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  • 101.
    Henkel, Martin
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Service-based Processes: Design for business and technology2008Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other scientific)
    Abstract [en]

    The concepts of processes and services can be used to structure both businesses and software systems. From a business perspective, the use of processes promises efficient management of organizations. From a software perspective, executable process descriptions provide a way to structure software systems according to the business process the systems should support. Furthermore, the concept of software services allows systems to be partitioned in a modular fashion, thereby enabling large-scale system integration on a technical level. By combining process descriptions with software services in service-based processes, it is feasible to address both business and more technical software needs.

    Aligning the business and software perspectives of processes and software services is, however, challenging, since implemented executable processes and software services need to cater for operational and strategic business needs as well as existing legacy software systems.

    In this thesis, several instruments are presented that aim at aiding the design and evolution of service-based processes. The aligning of operational business and software perspectives on process descriptions is addressed by the introduction of business and technical process model levels. These levels can be aligned by the use of a set of model transformations and associated transformation rules. Furthermore, the aligning is aided by introducing means for achieving flexibility on both the business and technical model levels. The development of service-based processes from a strategic business point of view is aided by the introduction of novel models and methods for goal-based design of software services. Taken together, the instruments can be used for the design and evolution of service-based processes.

  • 102.
    Henkel, Martin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Boström, Gustav
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Wäyrynen, Jaana
    Moving from internal to external services using aspects2006In: Interoperability of Enterprise Software and Applications, Springer, 2006, p. 301-310Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Service oriented computing and web service technology provide the means to structure an organisation’s internal IT resources into a highly integrated network of services. In e-business and business process integration the internal services are interconnected with other, external organisations’ resources to form virtual organisations. This move from using services internally to external use puts new non-functional requirements on the service implementation. Without any supporting technologies, meeting these new requirements can result in re-writing or changing a large part of the service implementation. In this paper we argue that aspect oriented programming is an important technique that can be used to facilitate the implementation of the new requirements that arises when moving from internal to external services. The suggested solution is illustrated by an example where quality of service metrics is implemented by using aspect oriented programming.

  • 103.
    Henkel, Martin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Johannesson, Paul
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Perjons, Erik
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Zdravkovic, Jelena
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Value and goal driven design of e-services2007In: ICEBE 2007: IEEE International Conference on e-Business Engineering: Workshops: SOAIC 2007; SOSE 2007; SOKM 2007; Hong Kong; 24 October 2007 through 26 October 2007, 2007, p. 295-303Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    E-services are used as the cornerstones for modeling interaction points of cooperating IT systems, within and between enterprises. So far, research and development of e-services have mainly focused on an operational perspective, such as the development of standards for message exchanges and service coordination. However, on a strategic level, the success of e-services depends on its ability to work as a catalyst for the business values that are being exchanged. In this paper, we present an approach that utilize value and goal models as the foundation for designing e-services. The approach can be used to strategically ensure that the developed e-services support the desired business values for involved actors. A case study from the Swedish health sector is used to ground and apply the presented approach.

  • 104.
    Henkel, Martin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Perjons, Erik
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Zdravkovic, Jelena
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Domeij, Christer
    OOPix AB.
    Appehl, Gunnar
    OOPix AB.
    A value-based foundation for service modelling2006In: Proceedings of ECOWS 2006: 4th European Conference on Web Services: Zurich; 4 December 2006 through 6 December 2006, 2006, p. 129-137Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A broader use of e-services for cross enterprise collaboration requires the services to be analysed and designed with a clear business focus. From a business perspective, the e-services must support the primary values that an organization strives for. From an operational perspective, the e-services must be devised such that they support the day-to-day activities in the business. In this paper, we report on an effort to use value models and "service process models" as the foundation for analysis and design of e-services. Value models facilitate the exploration of new e-services, whereas service process models relate e-services to specific activities in an organization's business processes. We elicited a set of principles and models for analysis and design of e-services, and we discussed the experiences of practicing the principles in a project from the health sector. Having a well-defined alignment of software and business values provides benefits for service requirement gathering, service identification and service validation.

  • 105.
    Henkel, Martin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Zdravkovic, Jelena
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Supporting Development and Evolution of Service-Based Processes2005In: ICEBE 2005: IEEE International Conference on e-Business Engineering: Beijing; 18 October 2005 through 21 October 2005, 2005, p. 647-656Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    When designing executable enterprise processes, the alignment between business and technical requirements is still one of the central problems. Process specifications obtained from the pure business perspective commonly cannot be executed "as-is" due to constraints of information systems given in the form of existing software services. In this paper we introduce several concepts targeted towards aligning business processes and service-based systems. The notion of realization levels is introduced to discern the level of business conformance. Furthermore, a model of system constraints is introduced to guide the developer to process realizations with high business conformance. By. the combined use of the concepts, structured development and evolution of process realizations is enabled by continuous tracking of the alignment between business and the supporting technology.

  • 106. Heydari, S.
    et al.
    Ovenden, N.
    Siddiqui, Afzal
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Real options analysis of investment in carbon capture and sequestration technology2012In: Computational Management Science, ISSN 1619-697X, E-ISSN 1619-6988, Vol. 9, no 1, p. 109-138Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Among a comprehensive scope of mitigation measures for climate change, CO 2 capture and sequestration (CCS) plays a potentially significant role in industrialised countries. In this paper, we develop an analytical real options model that values the choice between two emissions-reduction technologies available to a coal-fired power plant. Specifically, the plant owner may decide to invest in either full CCS (FCCS) or partial CCS (PCCS) retrofits given uncertain electricity, CO 2, and coal prices. We first assess the opportunity to upgrade to each technology independently by determining the option value of installing a CCS unit as a function of CO 2 and fuel prices. Next, we value the option of investing in either FCCS or PCCS technology. If the volatilities of the prices are low enough, then the investment region is dichotomous, which implies that for a given fuel price, retrofitting to the FCCS (PCCS) technology is optimal if the CO 2 price increases (decreases) sufficiently. The numerical examples provided in this paper using current market data suggest that neither retrofit is optimal immediately. Finally, we observe that the optimal stopping boundaries are highly sensitive to CO 2 price volatility.

