SmartFilms is therefore integrated in three layers on a window, allowing the user to adjust each sections opacity through a special designed device connected to the SmartFilms. By controlling each section separately, the whole window does not need to be fully covered. The daylight control system will in this way, theoretically, prevent the experienced glare, at the same time provide with daylight and a view out.

  • 120.
    Vedin, Bengt-Arne
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    The design-inspired innovation workbook2011In: The Design-Inspired Innovation Workbook, World Scientific Publishing Co. , 2011, p. 1-352Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This book argues for the need to make design the driving force for propelling innovation, as it provides important impetus for innovation, realizing dreams and obtaining a different focus from cost, technology, or production processes. Design also evokes creativity of a higher order and causes unexpected and inventive cross-fertilization across traditional borders or disciplines. This volume offers the "how-to's" for designing for successful novelty, and discusses issues such as product language and meaning, and connecting with the end-user. It will also serve as a checklist, primer, and handbook, providing the reader-practitioner hands-on, but sometimes provocative advice. The Design-Inspired Innovation Workbook is an indispensable handbook and important foundation for facilitating dialog between internal and external product service managers and designers, and aims to cover a vast arena of design-cum-innovation efforts while making the reader discover or invent the exact undertakings by him or herself.

  • 121. Waern, Annika
    et al.
    Back, Jon
    Sallnäs Pysander, Eva Lotta
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Heefer, Caspar J. H.
    KTH.
    Rau, Andreas
    KTH.
    Paget, Susan
    Petterson, Linda
    DigiFys: The interactive play landscape2015In: 12TH ADVANCES IN COMPUTER ENTERTAINMENT TECHNOLOGY CONFERENCE (ACE15), Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The DigiFys project explores the design of interactive landscapes for children's outdoor play. The project combines landscape architecture with design of interactive technology, working towards designs that support children in their everyday play activity, close to home. In the creative lab session, we want to co-design the play landscape together with local children. The focus is on acquiring a perspective on similarities and differences between the children's play culture in Sweden where the project originates, and Malaysia.

  • 122.
    Wangel, Josefin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Strategic Sustainability Studies. School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC, Green Leap.
    Broms, Loove
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Strategic Sustainability Studies. School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC, Green Leap.
    Eriksson, Elina
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC, Green Leap.
    Hesselgren, Mia
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Product and Service Design. School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC, Green Leap.
    Kanulf, Gabriel
    Freelance graphic designer.
    Ljunggren, Andrejs
    Freelance graphic designer.
    Vitiden: en energifiktion2017Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    We must accept the present reality – only thereby do we have the possibility to understand it, relate to it to influence it and create culture that is a flexible tool for the transition.

    This is the opening paragraph of "Vitiden - an energy fiction"1 where the transition to a more sustainable society is explored through interacting text and image. In the forward-looking and text-based manifesto, Vitiden is outlined as an answer to today's ecological and social challenges. The high pitch and ambitions of the manifesto are commented on by an image-based future archaeology, constructed by fictional fragments of the future. Inset images from the acceptera manifesto2, which is also paraphrased in the introductory paragraph of Vitiden, relates the energy fiction to the modernist societal development and the critique thereof. A generous body of annotations contributes with further perspectives.

    1) The term Vitiden is Swedish and can be translated to the 'we-age'. In contrast to other 'ages' such as the bronze age or the atom age, Vitiden is not a description of a historical era, but a suggested future, an age yet to come, distinguished by its emphasis on togetherness.

    1An energy fiction is a design fiction or essentially any image of the future dealing primarily with questions related to energy, in this case as an enabling and constraining factor for sociomaterial entanglements and practices to emerge and endure.

    2Asplund, G., Gahn, W., Markelius, S., Paulsson, G., Sundahl, E., Åhrén, U. 1980[1931] acceptera. Tiden förlag. Faksimil.

