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  • 101.
    Owusu-Agyeman, Isaac
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Industrial Biotechnology. KTH Royal Inst Technol, Dept Ind Biotechnol, SE-10691 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Plaza, Elzbieta
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
    Elginoz, Nilay
    IVL Swedish Environm Res Inst, Box 21060, S-10031 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Atasoy, Merve
    Wageningen Univ, UNLOCK, Stippeneng 2, NL-6708 WE Wageningen, Netherlands.;Res & Tech Univ Delft, Stippeneng 2, NL-6708 WE Wageningen, Netherlands..
    Khatami, Kasra
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Industrial Biotechnology.
    Perez-Zabaleta, Mariel
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Industrial Biotechnology.
    Cabrera-Rodriguez, Carlos
    Greencovery BV, Nieuwe Kanaal 7D, NL-6709 PA Wageningen, Netherlands..
    Yesil, Hatice
    Marmara Univ, Dept Environm Engn, TR-34854 Istanbul, Turkiye..
    Tugtas, A. Evren
    Marmara Univ, Dept Environm Engn, TR-34854 Istanbul, Turkiye..
    Calli, Baris
    Marmara Univ, Dept Environm Engn, TR-34854 Istanbul, Turkiye..
    Cetecioglu, Zeynep
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Industrial Biotechnology.
    Conceptual system for sustainable and next-generation wastewater resource recovery facilities2023In: Science of the Total Environment, ISSN 0048-9697, E-ISSN 1879-1026, Vol. 885, p. 163758-, article id 163758Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Shifting the concept of municipal wastewater treatment to recover resources is one of the key factors contributing to a sustainable society. A novel concept based on research is proposed to recover four main bio-based products from mu-nicipal wastewater while reaching the necessary regulatory standards. The main resource recovery units of the pro-posed system include upflow anaerobic sludge blanket reactor for the recovery of biogas (as product 1) from mainstream municipal wastewater after primary sedimentation. Sewage sludge is co-fermented with external organic waste such as food waste for volatile fatty acids (VFAs) production as precursors for other bio-based production. A por-tion of the VFA mixture (product 2) is used as carbon sources in the denitrification step of the nitrification/denitrifica-ti on process as an alternative for nitrogen removal. The other alternative for nitrogen removal is the partial nitrification/anammx process. The VFA mixture is separated with nanofiltration/reverse osmosis membrane technol-ogy into low-carbon VFAs and high-carbon VFAs. Polyhydroxyalkanoate (as product 3) is produced from the low -carbon VFAs. Using membrane contactor-based processes and ion-exchange techniques, high-carbon VFAs are recovered as one-type VFA (pure VFA) and in ester forms (product 4). The nutrient-rich fermented and dewatered bio-solid is applied as a fertilizer. The proposed units are seen as individual resource recovery systems as well as a concept of an integrated system. A qualitative environmental assessment of the proposed resource recovery units confirms the positive environmental impacts of the proposed system.

  • 102.
    Owusu-Agyeman, Isaac
    et al.
    Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Germany.
    Shen, J
    Schäfer, Andrea Iris
    Renewable energy powered membrane technology: Impact of pH and ionic strength on fluoride and natural organic matter removal2018In: Science of the Total Environment, ISSN 0048-9697, E-ISSN 1879-1026, Vol. 621, p. 138-147Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Real water pH and ionic strength vary greatly, which influences the performance of membrane processes such as nanofiltration (NF) and reverse osmosis (RO). Systematic variation of pH (3 − 12) and ionic strength (2–10 g/L as total dissolved solids (TDS)) was undertaken with a real Tanzanian water to investigate how water quality affects retention mechanisms of fluoride (F) and natural organic matter (NOM).

    An autonomous solar powered NF/RO system driven by a solar array simulator was supplied with constant power from a generator. An open NF (NF270) and a brackish water RO (BW30) membrane were used. A surface water with a very high F (59.7 mg/L) and NOM (110 mgC/L) was used. Retention of F by NF270 was < 20% at pH < 6, increased to 40% at pH 6, and 60–70% at pH 7–12, indicating a dominance of charge repulsion while being ineffective in meeting the guideline of 1.5 mg/L. Increase in ionic strength led to a significant decline in retention of F (from 70 to 50%) and electrical conductivity (from 60 to 10%) by NF270, presumably due to charge screening. In contrast, BW30 retained about 50% of F at pH 3, > 80% at pH 4, and about 99% at pH > 5, due to the smaller pore size and hence a more dominant size exclusion. In consequence, only little impact of ionic strength increase was observed for BW30. The concentration of NOM in permeates of both NF270 and BW30 were typically < 2 mg/L. This was not affected by pH or ionic strength due to the fact that the bulk of NOM was rejected by both membranes through size exclusion.

    The research is carried out in the context of providing safe drinking water for rural and remote communities where infrastructure is lacking, and water quality varies significantly. While other studies focus on energy fluctuations, this research emphasises on feed water quality that affects system performance and may alter due to a number of environmental factors.

  • 103.
    Papageorgiou, Asterios
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Resources, Energy and Infrastructure.
    Azzi, Elias Sebastian
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
    Enell, Anja
    Swedish Geotechnical Institute (SGI), SE-581 93 Linköping, Swede.
    Sundberg, Cecilia
    Department of Energy and Technology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences (SLU), Uppsala, Sweden.
    Biochar produced from wood waste for soil remediation in Sweden: Carbon sequestration and other environmental impacts2021In: Science of the Total Environment, ISSN 0048-9697, E-ISSN 1879-1026, Vol. 776Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The use of biochar to stabilize soil contaminants is emerging as a technique for remediation of contaminated soils. In this study, an environmental assessment of systems where biochar produced from wood waste with energy recovery is used for remediation of soils contaminated with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) and metal(loid)s was performed. Two soil remediation options with biochar (on- and off-site) are considered and compared to landfilling. The assessment combined material and energy flow analysis (MEFA), life cycle assessment (LCA), and substance flow analysis (SFA). The MEFA indicated that on-site remediation can save fuel and backfill material compared to off-site remediation and landfilling. However, the net energy production by pyrolysis of wood waste for biochar production is 38% lower than incineration. The LCA showed that both on-site and off-site remediation with biochar performed better than landfilling in 10 of the 12 environmental impact categories, with on-site remediation performing best. Remediation with biochar provided substantial reductions in climate change impact in the studied context, owing to biochar carbon sequestration being up to 4.5 times larger than direct greenhouse gas emissions from the systems. The two biochar systems showed increased impacts only in ionizing radiation and fossils because of increased electricity consumption for biochar production. They also resulted in increased biomass demand to maintain energy production. The SFA indicated that leaching of PAH from the remediated soil was lower than from landfilled soil. For metal(loid)s, no straightforward conclusion could be made, as biochar had different effects on their leaching and for some elements the results were sensitive to water infiltration assumptions. Hence, the reuse of biocharremediated soils requires further evaluation, with site-specific information. Overall, in Sweden's current context, the biochar remediation technique is an environmentally promising alternative to landfilling worth investigating further.

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  • 104.
    Pechsiri, Joseph Santhi
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Industrial Ecology.
    Thomas, Jean Baptiste E.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Industrial Ecology.
    Risén, Emma
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Industrial Ecology. Currently at Sweco Environment AB, Sweden.
    Ribeiro, Mauricio S.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Industrial Ecology.
    Malmström, Maria E.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Industrial Ecology.
    Nylund, G. M.
    Jansson, A.
    Welander, U.
    Pavia, H.
    Gröndahl, Fredrik
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Industrial Ecology.
    Energy performance and greenhouse gas emissions of kelp cultivation for biogas and fertilizer recovery in Sweden2016In: Science of the Total Environment, ISSN 0048-9697, E-ISSN 1879-1026, Vol. 573, p. 347-355Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The cultivation of seaweed as a feedstock for third generation biofuels is gathering interest in Europe, however, many questions remain unanswered in practise, notably regarding scales of operation, energy returns on investment (EROI) and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, all of which are crucial to determine commercial viability. This study performed an energy and GHG emissions analysis, using EROI and GHG savings potential respectively, as indicators of commercial viability for two systems: the Swedish Seafarm project's seaweed cultivation (0.5 ha), biogas and fertilizer biorefinery, and an estimation of the same system scaled up and adjusted to a cultivation of 10 ha. Based on a conservative estimate of biogas yield, neither the 0.5 ha case nor the up-scaled 10 ha estimates met the (commercial viability) target EROI of 3, nor the European Union Renewable Energy Directive GHG savings target of 60% for biofuels, however the potential for commercial viability was substantially improved by scaling up operations: GHG emissions and energy demand, per unit of biogas, was almost halved by scaling operations up by a factor of twenty, thereby approaching the EROI and GHG savings targets set, under beneficial biogas production conditions. Further analysis identified processes whose optimisations would have a large impact on energy use and emissions (such as anaerobic digestion) as well as others embodying potential for further economies of scale (such as harvesting), both of which would be of interest for future developments of kelp to biogas and fertilizer biorefineries.