  • 107. Heydari, Somayeh
    et al.
    Siddiqui, Afzal
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Valuing a gas-fired power plant: A comparison of ordinary linear models, regime-switching approaches, and models with stochastic volatility2010In: Energy Economics, ISSN 0140-9883, E-ISSN 1873-6181, Vol. 32, no 3, p. 709-725Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Energy prices are often highly volatile with unexpected spikes. Capturing these sudden spikes may lead to more informed decision-making in energy investments, such as valuing gas-fired power plants, than ignoring them. In this paper, non-linear regime-switching models and models with mean-reverting stochastic volatility are compared with ordinary linear models. The study is performed using UK electricity and natural gas daily spot prices and suggests that with the aim of valuing a gas-fired power plant with and without operational flexibility, non-linear models with stochastic volatility, specifically for logarithms of electricity prices, provide better out-of-sample forecasts than both linear models and regime-switching models.

  • 108. Huang, V.
    et al.
    Javed, Muhammad Kashif
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Semantic sensor information description and processing2008In: Proc. - Int. Conf. Sensor Technol. Appl. SENSORCOMM, Incl., MESH: Int. Conf. Adv. Mesh Netw., ENOPT: Int. Workshop Energy Opt, 2008, p. 456-461Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Wireless sensor networks (WSN) generate large volumes of raw data which possess natural heterogeneity. WSNs are normally application specific with no sharing or reusability of sensor data among applications. In order for applications and services to be developed independently of particular WSNs, sensor data need to be enriched with semantic information. In this paper, we propose a Semantic Web Architecture for Sensor Networks (SWASN). This information oriented architecture allows the sensor data to be understood and processed in a meaningful way by a variety of applications with different purposes. We develop ontologies for sensor data and use the Jena API for processing which includes querying and inference over sensor data. By studying a building fire emergency scenario, we show that semantic web technologies can provide high level information extraction and inference of sensor data.

  • 109. Huber, M.
    et al.
    Kowalski, Stewart
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Nohlberg, M.
    Tjoa, S.
    Towards automating social engineering using social networking sites2009In: Proceedings - 12th IEEE International Conference on Computational Science and Engineering, CSE 2009, 2009, p. 117-124Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A growing number of people use social networking sites to foster social relationships among each other. While the advantages of the provided services are obvious, drawbacks on a users' privacy and arising implications are often neglected. In this paper we introduce a novel attack called automated social engineering which illustrates how social networking sites can be used for social engineering. Our approach takes classical social engineering one step further by automating tasks which formerly were very time-intensive. In order to evaluate our proposed attack cycle and our prototypical implementation (ASE bot), we conducted two experiments. Within the first experiment we examine the information gathering capabilities of our bot. The second evaluation of our prototype performs a Turing test. The promising results of the evaluation highlight the possibility to efficiently and effectively perform social engineering attacks by applying automated social engineering bots.

  • 110. Idefeldt, J.
    et al.
    Larsson, A.
    Danielson, Mats
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Preference ordering algorithms with imprecise expectations2006In: Lect. Notes Eng. Comput. Sci., 2006, p. 750-755Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In imprecise domains the preference order of the alternatives is not straightforward to establish, due to possible overlapping of expected values among the alternatives. Nevertheless, such rankings are useful in decision analysis applications, as obtaining a ranking of alternatives is a way to gain an overview of the situation. The rankings presented in this paper represent overviews of a preference order of the alternatives based on their respective expected utility. The ranking can be either ordinal, focusing only on the ordering, or cardinal, also taking the differences in expected utility into account. The first set of procedures discussed is a cardinal ranking, which provides the user with expected utility intervals of the evaluated alternatives. This yields a more extensive overview with more detailed information. The second set of procedures discussed ordinal rankings of the alternatives based on three different approaches; 1) contraction based ranking, 2) intersection based ranking, and 3) focal point based ranking with indifference level. Finally, we show that regardless of ranking method their respective maximal elements all conform to the maximal element of the ordinal ranking. Hence, if the intention is to find a maximal element, it is sufficient to use either pointwise cardinal ranking or ordinal ranking with zero as indifference level.

  • 111.
    Ilayperuma, Tharaka
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Zdravkovic, Jelena
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Exploring business value models from the inter-organizational collaboration perspective2010In: Proceedings of the 2010 ACM Symposium on Applied Computing, 2010, p. 99-105Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    From a strategic enterprise perspective, the success of e-services depends on their ability to work as a medium for the exchange of business values. Thus, there is a need to be able to describe and analyze business collaborations in a structured way, in order to identify the needs and appropriate offerings of the participating actors. To model business collaborations, business value models are increasingly used. However, a question remains - how to systematically create value models in order to identify the offerings of the involved actors, while spanning the whole life-cycle of a business collaboration? In this study we propose a method for designing more exploratory business models with a focus to how: (a). consumers classify values, and (b). the values are elicited in different phases of business collaboration life-cycle. A case study from the Swedish health care sector is used to ground and apply the presented method.

  • 112. Ilayperuma, Tharaka
    et al.
    Zdravkovic, Jelena
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Modelling business transactions from the value and collaboration perspective2009In: CEUR Workshop Proceedings, 2009Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Business collaborations between actors encompass different business objectives, such as making product awareness, buying or selling specific products or goods, providing post-sale services, and so forth. Thereby, a clear identification of required business transactions is vital for modeling complex business collaboration, as well as for their further implementation with IT systems. Although value-oriented approaches are used to model businesses, a question remains about how to systematically identify business transactions and the values exchanged by these transactions. In this paper we propose a method for creating more exploratory business models using a defined class of business transaction as a basis for identifying the exchanged values spanning entire collaboration life-cycles.

  • 113.
    Ilayperuma, Tharaka
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Zdravkovic, Jelena
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Value-Based Risk Management for Web Information Goods2009In: INFORMATION SYSTEMS, TECHNOLOGY AND MANAGEMENT-THIRD INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE: ICISTM 2009 / [ed] Prasad SK; Routray S; Khurana R; Sahni S, 2009, Vol. 31, p. 64-75Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Alongside with the growth of the World Wide Web, the exchange of information goods is tremendously increasing. Some information has entertainment value, and some has business value, but regardless of that, more and more people are willing to pay for information. Business models have become a common technique for representing the value exchanges among the actors involved in a business constellation. In this study, we utilize the notion of the business model to investigate and classify risks on the value of information goods and further, to propose adequate risk mitigation instruments.

