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  • 101.
    Finnveden, Göran
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Strömberg, Emma
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Developing sustainability learning outcomes for engineering2013In: Proceedings of the EESD13 Conference, 2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 102.
    Finnveden, Göran
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Åkerman, Jonas
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Not planning a sustainable transport system2014In: Environmental impact assessment review, ISSN 0195-9255, E-ISSN 1873-6432, Vol. 46, p. 53-57Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The overall objective of the Swedish transport policy is to ensure the economically efficient and sustainable provision of transport services for people and business throughout the country. More specifically, the transport sector shall, among other things, contribute to the achievement of environmental quality objectives in which the development of the transport system plays an important role in the achievement of the objectives. The aim of this study is to analyse if current transport planning supports this policy. This is done by analysing two recent cases: the National Infrastructure Plan 2010-2021, and the planning of Bypass Stockholm, a major road investment. Our results show that the plans are in conflict with several of the environmental quality objectives. Another interesting aspect of the planning processes is that the long-term climate goals are not included in the planning processes, neither as a clear goal nor as factor that will influence future transport systems. In this way, the longterm sustainability aspects are not present in the planning. We conclude that the two cases do not contribute to a sustainable transport system. Thus, several changes must be made in the processes, including putting up clear targets for emissions. Also, the methodology for the environmental assessments needs to be further developed and discussed.

  • 103.
    Finnveden, Göran
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Åkerman, Jonas
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Redovisa hur vi ska klimatmålen, Bildt2013In: Expressen, no 27/4, p. 4-Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    I en artikel i Expressen den 24 mars hyllar Carl Bildt det ökade resandet. Han skriver om dess fördelar. De är vi överens om.

    Det är när han skriver om resandets nackdelar som det blir konstigt.

  • 104. Fischer, Klara
    et al.
    Ekener-Petersen, Elisabeth
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Rydhmer, Lotta
    Edvardsson Björnberg, Karin
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, Philosophy.
    Social Impacts of GM Crops in Agriculture: A Systematic Literature Review2015In: Sustainability, ISSN 2071-1050, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 7, no 7, p. 8598-8620Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It has recently been argued that the fragmented knowledge on the social impacts of genetically modified (GM) crops is contributing to the polarised debate on the matter. This paper addresses this issue by systematically reviewing 99 peer-reviewed journal articles published since 2004 on the social impacts of GM crops in agriculture; summarising current knowledge, and identifying research gaps. Economic impact studies currently dominate the literature and mainly report that GM crops provide economic benefits for farmers. Other social impacts are less well studied, but present a more complex picture. Studies on access to and benefits of GM crops show that these vary significantly depending on the political and regulatory setting. Substantial evidence indicates that intellectual property rights (IPR) and the private industry's dominance limit the access and utility of available GM crops to many farmers. Wellbeing is frequently discussed in the literature, but rarely investigated empirically. Existing evidence is contradictory and inconclusive. Impact studies from the Global North are virtually non-existent. Moreover, two-thirds of publications are based on previously published empirical evidence, indicating a need for new empirical investigations into the social impacts of GM crops in agriculture.

  • 105.
    Francart, Nicolas
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Climate Implications of a Collaborative Economy Scenario for Transportation and the Built Environment2016Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    In a context of increasingly ambitious climate objectives after the Paris Agreement in 2015, this thesis investigates a scenario for sustainable development in Sweden in 2050 in terms of greenhouse gases emissions. The scenario is built around the idea of a development of collaborative economy in a context of low growth or degrowth. The concept of “collaborative economy” encompasses the sharing of services and underused and unwanted goods between individuals, a focus on the access to services rather than the ownership of products, and new ways of sharing space and time (cohousing, time banks, etc). The present study focuses on the implications of the Collaborative Economy scenario for transports and the built environment at a municipal scale, and aims at modeling the corresponding greenhouse gases emissions. A literature review was carried out to identify the main aspects of the scenario and exemplify the changes it entails. Two spreadsheet models were then developed for transports and the built environment, estimating greenhouse gases emission levels based on a range of assumptions elaborated from the literature review. The municipality of Malmö was used as a case study. Overall, the results of the models and the sensitivity analysis indicate a rather weak influence of collaborative economy strategies on greenhouse gases emissions. Strategies related to changes in the energy mix for heating, materials used in construction, fuels, etc seem to be much more impactful. However, such strategies only impact greenhouse gases emissions, whereas collaborative economy strategies can have other benefits. In particular, cohousing can increase social capital and foster sharing, which in turn could decrease energy and material use for the production of goods. Ridesharing, remote working among others, can decrease congestion and the daily distance traveled. Most of these strategies also provide energy savings, improving the resilience of the system and freeing the energy supply for other purposes.

  • 106.
    Giers Arekrans, Sophie
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Assessing the Stockholm Water and Sewage System: Sustainability and Resilience in a Long-term Perspective2016Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This report presents a case study on the Water and Sewage (abbreviated as WS in the following) system of Stockholm, which is faced with several challenges over the coming decades. The purpose is to explore the current and future threats and challenges that can have an impact on the WS system, with the aim of identifying a sustainable and resilient way of handling potential issues and incorporating a wider perspective when planning for a continued water and sewage infrastructure of sufficient capacity and quality. The study asks what the current and potential future challenges for the Stockholm WS system are, what is required to enable a sustainable and resilient WS system in a long-term perspective, which actors are involved or need to be involved beyond Stockholm Water, to provide Stockholm with a resilient and sustainable WS system, and what would be required for efficient governance?

    A content analysis of literature was made in order to develop three possible future scenarios, each with its own set of challenges. The scenarios were discussed with several interviewees from the WS-sector. The information provided during the interviews was used in a resilience analysis, based on the framework developed by the Resilience Alliance Workbook for Practitioners. A discussion follows in relation to the connected theoretical concepts of futures studies, resilience theory, governance and sustainability.

    The findings in this study suggests that the main challenges facing the WS system are primarily climate change and population increase. The WS system has to expand to support a growing population, as well as be adapted to cope with the consequences of climate change. Also pulse disturbances, such as sabotage and bio-terrorist attacks, were discussed and constitute a worry to which there is less preparedness. Further, a different challenge was found in the difficulties in planning for this required expansion and development where there is a lack of support, funding, communication and division of responsibilities.