  • 105.
    Pechsiri, Joseph Santhi
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Water and Environmental Engineering.
    Thomas, Jean-Baptiste
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Water and Environmental Engineering.
    El Bahraoui, Naoufel
    Mines ParisTech, Ctr Energy Efficiency & Syst, 60 Bd St Michel, F-75272 Paris, France.;Setec Energie Environm, 42-52 Quai Rapee, F-75012 Paris, France..
    Acien Fernandez, Francisco Gabriel
    Univ Almeria, Dept Chem Engn, Canda San Urbano S-N, Almeria 04120, Spain..
    Chaouki, Jamal
    Polytech Montreal, 2500 Chem Polytech, Montreal, PQ H3T 1J4, Canada..
    Chidami, Saad
    Polytech Montreal, 2500 Chem Polytech, Montreal, PQ H3T 1J4, Canada..
    Tinoco, Rodrigo Rivera
    Mines ParisTech, Ctr Energy Efficiency & Syst, 60 Bd St Michel, F-75272 Paris, France..
    Pena Martin, Jose
    Univ Almeria, Dept Chem Engn, Canda San Urbano S-N, Almeria 04120, Spain..
    Gomez, Cintia
    Univ Almeria, Dept Chem Engn, Canda San Urbano S-N, Almeria 04120, Spain..
    Combe, Michel
    Setec Energie Environm, 42-52 Quai Rapee, F-75012 Paris, France..
    Gröndahl, Fredrik
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Water and Environmental Engineering.
    Comparative life cycle assessment of conventional and novel microalgae production systems and environmental impact mitigation in urban-industrial symbiosis2023In: Science of the Total Environment, ISSN 0048-9697, E-ISSN 1879-1026, Vol. 854, article id 158445Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The versatility of microalgae biomass as candidates for various products and bioremediation needs motivates interests towards design and implementation of novel microalgae bioreactors. Conventional open-reactors are reliant on large quantities of sunlight and space while yields are constrained by outdoor environment conditions. Conversely, closed-reactor systems like bubble columns reduces these constrains on microalgae growth while occupying far less space at the expense of high energy demands, notably from lighting systems. A novel patented closed reactor design has recently been proposed that improves the bubble column concept with an efficient and effective lighting system. The present study uses Life Cycle Assessment approach to compare the environmental performance of conventional reactors and the proposed internally luminated novel closed reactor design, expressing impacts per kg biostimulant for the Scenedesmus almeriensis harvest from such units. All performance data was collected from a pilot facility in Almeria, Spain. Urban-industrial symbiosis scenarios are also portrayed in the study using wastewater and incinerator flue gas. Results show that under synthetic nutrient and carbon inputs in Spanish pilot operations, the cumulative energy demand for the novel photobioreactors is similar to conventional vertically-stacked horizon bioreactors but are substantially more demanding than conventional open reactors. However, when leveraging renewable energy sources and the photosynthesis process to consume wastestreams in urban-industrial symbiosis scenarios, the novel photobioreactor was able to achieve up to 80 % improvements in several impact categories e.g. eutrophication and climate change. Impact mitigation credits per kg dwt biomass across all energy scenarios in symbiosis amount to asymptotic to 1.8 kg CO(2)eq and asymptotic to 0.09 kg PO4 eq. This highlights that such closed and internally illuminated photobioreactors can be competitive with conventional reactors, and have potential to harness photosynthesis to reduce environmental burdens in an urban-industrial symbiosis setting. Possible economies of scale and the associated potential gains in efficiencies are further discussed.

  • 106.
    Pedrazzani, Roberta
    et al.
    Univ Brescia, Dept Mech & Ind Engn, Via Branze 38, I-25123 Brescia, Italy.;Univ Brescia, Univ Res Ctr Integrated Models Prevent & Protect, Via Branze 38, I-25123 Brescia, Italy..
    Bertanza, Giorgio
    Univ Brescia, Univ Res Ctr Integrated Models Prevent & Protect, Via Branze 38, I-25123 Brescia, Italy.;Univ Brescia, Dept Civil Environm Architectural Engn & Math, Via Branze 43, I-25123 Brescia, Italy..
    Brnardic, Ivan
    Univ Zagreb, Fac Met, Aleja Narodnih Heroja 3, Sisak 44103, Croatia..
    Cetecioglu, Zeynep
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering.
    Dries, Jan
    Univ Antwerp, Fac Appl Engn, Salesianenlaan 90, B-2660 Antwerp, Belgium..
    Dvarioniene, Jolanta
    Kaunas Univ Technol, Inst Environm Engn, Gedimino Str 50, LT-44239 Kaunas, Lithuania..
    Garcia-Fernandez, Antonio J.
    Univ Murcia, Dept Toxicol, Fac Vet Med, Campus Espinardo, E-30100 Murcia, Spain..
    Langenhoff, Alette
    Wageningen Univ & Res, Dept Environm Technol, Bornse Weilanden 9, NL-6708 WG Wageningen, Netherlands..
    Libralato, Giovanni
    Univ Naples Federico II, Dept Biol, Via Cinthia Ed 7, I-80126 Naples, Italy..
    Lofrano, Giusy
    Univ Salerno, Dept Chem & Biol A Zambelli, Via Giovanni Paolo II 132, I-84084 Fisciano, Italy..
    Skrbic, Biljana
    Univ Novi Sad, Fac Technol, Bulevar Cara Lazara 1, Novi Sad 21000, Serbia..
    Martinez-Lopez, Emma
    Univ Murcia, Dept Toxicol, Fac Vet Med, Campus Espinardo, E-30100 Murcia, Spain..
    Meric, Sureyya
    Namik Kemal Univ, Corlu Engn Fac, Dept Environm Engn, TR-59860 Corlu, Tekirdag, Turkey..
    Pavlovic, Dragana Mutavdzic
    Univ Zagreb, Dept Analyt Chem, Fac Chem Engn & Technol, Marulicev Trg 19, Zagreb 10000, Croatia..
    Papa, Matteo
    Univ Brescia, Univ Res Ctr Integrated Models Prevent & Protect, Via Branze 38, I-25123 Brescia, Italy.;Univ Brescia, Dept Civil Environm Architectural Engn & Math, Via Branze 43, I-25123 Brescia, Italy..
    Schroeder, Peter
    Helmholtz Ctr Environm Hlth GmbH, Ingolstaedter Landstr 1, D-85764 Neuherberg, Germany..
    Tsagarakis, Konstantinos P.
    Democritus Univ Thrace, Dept Environm Engn, Vas Sofias 12, GR-67100 Xanthi, Greece..
    Vogelsang, Christian
    Norwegian Inst Water Res, Gaustadalleen 21, N-0349 Oslo, Norway..
    Opinion paper about organic trace pollutants in wastewater: Toxicity assessment in a European perspective2019In: Science of the Total Environment, ISSN 0048-9697, E-ISSN 1879-1026, Vol. 651, p. 3202-3221Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This opinion paper focuses on the role of eco-toxicological tools in the assessment of possible impacts of emerging contaminants on the aquatic ecosystem, hence, on human health. Indeed, organic trace pollutants present in raw and treated wastewater are the pivot targets: a multidisciplinary approach allows defining the basic principles for managing this issue, from setting a proper monitoring campaign up to evaluating the optimal process treatment. Giving hints on trace pollutants fate and behaviour, attention is focused on the choice of the bioassay(s), by analysing the meaning of possible biological answers. Data interpretation and exploitation are detailed with the final goal of providing criteria in order to be able to select the best targeted treatment options. The manuscript dealswith conventional and innovative analytical approaches for assessing toxicity, by reviewing laboratory and field assays; illustrative real scale and laboratory applications integrate and exemplify the proposed approach.

  • 107.
    Perez-Zabaleta, Mariel
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering, Resource recovery. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Industrial Biotechnology. KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Centres, Albanova VinnExcellence Center for Protein Technology, ProNova.
    Archer, Amena
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Cellular and Clinical Proteomics.
    Khatami, Kasra
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering. KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Centres, Albanova VinnExcellence Center for Protein Technology, ProNova. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Industrial Biotechnology.
    Jafferali, Mohammed Hakim
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Nandy, Prachi
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering.
    Atasoy, Merve
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering, Resource recovery.
    Birgersson, Madeleine
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science.
    Williams, Cecilia
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Cellular and Clinical Proteomics.
    Cetecioglu, Zeynep
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Industrial Biotechnology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering, Resource recovery. KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Centres, Albanova VinnExcellence Center for Protein Technology, ProNova.
    Long-term SARS-CoV-2 surveillance in the wastewater of Stockholm: What lessons can be learned from the Swedish perspective?2023In: Science of the Total Environment, ISSN 0048-9697, E-ISSN 1879-1026, Vol. 858, article id 160023Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Wastewater-based epidemiology (WBE) can be used to track the spread of SARS-CoV-2 in a population. This study pre-sents the learning outcomes from over two-year long monitoring of SARS-CoV-2 in Stockholm, Sweden. The three main wastewater treatment plants in Stockholm, with a total of six inlets, were monitored from April 2020 until June 2022 (in total 600 samples). This spans five major SARS-CoV-2 waves, where WBE data provided early warning signals for each wave. Further, the measured SARS-CoV-2 content in the wastewater correlated significantly with the level of positive COVID-19 tests (r = 0.86; p << 0.0001) measured by widespread testing of the population. Moreover, as a proof-of-concept, six SARS-CoV-2 variants of concern were monitored using hpPCR assay, demonstrating that var-iants can be traced through wastewater monitoring.During this long-term surveillance, two sampling protocols, two RNA concentration/extraction methods, two calcula-tion approaches, and normalization to the RNA virus Pepper mild mottle virus (PMMoV) were evaluated. In addition, a study of storage conditions was performed, demonstrating that the decay of viral RNA was significantly reduced upon the addition of glycerol to the wastewater before storage at -80 degrees C. Our results provide valuable information that can facilitate the incorporation of WBE as a prediction tool for possible future outbreaks of SARS-CoV-2 and preparations for future pandemics.