  • 114. Isbister, K.
    et al.
    Höök, Kia
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Sundström, Petra
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Laaksolahti, J.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Generating ideas and building prototypes2011In: Cognitive Technologies, Springer Verlag , 2011, no 9783642151835, p. 671-685Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Design always involves the difficult step from seeing users and their activities to inventing something new that will make sense to them. In this chapter we turn to framing of the problem in such a way that the design process can start and the first prototypes can be constructed. Following a prototype-driven approach, we first provide a discussion of how to frame a problem, drawing on information gathered by methods presented in the previous chapter. We then show not only how to generate ideas for prototypes that would aid to validate a potential solution to that problem, but also methods to actually build and validate such prototypes. Finally, we discuss specific challenges related to affective interaction. The intention pursued with a prototype-driven approach is not to design a product, but a research vehicle for exploring a specific research idea. However, for one to say something of how successful a solution has been, a scenario for such prototype needs to be as realistic as possible, almost as if one was to design a product.

  • 115. Islam, M. N.
    et al.
    Islam, Md.A.
    Shadaque, I. J.
    Khan, Md.Razib Haya
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Developing an extensible framework for content based searching in super peer P2P network2007In: 2007 10th International Conference on Computer and Information Technology, ICCIT, IEEE , 2007, p. 4579381-Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Searching is an important factor in p2p network for content retrieval. Most of the searches in p2p system are title-based with their limited functionality. Without knowing the unique filename we can't retrieve the content of the file in title based search. Here super peer p2p network is designed that supports content-based search for relevant documents. At the beginning, a general and extensible framework is proposed which is based on hierarchical summary structure for searching similar documents in p2p network. The summary structure is formed by Vector Space Model (VSM), Latent Semantic Indexing (LSI) and Singular Value Decomposition (SVD) techniques. Than an effective document searching is developed by summarizing and maintaining all documents within the network with different factors. Finally at the end, the experimental result is verified on a real p2p prototype and large scale network. The results show the effectiveness, efficiency and scalability of the proposed system.

  • 116.
    Jamal, Arshad
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Towards a Taxonomy of Privacy Concerns of Online Social Network Sites Users: A Case Study of Facebook Beacon2011Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    More than half a billion people use Online Social Network Sites (OSNS) today. They disclose personally identifiable information such as names, date of birth, email address, phone numbers, and home address on their profiles. Some OSNS users also disclose their political and religious views and personal interests. The huge commercial potential of OSNS users’ information and the integration of OSNS with third party advertisers and/or aggregators pose threats to users’ privacy. This thesis reports a study which contributes to our understanding of the form and nature of online privacy by critically analysing the privacy concerns related with the failed launch of Facebook’s advertising tool Beacon. Beacon is an interesting case study because it highlighted the privacy concerns of OSNS users.

    Qualitative data was gathered from 29 weblogs (blogs) representing user opinions (492 comments) published between 6th November 2007(when Beacon was launched) and 28th February 2008 (when commentary had dwindled). A thematic analysis of the blogs contributed in the development of a taxonomy of privacy concerns of OSNS users specifically related with the third party information use. Noticeably, the concerns such as commercialism, terms of service (TOS), lack of user control, lack of user awareness and data protection influence user perceptions of online privacy. The limitations and key implications for designers and service providers of OSNS are also discussed.

  • 117.
    Jansson, Carl-Gustaf
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV. KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Centres, Center for Wireless Systems, Wireless@kth.
    Jonsson, Martin
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV. KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Centres, Center for Wireless Systems, Wireless@kth.
    Kanter, Theo G.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Centres, Center for Wireless Systems, Wireless@kth. Ericsson Research, Sweden.
    Kilander, Fredrik
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV. KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Centres, Center for Wireless Systems, Wireless@kth.
    Maguire Jr., Gerald Q.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Communication Systems, CoS. KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Centres, Center for Wireless Systems, Wireless@kth.
    Li, Wei
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV. KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Centres, Center for Wireless Systems, Wireless@kth.
    Context Middleware for Adaptive Services in Heterogeneous Wireless Networks: Concepts, Approach and Work-In-Progress in the ACAS Project2005In: VTC 2005-Spring: 2005 IEEE 61st Vehicular Technology Conference, Proceedings, IEEE , 2005, Vol. 5, p. 2954-2958Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper provides an overview of important results and work-in-progress within the ACAS project concerning context middleware to enable adaptive, user-centric, mobile services available to users via a heterogeneous wireless infrastructure.

  • 118.
    Jansson, Eva
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Working together when being apart: An analysis of distributed collaborative work through ICT from an organizational and psychosocial perspective2005Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other scientific)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of the research is to analyze collaboration and communication in distributed teams working together through ICT (Information and Communication Technology), to provide an overview and a broader understanding of important areas that require consideration. The analysis is from an organizational, psychosocial and managerial perspective, with the aim to support the development of strategies and the creation of more efficient and pleasant distributed work environments. Research questions concern the psychosocial work environment; differences, problems and opportunities for distributed teams, with deeper analysis of areas that was demonstrated particularly difficult. The analysis is concretized into advice to guide distributed teams; common problem areas are pointed out and an attempt on a theoretical model of distributed project work is made. A solid ground for continued research in the area as well as possibilities to support distributed teams is provided.

    The research was mainly conducted in globally distributed project courses at a university level, where students communicated and collaborated through ICT. The results apply on distributed projects, but can also be relevant for other areas in the new ICT facilitated work environment. The research has been conducted by investigating how team members behave in and perceive distributed work environments; analyzing how i.e. variations in organization, work, social activities and behavior affect how well the collaboration and communication work

    Teams working in distributed projects go through the same stages and encounter the same problems as any other team. Some problems become harder to overcome, there are new obstacles, at the same time as other problems become less noticeable and new opportunities arise. The base for collaboration and communication changes when team members don't see each other regularly. Teams are entailed to use ICT for basically all communication and various media demands alterations in behavior, as well as it alters the relation between senses and how people perceive things. Distributed team members don't have the same awareness of each other and get fewer cues to interpret situations and handle teambuilding, motivational problems and conflicts. Several of the regular ways to start socializing, build trust and get a common base for understanding and collaboration are not present in a distributed environment. There is no physical team space to meet in and team members don't "see" each other on a regular basis.