    In order to retain a WS system that is able to provide high quality water services of sufficient quantity, communication and coordination between actors need to improve, and someone has to take a lead in continued work to ensure that all actors and stakeholders move in the same direction. Long-term planning is required on all parts, and there is a need to make decisions that will enable a sustained water and sewage structure in the long run. It is also required that water is made a priority; that water and sewage related issues are allowed more space in the municipal planning process and are discussed at a much earlier stage. Further, all municipalities will face challenges that concerns the WS system, leading to an increasing requirement of a more extensive regional cooperation, where planning and development occurs across municipal borders, focusing on watershed- and drainage areas.

    This study focuses on specified resilience, which means that only a limited number of challenges and events that could affect the WS system have been studied. Further studies are encouraged to determine the general resilience of the system, and provide a more detailed and comprehensive assessment.

  • 107.
    Glaumann, Mauritz
    et al.
    University of Gävle.
    Svenfelt, Åsa
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment. KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Malmqvist, Tove
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment.
    Finnveden, Göran
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies (moved 20130630).
    Eriksson, O
    Development of an environmental classification system for buildings through a new kind of dialogue between stakeholders and researchers2006Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 108.
    Gunnarsson-Östling, Ulrika
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Höjer, Mattias
    School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Pargman, Daniel
    School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Aguiar Borges, Luciane
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Pluralising the Future Information SocietyManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Following the argument that the sustainability challenges that emerge from the production and use of ICT are complex to evaluate due to the high pace of ICT development, the rapid dissemination of new ICT infrastructure and devices and their unpredictable effects on socio-economic structures, this study shows that there are alternatives to contemporary forecasted futures and exemplifies that ICT can be used to facilitate different societal developments. It is argued that creating parallel possible futures (plural) aids in the process of identifying potential benefits and drawbacks of technological development and situate current decisions in a longer time frame. The process of designing five images of the future of Sweden in 2060 is, then, presented and some of the advantages of using these images for different purposes are discussed. Among the concluding reflections it is highlighted that exploring benefits and drawbacks of different possible futures can empower actors that at the present play a role in shaping and implementing ICT strategies and policies and also actors from other sectors getting to see the opportunities and risks with ICT.

  • 109.
    Gustafsson, Johan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Kenttä, William
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Nya tunnelbanan och klimatmål: En framtidsstudie om tunnelbaneutbyggnaden i Stockholmsregionen och dess bidrag till att uppnå klimatmål2017Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 110. Hajer, Maarten
    et al.
    Nilsson, Måns
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms). Stockholm Environment Institute, Sweden.
    Raworth, Kate
    Bakker, Peter
    Berkhout, Frans
    de Boer, Yvo
    Rockstrom, Johan
    Ludwig, Kathrin
    Kok, Marcel
    Beyond Cockpit-ism: Four Insights to Enhance the Transformative Potential of the Sustainable Development Goals2015In: Sustainability, ISSN 2071-1050, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 7, no 2, p. 1651-1660Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Sustainable Development Goals (SDG) have the potential to become a powerful political vision that can support the urgently needed global transition to a shared and lasting prosperity. In December 2014, the United Nations (UN) Secretary General published his report on the SDGs. However, the final goals and targets that will be adopted by the UN General Assembly in September 2015 risk falling short of expectations because of what we call "cockpit-ism": the illusion that top-down steering by governments and intergovernmental organizations alone can address global problems. In view of the limited effectiveness of intergovernmental efforts and questions about the capacity of national governments to affect change, the SDGs need to additionally mobilize new agents of change such as businesses, cities and civil society. To galvanize such a broad set of actors, multiple perspectives on sustainable development are needed that respond to the various motives and logics of change of these different actors. We propose four connected perspectives which can strengthen the universal relevance of the SDGs: "planetary boundaries" to stress the urgency of addressing environmental concerns and to target governments to take responsibility for (global) public goods; "the safe and just operating space" to highlight the interconnectedness of social and environmental concerns and its distributive consequences; "the energetic society" to benefit from the willingness of a broad group of actors worldwide to take action; and "green competition" to stimulate innovation and new business practices. To realize the transformative potential of the SDGs, these four perspectives should be reflected in the focus and content of the SDGs that will be negotiated in the run up to September 2015 and its further implementation.

  • 111.
    Hakansson, Cecilia
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms). School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Finnveden, Göran
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms). School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Indirect Rebound and Reverse Rebound Effects in the ICT-sector and Emissions of CO22015In: PROCEEDINGS OF ENVIROINFO AND ICT FOR SUSTAINABILITY 2015, 2015, p. 66-73Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It has been suggested that the ICT sector has a large potential of reducing environmental impacts in society through enabling smarter and more efficient solutions. Some of this potential may however be offset by different types of rebound and other indirect effects. There are a number of different types of rebound and other indirect effects that can be relevant. Some of them may lead to positive environmental impacts; others may lead to negative impacts. In this paper we have analysed the indirect rebound effects for the ICT-sector and also what we here call the reverse rebound effect. We have used Environmentally Extended Input-Output Analysis with data for Sweden. The results in this paper indicate that rebound effects can be significant. If efficiency improvements occur in the production of the ICT equipment, there could be a strong rebound effect which would reduce the potential decrease of emissions that could occur without the rebound effect. If on the other hand, efficiency improvements concern the electricity used by the ICT equipment, the rebound effect is expected to be smaller, and real emission reductions could be expected. The total spending on ICT products have increased and this could lead to a reversed rebound effect when less is consumed of other products and services. The results here suggest that this reversed rebound effect could be significant and lead to overall reduced emissions.

  • 112.
    Hansson, Robin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Mokeeva, Elena
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Securing resilience to climate change impacts in coastal communities through an environmental justice perspective: A case study of Mangunharjo, Semarang, Indonesia2015Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Climate change impacts have been shown to increase the social, economic and ecological vulnerabilities of poor groups in coastal communities of Asian countries. Mangunharjo village in Semarang city, Indonesia, has been identified as vulnerable to sea level rise, coastal erosion, tidal inundation and flooding, and the well-being of residents is threatened due to loss of livelihoods. In order to secure their future, the community has to enhance its resilience to climate change impacts, however, additional factors are undermining thepotential of a resilient and prosperous village. As resilience theory carried out in practice could negatively affect already marginalized people if trade-offs are not identified, a complementing theory is needed.