  • 108.
    Quino Lima, Israel
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Water and Environmental Engineering.
    Ramos, Oswaldo Ramos
    Universidad Mayor de San Andrés.
    Munoz, Mauricio Ormachea
    Universidad Mayor de San Andrés.
    Aguirre, Jorge Quintanilla
    Universidad Mayor de San Andrés.
    Duwig, Celine
    Univ. Grenoble Alpes, CNRS, IRD.
    Maity, Jyoti Prakash
    National Chung Cheng University.
    Sracek, Ondra
    Palacky University,.
    Bhattacharya, Prosun
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering, Environmental Geochemistry and Ecotechnology. KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Water and Environmental Engineering.
    Spatial dependency of arsenic, antimony, boron and other trace elements in the shallow groundwater systems of the Lower Katari Basin, Bolivian Altiplano2020In: Science of the Total Environment, ISSN 0048-9697, E-ISSN 1879-1026, Vol. 719, article id 137505Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Spatial patterns, cluster or dispersion trends are statistically different from random patterns of trace elements (TEs), which are essential to recognize, e.g., how they are distributed and change their behavior in different environmental processes and/or in the polluted/contaminated areas caused by urban and industrial pollutant located in upstream basins and/or by different natural geological conditions. The present study focused on a statistical approach to obtain the spatial variability of TEs (As, B and Sb) in shallow groundwater (GW) in a high-altitude arid region (Lower Katari Basin, Bolivian Altiplano), using multivariate analysis (PCA and HCA), geochemical modeling (PHREEQC, MINTEQ) and spatial analyses (Moran's 1 and LISA), considering the community supply wells. The results indicate that despite of the outliers there is a good autocorrelation in all cases, since Moran's I values are positive. The global spatial dependence analysis indicated a positive and statistically significant spatial autocorrelation (SA) for all cases and TEs are not randomly distributed at 99% confidence level. The results of hydrochemical modeling suggested the precipitation and stability of Fe (III) phases such as goethite. The re-adsorption of As and Sb on the mineral surface in the aquifer could be limiting the concentrations of both metalloids in southern regions. Spatial autocorrelation was positive (High-High) in northwestern (arsenic), southeastern (boron) and northeastern (antimony) region. The results reflected that the As and Sb are the main pollutants linked to the natural geological conditions, but B is a main pollutant due to the anthropogenic activities. Furthermore, >50% shallow groundwater exceeded the WHO limit and NB-512 guideline values for Sb (87%), B (56%) and As (50%); therefore the spatial distribution and concentrations of these TEs in GW raise a significant concern about drinking water quality in the study area.

  • 109. Rahmati, O.
    et al.
    Panahi, M.
    Kalantari, Z.
    Soltani, E.
    Falah, F.
    Dayal, K. S.
    Mohammadi, F.
    Deo, R. C.
    Tiefenbacher, J.
    Tien Bui, D.
    Capability and robustness of novel hybridized models used for drought hazard modeling in southeast Queensland, Australia2020In: Science of the Total Environment, ISSN 0048-9697, E-ISSN 1879-1026, Vol. 718, article id 134656Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 110.
    Riml, Joakim
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering, Hydraulic Engineering.
    Wörman, Anders
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering, Hydraulic Engineering.
    Kunkel, Uwe
    Univeristy of Bayreuth.
    Radke, Michael
    Stockholm University.
    Evaluating the fate of six common pharmaceuticals using a reactive transport model: Insights from a stream tracer test2013In: Science of the Total Environment, ISSN 0048-9697, E-ISSN 1879-1026, Vol. 458, p. 344-354Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Quantitative information regarding the capacity of rivers to self-purify pharmaceutical residues is limited. To bridge this knowledge gap, we present a methodology for quantifying the governing processes affecting the fate of pharmaceuticals in streaming waters and, especially, to evaluate their relative significance for tracer observations. A tracer test in Sava Brook, Sweden was evaluated using a coupled physical-biogeochemical model framework containing surface water transport together with a representation of transient storage in slow/immobile zones of the stream, which are presumably important for the retention and attenuation of pharmaceuticals. To assess the key processes affecting the environmental fate of the compounds, we linked the uncertainty estimates of the reaction rate coefficients to the relative influence of transformation and sorption that occurred in different stream environments. The hydrological and biogeochemical contributions to the fate of the pharmaceuticals were decoupled, and the results indicate a moderate hydrological retention in the hyporheic zone as well as in the densely vegetated parts of the stream. Biogeochemical reactions in these transient storage zones further affected the fate of the pharmaceuticals, and we found that sorption was the key process for bezafibrate, metoprolol, and naproxen, while primary transformation was the most important process for clofibric acid and ibuprofen. Conversely, diclofenac was not affected by sorption or transformation.

  • 111.
    Rodrigues, Cândido C.
    et al.
    Laboratory of Environmental Biotechnology and Ecotoxicology, Institute of Tropical Pathology and Public Health, Federal University of Goiás, Goiânia, Goiás, Brazil, Goiás.
    Harayashiki, Cyntia A.Y.
    Laboratory of Environmental Biotechnology and Ecotoxicology, Institute of Tropical Pathology and Public Health, Federal University of Goiás, Goiânia, Goiás, Brazil, Goiás.
    S. Pereira, Eufrásia
    Laboratory of Cheminformatics, Faculty of Pharmacy, Federal University of Goiás, Goiânia, Goiás, Brazil, Goiás.
    Rodrigues, Gabriel L. S.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry.
    Neves, Bruno J.
    Laboratory of Cheminformatics, Faculty of Pharmacy, Federal University of Goiás, Goiânia, Goiás, Brazil, Goiás.
    Rocha, Thiago L.
    Laboratory of Environmental Biotechnology and Ecotoxicology, Institute of Tropical Pathology and Public Health, Federal University of Goiás, Goiânia, Goiás, Brazil, Goiás.
    How do microplastics alter molluscicidal activity? Effects of weathered microplastics and niclosamide in developing freshwater snails2024In: Science of the Total Environment, ISSN 0048-9697, E-ISSN 1879-1026, Vol. 922, article id 171165Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite the wide distribution and persistence of microplastics (MPs), their interactive effects with molluscicides are unknown. Schistosomiasis, a neglected tropical disease, affects 236.6 million people worldwide. Niclosamide (NCL) is the only molluscicide recommended by the World Health Organization (WHO) and it is used to control the population of Schistosoma spp.'s intermediate host. Thus, this study aimed to evaluate of the interaction between polyethylene (PE) MPs and NCL, and their associated toxicity in the freshwater snail Biomphalaria glabrata (Say 1818). Weathered PE MPs were characterized and theoretical analysis of NCL-MP adsorption nature was made using quantum mechanical calculations. The toxicity of NCL isolated (0.0265 to 0.0809 mg L−1) and under interaction with PE MPs (3400 μg L−1) in B. glabrata embryos and newly hatched snails was analyzed. In silico analysis confirmed the adsorption mechanisms of NCL into PE MPs. PE MPs decreased the NCL toxicity to both B. glabrata developmental stages, increasing their survival and NCL lethal concentrations, indicating concerns regarding NCL use as molluscicide in aquatic environments polluted by MPs. In conclusion, MPs may change the efficiency of chemicals used in snail control programs.

  • 112.
    Roos, Vendela
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, Philosophy.
    Gunnarsson, L.
    Fick, J.
    Larsson, D. G. J.
    Rudén, Christina
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, Philosophy.
    Prioritising pharmaceuticals for environmental risk assessment: Towards adequate and feasible first-tier selection2012In: Science of the Total Environment, ISSN 0048-9697, E-ISSN 1879-1026, Vol. 421, p. 102-110Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The presence of pharmaceuticals in the aquatic environment, and the concerns for negative effects on aquatic organisms, has gained increasing attention over the last years. As ecotoxicity data are lacking for most active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs), it is important to identify strategies to prioritise APIs for ecotoxicity testing and environmental monitoring. We have used nine previously proposed prioritisation schemes, both risk- and hazard-based, to rank 582 APIs. The similarities and differences in overall ranking results and input data were compared. Moreover, we analysed how well the methods ranked seven relatively well-studied APIs. It is concluded that the hazard-based methods were more successful in correctly ranking the well-studied APIs, but the fish plasma model, which includes human pharmacological data, also showed a high success rate. The results of the analyses show that the input data availability vary significantly: some data, such as logP, are available for most API while information about environmental concentrations and bioconcentration are still scarce. The results also suggest that the exposure estimates in risk-based methods need to be improved and that the inclusion of effect measures at first-tier prioritisation might underestimate risks. It is proposed that in order to develop an adequate prioritisation scheme, improved data on exposure such as degradation and sewage treatment removal and bioconcentration ability should be further considered. The use of ATC codes may also be useful for the development of a prioritisation scheme that includes the mode of action of pharmaceuticals and, to some extent, mixture effects.

  • 113. Sahle, A.
    et al.
    Potting, Josepha
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies.
    Environmental life cycle assessment of Ethiopian rose cultivation2013In: Science of the Total Environment, ISSN 0048-9697, E-ISSN 1879-1026, Vol. 443, p. 163-172Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A life cycle assessment (LCA) was conducted for Ethiopian rose cultivation. The LCA covered the cradle-to-gate production of all inputs to Ethiopian rose cultivation up to, and including transport to the Ethiopian airport. Primary data were collected about materials and resources used as inputs to, and about the product outputs from 21 farms in 4 geographical regions (i.e. Holleta, Sebeta, Debre Ziet, and Ziway). The primary data were imported in, and analyzed with the SimaPro7.3 software. Data for the production of used inputs were taken from the EcoInvent®2.0 database. Emissions from input use on the farms were quantified based on estimates and emission factors from various studies and guidelines. The resulting life cycle inventory (LCI) table was next evaluated with the CML 2 baseline 2000. V2/world, 1990/characterization method to quantify the contribution of the rose cultivation chain to 10 environmental impact categories. The set of collected primary data was comprehensive and of high quality. The data point to an intensive use of fertilizers, pesticides, and greenhouse plastic. Production and use of these inputs also represent the major contributors in all environmental impact categories. The largest contribution comes from the production of the used fertilizers, specifically nitrogen-based fertilizers. The use of calcium nitrate dominates Abiotic Depletion (AD), Global Warming (GW), Human Toxicity (HT) and Marine Aquatic Ecotoxicity (MAET). It also makes a large contribution to Ozone Depletion (OD), Acidification (AD) and Fresh water Aquatic Ecotoxicity (FAET). Acidification (AC) and Eutrophication (EU) are dominated by the emission of fertilizers. The emissions from the use of pesticides, especially insecticides dominate Terrestrial Ecotoxicity (TE) and make a considerable contribution to Freshwater Aquatic Ecotoxicity (FAET) and Photochemical Oxidation (PhO). There is no visible contribution from the use of pesticides to the other toxicity categories. Production and use of greenhouse plastic are another important contributors, and just a bit less than the contribution of calcium nitrate to Abiotic Depletion (AD). The results of this study clearly indicate nutrient management and emissions from pesticide use, especially insecticides, as a focus point for environmental optimization of the rose cultivation sector in Ethiopia.