    It is possible to successfully work in distributed teams without regular face-to-face meetings even if it is more intricate. It will always be different, and the big danger is believing that it won't. Working in distributed teams is not necessarily worse, but there are no effortless solutions for replacing face-to-face encounters. Distributed projects require effort, but conducted right it can be a rewarding experience that brings an extra dimension to the project work. To make distributed projects work well it is necessary to consider technological issues as well as their effects on individuals. It is essential to understand the new issues people encounter when moving to a distributed work environment and the interrelations between different areas and variables.

  • 119.
    Jeppesen, Gudrun
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Kajko-Mattsson, Mira
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Murphy, J.
    Peeking into developers' testing process2009In: Proceedings - 2009 International Conference on Computational Intelligence and Software Engineering, CiSE 2009, 2009, p. 5366347-Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recently, developers' testing process has received more recognition. Despite this, we have still no insight into its status within the industry. In this paper, we study the status of developers' testing process at Nomadic Software AB. Our results show that the process is not uniformly executed. The company suffers from lack of control over the methods used, lack of formal requirements communication, lack of static testing practice and lack of testing process documentation.

  • 120.
    Johannesson, Paul
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    The role of business models in enterprise modelling2007In: Conceptual Modelling in Information Systems Engineering / [ed] Krogstie, J; Opdahl, AL; Brinkkemper, S, 2007, p. 123-140Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In order to cope with increasingly complex business and IT environments, organisations need effective instruments for managing their knowledge about these environments. Essential among these instruments are enterprise models that represent an organisation including its domain of work, processes, and context. Most enterprise models have focussed on information and process structures, but there has recently also been a growing interest in goal models, describing the intention of actors. We suggest that there is a need for an additional type of model, often called value model or business model, that focuses on the value created and interchanged between actors in a business environment. This kind of model provides a clear and declarative foundation for other kinds of enterprise models and they will become increasingly important in managing a complex environment characterised by collaboration, variety, and change.

  • 121.
    Johannesson, Paul
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Andersson, Birger
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Bergholtz, Maria
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Weigand, Hans
    Enterprise Modelling for Value Based Service Analysis2008In: Practice Of Enterprise Modeling / [ed] Stirna, J; Persson, A, 2008, Vol. 15, p. 153-167Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Service oriented architectures are becoming increasingly important as enablers of exchange, coordination. and cooperation between organizations and individuals. Engineering and management of services raise a number of issues concerning the analysis, design, integration, bundling, and maintenance of services. These issues are notoriously difficult to resolve due to the abstractness of services as compared to other kinds of resources. In this paper, we analyze the concept of service based on a number of definitions from the literature and propose a conceptual service model based on the REA ontology. The model relates the service notion to the resource concept and shows how the abstractions offered by services can be represented using an encapsulation relationship. The use of the proposed service model is illustrated by means of an application oil marketing oriented representation and design of services.

  • 122.
    Johannesson, Paul
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Andersson, Birger
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Weigand, H.
    Resource Analysis and Classification for Purpose Driven Value Model Design2010In: International Journal of Information System Modeling and Design, ISSN 1947-8186, E-ISSN 1947-8194, Vol. 1, no 1, p. 56-78Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Business and IT systems are today facing an ever more complex environment characterised by openness, variety, and change. In order to cope with this environmental complexity, organisations need effective instruments for managing their knowledge. Essential among these instruments are enterprise models, i.e. computational representations of the structure, processes, information, resources, and goals of organisations. When using enterprise modeling for analysing and designing business scenarios and networks, the reasoning should not start from business processes and activities but from notions at a higher level of abstraction. This can be done by focusing on the business motivation behind processes and expressing it in value models, i.e. models focusing on high level and business oriented objects like resources, actors, resource conversions, and resource exchanges. The declarative orientation of value models make them attractive for a number of different purposes, including profitability analysis, marketing analysis, process design, and service analysis. As value models can be used for many different purposes, there is a risk that they will become overloaded, complex, and difficult to understand. Therefore, when designing a value model, its purpose should be explicitly stated in order to focus the analysis. The goal of this article is to show how the purpose of a value model should influence its design. The approach builds on an analysis and classification of resources, resource conversions, and resource exchanges.

  • 123.
    Johannesson, Paul
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Andersson, Birger
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Wohed, Petia
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Business Process Management with Social Software Systems: A New Paradigm for Work Organisation2009In: BUSINESS PROCESS MANAGEMENT WORKSHOPS / [ed] Ardagna D; Mecella M; Yang J, 2009, Vol. 17, p. 659-665Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Business process management systems are systems aimed to support the management of business processes in organizations. In recent years social software has emerged as all alternative approach for production and work management. In this paper, we contrast the two, identify and analyse similarities and differences, and propose a set of guidelines Suggesting how they can be used ill complementary ways to support work in organizations.

  • 124.
    Johannesson, Paul
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Jayaweera, P.
    Value and intention based information systems engineering2008In: Information Systems Engineering: From Data Analysis to Process Networks, IGI Global, 2008, p. 66-96Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In order to cope with increasingly complex business and IT environments, organisations need effective instruments for managing their knowledge about these environments. Essential among these instruments are models, i.e. representations of aspects of reality including the domain of work, the processes, and their context. Models come in a variety of forms, formal or informal; describing static or dynamic aspects; representing agents, data, goals, processes, or resources; focusing on business or IT aspects. A major question is how to organise and relate the different models that are needed for representing and visualising enterprises and their environments, and this issue has been addressed within the area of enterprise architecture. In this chapter, we propose a light-weight enterprise architecture framework based on linguistic theories and organizational metaphors. The concepts and entities of an organization are categorized into three groups concerning resources and resource exchanges, contracts and commitments, and authorities and roles. The activities and processes in organizations are divided into three levels based on how they affect physical, communicative and social aspects of organizations.