    This study develops a novel joint framework of resilience theory and environmental justice for analyzing the potential of enhancin gthe community’s resilience. It also explores what is needed for the village in order to increase its resilience.

    The framework revealed to be successful in identifying root problems and highlighted deficiencies in current resilience strategies. Moreover, the incorporation of environmental justice broadened the perspective of what could weaken the resilience ofthe village. Hence, an environmental justice perspective complements resilience theory as it identifies potential trade-offs and analyzes whose resilience is enhanced. The framework is argued to be a useful tool to secure resilience of a social-ecological system of various scales, however, further research is needed onthe optimal linkages of the two theories.

  • 113. Hasselstrom, Linus
    et al.
    Håkansson, Cecilia
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Detailed vs. fuzzy information in non-market valuation studies: the role of familiarity2013In: Journal of Environmental Planning and Management, ISSN 0964-0568, E-ISSN 1360-0559, Vol. 57, no 1, p. 123-143Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We apply a split-sample contingent valuation survey to test whether the level of ecological information affects the willingness to pay (WTP) and valuation uncertainty for improved water quality. For respondents who are unfamiliar with water quality problems, the WTP is significantly different between the sample that received detailed ecological information and the sample that received fuzzy information. This study also provides new empirical evidence for the counterfactual; in a situation with high familiarity, more information does not affect mean WTP. The main recommendation to future valuation practice is to provide detailed ecological information in the case when many respondents are unfamiliar with the good. The level of information did not influence valuation uncertainty.

  • 114.
    Hasselström, Linus
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    The monetary value of marine environmental change2016Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The marine ecosystems are fundamental for human welfare. A number of current environmental pressures need attention, and the formulation of management strategies requires information from a variety of analytical dimensions. The linkage between environmental change and resulting implications for human welfare is one such dimension.

    This thesis presents studies on welfare implications from hypothetical future policies which improve the state of the marine environment. The method for these studies is economic valuation. The studied scenarios concern eutrophication in the Baltic Sea (including the Kattegat) and oil spill risk from shipping in the Lofoten-Vesterålen area in the Arctic Barents Sea. The thesis shows that the economic benefits from undertaking policies to improve or protect the marine environment in these cases are substantial and exceed the costs of taking measures.

    In addition to providing new monetary estimates, the thesis also provides new insights concerning 1) what type of scenario to use when valuing an environmental improvement and 2) whether there may exist trade-offs between precision in estimates and the level of ambition with respect to survey instrument complexity and econometric models when conducting valuation studies. The findings suggest an end of an era for studies in which the environmental change is unspecified or based on a single environmental indicator while the actual consequences of the suggested measures are more multifaceted. In contrast, relevant scenarios to study are well-specified and holistic. The thesis further reveals that it might not always be worth the effort to go for the most advanced scenario presentation or statistically best-fitting model specifications. This is something that needs to be further discussed among practitioners in order to allocate valuation resources wisely and not waste resources on unnecessarily elegant valuation studies.

  • 115.
    Hasselström, Linus
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Water and Environmental Engineering. Anthesis Enveco AB, Sverige.
    Håkansson, Cecilia
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Noring, Maria
    Kemikalieinspektionen.
    Soutukorva, Åsa
    Enveco.
    Khaleevac, Julia
    Costs and benefits associated with marine oil spill prevention in northern Norway2017In: The Polar Journal, ISSN 2154-896X, E-ISSN 2154-8978, Vol. 7, no 1, p. 165-180Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study is to analyse conflicts regarding natural resources and ecosystem services involving different stakeholder groups using cost–benefit analysis (CBA). The paper is formed around a specific case study in Lofoten–Vesterålen in northern Norway, investigating costs and benefits of decreasing the probability of a major oil spill from shipping in the area. Benefits of decreasing the probability of a spill are far greater than costs, which means that measures to improve maritime safety would be economically profitable for society. Figures showing the effects of the impacts on fisheries and tourism sectors indicate that, compared to the total value for society, the market values of decreasing the probability of a spill are very small. On the other hand, non-market values associated with the protection of ecosystem services are of a much greater magnitude. These results suggest that the neglecting of non-market ecosystem service values in economic assessments for the Arctic may cause a biased picture of costs and benefits associated with measures to prevent environmental degradation. When feeding into decisions, such assessments may lead to too little preventive action from an economic perspective.

  • 116.
    Heiskala, Linnea
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Det bästa av två världar?: En utredning av praktisk tillämpning och användbarhet av hybrid-LCA för att inventera klimatpåverkan från konsumtion i kommuner och landsting2016Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    More and more local governments (municipalities and county councils) include the indirect climate impacts of consumption in their environmental work. Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) is an established tool for inventorying both direct and indirect impacts of a product or service, but when the climate impact of an entire organization's consumption of products and services is of interest, the inventory of data can easily become excessive. Through the years, various methods for enabling life cycle inventory on the organizational level have been developed. Hybrid-LCA is one of them where the term "hybrid" comes from that the method combines a so-called bottom up with a top down approach of the data inventory. The practical application of hybrid-LCA and the usefulness of the assessment results for local governments are not self-evident. This study aims to investigate the practical application of hybrid-LCA as a tool for inventorying climate impact for municipalities’ and county councils’ consumption. The purpose includes identifying the challenges associated with the practical procedure when conducting a hybrid-LCA and evaluating the inventory results’ usefulness in municipalities and county councils’ climate work. The results of the study are based on semi-structured interviews, a case study in which hybrid LCA is applied and a workshop where the case study is evaluated. The results show that the hybrid-LCA enables both a holistic approach to the climate impact and a level of detail for selected areas, making it possible to prioritize areas and identify measures to reduce the climate impact from consumption. The main challenges that arise in the practical procedure of the hybrid-LCA are associated with inventory and verification of foreground data and matching purchases of product groups to standardized classifications. To simplify the execution, increase transparency and facilitate monitoring, local governments are recommended to investigate the possibility of coordinating purchasing system and labeling product groups, in accordance with standardized classifications. It is also recommended to request information about a products weight and material content from suppliers. The uncertainties associated with the outcome of a hybrid-LCA are and remain large, therefore it is important that the results are communicated in terms of potential environmental impacts.