  • 114. Schneider, J.
    et al.
    Bundschuh, Jochen
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering. University of Southern Queensland, West Street, Toowoomba, QLD, Australia.
    do Nascimento, C. W. A.
    Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi-assisted phytoremediation of a lead-contaminated site2016In: Science of the Total Environment, ISSN 0048-9697, E-ISSN 1879-1026, Vol. 572, p. 86-97Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Knowledge of the behavior of plant species associated with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) and the ability of such plants to grow on metal-contaminated soils is important to phytoremediation. Here, we evaluate the occurrence and diversity of AMF and plant species as well as their interactions in soil contaminated with lead (Pb) from the recycling of automotive batteries. The experimental area was divided into three locations: a non-contaminated native area, a coarse rejects deposition area, and an area receiving particulate material from the chimneys during the Pb melting process. Thirty-nine AMF species from six families and 10 genera were identified. The Acaulospora and Glomus genera exhibited the highest occurrences both in the bulk (10 and 6) and in the rhizosphere soils (9 and 6). All of the herbaceous species presented mycorrhizal colonization. The highest Pb concentrations (mg kg− 1) in roots and shoots, respectively, were observed in Vetiveria zizanoides (15,433 and 934), Pteris vitata (9343 and 865), Pteridim aquilinun (1433 and 733), and Ricinus communis (1106 and 625). The diversity of AMF seems to be related to the area heterogeneity; the structure communities of AMF are correlated with the soil Pb concentration. We found that plant diversity was significantly correlated with AMF diversity (r = 0.645; P &gt; 0.05) in areas with high Pb soil concentrations. A better understanding of AMF communities in the presence of Pb stress may shed light on the interactions between fungi and metals taking place in contaminated sites. Such knowledge can aid in developing soil phytoremediation techniques such as phytostabilization.

  • 115.
    Sharker, Bishal
    et al.
    Dept. of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Hajee Mohammad Danesh Science and Technology University, Dinajpur, Bangladesh.
    Islam, Md Aminul
    Advanced Molecular Lab, Department of Microbiology, President Abdul Hamid Medical College, Karimganj, Kishoreganj, Bangladesh, Bangladesh, Karimganj; COVID-19 Diagnostic Lab, Department of Microbiology, Noakhali Science and Technology University, Noakhali, 3814, Bangladesh.
    Hossain, Md Al Amin
    Dept. of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Hajee Mohammad Danesh Science and Technology University, Dinajpur, Bangladesh.
    Ahmad, Iqrar
    Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, Prof. Ravindra Nikam College of Pharmacy, Dhule, Maharasta, India, Gondur.
    Al Mamun, Abdullah
    Dept. of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Hajee Mohammad Danesh Science and Technology University, Dinajpur, Bangladesh.
    Ghosh, Sibdas
    Dept. of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Barisal Trust University, Barisal, Bangladesh, 3333 Fifth Avenue.
    Rahman, Aminur
    Department of Biological Sciences, College of Arts and Sciences, Carlow University, 3333 Fifth Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA, 15213, USA.
    Hossain, Md Shohorab
    Dept. of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Hajee Mohammad Danesh Science and Technology University, Dinajpur, Bangladesh; Dept. of Soil Science, Hajee Mohammad Danesh Science and Technology University, Dinajpur, Bangladesh.
    Ashik, Md Ashikujjaman
    Dept. of Soil Science, Hajee Mohammad Danesh Science and Technology University, Dinajpur, Bangladesh.
    Hoque, Md Rayhanul
    Dept. Biomedical Sciences, College of Clinical Pharmacy, King Faisal University, Saudi Arabia.
    Hossain, Md Khalid
    Institute of Electronics, Atomic Energy Research Establishment, Bangladesh Atomic Energy Commission, Dhaka, 1349, Bangladesh.
    Mamun, M Al
    Materials Science Division, Atomic Energy Centre Dhaka, Bangladesh Atomic Energy Commission, Dhaka, 1000, Bangladesh.
    Haque, Md Atiqul
    Dept. of Microbiology, Hajee Mohammad Danesh Science and Technology University, Dinajpur, Bangladesh; Key Lab of Animal Epidemiology and Zoonoses of Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Affairs, College of Veterinary Medicine, China Agricultural University, Beijing, China.
    Patel, Harun
    Division of Computer Aided Drug Design, Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, R. C. Patel Institute of Pharmaceutical Education and Research, Shirpur,425405, Maharashtra, India, Maharashtra.
    Prodhan, Md Yeasin
    Dept. of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Hajee Mohammad Danesh Science and Technology University, Dinajpur, Bangladesh.
    Bhattacharya, Prosun
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Water and Environmental Engineering.
    Haque, Md Azizul
    Dept. of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Hajee Mohammad Danesh Science and Technology University, Dinajpur, Bangladesh.
    Characterization of lignin and hemicellulose degrading bacteria isolated from cow rumen and forest soil: Unveiling a novel enzymatic model for rice straw deconstruction2023In: Science of the Total Environment, ISSN 0048-9697, E-ISSN 1879-1026, Vol. 904, article id 166704Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Application of greener pretreatment technology using robust ligninolytic bacteria for short duration to deconstruct rice straw and enhance bioethanol production is currently lacking. The objective of this study is to characterize three bacterial strains isolated from the milieux of cow rumen and forest soil and explore their capabilities of breaking down lignocellulose – an essential process in bioethanol production. Using biochemical and genomic analyses these strains were identified as Bacillus sp. HSTU-bmb18, Bacillus sp. HSTU-bmb19, and Citrobacter sp. HSTU-bmb20. Genomic analysis of the strains unveiled validated model hemicellulases, multicopper oxidases, and pectate lyases. These enzymes exhibited interactions with distinct lignocellulose substrates, further affirmed by their stability in molecular dynamic simulations. A comprehensive expression of ligninolytic pathways, including β-ketoadipate, phenyl acetate, and benzoate, was observed within the HSTU-bmb20 genome. The strains secreted approximately 75–82 U/mL of cellulase, xylase, pectinase, and lignin peroxidase. FT-IR analysis of the bacterial treated rice straw fibers revealed that the intensity of lignin-related peaks decreased, while cellulose-related peaks sharpened. The values of crystallinity index for the untreated control and the treated rice straw with either HSTU-bmb18, or HSTU-bmb19, or HSTU-bmb20 were recorded to be 34.48, 28.49, 29.36, 31.75, respectively, which are much higher than that of 13.53 noted for those treated with the bacterial consortium. The ratio of fermentable cellulose in rice straw increased by 1.25-, 1.79-, 1.93- and 2.17-fold following treatments with HSTU-bmb18, HSTU-bmb20, HSTU-bmb19, and a mixed consortium of these three strains, respectively. These aggregative results suggested a novel model for rice straw deconstruction utilizing hydrolytic enzymes of the consortium, revealing superior efficacy compared to individual strains, and advancing cost-effective, affordable, and sustainable green technology.

  • 116.
    Sjoberg, Ylva
    et al.
    Univ Copenhagen, Ctr Permafrost CENPERM, Dept Geosci & Nat Resource Management, Oster Voldgade 10, DK-1350 Copenhagen, Denmark.;Stockholm Univ, Dept Phys Geog, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden.;Stockholm Univ, Bolin Ctr Climate Res, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Dessirier, Benoit
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Phys Geog, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden.;Stockholm Univ, Bolin Ctr Climate Res, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden.;Stockholm Univ, Baltic Sea Ctr, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Ghajarnia, Navid
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Phys Geog, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden.;Stockholm Univ, Bolin Ctr Climate Res, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Jaramillo, Fernando
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Phys Geog, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden.;Stockholm Univ, Bolin Ctr Climate Res, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Jarsjo, Jerker
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Phys Geog, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden.;Stockholm Univ, Bolin Ctr Climate Res, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Panahi, Davood Moshir
    Iran Univ Sci & Technol, Sch Civil Engn, Tehran 1684613114, Iran..
    Xu, Diandian
    Hohai Univ, Coll Water Conservancy & Hydropower Engn, Nanjing 210098, Peoples R China..
    Zou, Liangchao
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Resources, Energy and Infrastructure. Stockholm Univ, Dept Phys Geog, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden.;Stockholm Univ, Bolin Ctr Climate Res, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Manzoni, Stefano
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Phys Geog, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden.;Stockholm Univ, Bolin Ctr Climate Res, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Scaling relations reveal global and regional differences in morphometry of reservoirs and natural lakes2022In: Science of the Total Environment, ISSN 0048-9697, E-ISSN 1879-1026, Vol. 822, article id 153510Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Water bodies provide essential ecosystem services linked to morphometric features that might differ between natural lakes and reservoirs. We use the HydroLAKES global dataset to quantitatively compare large (area > 1 km(2)) reservoirs and natural lakes in terms of scaling exponents between morphometric measures (volume, area, shore length). These exponents are further compared to those expected from geometrical assumptions and constraints. Lakes cover a larger range of volumes for the same range of surface areas than reservoirs, and have a larger volume-area scaling exponent. The volume-area scaling exponent for reservoirs (but not natural lakes) and the area-shore length exponent for all water bodies follow the predictions for self-affine surfaces. Land cover and terrain influence the scaling relations more for lakes than for reservoirs. These morphometric differences may be used to model the impact of reservoirs and lakes on hydrological processes and associated ecosystem services at regional to global scales.