  • 125.
    Johannesson, Paul
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Perjons, Erik
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Value driven KPI design for health care2010Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A core component in any welfare society is an equal and efficient health care system. Large resources are spent on health care, but a number of problems still remain, such as deficiencies in service quality and long patient queues. A main reason behind these problems is the complexity of health care organisations which make them difficult to govern. One possible approach for improving the governance and management of health care organisations is the use of performance management, which is a management approach aiming at optimising the performance of an organisation. The main instrument in performance management is the Key Performance Indicator (KPI). However, designing effective KPIs is a complex and time consuming task that requires substantial efforts. Therefore, there is a need for methods and tools that assist organisations in designing KPIs. This paper proposes a value driven method for identifying patient oriented KPIs. The method is illustrated using a case study in eye health care.

  • 126.
    Johannesson, Paul
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Perjons, Erik
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Wangler, Benkt
    Åhlfeldt, Rose- Mharie
    Design solutions for interoperability using a process manager2006In: Interoperability of Enterprise Software and Applications / [ed] Konstantas, D; Bourrieres, JP; Leonard, M; Boudjlida, N, 2006, p. 397-408Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The healthcare domain is in urgent need for solutions to making clinical and administrative systems, possibly belonging to different healthcare units, interoperable and hence making them deliver timely and correct information as needed in particular situations. Process manager technology allows making all actors (humans or information systems) involved in healthcare processes communicate along these processes. This paper argues that process manager technology is essential for achieving interoperability in healthcare, but that some serious problems need to be overcome to realise its full potential. A number of design solutions to address these problems are proposed.

  • 127.
    Johannesson, Paul
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV. Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Söderström, E.
    Information systems engineering: From data analysis to process networks2008Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Information systems belong to the most complex artifacts built in today’s society. Developing, maintaining, and using an information system raises a large number of difficult problems, ranging from purely technical to organizational and social. Information Systems Engineering: From Data Analysis to Process Networks presents the most current research on existing and emergent trends on conceptual modeling and information systems engineering, bridging the gap between research and practice by providing a much-needed reference point on the design of software systems that evolve seamlessly to adapt to rapidly changing business and organizational practices.

  • 128.
    Johannesson, Paul
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Weigand, Hans
    Guest editors' introduction: Value modeling and business ontologies2015In: Applied Ontology, ISSN 1570-5838, E-ISSN 1875-8533, Vol. 10, no 1, p. 5-6Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ontology research can contribute to novel tools, methods and techniques for designing and developing innovative enterprise systems by providing foundational concepts for value creation, enterprise systems development and systems interoperability. A main driver for research in this area is the nee.

  • 129. Jongejan, B.
    et al.
    Dalianis, Hercules
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV. Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Automatic training of lemmatization rules that handle morphological changes in pre-, in- and suffixes alike2009In: ACL-IJCNLP 2009 - Joint Conf. of the 47th Annual Meeting of the Association for Computational Linguistics and 4th Int. Joint Conf. on Natural Language Processing of the AFNLP, Proceedings of the Conf., 2009, p. 145-153Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We propose a method to automatically train lemmatization rules that handle prefix, infix and suffix changes to generate the lemma from the full form of a word. We explain how the lemmatization rules are created and how the lemmatizer works. We trained this lemmatizer on Danish, Dutch, English, German, Greek, Icelandic, Norwegian, Polish, Slovene and Swedish full form-lemma pairs respectively. We obtained significant improvements of 24 percent for Polish, 2.3 percent for Dutch, 1.5 percent for English, 1.2 percent for German and 1.0 percent for Swedish compared to plain suffix lemmatization using a suffix-only lemmatizer. Icelandic deteriorated with 1.9 percent. We also made an observation regarding the number of produced lemmatization rules as a function of the number of training pairs.

  • 130.
    Jonsson, Martin
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Sensing and Making Sense: Designing Middleware for Context Aware Computing2007Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other scientific)
    Abstract [en]

    Computing devices are becoming wireless, smaller and embedded into other artifacts. Some of them are mobile while others are built into the environment. The novel technologies are also becoming more dependent of communication with other computing devices over different kinds of networks. These interconnected devices constitute locally and globally distributed service environments that will enforce new requirements on the design of software systems. These new type of environments provide both opportunities for new types of applications as well as a number of new problems that will have to be addressed. One approach that have been suggested both in order to provide new functionalities and as a possible solution to some of the problems is to try and collect and incorporate aspects of the /context/ of a person, activity or device as a part of the computer system.

    This thesis addresses some issues that have to be considered when designing this kind of systems. In particular the thesis examines how to design middleware that can support the creation of context aware applications. As a part of this work several instances of such systems have been implemented and put in use and tested in various applications. Some key problems with respect to the design of context information middleware are also identified and examined. One question that is addressed concerns the clash between the need for internal representations of context information and the goal of middleware to support a broad range of applications. Another problem that has been addressed concerns how to create means for context aware service discovery in ubiquitous computing environments. Various mechanisms that address these problems have been implemented and tested. Finally the work addresses issues related to the role of the users in this kind of systems. Implementations and experiments have been performed where users take more active roles in aspects of system maintenance and adaptation as well as in the interpretation and representation of context information.

  • 131.
    Juell-Skielse, Gustaf
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    ERP adoption in small and medium sized enterprises2006Licentiate thesis, monograph (Other scientific)
    Abstract [en]

    Enterprise resource planning (ERP) is established among a majority of small and medium sized companies in Kista Science City and seems to have a positive effect on organizational effectiveness. Kista Science City is Sweden’s largest corporate centre, with more companies and employees in a limited area than anywhere else in Europe. This study looks at the level of adoption of ERP functions, perceived organizational effectiveness and critical success factors. The most common use of ERP is for financial control and reporting, followed by order entry and purchasing. A significant relationship between the level of adoption and organizational effectiveness was found.

    Although Enterprise Resource Planning has become an established phenomenon the investments in ERP software are far from fully utilized. Most companies have started to use ERP to integrate functional areas but few companies have moved to extended ERP (ERPII). The adoption of functionality for customer relationship management seems to have started, but the use of e-commerce, business intelligence and supply chain management is very low. Different reasons for the low level of adoption are discussed and it is suggested that the interrelationship between SMEs and ERP-consultants be investigated further. ERP-consultants are important change agents and knowledge transfers for ERP and one way to interpret the data is that ERP-consultants are caught in a negative spiral where they focus on installations and technical maintenance of core ERP, which prevents them from developing new, extended ERP competence.