  • 117.
    Henriksson, Greger
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms). School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Börjesson Rivera, Miriam
    School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC. KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Why do we buy and throw away electronics?2014In: ISDRC 2014: Resilience - The New Research Frontier, Trondheim: Paper 6d7 in Electronically published full papers , 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 118.
    Henriksson, Greger
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms). School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Gullberg, Anders
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms). School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Höjer, Mattias
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms). School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Nyblom, Åsa
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms). School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    ICT-based sub-practices in sustainable development of city transport2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    How could use of ICTs make transport systems in large cities sustainable? To what degree would then everyday patterns of action, in which use of ICT is becoming increasingly integrated, be an effective force in such sustainable development? In this paper we use own and other ethnographic studies of how people travel and plan their travel in large Nordic cities and explore a couple of scientific articles built around scenarios of sustainable development of ICT-supported transport in large cities. In the scenarios the role of ICT was most prominently for travel planning, collective ownership and/or access to vehicles, payment systems and traffic management for environmental purposes. Two of the scenario articles were selected for a closer analysis. In the ethnographic material sub-practices, critical for transport in everyday life, were identified. The aim was to show if and how proposed solutions in the sustainability scenarios are possible and meaningful for urban dwellers to integrate into their everyday travel practice. We found that scenarios of this kind might benefit from being supplemented with certain components. We discuss how actors that currently develop traffic management, mobility and travel planning services are somewhat blind to some significant parts of the whole spectrum of relevant social practices. We also discuss how this could provide conditions for actors and stakeholders to highlight and facilitate sub-practices with ICT use and in line with sustainable development. We tentatively discuss and propose that authorities responsible for urban transport set goals for maintaining and spreading certain practices, related to sustainability impacts. In this way the development of everyday social practice among city residents could be supported as an effective force in the development of the city's transport system, specifically including the development of ICT in relation to transportation.

  • 119.
    Henriksson, Greger
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms). KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Kupersmidt, Judith
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms). KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Räsänen, Minna
    Södertörn University / School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies.
    A Day at the School of Opera: Less Travel throug Distance Education2013In: Nachhaltigkeit in der Wirtschaftskommunikation / [ed] Martin Nielsen, Iris Rittenhofer, Marianne Grove Ditlevsen, Sophie Esmann Andersen, Irene Pollach, Wiesbaden: Springer VS, Springer Fachmedien , 2013, p. 191-214Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    .

  • 120.
    Hischier, Roland
    et al.
    Empa Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, St. Gallen (Switzerland).
    Ahmadi Achachlouei, Mohammad
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms). School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC. Empa Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, St. Gallen (Switzerland).
    Hilty, Lorenz M.
    School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC. Empa Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, St. Gallen (Switzerland); University of Zürich, Department of Informatics, Zürich (Switzerland).
    Evaluating the sustainability of electronic media: Strategies for life cycle inventory data collection and their implications for LCA results2014In: Environmental Modelling & Software, ISSN 1364-8152, E-ISSN 1873-6726, Vol. 56, p. 27-36Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper compares two Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) studies independently carried out to assess the environmental impacts of electronic versus print media. Although the two studies lead to the same overall conclusion for the case of a news magazine namely that the tablet version of the magazine has environmental advantages over the print version there are significant differences in the details of the LCA results. We show how these differences can be explained by differences in the methodological approaches used for life cycle inventory (LCI) modelling, in particular the use of rough average data versus the attempt to use the most specific and detailed data as possible. We conclude that there are several issues in LCA practice (at least when applied in the domain of media) that can significantly influence the results already at the LCI level: The data collection strategy used (e.g. relying on desk-based research or dismantling a given device) and the decisions made at inventory level with regard to parameters with significant geographic variability, such as the electricity mix or recycling quotas.

  • 121.
    Hischier, Roland
    et al.
    Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, St. Gallen, Switzerland.
    Coroama, Vlad C.
    Measure-IT Research, Bucharest, Romania.
    Schien, Daniel
    Department of Computer Science, University of Bristol, UK.
    Ahmadi Achachlouei, Mohammad
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC. KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Grey Energy and Environmental Impacts of ICT Hardware2015In: ICT Innovations for Sustainability / [ed] Lorenz M. Hilty, Bernard Aebischer, Switzerland: Springer, 2015, p. 171-189Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Direct energy consumption of ICT hardware is only “half the story.” In order to get the “whole story,” energy consumption during the entire life cycle has to be taken into account. This chapter is a first step toward a more comprehensive picture, showing the “grey energy” (i.e., the overall energy requirements) as well as the releases (into air, water, and soil) during the entire life cycle of exemplary ICT hardware devices by applying the life cycle assessment method. The examples calculated show that a focus on direct energy consumption alone fails to take account of relevant parts of the total energy consumption of ICT hardware as well as the relevance of the production phase. As a general tendency, the production phase is more and more important the smaller (and the more energy-efficient) the devices are. When in use, a tablet computer is much more energy-efficient than a desktop computer system with its various components, so its production phase has a much greater relative importance. Accordingly, the impacts due to data transfer when using Internet services are also increasingly relevant the smaller the end-user device is, reaching up to more than 90 % of the overall impact when using a tablet computer.

  • 122.
    Hochschorner, Elisabeth
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Dan, György
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Communication Networks.
    Moberg, Åsa
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms). School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Carbon footprint of movie distribution via the internet: a Swedish case study2015In: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 87, p. 197-207Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Peer-to-peer (P2P) has been suggested as an energy-efficient means of movie distribution, indicating potential environmental benefits. An alternative option for the user would be to stream the movie from an internet protocol television (IPTV) solution. This paper presents an assessment of the carbon footprint of these two alternatives. When studying the environmental impacts of a product (goods or services), it is important to adopt a life cycle perspective in order to avoid moving the potential impacts from one part of the life cycle to another. Therefore the carbon footprint was assessed with a screening life cycle assessment (LCA). The results show that end-use equipment and distribution (in both P2P and IPTV systems) are clearly key aspects. Both manufacturing and use are important. In the use phase, the electricity for using the end-use devices and for distribution is the main contributor to the carbon footprint. For the distribution, another major contributor to the carbon footprint is the construction work involved in installing cables. Downlink/uplink bandwidth and movie size have a major influence on the environmental impact related to watching a movie by P2P, as the total time for which end-use devices need to be used is critical. Movie size determines the impact related to the distribution. In terms of the carbon footprint from the two systems, the P2P system has a higher impact, mainly caused by the end-use devices. Downlink uplink bandwidth and movie size determine the overall impact of the P2P system. The carbon footprint from P2P systems could be lowered either through higher uplink bandwidth or through decreased movie size.