  • 123.
    Wangel, Josefin
    et al.
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences.
    Hesselgren, Mia
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Product and Service Design. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC, Green Leap.
    Eriksson, Elina
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC, Green Leap.
    Broms, Loove
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Strategic Sustainability Studies.
    Kanulf, Gabriel
    Ateljé Gabriel Kanulf.
    Ljunggren, Andrejs
    Atlejé Andrejs Ljunggren.
    Vitiden: Transforming a policy-orienting scenario to a practice-oriented energy fiction2019In: Futures: The journal of policy, planning and futures studies, ISSN 0016-3287, E-ISSN 1873-6378, Vol. 112, article id UNSP 102440Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is a lack of futures studies addressing consumption and lifestyles at the level of everyday life. This article reports on the transformation of the policy-orienting scenario "Legato", developed by the Swedish Energy Agency in 2016, to a practice-oriented design speculation. The article describes the process of transformation and the resulting energy fiction “Vitiden”. The transformation involved three acts of translation. First, the scope of the transition was explored in-depth, both quantitatively and qualitatively, providing a more detailed understanding of the gap between the 'sustainable' 2050 and today. Second, the scenario Legato was analysed for practices and elements of practices that could be elaborated to descriptions of how everyday life could play out in this future. The third step involved re-presenting the practice-oriented scenario as a design speculation. The design speculation was given the form of a book named “Vitiden - an energy fiction” in which the reformulated version of Legato is presented through text and images, combining a forwardlooking manifesto and a backward-looking future archaeology. Besides the written content and the pictures and illustrations of Vitiden, the design of the book is also part of the speculation as it embodies an exploration of how publications, including form, graphic design and choice of materials, could look like in a future such as Legato.

  • 124.
    Wawrzyniak, Anna
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Lightning Design.
    A Light Booster metro car for the commuting work force: Human Centric Lighting in underground transportation2019Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    People at northern latitudes lack an effective portion of daylight, especially in winter time, to entrain their circadian rhythm. If one belongs to the group of employees who have no time for daylight exposure and are not supplied by Human Centric Lighting (HCL) in their office, the only chance to get circadian light may be the daily commute. The mega trend of urbanisation increases time of commute, with on average 20-60 minutes spent daily in public transportation in European cities. By introducing HCL to public transport, especially metro vehicles, this time frame can be used to provide the commuting work force with circadian lighting. A LIGHT BOOSTER metro car is proposed to provide the right intensity, spectral distribution, directionality and timing of light to regulate the human inner clock and support health. The LIGHT BOOSTER metro car is very efficient as light is best used due to a high person per square meter ratio. This ratio is higher than in any office building. The energy consumption equals that of an conventional single household. Besides expected health benefits, the LIGHT BOOSTER metro car works as an educative tool, raising awareness for the beneficial effects of light on human health and well-being.

  • 125.
    Westerlund, Bo
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Human - Computer Interaction, MDI (closed 20111231).
    Design space conceptual tool: grasping the design process2005In: Proceedings of Nordes, the Nordic Design Research Conference, ‘In the Making’, Nordes, Copenhagen, May 29–31, 2005., 2005Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper concerns an alternative and relatively simple model of the design process that can be used as a conceptual tool for designing a design process. Three different examples are used to test and show the model’s relevance. This model takes a quite different turn on the process: instead of describing the process as if it would start from a problem, it suggests that it is actually the solutions that are actively used when designing. These possible solutions are referred to as the ‘design space’. The paper also provides a methodological framework for understanding the different approaches with which methods can be used. Here the concepts ‘explorative’ and ‘experimental’ are essential. Finally some aspects of ‘constraints’ are discussed in relation to the design space. The model can be used for reflecting on as well as designing design processes in education, in research and commercially.

  • 126.
    Östlund, Britt
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Systems Safety and Management.
    The benefits of involving older people in the design process2015In: 1st International Conference on Human Aspects of IT for the Aged Population, ITAP 2015 Held as Part of 17th International Conference on Human-Computer Interaction, HCI International 2015, Springer, 2015, p. 3-14Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The more experience we get of involving older people in innovation and design processes, the more we recognize the benefits of having to do with life experience as input to the development of digital products and services. Heterogeneity raises personalization as a key component in design. This paper argues that old people are an asset in innovation processes, which is illustrated by projects conducted in Sweden from 1992 to 2014. The aim is to present how older people contribute to the development and what hinders them. The goal of these projects was to promote participation of older people during the design process but to varying degrees depending on the question. Different degrees of participation and involvement are discussed based on the “participation ladder”, on an idea of Arnstein from 1969 and on conclusions from innovation research.

  • 127.
    Holmstedt, Janna (Artist)
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Flock Frequency Colony: Sonospheric Communards and Points of Listening2019Artistic output (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This talk is about shutting up, about touching the matter of language, and animals that come together through listening.

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