    An analysis of critical success factors showed that although technical competence was important socially oriented factors such as project teamwork and composition as well as communication had a greater effect on organizational effectiveness. Surprisingly enough, project management did not have any effect on organizational effectiveness. Common implementation methods for ERP focus on project management. It is suggested to further analyse if these methods could be improved by an increased adaptability to differences in company settings and requirements as well as through a better use of critical success factors. Organizational effectiveness can be measured in many ways and it was found that the success factors varied in terms of how they correlated with different measures.

    In the next step, the doctorial thesis, it is suggested that a prototype environment is developed to stimulate an increased use of extended ERP among small and medium sized companies. Several actors, such as SMEs, consultants, vendors and students would be involved. The prototype environment could facilitate enhancements of implementation methods and reduction of implementation costs through the development of reusable objects such as add-on solutions, process maps and system configurations. It could also help small and medium sized companies to investigate the business benefits of ERP by increasing involvement and familiarity while on the same time decrease costs and risks.

  • 132.
    Juell-Skielse, Gustaf
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Perjons, Erik
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Improving E-Government through Benefit Analysis and Value Modeling2009In: 2009 IEEE 33RD INTERNATIONAL COMPUTER SOFTWARE AND APPLICATIONS CONFERENCE, VOL. 1, New York: IEEE , 2009, p. 332-339Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sweden is a precursor in e-government and development of municipal e-services. For example, the Swedish government has announced a national action plan for fast development of e-government using e-services and workflow systems for effective public administration. However, introducing e-government is a complex process including many different actors with different goals: public organizations with a complex combination of economic and non-economic goals, citizens and private organizations with different relations to the public organization, and IT vendors, offering different tools and techniques to develop and maintain e-services. In order to implement a right mix of e-services in the public sector, the benefits and costs of different e-services, and combinations of e-services, for all involved actors need to be investigated. In this paper, two established approaches for value analysis, Peng and Value modeling, are combined. Peng is a participative, bottom-up approach for identifying and estimating benefits and costs for IT-investments, while Value modeling is a top-down approach for analyzing economic viability of an entire net-work of actors. The aim of this paper is to demonstrate the application of the combined approach using a case study from the municipality of Jarfalla, a suburb of Stockholm. The results show that value analysis can be improved by combining these two models. The results also initiated an important discussion in the municipality of Järfalla on how to realize the potential values of a new e-service.

  • 133.
    Kabilan, Vandana
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Contract workflow model patterns using BPMN2005In: CEUR Workshop Proceedings, 2005, p. 171-182Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Business Process Models are typically used to express inter or intra - enterprise business activities/processes. Contractual obligations need to be fulfilled through execution of business processes on behalf of the contracting parties. To do so, business contract terms and conditions need to be semantically integrated to existing internal business process models. Contract obligation, performance, nonperformance and other related concepts have been expressed as conceptual models in a Multi-Tier Contract Ontology (MTCO). Based on the MTCO, business process modelers may model the contract obligation fulfillment process as Contract Workflow Models(CWM) using Business Process Modeling Notation (BPMN) diagrams. The paper discusses the ongoing research and choices made in the semantic translation from contract obligations to CWM-BPMN Diagrams. Some of the contract workflow patterns are also presented.

  • 134.
    Kabilan, Vandana
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Improving peer reviewing in scientific conferences2006In: WMSCI - World Multi-Conf. Syst., Cybern. Informatics, Jointly Int. Conf. Inf. Syst. Anal. Synth., ISAS - Proc., 2006, p. 413-416Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    What is Science? What is Scientific Research? These are some eternal questions which philosophers, academicians and practioner have debated upon for eons, and no doubt shall continue to do so. But, the general consensus is that, scientific research is a quest for new knowledge, and this knowledge has to be critically, methodically and objectively obtained, in order to be considered of potential scientific value. This paper shall not focus on the scientific research principles or criteria, but instead look at one of the evaluating conditions for acceptable scientific research-that of validation of scientific research. Scientific hypothesis and results proposed by a researcher need to be verifiable, repeatable or falsifiable. One such validation is attained through peer review by fellow researchers engaged in scientific research themselves. Today, the way to do so is to submit scientific research papers to conferences, journals and workshops. But is the current system of peer reviewing carried out by the so called 'established' conferences, truly objective, and true validation of innovative research? This paper puts forward some reflections on this issue.

  • 135.
    Kabilan, Vandana
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Ontology for Information Systems (04IS) Design Methodology: Conceptualizing, Designing and Representing Domain Ontologies2007Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other scientific)
    Abstract [en]

    Globalization has opened new frontiers for business enterprises and human communication. There is an information explosion that necessitates huge amounts of information to be speedily processed and acted upon. Information Systems aim to facilitate human decision-making by retrieving context-sensitive information, making implicit knowledge explicit and to reuse the knowledge that has already been discovered. A possible answer to meet these goals is the use of Ontology.

    Ontology has been studied for a long time in the fields of AI, Logic and Linguistics. Current state-of-the art research in Information Systems has focused on the use of ontologies. However, there remain many obstacles for the practical and commercial use of ontologies for Information Systems. One such obstacle is that current Information System designers lack the know-how to successfully design an ontology. Current ontology design methodologies are difficult to use by Information Systems designers having little theoretical knowledge of ontology modeling. Another issue is that business enterprises mostly function in the social domain where there are complex underlying semantics and pragmatics involved.

    This research tries to solve some of these issues by proposing the Ontology for Information Systems (O4IS) Design Methodology for the design of ontologies for Information Systems. The research also proposes a Unified Semantic Procedural Pragmatic Design for explicit conceptualization of the semantics and pragmatics of a domain. We further propose a set of Semantic Analysis Representations as conceptual analysis patterns for semantic relationship identification. We also put forward the Dual Conceptual Representation so that the designed ontology is understandable by both humans and machines. Finally, a logical architecture for domain ontology design called the Multi-Tier Domain Ontology Architecture is proposed.

    We follow the design science in Information Systems research methodology. The proposed solutions are demonstrated through two case studies carried out in different domains. The first case study is that of business contract knowledge management, which focuses on the analysis of contractual obligations, their fulfillment via the performance of business actions, and the deduction of a contract compliant workflow model. The second case study relates to military operations simulations and modeling. The emphasis in this case study is to analyze, model and represent the domain knowledge as a re-usable resource to be used in a number of modeling and simulation applications.