  • 123. Håkansson, Anne Kristin
    et al.
    Höjer, Mattias
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Howlett, R.J
    Preface2013In: Smart Innovation, Systems and Technologies, ISSN 2190-3018, E-ISSN 2190-3026, Vol. 22Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 124.
    Håkansson, Cecilia
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Östberg, Katarina
    Bostedt, Göran
    Estimating distributional effects of environmental policy in Swedish coastal environments: a walk along different dimensions2016In: Journal of Environmental Economics and Policy, ISSN 2160-6544, E-ISSN 2160-6552, Vol. 5, no 1, p. 49-78Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper studies distributional effects of environmental policies in Swedish coastal environments, in monetary and environmental quality terms, for different dimensions: income, gender, age, non-users vs. users, distance, familiarity, and origin (if people have a Swedish background or not). The study area is widely used for different recreational activities and has a mix of different visitors. The data come from a choice experiment study. The results indicate that latent class modelling can be used to identify how monetary preferences vary between different groups of respondents, and largely confirm the limited existing knowledge from the previous research on distributional effects of environmental policies. However, the previous literature on distributional effects related to background is very limited, making it hard to draw comparisons. The results in our paper also show that the distributional effects differ depending on the environmental amenity. These results are of policy relevance since coastal environments are important for people's well-being and associated with positive health effects.

  • 125. Högström, Ebba
    et al.
    Wangel, Josefin
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC. KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Henriksson, Greger
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms). KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Performing Sustainability: Institutions, Inertia, and the Practices of Everyday Life2013In: Sustainable Stockholm: Exploring Urban Sustainability in Europe’s Greenest City / [ed] Metzger, Jonathan, and Amy Rader Olsson, New York and London: Routledge, 2013, p. 147-167Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 126.
    Höijer, Mattias
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Finnveden, Göran
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Vi måste våga diskutera flygets klimatpåverkan2015In: Dagens nyheter, ISSN 1101-2447, no 2015-12-18Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 127.
    Höjer, Mattias
    et al.
    School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC. KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Ahlroth, Sofia
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies (moved 20130630).
    Dreborg, Karl-Henrik
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies (moved 20130630).
    Ekvall, Tomas
    Finnveden, Göran
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies (moved 20130630).
    Hjelm, Olof
    Hochschorner, Elisabeth
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies (moved 20130630).
    Nilsson, Måns
    Stockholm Environment Institute.
    Palm, Viveka
    Scenarios in selected tools for environmental systems analysis2008In: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 16, no 18, p. 1958-1970Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A number of different tools for analysing environmental impacts of different systems have been developed. These include procedural tools such as strategic environmental assessment (SEA) and environmental management systems (EMS) as well as analytical ones such as life cycle assessment (LCA), life cycle costing (LCC), cost-benefit analysis (CBA) and the system of economic and environmental accounts (SEEA) including input-output analysis (IOA). Descriptions or scenarios of the future are typically relevant elements in these tools, since they are often used to describe impacts in the future. For futures studies a number of different approaches and techniques have been developed. In an earlier paper we have presented a typology of different types of scenarios that respond to different types of questions. These include predictive scenarios, explorative scenarios and normative scenarios. The aim of this paper is to explore connections between selected tools for environmental systems analysis and different scenario types. Although there is a clear need for futures studies in several tools for environmental systems analysis, it is interesting to note that the literature on methodologies for and case studies of combinations of futures studies and environmental systems analysis tools is rather limited. This suggests that there is a need for further research in this area including both methodoloy and practical case studies.

  • 128.
    Höjer, Mattias
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies (moved 20130630). School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Dreborg, Karl Henrik
    KTH.
    Engström, Rebecka
    KTH.
    Gunnarsson-Östling, Ulrika
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Svenfelt, Åsa
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Experiences of the development and use of scenarios for evaluating Swedish environmental quality objectives2011In: Futures: The journal of policy, planning and futures studies, ISSN 0016-3287, E-ISSN 1873-6378, Vol. 43, no 4, p. 498-512Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents and evaluates a method for encouraging long-term thinking and for considering a variety of scenarios in environmental policy processes. The Swedish environmental policy is based on 16 environmental quality objectives (EQOs) that national authorities are obliged to observe. These objectives are reviewed annually and evaluated in depth every four years. Here we describe and explore a futures study project for introducing more long-term thinking into work on the EQOs, which we tested in the in-depth evaluation in 2008. We found it difficult to design a collective scenario for a case with a wide variety of objectives and individuals with different backgrounds. However, this difficulty makes it even more important to incorporate futures studies into the work of the relevant authorities. Scenario work is often subcontracted, leading to a constant lack of futures studies expertise and thinking within authorities. Despite the difficulties, we found that experts within the authorities did begin to recognise the opportunities provided by futures studies. The project revealed an interest and need for futures studies within the authorities in charge of Swedish environmental quality objectives and our findings show that the authorities need to build up their own skills in futures studies. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd.

  • 129.
    Höjer, Mattias
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms). School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Lago, PatriciaVU University Amsterdam.Wangel, JosefinKTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms). School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Proceedings of the 2014 conference ICT for Sustainability2014Conference proceedings (editor) (Refereed)
  • 130.
    Höjer, Mattias
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms). School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Moberg, Åsa
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms). School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Henriksson, Greger
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms). School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Digitalisering och hållbar konsumtion: Underlagsrapport till fördjupad utvärdering av miljömålsarbetet2015Report (Other academic)
  • 131.
    Höjer, Mattias
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC. KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Wangel, Josefin
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC. KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Smart sustainable cities: definition and challenges2015In: ICT Innovations for Sustainability, Springer, 2015, p. 333-349Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this chapter, we investigate the concept of Smart Sustainable Cities. We begin with five major developments of the last decades and show how they can be said to build a basis for the Smart Sustainable Cities concept. We argue that for the concept to have any useful meaning, it needs to be more strictly defined than it has previously been. We suggest such a definition and bring up some of the concept’s more crucial challenges.