  • 117.
    Sjöstedt, Carin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Wallstedt, Teresia
    Gustafsson, Jon Petter
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering, Environmental Geochemistry and Ecotechnology.
    Borg, Hans
    Speciation of aluminium, arsenic and molybdenum in excessively limed lakes2009In: Science of the Total Environment, ISSN 0048-9697, E-ISSN 1879-1026, Vol. 407, no 18, p. 5119-5127Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The possible existence of the potentially toxic oxyanions of Al (AI(OH)(4)(-)). As (HAsO42-), and Mo (MoO42-) was examined in excessively limed lakes. In-situ dialysis (MWCO 1 kDa) was performed in the surface and bottom waters of two excessively limed lakes (pH 7.1-7.7) and one acidic lake (pH similar to 5.4). The dialysable metal concentrations were compared to the equilibrium distribution of species as calculated with the geochemical code Visual MINTEQ incorporating the CD-MUSIC and Stockholm Humic models for complexation onto colloidal ferrihydrite and dissolved organic matter. Arsenic and molybdenum in the excessively limed lakes were to a large extent present in the dialysable fraction (>79% and >92% respectively). They were calculated to exist as free or adsorbed oxyanions. Most of the Al was observed to reside in the colloidal fraction (51-82%). In agreement with this, model predictions indicated aluminium to be present mostly as colloids or bound to dissolved organic matter. Only a small fraction was modelled as AI(OH)(4)(-) ions. In most cases, modelled values were in agreement with the dialysis results. The free concentrations of the three oxyanions were mostly low compared to toxic levels.

  • 118.
    Skeppström, Kirlna
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Olofsson, Bo
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    A prediction method for radon in groundwater using GIS and multivariate statistics2006In: Science of the Total Environment, ISSN 0048-9697, E-ISSN 1879-1026, Vol. 367, no 2-3, p. 666-680Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Radon (Rn-222) in groundwater constitutes a source of natural radioactivity to indoor air. It is difficult to make predictions of radon levels in groundwater due to the heterogeneous distribution of uranium and radium, flow patterns and varying geochemical conditions. High radon concentrations in groundwater are not always associated with high uranium content in the bedrock, since groundwater with a high radon content has been found in regions with low to moderate uranium concentrations in the bedrock. This paper describes a methodology for predicting areas with high concentrations of Rn-222 in groundwater on a general scale, within an area of approximately 185 x 145 km(2). The methodology is based on multivariate statistical analyses, including principal component analysis and regression analysis, and investigates the factors of geology, land use, topography and uranium (U) content in the bedrock. A statistical variable based method (the RV method) was used to estimate risk values related to different radon concentrations. The method was calibrated and tested on more than 4400 drilled wells in Stockholm County.

    The results showed that radon concentration was clearly correlated to bedrock type, well altitude and distance from fracture zones. The weighted index (risk value) estimated by the RV method provided a fair prediction of radon potential in groundwater on a general scale. Risk values obtained using the RV method were compared to radon measurements in 12 test areas (on a local scale, each of area 25 x 25 km(2)) in Stockholm County and a high correlation (r=-0.87) was observed. The study showed that the occurrence and spread of radon in groundwater are guided by multiple factors, which can be used in a radon prediction method on a general scale. However, it does not provide any direct information on the geochemical and flow processes involved.

  • 119.
    Thunqvist, Eva-Lotta
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Centres, Centre for Health and Building, CHB.
    Regional increase of mean chloride concentration in water due to the application of deicing salt2004In: Science of the Total Environment, ISSN 0048-9697, E-ISSN 1879-1026, Vol. 325, no 1-3, p. 29-37Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Directive of the European Parliament and of the Council 2000/60/EC: Establishing a Framework for Community Action in the Field of Water Policy, states that it is necessary to consider human activities within a river basin in order to prevent and reduce the spreading of pollutants and to achieve good water status. This paper shows a simple method to estimate the environmental pressure from the deicing of roads as steady state chloride concentration in water. The data processed are presented using GIS. The result showed that the contribution of deicing salt is of importance for the chloride concentration on a regional scale. The increase in chloride concentration is also compared to the background concentration and other sources of chloride within the river basin. Road salt applied by the Swedish National Road Administration (SNRA) accounts for more than half of the total chloride load for the river basin investigated. The method presented may easily be generalised to a national scale for monitoring the environmental effects of deicing salt application.

  • 120.
    Tiwari, Ananda
    et al.
    Univ Helsinki, Fac Vet Med, Dept Food Hyg & Environm Hlth, Helsinki, Finland.;Finnish Inst Hlth & Welf, Dept Hlth Secur, Expert Microbiol Res Unit, Helsinki, Finland..
    Adhikari, Sangeet
    Arizona State Univ, Biodesign Inst, Biodesign Ctr Environm Hlth Engn, Tempe, AZ 85287 USA..
    Kaya, Devrim
    Oregon State Univ OSU, Sch Chem Biol & Environm Engn, Corvallis, OR USA..
    Islam, Md. Aminul
    Noakhali Sci & Technol Univ, Dept Microbiol, Diagnost Lab, COVID 19, Noakhali 3814, Bangladesh.;President Abdul Hamid Med Coll, Dept Microbiol, Adv Mol Lab, Kishoreganj, Bangladesh..
    Malla, Bikash
    Univ Yamanashi, Interdisciplinary Ctr River Basin Environm, 4-3-11 Takeda, Kofu, Yamanashi 4008511, Japan..
    Sherchan, Samendra P.
    Morgan State Univ, Dept Biol, Baltimore, MD USA.;Tulane Univ, Sch Publ Hlth & Trop Med, Dept Environm Hlth Sci, New Orleans, LA USA..
    Al-Mustapha, Ahmad I.
    Univ Helsinki, Fac Vet Med, Dept Food Hyg & Environm Hlth, Helsinki, Finland.;Univ Ibadan, Fac Vet Med, Dept Vet Publ Hlth & Prevent Med, Oyo, Nigeria.;Kwara State Minist Agr & Rural Dev, Dept Vet Serv, Ilorin, Kwara, Nigeria..
    Kumar, Manish
    Univ Petr & Energy Studies, Sch Engn, Sustainabil Cluster, Dehra Dun 248007, Uttaranchal, India..
    Aggarwal, Srijan
    Univ Alaska Fairbanks, Coll Engn & Mines, Dept Civil Geol & Environm Engn, POB 755900, Fairbanks, AK 99775 USA..
    Bhattacharya, Prosun
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Water and Environmental Engineering.
    Bibby, Kyle
    Univ Notre Dame, Dept Civil & Environm Engn & Earth Sci, Notre Dame, IN 46556 USA..
    Halden, Rolf U.
    Arizona State Univ, Biodesign Inst, Biodesign Ctr Environm Hlth Engn, Tempe, AZ 85287 USA..
    Bivins, Aaron
    Louisiana State Univ, Dept Civil & Environm Engn, Baton Rouge, LA USA..
    Haramoto, Eiji
    Univ Yamanashi, Interdisciplinary Ctr River Basin Environm, 4-3-11 Takeda, Kofu, Yamanashi 4008511, Japan..
    Oikarinen, Sami
    Tampere Univ, Fac Med & Hlth Technol, Tampere, Finland..
    Heikinheimo, Annamari
    Univ Helsinki, Fac Vet Med, Dept Food Hyg & Environm Hlth, Helsinki, Finland.;Finnish Food Author, Seinajoki, Finland..
    Pitkaenen, Tarja
    Univ Helsinki, Fac Vet Med, Dept Food Hyg & Environm Hlth, Helsinki, Finland.;Finnish Inst Hlth & Welf, Dept Hlth Secur, Expert Microbiol Res Unit, Helsinki, Finland..
    Monkeypox outbreak: Wastewater and environmental surveillance perspective2023In: Science of the Total Environment, ISSN 0048-9697, E-ISSN 1879-1026, Vol. 856, article id 159166Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Monkeypox disease (MPXD), a viral disease caused by the monkeypox virus (MPXV), is an emerging zoonotic disease endemic in some countries of Central and Western Africa but seldom reported outside the affected region. Since May 2022, MPXD has been reported at least in 74 countries globally, prompting the World Health Organization to declare the MPXD outbreak a Public Health Emergency of International Concern. As of July 24, 2022; 92 % (68/74) of the countries with reported MPXD cases had no historical MPXD case reports. From the One Health perspective, the spread of MPXV in the environment poses a risk not only to humans but also to small mammals and may, ultimately, spread to potent novel host populations. Wastewater-based surveillance (WBS) has been extensively utilized to monitor communicable diseases, particularly during the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic. It helped in monitoring infectious disease case-loads as well as specific viral variants circulating in communities. The detection of MPXV DNA in lesion materials (e.g. skin, vesicle fluid, crusts), skin rashes, and various body fluids, including respiratory and nasal secretions, saliva, urine, feces, and semen of infected individuals, supports the possibility of using WBS as an early proxy for the detection of MPXV infections. WBS of MPXV DNA can be used to monitor MPXV activity/trends in sewerage network areas even before detecting laboratory-confirmed clinical cases within a community. However, several factors affect the detection of MPXV in wastewater including, but not limited to, routes and duration time of virus shedding by infected individuals, infection rates in the relevant affected population, environmental persistence, the processes and analytical sensitivity of the used methods. Further research is needed to identify the key factors that impact the detection of MPXV biomarkers in wastewater and improve the utility of WBS of MPXV as an early warning and monitoring tool for safeguarding human health. In this review, we shortly summarize aspects of the MPXV outbreak relevant to wastewater monitoring and discuss the challenges associated with WBS.

  • 121.
    Toldrà Filella, Anna
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. IRTA, Ctra Poble Nou Km 5-5, Tarragona 43540, Spain..
    O'Sullivan, Ciara K.
    Univ Rovira & Virgili, Dept Engn Quim, Ave Paisos Catalans 26, Tarragona 43007, Spain.;Inst Catalana Recerca & Estudis Avancats ICREA, Pg Lluis Co 23, Barcelona 08010, Spain..
    Diogene, Jorge
    IRTA, Ctra Poble Nou Km 5-5, Tarragona 43540, Spain..
    Campas, Monica
    IRTA, Ctra Poble Nou Km 5-5, Tarragona 43540, Spain..
    Detecting harmful algal blooms with nucleic acid amplification-based biotechnological tools2020In: Science of the Total Environment, ISSN 0048-9697, E-ISSN 1879-1026, Vol. 749, article id 141605Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Harmful algal blooms (HABs) represent a growing threat to aquatic ecosystems and humans. Effective HAB management and mitigation efforts strongly rely on the availability of timely and in-situ tools for the detection of microalgae. In this sense, nudeic acid-based (molecular) methods are being considered for the unequivocal identification of miaoalgae as an attractive alternative to the currently used time-consuming and laboratory-based light microscopy techniques. This review provides an overview of the progress made on new molecular biotechnological tools for microalgal detection, particularly focusing on those that combine a nudeic acid (DNA or RNA) amplification step with detection. Different types of amplification processes (thermal and isothermal) and detection formats (e.g. microarrays, biosensors, lateral flows) are presented, and a comprehensive overview of their advantages and limitations is provided Although isothermal techniques are an attractive alternative to thermal amplification to reach in-situ analysis, further development is still required. Finally, current challenges, critical steps and future directions of the whole analysis process ( from sample procurement to in-situ implementation) are described.