  • 136.
    Kabilan, Vandana
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Johannesson, Paul
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Ruohomaa, Sini
    Moen, Pirjo
    Herrmann, Andrea
    Åhlfeldt, Rose-Mharie
    Weigand, Hans
    Introducing the common non-functional ontology2007In: Enterprise Interoperability II: New Challenges and Approaches / [ed] Goncalves, RJ; Muller, JP; Mertins, K; Zelm, M, 2007, p. 633-645Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Enterprise systems interoperability is impeded by the lack of a cohesive, integrated perspective on non-functional aspects (NFA). We propose to respond to the fragmentation in NFA research by supporting a shared, common understanding. For this purpose:- first, we propose a common NFA ontology, which generalizes and integrates the different non-functional aspects under a common top-level ontology. Second, we introduce a series of specialized ontologies on specific non-functional aspects, such as trust, risk, privacy, threat and misuse. By fostering a consensual and shared view of the non-functional aspects domain, we aim to move closer to enhancing semantic enterprise interoperability. This shared perspective on what non-functional aspects are and how they relate to the other 'functional' aspects of enterprise systems, is the key towards enterprise interoperability.

  • 137.
    Kabilan, Vandana
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Mojtahed, V.
    Introducing DCMF-O: Ontology suite for defence conceptual modelling2006Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Defence Conceptual Modelling Framework (DCMF) is the Swedish Defence Research Agency's (FOI) proposal to deal with Conceptual Modelling issues in the military domain. It has its origin in Conceptual Models of the Mission Space (CMMS), a concept initially introduced by the US DoD. The vision for that concept was to achieve interoperability, composability and reusability of knowledge for modelling and simulation in the military domain, but the concept got never completed. After having made several supplementary adaptations to the original CMMS, FOI has, with effect from 2005, renamed its version of the CMMS as Defence Conceptual Modelling Framework (DCMF). The framework consists of tools for development and reusability of conceptual models, as well as standards for acquisition, representation, modelling, integration, management and preservation of knowledge. In its aim to capture and model re-usable knowledge of the mission space or MSMs (Mission Space Models) the Framework involves a set of knowledge capture, analysis, modelling, representation and finally usage methods, tools and approaches. The need for a central domain knowledge pool was felt when we started to delve deeply in to the DCMF-P (the Process part of the framework). This central knowledge suite was required to provide the background, semantic concepts and their complex interrelationships as well as provide features for interoperability with other M&S applications, reasoning, and analysis and decision support utilities. Thus, FOI proposes the use of an ontology suite named DCMF-O (Defence Conceptual Modelling Framework-Ontology), and began its work in 2005 by a survey of contemporary state of the art ontology design and development methodologies. However, due to the specific requirements and nature of the military simulation and modelling domain, we found that we had to make choices in design principles, criteria and approaches. In this paper we introduce the Military Specific Ontology development, MiSO Methodology which combines the functional domain requirements with current ontology design methodologies in the military M&S context. In this paper we discuss the role of ontology in our DCMF process, with a short background on ontologies and their design philosophy in general. Thereafter, we discuss the requirements and criteria that our DCMF posed on any proposed ontology. We present the MiSO methodology as a guideline to design our proposed DCMF-O architecture which meets the above mentioned specifications. Finally, we introduce briefly the DCMF-O suite.

  • 138.
    Kabilan, Vandana
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Svan, Pemilla
    ECA rule ontology - Modelling prescriptive rules as descriptive ontology2007In: WEBIST 2007: Proceedings of the Third International Conference on Web Information Systems and Technologies, Vol WIA: Web Interfaces And Applications / [ed] Filipe, J; Cordeiro, J, 2007, p. 408-415Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ontology is said to be descriptive in contrast to the prescriptive nature of typical behaviour, process or rules. However, rules and behaviour models are in themselves a domain of re usable shared knowledge. Whether in the domain of enterprise systems or in military modelling and simulations, we find instances of such 'prescriptive' body of knowledge. While capturing such 'rules' as programmatic axioms using rule languages may be viable, it does not help us is establishing the reusable domain knowledge. In this paper, we combine software engineering technique based on the Event Condition Action logic to propose the ECA Rule Ontology as a mechanism for capturing such prescriptive rules as ontological conceptualisations. We exemplify our approach by applying it to the domain of military operations modelling and simulations.

  • 139.
    Kabilan, Vandana
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Zdravkovic, Jelena
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Johannesson, Paul
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Using multi tier contract ontology to deduce contract workflow models for enterprise process interoperability2005In: CEUR Workshop Proceedings, 2005Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ontologies are being proposed as a medium for affecting enterprise application integration. Though it is widely accepted that ontologies can support inter- enterprise interoperability, the exact nature and extent to which ontology may be useful is uncertain. We promote the use of ontology in a two-fold way: first, as a knowledge base for fostering human-to-human shared understanding; second, as 'Interlingua' for promoting human-to-machine as well as semantics-to-execution specification. The proposed concept is described using a case scenario in the realm of legal business contracts, followed by their integration to the business domain, with an objective to model contract compliant business process models. With the case, we illustrate the use of Multi-Tier Contract Ontology (MTCO) to deduce a high level, partial business process model named the Contract Workflow Model (CWM). Such a model, from the business process perspective, may be used as a skeleton for designing internal business processes for each individual contracting party, or for mapping to existing processes.

  • 140.
    Kajko-Mattsson, Mira
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Applicability of IEEE 1219 within corrective maintenance2006Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The IEEE 1219 standard is too general. It proposes one generic process model for all maintenance categories. However, maintenance categories differ too much. Hence, they cannot be reflected in one generic model. In this paper, we match Corrective Maintenance Maturity Model and parts of Evolution and Maintenance Maturity Model against the IEEE 1219 standard. Our results show that the IEEE 1219 standard must be revised to properly reflect the domain of corrective maintenance within industry.

  • 141.
    Kajko-Mattsson, Mira
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Björnsson, Therez
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Outlining developers' testing process model2007In: SEAA 2007: 33rd EUROMICRO Conference on Software Engineering and Advanced Applications, Proceedings / [ed] Muller, P; Liggesmeyer, P; Maehle, E, 2007, p. 263-270Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Most of the effort has been spent on formalizing processes for system testing. Little has been done regarding developers' unit and unit integration testing. In this paper, we study the routines of six developers when testing their software components. Our contribution is twofold. It first outlines a process model for unit and unit integration testing. It then provides feedback on the state of practice within six organizations.