  • 132.
    Isacs, Lina
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Finnveden, Göran
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Dahllöf, Lisbeth
    Håkansson, Cecilia
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Petersson, Linnea
    Steen, Bengt
    Swanström, Lennart
    Wikström, Anna
    Choosing a monetary value of greenhouse gases in assessment tools2016In: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is a societal need for using monetary estimates of social impacts of CO2 and other greenhouse gases in different assessment tools, such as cost-benefit analysis and life-cycle assessment. A number of estimates are available in the literature. Since these differ by several orders of magnitude, there is ambiguity and confusion about which to use. This review aims to give some guidance on this issue. The variation in carbon value estimates depends on several uncertain aspects – which will remain uncertain – including climate sensitivity, assumptions about future emissions, and decision makers' ethical standpoints. Hence, there is no single correct monetary value for CO2: it will depend on the ethical standpoint of the user. Due to this, estimates of social costs of CO2 emissions cannot be used for calculating an optimal emission level, although they can inform such assessments. It is suggested that marginal abatement cost values are used for emissions capped by binding targets in short-term assessments, and that social cost of carbon values should be used for all other emissions. Benchmark principles for choosing a monetary carbon value are suggested along with associated estimates. Depending on the choices made with regard to ethical standpoints and assumptions about future emissions and climate sensitivity, estimates can be significantly higher than the ones typically used in assessment tools today. The estimates need continuous updating, and there is need for better understanding and communication around the limitations and uncertainties involved.

  • 133.
    Isacs, Lina
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Finnveden, Göran
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Palander, Sara
    Chalmers University of Technology.
    Steen, Bengt
    Chalmers University of Technology.
    Widerberg, Anna
    SP Technical Research Institute of Sweden.
    Wikström, Anna
    Chalmers University of Technology.
    Ingen vet kostnaden för utsläpp2014In: Dagens industri, ISSN 0346-640XArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 134.
    Jank, Merle-Hendrikje
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering.
    O'Reilly, Ciarán J.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center for ECO2 Vehicle design.
    Göransson, Peter
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center for ECO2 Vehicle design.
    Baumgartner, Rupert J.
    University of Graz, Institute of Systems Sciences Innovation & Sustainability Research, Austria.
    Schöggl, Josef-Peter
    University of Graz, Institute of Systems Sciences Innovation & Sustainability Research, Austria.
    Potting, José
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms). PBL Netherlands Environmental Assessment Agency, The Netherlands.
    Advancing energy efficient early-stage vehicle design through inclusion of end-of-life phase in the life cycle energy optimisation methodology2017In: 12th International Conference on Ecological Vehicles and Renewable Energies Conference, EVER, 2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Environmentally-friendly energy-efficient vehicles are an important contributor to meet future global transportation needs. To minimise the environmental impact of a vehicle throughout its entire life cycle, the life cycle energy optimisation (LCEO) methodology has been proposed. Using the proxy of life cycle energy, this methodology balances the energy consumption of vehicle production, operation and end-of-life scenarios. The overall aim is to design a vehicle where life cycle energy is at a minimum. While previous work only included vehicle production and operation, this paper aims at advancing the LCEO methodology by including an end-of-life phase. A simplified design study was conducted to illustrate how vehicle design changes when end-of-life treatment is included. Landfilling, incineration and recycling have been compared as end-of-life treatments, although the focus was put on recycling. The results reveal that the optimal design not only changes with the inclusion of an end-of-life phase but it changes with specific end-of-life treatment. 

  • 135.
    Jennifer, Engström
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Att inkludera klimatpåverkan som miljö aspekt i MKB med ett livscykelperspektiv2015Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 136. Jeong, Hayeong
    et al.
    Kobayashi, Kiyoshi
    Westlund, Hans
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Social capital for sustainable rural regions: the roles of voluntary association-mediated public service2013In: Social Capital and Rural Development in the Knowledge Society / [ed] Hans Westlund and Kiyoshi Kobayashi, Cheltenham: Edward Elgar Publishing, 2013, p. 299-332Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 137.
    Johansson, Pernilla
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Consuming the City: How does non-consumers experience the city?2014Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    We often speak of our society as a consumption society, a label that emerged after World War II. But the consumption society dates back longer than that, and can be deduced as far back as the colonialist era and the rise of luxury goods. One could say that the consumption society is the cultural answer to the transfer of the economy into capitalism as well as a consequence of industrial mass production.

    Swedes’ consumption habits negatively affect the environment, being part of the wealthiest 20% of the world’s population that stands for more than three-quarters of total private consumption. More and more people consciously change their lifestyle into consuming less. This aversion from the capitalistic consumer society has been around for quite some time but continues to grow stronger. But how does these voluntary non-consumers experience the city that they live in? With major cities today being so focused around an ever-increasing consumption, this study aims to find out how Swedish non-consumers experience the city of Stockholm by the use of qualitative interviews.

    The empirical result shows that the interviewed non-consumers primarily choose their lifestyle due to environmental concerns, and that they feel that Stockholm is too centered on consumption, not having enough mixed areas, and that they are missing greenery and cultural activities in the city. Non-consumers seem to influence friends and family to adopt a more sustainable consumption habit, something that could be useful for the further development of a more environmentally friendly and sustainable consumption behavior in Sweden.

  • 138.
    Jonsson, Daniel K.
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms). Swedish Defence Research Agency.
    Månsson, A.
    Johansson, B.
    Energy security and climate change mitigation as combined areas of analysis in contemporary research2013In: Energy studies review, ISSN 0843-4379, Vol. 20, no 2, p. 90-112Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Climate change mitigation and energy security are partly interacting areas that both present future challenges. The extensive research underway within these areas is mainly conducted in separate research communities, although there are some integrative efforts. This paper examines the breadth and heterogeneity involved in treating energy security and climate change mitigation as a combined research area. The outcome is a comprehensive analytical framework which considers energy security aspects, climate change mitigation strategies, temporal scope and future perspective, analytical focus, approaches and methodologies, geographical scope, and scientific traditions and perspectives.

  • 139.
    Jonsson, Daniel K.
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms). Swedish Defence Research Agency (FOI), Sweden.
    Johansson, B.
    Månsson, A.
    Nilsson, L. J.
    Nilsson, Måns
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms). Stockholm Environment Institute (SEI), Sweden.
    Sonnsjö, H.
    Energy security matters in the EU Energy Roadmap2015In: Energy Strategy Reviews, ISSN 2211-467X, E-ISSN 2211-4688, Vol. 6, p. 48-56Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Energy security has gained increasing prominence on the EU political agenda, but is often framed narrowly, in terms of import dependency or security of supply. In this paper we screen and scope out a more comprehensive suite of energy security aspects to be considered when assessing low-carbon energy scenarios and apply it using the EU Energy Roadmap as an example. Availability and affordability issues as well as security of demand matters and geopolitical security aspects are identified and discussed. External factors, e.g., future international climate treaties and international relations, are important for some energy security outcomes. A broader framing of energy security together with structured assessments on the security implications of energy transitions would benefit future EU energy policy.