  • 122.
    Tomasek, Ines
    et al.
    Vrije Univ Brussel, Dept Chem, Analyt Environm & Geochem AMGC Grp, Brussels, Belgium.;Vrije Univ Brussel, Dept Geog, Phys Geog FARD Grp, Brussels, Belgium..
    Mouri, Hassina
    Univ Johannesburg, Dept Geol, Johannesburg, South Africa..
    Dille, Antoine
    Vrije Univ Brussel, Dept Geog, Phys Geog FARD Grp, Brussels, Belgium.;Royal Museum Cent Africa, Dept Earth Sci, Tervuren, Belgium..
    Bennett, George
    Univ Ghent, Dept Geol, Lab Appl Geol & Hydrogeol, Ghent, Belgium.;Univ Dodoma, Dept Min & Mineral Proc Engn, Dodoma, Tanzania..
    Bhattacharya, Prosun
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Water and Environmental Engineering.
    Brion, Natacha
    Vrije Univ Brussel, Dept Chem, Analyt Environm & Geochem AMGC Grp, Brussels, Belgium..
    Elskens, Marc
    Vrije Univ Brussel, Dept Chem, Analyt Environm & Geochem AMGC Grp, Brussels, Belgium..
    Fontijn, Karen
    Univ Libre Bruxelles, Dept Geosci Environm & Soc, Lab G Time, Brussels, Belgium..
    Gao, Yue
    Vrije Univ Brussel, Dept Chem, Analyt Environm & Geochem AMGC Grp, Brussels, Belgium..
    Gevera, Patrick Kirita
    Univ Johannesburg, Dept Geol, Johannesburg, South Africa..
    Ijumulana, Julian
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Water and Environmental Engineering. Univ Dar Es Salaam, Coll Engn & Technol, Dept Water Resources Engn, DAFWAT Res Grp, Dar Es Salaam, Tanzania..
    Kisaka, Mary
    Vrije Univ Brussel, Dept Geog, Phys Geog FARD Grp, Brussels, Belgium.;Univ Dodoma, Dept Geol, Dodoma, Tanzania..
    Leermakers, Martine
    Vrije Univ Brussel, Dept Chem, Analyt Environm & Geochem AMGC Grp, Brussels, Belgium..
    Shemsanga, Ceven
    Univ Dodoma, Dept Geol, Dodoma, Tanzania..
    Walraevens, Kristine
    Univ Ghent, Dept Geol, Lab Appl Geol & Hydrogeol, Ghent, Belgium..
    Wragg, Joanna
    British Geol Survey, Environm Sci Ctr, Nottingham, England..
    Kervyn, Matthieu
    Vrije Univ Brussel, Dept Geog, Phys Geog FARD Grp, Brussels, Belgium..
    Naturally occurring potentially toxic elements in groundwater from the volcanic landscape around Mount Meru, Arusha, Tanzania and their potential health hazard2022In: Science of the Total Environment, ISSN 0048-9697, E-ISSN 1879-1026, Vol. 807, article id 150487Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The population of the semi-arid areas of the countries in the East African Rift Valley (EARV) is faced with serious problems associatedwith the availability and the quality of the drinkingwater. In these areas, the drinking water supply largely relies on groundwater characterised by elevated fluoride concentration (> 1.5 mg/L), resulting from interactions with the surrounding alkaline volcanic rocks. This geochemical anomaly is often associated with the presence of other naturally occurring potentially toxic elements (PTEs), such as As, Mo, U, V, which are known to cause adverse effects on human health. This study reports on the occurrence of such PTEs in the groundwater on the populated flanks of Mt. Meru, an active volcano situated in the EARV.

    Our results show that the majority of analysed PTEs (Al, As, Ba, Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe,Mn, Ni, Se, Sr, Pb, and Zn) are within the acceptable limits for drinking purpose in samples collected from wells, springs and tap systems, suggesting that there is no immediate health risk associated with these PTEs. However, some of the samples were found to exceed the WHO tolerance limit for U (> 30 μg/L) and Mo (> 70 μg/L). The sample analysis also revealed that in someof the collected samples, the concentrations of total dissolved solids, Na+ and K+ exceed the permissible limits. The concerning levels of major parameters and PTEs were found to be associated with areas covered with debris avalanche deposits on the northeast flank, and volcanic ash and alluvial deposits on the southwest flanks of the volcano. The study highlights the need to extend the range of elements monitored in the regional groundwater and make a more routine measurement of PTEs to ensure drinking water safety and effective water management measures.

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  • 123.
    Vadiati, Meysam
    et al.
    Univ Calif Davis, Global Affairs, Hubert H Humphrey Fellowship Program, 10 Coll Pk, Davis, CA 95616 USA..
    Beynaghi, Ali
    Amirkabir Univ Technol, Off Sustainabil, Tehran, Iran.;Univ Toronto, Dept Civil & Mineral Engn, Toronto, ON, Canada..
    Bhattacharya, Prosun
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
    Bandala, Erick R.
    Desert Res Inst, Div Hydrol Sci, 755 E Flamingo Rd, Las Vegas, NV 89119 USA..
    Mozafari, Masoud
    Iran Univ Med Sci, Fac Adv Technol Med, Dept Tissue Engn & Regenerat Med, Tehran, Iran.;Univ Toronto, Mt Sinai Hosp, Lunenfeld Tanenbaum Res Inst, Toronto, ON, Canada..
    Indirect effects of COVID-19 on the environment: How deep and how long?2022In: Science of the Total Environment, ISSN 0048-9697, E-ISSN 1879-1026, Vol. 810, p. 152255-, article id 152255Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although the World Health Organization (WHO) announcement released in early March 2020 stated there is no proven evidence that the COVID-19 virus can survive in drinking water or sewage, there has been some recent evidence that coronaviruses can survive in low-temperature environments and in groundwater for more than a week. Some studies have also found SARS-CoV-2 genetic materials in raw municipal wastewater, which highlights a potential avenue for viral spread. A lack of information about the presence and spread of COVID-19 in the environment may lead to decisions based on local concerns and prevent the integration of the prevalence of SARS-CoV-2 into the global water cycle. Several studies have optimistically assumed that coronavirus has not yet affected water ecosystems, but this assumption may increase the possibility of subsequent global water issues. More studies are needed to provide a comprehensive picture of COVID-19 occurrence and outbreak in aquatic environments and more specifically in water resources. As scientific efforts to report reliable news, conduct rapid and precise research on COVID-19, and advocate for scientists worldwide to overcome this crisis increase, more information is required to assess the extent of the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic on the environment. The goals of this study are to estimate the extent of the environmental effects of the pandemic, as well as identify related knowledge gaps and avenues for future research.

  • 124. van der Harst, Eugenie
    et al.
    Potting, Josepha
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms). Environmental Systems Analysis Group, Wageningen University, Netherlands .
    Kroeze, Carolien
    Multiple data sets and modelling choices in a comparative LCA of disposable beverage cups2014In: Science of the Total Environment, ISSN 0048-9697, E-ISSN 1879-1026, Vol. 494, p. 129-143Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study used multiple data sets and modelling choices in an environmental life cycle assessment (LCA) to compare typical disposable beverage cups made from polystyrene (PS), polylactic acid (PLA; bioplastic) and paper lined with bioplastic (biopaper). Incineration and recycling were considered as waste processing options, and for the PLA and biopaper cup also composting and anaerobic digestion. Multiple data sets and modelling choices were systematically used to calculate average results and the spread in results for each disposable cup in eleven impact categories. The LCA results of all combinations of data sets and modelling choices consistently identify three processes that dominate the environmental impact: (1) production of the cup's basic material (PS, PLA, biopaper), (2) cup manufacturing, and (3) waste processing. The large spread in results for impact categories strongly overlaps among the cups, however, and therefore does not allow a preference for one type of cup material. Comparison of the individual waste treatment options suggests some cautious preferences. The average waste treatment results indicate that recycling is the preferred option for PLA cups, followed by anaerobic digestion and incineration. Recycling is slightly preferred over incineration for the biopaper cups. There is no preferred waste treatment option for the PS cups. Taking into account the spread in waste treatment results for all cups, however, none of these preferences for waste processing options can be justified. The only exception is composting, which is least preferred for both PIA and biopaper cups. Our study illustrates that using multiple data sets and modelling choices can lead to considerable spread in LCA results. This makes comparing products more complex, but the outcomes more robust

  • 125. van Oosten, H. Herman
    et al.
    van den Burg, Arnold B.
    Arlt, Debora
    Both, Christiaan
    van den Brink, Nico W.
    Chiu, Suzanne
    Crump, Doug
    Jeppsson, Tobias
    The Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Department of Ecology; Centre of Ecological & Evolutionary Synthesis, Universitet of Oslo, Norway.
    de Kroon, Hans
    Traag, Wim
    Siepel, Henk
    Hatching failure and accumulation of organic pollutants through the terrestrial food web of a declining songbird in Western Europe2019In: Science of the Total Environment, ISSN 0048-9697, E-ISSN 1879-1026, Vol. 650, no 1, p. 1547-1553Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Population growth in passerine birds is largely driven by fecundity. If fecundity is affected, for instance by hatching failure, populations may decline. We noted high hatching failure of up to 27% per year in relict populations of the Northern wheatear (Oenanthe oenanthe) in The Netherlands, a strongly declining, migratory passerine in Europe. This hatching failure itself can cause population decline, irrespective of other adverse factors. Additionally, we investigated the cause of hatching failure. Unhatched eggs showed egg yolk infections or embryonic malformations, part of which is associated with the actions of dioxin-like compounds (DLCs). Indeed, DLCs appear to bioaccumulate in the local foodweb, where the soil contained only background concentrations, similar to those found at many other locations. DLC concentrations in Dutch eggs were six-fold higher than those in a reference population in Sweden, where egg failure was only 6%. However, Northern wheatears appear to be only moderately sensitive to the actions of DLCs, because of their specific Ah-receptor type which may moderate the receptor mediated effects of DLCs. This indicates that the concentrations of DLCs, although elevated, may not have caused the embryo malformations or the low hatching rates. We discuss whether other toxins may be important or imbalances in the nutrition and if inbreeding may play a larger role than expected.