  • 142.
    Kajko-Mattsson, Mira
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Bosu, Michael Franklin
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Eliciting an enhancive maintenance model in three organisations in Ghana2006In: Proc. IEEE/ACIS Int. Conf. Comput. Info. Sci., 2006, p. 244-251Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To continuously meet the changing needs of the customers, organisations follow their own enhancive maintenance process models. Unfortunately, these models are not easily available to the academic world. In this paper, we study enhancive maintenance in three organisations in Ghana. Our goal is to explore information about the initial phases of the enhancive maintenance process and put them into a process model Our model makes provision for process phases, their activities, roles, and data needed for managing enhancements. Although the primary goal of this paper is to elicit an enhancive maintenance model, we will not deny that it also provides the information on the state of enhancive maintenance practice in one developing country - Ghana.

  • 143.
    Kajko-Mattsson, Mira
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Britts, S.
    A model of front-end pre-change corrective testing2006Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Most of the testing process models deal with testing within development. To our knowledge, there are no process models exclusively dedicated to the testing of corrective changes. For this reason, we have outlined a process model covering the testing activities at the front-end support level and evaluated them within IS software organizations.

  • 144.
    Kajko-Mattsson, Mira
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV. Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Lewis, G. A.
    Smith, D. B.
    A framework for roles for development, evolution and maintenance of SOA-based systems2007In: Proceedings - ICSE 2007 Workshops: International Workshop on Systems Development in SOA Environments, SDSOA'07, 2007, p. 4273295-Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Development, evolution and maintenance of SOAbased systems demands rethinking of the traditional roles for performing these activities. The key objective of this paper is to present preliminary ideas on the roles required for developing, evolving and maintaining SOA-based systems and to suggest a framework for areas of needed research.

  • 145.
    Kajko-Mattsson, Mira
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Lewis, G. A.
    Smith, D. B.
    Evolution and maintenance of SOA-based systems at SAS2008In: Proc. Annu. Hawaii Int. Conf. Syst. Sci., 2008Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As SOA-based systems are becoming more common, there is a need to consider how traditional IT roles and responsibilities need to change. This paper proposes a framework for roles that are required for evolving and maintaining SOA-based systems. It builds on work on traditional IT roles, as well as insights emerging from current research on SOA. The paper also presents a questionnaire for collecting data from organizations on roles that they use for SOA-based systems maintenance and evolution. Results from a pilot use of the questionnaire with Scandinavian Airline Systems (SAS) are presented.

  • 146.
    Kajko-Mattsson, Mira
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Liang, Z.
    Yuansha, Z.
    There are no national boundaries when teaching software engineering2008In: Proceedings - International Conference on Computer Science and Software Engineering, CSSE 2008, 2008, p. 1226-1229Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As part of globalizing education, the Linnaeus-Palme programme offers universities to exchange lecturers. Two departments coming from China and Sweden utilized this opportunity. A Swedish professor gave a course on software lifecycle management in China. In this paper, we report on a teaching experience gained during this programme. This experience indicates that there are no national boundaries when teaching software engineering. It also provides an important point of reference for improving current educational exchange programmes.

  • 147.
    Kajko-Mattsson, Mira
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Lundholm, Jan
    Norrby, Jonas
    Insight into risk management in five software organizations2009In: SEAA '09. 35th Euromicro Conference on Software Engineering and Advanced Applications, 2009, 2009, p. 321-326Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many software development and evolution projects use risk management process for tackling various uncertainties, unexpected events and unclear project prerequisites. Despite this, little is known about their effectiveness. In this paper, we report on the status of risk management practice within five organizations. The report encompasses issues such as (1) industrial understanding of risk, (2) project uncertainty, (3) risk management within projects, and (4) use of risk management process.

  • 148.
    Kajko-Mattsson, Mira Miroslawa
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    A survey of documentation practice within corrective maintenance2005In: Journal of Empirical Software Engineering, ISSN 1382-3256, E-ISSN 1573-7616, Vol. 10, no 1, p. 31-55Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of documentation is to describe software systems and software processes. Consistent, correct and complete documentation of a software system is an important vehicle for the maintainer to gain its understanding, to ease its learning and/or relearning processes, and to make the system more maintainable. Poor system documentation, on the other hand, is the primary reason for quick software system quality degradation and aging. Proper process documentation records the process, its stages and tasks, executing roles, their decisions and motivations, and the results of each individual process task. It is extremely important for achieving insight and visibility into the processes, important for their meaningful process measurement and thereby pivotal for achieving high process maturity. In this paper, we report on the results of an explorative study in which we have identified a number of rudimentary documentation requirements relevant within corrective maintenance, and found out how they were implemented within eighteen software organizations in Sweden. The goal was to examine the industrial documentation practice within corrective maintenance. Our results show that the documentation within corrective maintenance is still a very neglected issue within the organizations studied. None of our organizations has fully implemented all our documentation requirements.

  • 149.
    Kajko-Mattsson, Mira Miroslawa
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Evaluation of CM3: Front-end problem management within industry2006Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We have created a process model for managing corrective maintenance requests at the front-end support level. Our model is called CM3: Front-End Problem Management. It was elicited at two ABB organisations and refined at Cap Gemini Ernst & Young and Scandinavian Airline Systems. In this paper, we evaluate it on a major scale using feedback from 15 major software organisations. The evaluation results show that CM3: Front-End Problem Management appropriately mirrors the industrial reality.

  • 150.
    Kajko-Mattsson, Mira Miroslawa
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Fredriksson, Ralf
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Hauzenberger, Anna
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Eliciting a retirement process model: Case study 12008In: Proceedings - International Conference on Computer Science and Software Engineering, CSSE 2008, 2008, Vol. 2, p. 332-337Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The software engineering discipline has been quite successful in creating various development models for constructing software systems. It has not however been that successful in creating later lifecycle process models. One of them concerns retirement. In this paper, we elicit a retirement process model and compare it to the current standard retirement process models. Our goal is to evaluate current retirement process standards and provide feedback for their extension. The elicitation process has been made within one Nordic financial company.

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