  • 140.
    Joyce, Peter James
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Lcopt - An interactive tool for creating fully parameterised Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) foreground models2017In: The Journal of Open Source Software, ISSN 2475-9066, Vol. 2, no 16, p. 339-Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 141.
    Joyce, Peter James
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
    Goronovski, Andrei
    Institute of Physics, University of Tartu.
    Tkaczyk, Alan Henry
    Institute of Physics, University of Tartu.
    Björklund, Anna
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    A framework for including enhanced exposure to naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM) in LCA2017In: The International Journal of Life Cycle Assessment, ISSN 0948-3349, E-ISSN 1614-7502, Vol. 22, no 7, p. 1078-1095Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose Despite advances in the development of impact categories for ionising radiation, the focus on artificial radionuclides produced in the nuclear fuel cycle means that the potential impacts resulting from increased exposure to naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM) are still only covered to a limited degree in life cycle assessment (LCA). Here, we present a potential framework for the inclusion of the exposure routes and impact pathways particular to NORM in LCA. Methods We assess the potential magnitude of enhanced NORM exposure, particularly in light of the potential use of NORM residues in building materials, and set out the potential exposure routes that may exist. We then assess the current state of the art, in terms of available fate, exposure and damage models, both within and outside of the LCA sphere. Finally, these exposure routes and modelling techniques are combined in order to lay out a potential framework for NORM assessment in LCA, both in terms of impact on humans and ecosystems. Results and discussion Increased exposure to NORM radionuclides can result either from their release to the environment or their proximity to humans as they reside in stockpiles, landfills or products. The exposure route via products is considered to be increasingly significant in light of current attempts to incorporate technologically enhanced NORMs (TENORM) including bauxite residue into building materials, by groups such as the ETN-MSCA REDMUD project. Impact assessment models for NORM exposure are therefore required to avoid potential burden shifting in the assessment of such TENORM products. Models describing the fate of environmental releases, the exhalation of radon from building products and the shielding effects on landfills/stockpiles are required to assess potential exposure. Subsequently, models relating exposure to radiation sources and the effective internal and external dose received by receptors are required. Finally, an assessment of the damage caused to the receptors is desirable. Conclusions A sufficient suite of currently existing and internationally recognised models exist that can, with varying degrees of modification, form the building blocks of a comprehensive NORM characterisation method for LCA. The challenge ahead lies in consolidating these models, from disparate fields, into a coherent and generally applicable method for the assessment of enhanced NORM exposure in LCA.

  • 142.
    Jutterström, Sophie
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Klimatpåverkan från dricksvatten: Beräkningsmodell för Norrvattens koldioxidavtryck2015Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the study was to develop a model and define key figures in order to determine the carbon footprint of Norrvatten’s drinking water production and distribution, as well as analyse possible improvements. To generate the carbon footprint the study was developed from a life cycle assessment perspective, where the only environmental impact category considered was global warming. The system boundaries and methodology was determined through literature studies about carbon footprint and earlier studies about the environmental impact of drinking water production. Key figures where no site-specific data was available were made by literature studies as well as life cycle assessment databases.

    The results of Norrvatten’s carbon footprint 2014 showed that the production of chemicals used for the process contributed the most to the total carbon footprint. Aluminium sulphate and slacked lime had the most significant impact impacts out of all the chemicals, and contributed to approximately two thirds of the total carbon footprint. The source of electricity also had a big impact on the total result, where green energy and Swedish average electricity generated significantly lower carbon footprints. The results also showed that materials and generated waste contributed very little to the carbon footprint compared to chemicals, energy as well as transports.

    The most important possibilities for improvements that can be done during a shorter time span includes optimization of pumps and pumping strategy, as well as the dosage of chemicals. When considering longer time spans membrane technology and alternative agents for precipitation could improve the carbon footprint. However these methods need to be investigated further before they can be implemented.

    Using a carbon footprint as a tool to analyse environmental impacts can give a guideline to how continued work for improvements can be implemented. Nevertheless a carbon footprint is limited as only one environmental impact category is analysed. For further analysis of the environmental impact it is therefore suggested that a more complete life cycle assessment could be implemented. Social sustainability that can be related to for instance the production of chemicals is hard to quantify. Therefore this factor might need to be taken into consideration during an expanded future analysis.   

  • 143.
    Jöhnemark, Anna-Maja
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Exploring the possibilities for implementing Collaborative Consumption within Hammarby Sjöstad, Stockholm: Going beyond the visions of the citizen initiative HS20202015Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This is a futures study based on the citizen initiative HS2020 in Hammarby Sjöstad, Stockholm. The initiative has the vision to “Renew a new city”, and further develop Hammarby Sjöstad’s environmental profile towards a sustainable development until 2020.

    The aim of this study is to explore the possibilities for HS2020 to also work with Collaborative Consumption, which involves the sharing of goods, services, and space, as a contributing factor to the sustainable development of Hammarby Sjöstad. This study uses an explorative scenario approach together with backcasting, a normative scenario approach to create future images of Hammarby Sjöstad in 2020. These images explore the possibilities for HS2020 to also work with Collaborative Consumption in six of their sub-projects. The futures images were generated based on three workshops with participants connected to HS2020’s work, and also on the literature study and the collected background information.

    The future images of Hammarby Sjöstad mediate how HS2020 could further develop the existing sub-projects, by focusing more on Collaborative Consumption. The solutions presented in the theory could be implemented in Hammarby Sjöstad. They could be for anyone, restricted to members, within an apartment building or a small group of people that could also own and maintain the sharing solution. Other important actors are private companies, the municipality and non-profit organization that could initiate, own and maintain these sharing solutions. The future images show that they could contribute to increased sustainability in different ways. 