  • 126.
    Vanham, Davy
    et al.
    European Commiss, Joint Res Ctr, Ispra, Italy..
    Leip, Adrian
    European Commiss, Joint Res Ctr, Ispra, Italy..
    Galli, Alessandro
    Global Footprint Network, 18 Ave Louiss Casai, CH-1219 Geneva, Switzerland..
    Kastner, Thomas
    Senckenberg Biodivers & Climate Res Ctr SBiK F, Senckenberganlage 25, D-60325 Frankfurt, Germany..
    Bruckner, Martin
    Vienna Univ Econ & Business WU, Inst Ecol Econ, Welthandelspl 1, A-1020 Vienna, Austria..
    Uwizeye, Aimable
    Food & Agr Org United Nations, Anim Prod & Hlth Div, Viale Terme Caracalla, I-00153 Rome, Italy.;Wageningen Univ & Res, Anim Prod Syst Grp, POB 338, NL-6700 AH Wageningen, Netherlands.;TEAGASC, Crops Environm & Land Use Programme, Johnstown Castle, Wexford, Ireland..
    van Dijk, Kimo
    ESSP, Ave Dirigeable 8, B-1170 Brussels, Belgium..
    Ercin, Ertug
    R2Water Res & Consultancy, Amsterdam, Netherlands..
    Dalin, Carole
    UCL, Bartlett Sch Environm Energy & Resources, Inst Sustainable Resources, London WC1H 0NN, England..
    Brandao, Miguel
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
    Bastianoni, Simone
    Univ Siena, Dept Earth Environm & Phys Sci, Ecodynam Grp, Pian dei Mantellini 44, I-53100 Siena, Italy..
    Fang, Kai
    Zhejiang Univ, Sch Publ Affairs, Hangzhou 310058, Zhejiang, Peoples R China..
    Leach, Allison
    Univ New Hampshire, Environm & Sustainabit Inst, Dept Nat Resources, Durham, NH 03824 USA..
    Chapagain, Ashok
    Univ Free State, 205 Nelson Mandela Dr,Pk West, ZA-9301 Bloemfontein, South Africa..
    Van Der Velde, Marijn
    European Commiss, Joint Res Ctr, Ispra, Italy..
    Sala, Serenella
    European Commiss, Joint Res Ctr, Ispra, Italy..
    Pant, Rana
    European Commiss, Joint Res Ctr, Ispra, Italy..
    Mancini, Lucia
    European Commiss, Joint Res Ctr, Ispra, Italy..
    Monforti-Ferrario, Fabio
    European Commiss, Joint Res Ctr, Ispra, Italy..
    Carmona-Garcia, Gema
    European Commiss, Joint Res Ctr, Ispra, Italy..
    Marques, Alexandra
    European Commiss, Joint Res Ctr, Ispra, Italy..
    Weiss, Franz
    European Commiss, Joint Res Ctr, Ispra, Italy..
    Hoekstra, Arjen Y.
    Univ Twente, Twente Water Ctr, POB 217, Enschede, Netherlands.;Natl Univ Singapore, Inst Water Policy, Lee Kuan Yew Sch Publ Policy, Singapore, Singapore..
    Environmental footprint family to address local to planetary sustainability and deliver on the SDGs2019In: Science of the Total Environment, ISSN 0048-9697, E-ISSN 1879-1026, Vol. 693, article id UNSP 133642Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The number of publications on environmental footprint indicators has been growing rapidly, but with limited efforts to integrate different footprints into a coherent framework. Such integration is important for comprehensive understanding of environmental issues, policy formulation and assessment of trade-offs between different environmental concerns. Here, we systematize published footprint studies and define a family of footprints that can be used for the assessment of environmental sustainability. We identify overlaps between different footprints and analyse how they relate to the nine planetary boundaries and visualize the crucial information they provide for local and planetary sustainability. In addition, we assess how the footprint family delivers on measuring progress towards Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), considering its ability to quantify environmental pressures along the supply chain and relating them to the water-energy-food-ecosystem (WEFE) nexus and ecosystem services. We argue that the footprint family is a flexible framework where particular members can be included or excluded according to the context or area of concern. Our paper is based upon a recent workshop bringing together global leading experts on existing environmental footprint indicators. Elsevier B.V.

  • 127.
    Venkataraman, Siddharth
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center for ECO2 Vehicle design. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Engineering Mechanics, Fluid Mechanics and Engineering Acoustics.
    Rumpler, Romain
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center for ECO2 Vehicle design. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Engineering Mechanics, Fluid Mechanics and Engineering Acoustics.
    Leth, Siv
    Accumera AB, S-18137 Lidingo, Sweden..
    Toward, Martin
    Univ Southampton, Inst Sound & Vibrat Res, Southampton SO17 1BJ, Hants, England..
    Bustad, Tohmmy
    Trafikverket, S-78189 Borlänge, Sweden..
    Improving strategic noise mapping of railway noise in Europe: Refining CNOSSOS-EU calculations using TWINS2022In: Science of the Total Environment, ISSN 0048-9697, E-ISSN 1879-1026, Vol. 839, p. 156216-, article id 156216Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Environmental Noise Directive (2002/49/EC) requires all European Union Member States to produce strategic noise maps using a common assessment methodology: CNOSSOS-EU. The reliability of CNOSSOS-EU railway noise evaluation is dependent on the input vehicle and track transfer functions. The CNOSSOS-EU default database contains the currently available choices for these transfer functions. However, these available transfer functions are limited and of insufficient quality, resulting in large errors in noise level calculations. An approach is presented, introducing an established analytical railway rolling noise calculation technique (TWINS), to extract more reliable and specific transfer functions. A case study consisting of railway rolling noise mitigation measures is defined and used as the basis for extracting and testing these transfer functions. The extracted transfer functions reduce the average deviation between CNOSSOS-EU and reference calculations using TWINS from6.1 dB(A) to 0.8 dB(A) in absolute sound power levels, and from 1.2 db(A) to 0.3 dB(A) in estimates of noise reduction potential for the defined mitigation measures. Application of this approach shows potential to improve the quality and depth of the existing CNOSSOS-EU default database. This may lead to more reliable estimations of railway noise in the strategic noise maps and the subsequent assessment of its harmful effects.

  • 128.
    von Brömssen, Mattias
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Jakariya, Md.
    Research and Evaluation Division, BRAC Centre, Dhaka.
    Bhattacharya, Prosun
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Ahmed, K. M.
    Department of Geology, University of Dhaka.
    Hasan, M. A.
    Department of Geology, University of Dhaka.
    Sracek, O.
    Institute of Geological Sciences, Faculty of Science, Masaryk University, Brno.
    Jonsson, Linda
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Lundell, Leonidas
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Jacks, Gunnar
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Targeting low-arsenic aquifers in Matlab Upazila, Southeastern Bangladesh2007In: Science of the Total Environment, ISSN 0048-9697, E-ISSN 1879-1026, Vol. 375, no 2-3, p. 121-132Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Groundwater with high concentration of geogenic arsenic (As) occurs extensively in the Holocene alluvial aquifers of Bangladesh. Local drillers in Matlab Upazilla are constructing deeper tubewells than in the recent past, primarily because of low concentrations of dissolved Fe and As. Locally a thick layer of black to grey sediments overlies an oxidised unit of yellowish-grey to reddish-brown sediments. The correlation between the colour of both units and the groundwater redox conditions was investigated to provide an easy tool for targeting low-arsenic groundwater. Based on the sediment colour at the screen depths described by local drillers, 40 domestic shallow tubewells were selected for water sampling. Four colours were used to describe the sediments: black, white, off-white (buff) and red. Generally, the groundwater was anoxic and the As concentrations ranged from less than 5.2 to 355 mu g/L. Water derived from the black sediment is characterized by relatively higher concentrations of dissolved NH4+, DOC, Fe, P, As and by low Mn and SO42- concentrations. The off-white and red sediments had high concentration of Mn and low NH4+, DOC, Fe, P and As concentrations. The water abstracted from the black sediments indicated the most reducing environment, followed by white, off-white and red respectively. Three boreholes verified the driller's perception of the subsurface lithologic conditions. Discrepancies between the driller's and the research team description of the sediment colours were insignificant. This study shows that sediment colour is a reliable indicator of high and low-As concentrations and can be used by local drillers to target low-arsenic groundwater.

  • 129. Wang, Zihan
    et al.
    Yin, Yulong
    Liu, Gang
    Lun, Fei
    Zhang, Fusuo
    Cui, Zhenling
    Wu, Jiechen
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Water and Environmental Engineering. College of Resources and Environmental Sciences, China Agricultural University, Beijing, 100193, China.
    International trade reduces global phosphorus demand but intensifies the imbalance in local consumption2022In: Science of the Total Environment, ISSN 0048-9697, E-ISSN 1879-1026, Vol. 830, p. 154484-, article id 154484Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    International trade has led to increasing levels of economic development; however, its role in altering the global phosphorus (P) demand and local P footprint (PF) is unclear. Here, through a multi-regional input–output (MRIO) analysis, we quantified the PF associated with the global consumption of agricultural products for 159 countries and 169 crops over the period of 1995–2015. The results suggested that the international network of P flows was highly connected and the flow distribution was overridingly driven by developed economies (e.g., USA and Germany) and large emerging economies (e.g., China and India). A decoupling between the PF and economic growth was observed in most countries. The high PF per capita in developed economies was mainly driven by imports from developing countries rather than domestic P applications. Our results also highlighted that international trade had two impacts on global P management. Firstly, it reduced the total global P demand from agricultural production by 16%; secondly, it intensified the imbalance of local P consumption. Therefore, the future sustainable management of P requires consideration of the original suppliers and final consumers along the global supply chains and the associated consequences on P management from both local and global perspectives.

  • 130.
    Wu, Jiechen
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Industrial Ecology.
    Franzén, Daniel
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Industrial Ecology.
    Malmström, Maria E.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Industrial Ecology.
    Anthropogenic phosphorus flows under different scenarios for the city of Stockholm, Sweden2016In: Science of the Total Environment, ISSN 0048-9697, E-ISSN 1879-1026, Vol. 542, p. 1094-1105Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Today, concerns prevail about the unsustainable use of phosphorus and worldwide eutrophication, thus requiring efficient management of phosphorus flows. With increasing population and associated urban growth, urban management of phosphorus flows in the perspectives of recycling, eutrophication and total budget becomes increasingly important. This study mapped phosphorus flows for a reference year (2013) and a future year (2030) using different scenarios for the city of Stockholm, Sweden. The results indicated that the Swedish goal of recycling phosphorus from wastewater would cover the majority of the total phosphorus budget for Stockholm. However, in 2013, only 10% of phosphorus was recycled for agricultural use, around half of which was from sewage sludge and the other half from food waste. Almost 50% of total phosphorus was sent to landfill/mining waste capping with sewage sludge, for economic reasons and lack of market. Among the scenarios of upstream and downstream urban management options studied in combination with population growth, recovery of phosphorus from sewage sludge had the greatest potential to increase the fraction recycled to agriculture. However, only upstream measures, e.g. changed diet, were able to reduce the total phosphorus budget. Urban management of phosphorus flows based on the different perspectives of recycling, eutrophication or total budget was shown to potentially result in different preferred management actions and both upstream and downstream measures need to be considered. Moreover, management needs to pay attention to small but environmentally sensitive flows, particularly when setting city goals on phosphorus recycling by percentage in a large budget.

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  • 131.
    Wu, Jiechen
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Industrial Ecology.
    Malmström, Maria E.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Industrial Ecology.
    Nutrient loadings from urban catchments under climate change scenarios: Case studies in Stockholm, Sweden2015In: Science of the Total Environment, ISSN 0048-9697, E-ISSN 1879-1026, Vol. 518-519, p. 393-406Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Anthropogenic nutrient emissions and associated eutrophication of urban lakes are a global problem. Future changes in temperature and precipitation may influence nutrient loadings in lake catchments. A coupling method, where the Generalized Watershed Loading Functions method was tested in combination with source quantification in a Substance Flow Analysis structure, was suggested to investigate diffuse nutrient sources and pathways and climate change effects on the loadings to streamflow in urban catchments. This method may, with an acceptable level of uncertainty, be applied to urban catchments for first-hand estimations of nutrient loadings in the projected future and to highlight the need for further study and monitoring. Five lake catchments in Stockholm, Sweden (Råcksta Träsk, Judarn, Trekanten, Långsjön and Laduviken) were employed as case studies and potential climate change effects were explored by comparing loading scenarios in two periods (2000-2009 and 2021-2030). For the selected cases, the dominant diffuse sources of nutrients to urban streamflow were found to be background atmospheric concentration and vehicular traffic. The major pathways of the nitrogen loading were suggested to be from both developed areas and natural areas in the control period, while phosphorus was indicated to be largely transported through surface runoff from natural areas. Furthermore, for nitrogen, a modest redistribution of loadings from surface runoff and stormwater between seasons and an increase in the annual loading were suggested for the projected future climate scenarios as compared to the control period. The model was, due to poor monitoring data availability, only able to set an upper limit to nutrient transport by groundwater both in the control period and the future scenarios. However, for nitrogen, groundwater appeared to be the pathway most sensitive to climate change, with a considerable increase and seasonal redistribution of loadings. For phosphorus, loadings by different pathways were apparently less sensitive to climate change.

  • 132.
    Yan, Jinying
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering. Vattenfall AB, Stockholm, SE-169 92, Sweden.
    Karlsson, Anna
    Vattenfall AB, SE-16992 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Zou, Zhi
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering.
    Dai, Deliang
    Linnaeus Univ, Econ & Stat, SE-35195 Växjö, Sweden..
    Edlund, Ulrica
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Contamination of heavy metals and metalloids in biomass and waste fuels: Comparative characterisation and trend estimation2020In: Science of the Total Environment, ISSN 0048-9697, E-ISSN 1879-1026, Vol. 700, article id UNSP 134382Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The use of contaminated biomass and waste fuels is essential for waste management, waste to energy (WtE) and mitigating carbon emissions. The contamination of heavy metals and metalloids is specially concerned by environmental regulation and waste to energy processes. In this study, comparative characterisation is performed for three typical contaminated biomass and waste fuels. i.e. recycled woods, combustible municipal solid waste, and industrial and commercial wastes. The contamination characteristics are further analysed using statistical methods (e.g. significance, correlation, profile, and principal component analyses) to identify specific contamination features, relations among the contaminants and potential contamination sources. Contamination trend is estimated based on the continuously monitoring fuel qualities, the driving forces for regulating and reduction of the contaminations, and potential changes in major contamination sources. The comparative characterisation combined with statistical analyses provides a better way to understand the contamination mechanisms. The approach can also relate the fuel contamination with the contamination sources and their changes for trend estimation. Generally, the toxic heavy metals and metalloids are expected to be significantly reduced due to stricter regulations, but there is no general trend for the reduction of other metals and metalloids because of the complicated changes in contamination sources and waste recycling streams in the near future.

  • 133.
    Zhu, Fengyi
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Industrial Biotechnology.
    Kendir Cakmak, Ece
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Industrial Biotechnology.
    D'Amico, Federica
    Unit of Microbiome Science and Biotechnology, Department of Pharmacy and Biotechnology, University of Bologna, 40126 Bologna, Italy.
    Candela, Marco
    Unit of Microbiome Science and Biotechnology, Department of Pharmacy and Biotechnology, University of Bologna, 40126 Bologna, Italy.
    Turroni, Silvia
    Unit of Microbiome Science and Biotechnology, Department of Pharmacy and Biotechnology, University of Bologna, 40126 Bologna, Italy.
    Cetecioglu, Zeynep
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Industrial Biotechnology.
    Phosphorus mining from marine sediments adopting different carbon/nitrogen strategies driven by anaerobic reactors: The exploration of potential mechanism and microbial activities2024In: Science of the Total Environment, ISSN 0048-9697, E-ISSN 1879-1026, Vol. 914, article id 169902Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To investigate the possibility of phosphorus (P) recovery from marine sediment and explore the role of the carbon: nitrogen ratio in affecting the internal P release under anaerobic conditions, we experimented with the external addition of carbon (acetic acid and glucose) and ammonia nitrogen (NH4-N) to expose P release mechanisms. The 24-day anaerobic incubations were conducted with four different carbon: nitrogen dosing groups including no NH4-N addition and COD/N ratios of 100, 50, and 10. The P release showed that extra NH4-N loading significantly suppressed the decomposition of P (p < 0.05) from the marine sediment, the maximum P release was 4.07 mg/L and 7.14 mg/L in acetic acid- and glucose-fed systems, respectively, without extra NH4-N addition. Additionally, the results exhibited that the imbalance of carbon: nitrogen not only failed to induce the production of organic P mineralization enzyme (alkaline phosphatase) in the sediment but also suppressed its activity under anaerobic conditions. The highest enzyme activity was observed in the group without additional NH4-N dosage, with rates of 1046.4 mg/(kg∙h) in the acetic acid- and 967.8 mg/(kg∙h) in the glucose-fed system, respectively. Microbial data analysis indicated that a decrease in the abundance of P release-regulating bacteria, including polyphosphate-accumulating organisms (Rhodobacteraceae) and sulfate-reducing bacteria (Desulfosarcinaceae), was observed in the high NH4-N addition groups. The observed reduction in enzyme activity and suppression of microbial activity mentioned above could potentially account for the inhibited P decomposition in the presence of high NH4-N addition under anaerobic conditions. The produced P-enriched solution from the bioreactors may offer a promising source for future recovery endeavors.

  • 134.
    Ågerstrand, Marlene
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, Philosophy.
    Rudén, Christina
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, Philosophy.
    Evaluation of the accuracy and consistency of the Swedish Environmental Classification and Information System for pharmaceuticals2010In: Science of the Total Environment, ISSN 0048-9697, E-ISSN 1879-1026, Vol. 408, no 11, p. 2327-2339Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Swedish environmental and classification system for pharmaceuticals is a voluntary, industry-owned system with the purpose to provide environmental information about active pharmaceutical ingredients in the Swedish market. In this paper we report the results from a detailed evaluation of the accuracy and consistency of the risk assessments conducted within this system. The evaluation focused on the following three aspects: 1) comparison of the companies' risk assessments with the classification system's own guidance document, 2) how the risk assessments are affected if additional effect data is used, and 3) the consistency of different risk assessments for the same pharmaceutical substance. The analyses show that the system's guidance gives no criteria for when to consider a study "long-term" or "short-term", and that this confusion affected the outcome of the risk assessments in some cases. Furthermore, when the system's guidance document is followed and the risk assessment was supplemented with effect data from the open scientific literature, then the risk classification for a substantial number of the evaluated substances was altered. Our analyses also revealed that in some cases risk assessors disagree on the outcome of the assessment for the same active pharmaceutical ingredient. Finally we list some recommendations to improve the classification system. The recommendations include clarifying concepts and instructions in the guidance document, introduction of a standardized way of reporting data to the website, and promotion of use of nonstandard test data when considered the most relevant.

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