  • 144.
    Jöhnemark, Anna-Maja
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Hållbara livsstilar: Gemenskapen nyckeln till att fler ska vilja leva mer hållbart2013Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Den här uppsatsen presenterar hur hållbara livsstilar och konceptet delad resursanvändning kan bidra till en mer hållbar stadsutveckling. Idag ligger stort fokus på att bygga den hållbara staden genom nya tekniska lösningar. Syftet med detta arbete är att ta reda på vad som kan göras för att bidra till den hållbara staden genom boendes engagemang till mer hållbara livsstilar. I arbetet beskrivs först varför hållbarhetstänket behövs, vad hållbara livsstilar är och grundprinciperna bakom konceptet delad resursanvändning. Huvuddelen av arbetet består av en fallstudie av ett pågående stadsutvecklingsprojekt som går ut på att göra stadsdelen Hökarängen mer hållbar. Detta projekt är ett exempel på vad som görs idag för att bidra till den hållbara staden genom att bland annat utföra hållbarhetsinvesteringar i fastigheterna och fokusera på vad de boende samt verksamma i området kan göra för att leva mer hållbart. Det som framkom av arbetet var att de som engagerar folk mest i Hökarängen är odling och återvinningsfrågan. Det går att göra kopplingar mellan konceptet delad resursanvändning och de arbete som görs i Hökarängen. För att utveckla arbetet i Hökarängen kan en viktig faktor vara att skapa en gemenskap för att de boende lättare ska kunna ta till sig både konceptet hållbara livsstilar och delad resursanvändning. Lärdom kan tas från detta projekt till andra stadsutvecklingsprojekt genom att försöka ha ett liknande arbetssätt, där de försöker utgå från de boendes synpunkter och de styrkor som finns i området.

  • 145.
    Jöhnemark, Anna-Maja
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Svane, Örjan
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    What if Sharing Were Part of the Citizen Initiative’s Vision?: Exploring Collaborative Consumption as implemented in Hammarby Sjöstad, Stockholm2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    “Renewing a New City” is the vision of citizen initiative HS2020, established in the ongoing brownfield development of Hammarby Sjöstad, Stockholm. Previous research indicates that there is a potential to further develop the Sjöstad, contributing to urban sustainable development. The Sjöstad is internationally renowned for its environmental profile and refurbishment lies in the far future. Therefore, this is of great general interest, although HS2020 in itself is totally unique.

    This paper presents a futures study exploring how HS2020 could work also with Collaborative Consumption, i.e. the residents’ sharing of goods, services, and space instead of owning it. It uses elements of explorative and normative scenario approaches to create future images of Hammarby Sjöstad in 2020. The images incorporate Collaborative Consumption in six established HS2020 sub-projects, on e.g. Energy Efficiency in Buildings, Interactive ICT, Recycling and Electric Vehicles. The images were generated through workshops with participants from the citizen initiative, with inputs from a literature review.

    In the HS2020 projects, sharing could take the form of Collaborative Lifestyles, Redistribution Markets or Product Service Systems. It could be open for anyone, restricted to members, or to residents within a building. These different groups could also initiate, own and maintain the sharing solution. Other potential actors are private companies, the municipality and non-profit organizations. Qualitative assessment indicates that Collaborative Consumption in the Sjöstad projects could reduce energy use and other environmental impacts. It could also help building local community, but realisation in itself also calls for elements of community and trust among participants.

  • 146.
    Karlsson, Caroline
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Miliutenko, Sofiia
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Björklund, Anna
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Mörtberg, Ulla
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Olofsson, Bo
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Toller, Susanna
    Life cycle assessment in road infrastructure planning using spatial geological data2017In: The International Journal of Life Cycle Assessment, ISSN 0948-3349, E-ISSN 1614-7502, Vol. 22, no 8, p. 1302-1317Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The purpose of the study was to outline and demonstrate a new geographic information system (GIS)-based approach for utilising spatial geological data in three dimensions (i.e. length, width and depth) to improve estimates on earthworks during early stages of road infrastructure planning. Methods: This was undertaken by using three main methodological steps: mass balance calculation, life cycle inventory analysis and spatial mapping of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and energy use. The mass balance calculation was undertaken in a GIS environment using two assumptions of geological stratigraphy for two proposed alternative road corridors in Sweden. The estimated volumes of excavated soil, blasted rock and filling material were later multiplied with the GHG emission and energy use factors for these processes, to create spatial data and maps in order to show potential impacts of the studied road corridors. The proposed GIS-based approach was evaluated by comparing with actual values received after one alternative was constructed. Results and discussion: The results showed that the estimate of filling material was the most accurate (about 9 % deviation from actual values), while the estimate for excavated soil and blasted rock resulted in about 38 and 80 % deviation, respectively, from the actual values. It was also found that the total volume of excavated and ripped soils did not change when accounting for stratigraphy. Conclusions: The conclusion of this study was that more information regarding embankment height and actual soil thickness would further improve the model, but the proposed GIS-based approach shows promising results for usage in LCA at an early stage of road infrastructure planning. Thus, by providing better data quality, GIS in combination with LCA can enable planning for a more sustainable transport infrastructure.

  • 147.
    Karlsson, Caroline
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Miliutenko, Sofiia
    KTH.
    Björklund, Anna
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Mörtberg, Ulla
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Olofsson, Bo
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Toller, Susanna
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
    Life cycle assessment in road infrastructure planning using spatial geological dataManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 148.
    Karlsson, Caroline
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Miliutenko, Sofiia
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Land and Water Resources Engineering. KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Björklund, Anna
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Mörtberg, Ulla
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Olofsson, Bo
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Toller, Susanna
    Swedish Transport Agency.
    Towards a better planning process: Can geological data be useful?2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 149.
    Katzeff, Cecilia
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC. Interactive Institute Swedish ICT, Sweden.
    Wangel, Josefin
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms). KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Social practices, households, and design in the smart grid2015In: ICT Innovations for Sustainability, Springer International Publishing , 2015, p. 351-365Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Considerable effort is put into the design and development of cleaner and more efficient energy systems. In this paper, we describe the problems arising when these systems are designed from a top-down technological perspective and when much development fails to account for the complex processes involved since people and their practices are key parts of transitioning to new systems. The transition to a smart grid not only demands new technologies, but is also fundamentally dependent on households taking on a role as co-managers of the energy system. The chapter illustrates how the emerging research field of “sustainable interaction design” may play a role in supporting these roles and in shaping sustainable practices.

  • 150.
    Klemmayer, Inga
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    The Water Footprint of Bio-SPK derived from Jatropha Oil: A comparison of different methodologies2013Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
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