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  • 101. Berglund, H.
    et al.
    Magnusson, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Sandström, C.
    Towards a symmetric theory of disruptive innovation2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 102.
    Bergqvist, Lisa
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Brönmark Riex, Oscar
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Holm Bjelke, Jakob
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Produktutvecklingsprocessen i lean producerandeföretag2021Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Lean is a concept which has influenced the modern industry during the last few decades and is something many companies strive to practice. However, there is still a lack of knowledge regarding how lean can be applied during product development, how methods are used and the roll of communication in lean organizations. This study aims to investigate product development in manufacturing companies who apply lean thinking to examine what methods they use in this early process. Furthermore, the study looks into the role of communication within lean organized organizations and its impact on the application of lean methods. The study is partly based on a literature review with the purpose of improving current knowledge about lean thinking regarding both production and product development while retaining a critical approach to the subject. The literature review focuses on scientific articles and previously performed studies to find out which methods are used, why they are used and when they are used. The study is also partially based on an empirical study in the format of semi-structured interviews with six respondents from three different companies. All three companies apply lean thinking in their organization and interviews were held with one employee from production and one employee from product development at each company. The information gathered from the empirical study has then been compared to the information learned from the literature review and consequently analyzed and discussed. The results reveal that lean thinking differs in theory and practice in several aspects, partly because of the companies different interpretations of lean. The results also disclosed that all three companies actively and, in some cases, unknowingly applied lean methods in their product development which helped pave the way for effective lean production. An imperative factor for successfully achieving a lean organization proved to be the communication between departments. Deficient communication might result in products which cannot be effectively produced with the production departments current layout. Additionally, the results reveal that the companies sometimes consciously choose to not apply lean methods as the resource-efficient approach of lean may have a negative effect on innovation and knowledge gain.

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  • 103.
    Bergsjö, Dag
    et al.
    Chalmers.
    Malvius, Diana
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Motivation mapping method as a means to improve engineering information management2008In: IAMOT 2008 Proceedings, 2008Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There exist several tools and methods that are designed to support and justify ICT introduction projects, e.g. return on investment calculations. This paper focuses on enhancing the adoption of new ICT by involving end-users in the introduction process, using quantitative data collection and analysis. In this context, a method named Motivation Mapping Method (MMM) has been developed to assist management in large and complex ICT introduction projects. The method is a first attempt to enable companies to tailor their ICT introductions according to users' specific needs in an efficient manner. Motivation levels based on the factors satisfaction, experienced benefits, and expectations can be used to identify clusters of designers with varied needs for ICT support. The method has been developed in a case study at Volvo Car Corporation, where a questionnaire was sent out and answered by 326 respondents in R&D. The results presented in the paper demonstrate the possibility to statistically form clusters of employees based on the respondents’ motivation for ICT adoption. It is discussed in the paper that the application of MMM is a good complement to the current portfolio of evaluation tools used by management, and that the MMM in a prolonged situation leads to reduced introduction cost and risk as well as facilitating the ICT introduction process for both management and end-users.

  • 104.
    Bergsjö, Dag
    et al.
    Chalmers.
    Malvius, Diana
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Christensson, Christina
    Volvo Car Corporation VCC.
    Measurement for information management performance in complex product development: A model to identify improvement areas based on user satisfactionArticle in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The satisfaction level among information systems (IS) users is used to measure performance with regard to information management in complex product development. Findings gathered from qualitative interview and observation studies performed at Volvo Car Corporation (VCC) in Sweden during 2005-2006 form the basis for the research model presented in this article. The model was designed and used as the foundation for the formulation of a web-based questionnaire. The reported analysis is based on data gathered in January-February of 2007 from 281 respondents belonging to the R&D software and electrical and electronics department at VCC.

    It is concluded that the suggested angle of approach to measure performance has proven to be statistically valid, which indicates possibilities for further use of the model and unit of analysis, namely designers in use of interdisciplinary information and IS. Suggested improvement areas in the VCC case are improved information structure and user satisfaction.

    Suggested overall company benefit is the possibility to identify critical improvement areas – perceived from an operative perspective – and that are suggested to be strategic to come to terms with. It is also discussed whether or not the proposed approach is suitable as evaluation method on a year-to-year basis in order to work with continuous improvements in information management.

  • 105.
    BERGSTRÖM, WILLIAM
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    TEMPELMAN, LUDVIG
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Integrerad produktutveckling i praktiken: Hur graden av förnyelse påverkar struktureringen av projekt2018Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Konkurrensen i dagens företagsvärld kräver att företag verkligen utmärker sig från mängden. Huvudsakligen finner bolag möjligheten att överträffa sina konkurrenter genom differentiering eller kostnadsminimering. Idag har båda dessa begrepp en klar koppling till produktutveckling. Men för att kunna differentiera sig så måste bolag skapa något nytt, de behöver alltså produktutveckla. För att utveckla produkter på ett effektivt och målinriktat sätt använder sig företag av integrerad produktutveckling (IPU). Integrerad produktutveckling syftar till att involvera olika kompetenser inom bolaget för att styra produktutvecklingen på ett sätt som är bäst lämpad för marknaden. Exempelvis involveras försäljare i produktutvecklingen för att säkerställa att det som utvecklas kan säljas och leverera värde till kunden. IPU syftar till att både främja effektivitet och innovation, genom att alla relevanta personer involveras i ett tidigt skede för att inte upptäcka problem sent i produktutvecklingsprocessen. Men det finns även kritik mot IPU som menar att involvering av för mycket personer bidrar till ökade kompromisser, vilket kan hämma innovationen. Ytterligare kritik mot IPU menar att bolags administrativa kostnader blir onödigt stora av att involvera för många medarbetare. Således står IPU i viss konflikt mellan kostnadsminimering och innovation.  Denna studie vill bidra med kunskap kring hur företag kan anpassa det integrerade arbetet efter projektets uppgift och omfattning. Eftersom ett kunskapsbehov i detta område kan vara anledningen till att IPU fortfarande ifrågasätts och inte är felfritt. Således definierades parametern  Graden av förnyelse som syftar till att beskriva hur stor andel av produktutvecklingsarbetet innebär innovation. Studien syftar till att undersöka hur graden av förnyelse påverkar hur projekt utförs i praktiken.

    Detta studerades med hjälp av semistrukturerade intervjuer av R&D-medarbetare hos två stora teknikbolag. Empirin från dessa studier indikerar att bolag tar hänsyn till graden av förnyelse i sitt produktutvecklingsarbete. Vid projekt med hög grad av förnyelse, så kallade utvecklingsprojekt, så använde sig båda bolagen av en stage-gateprocess som kännetecknas av integrerade kontrollmekanismer och beslutsfattande. Projekt med hög grad av förnyelse tenderar även att vara mer centraliserat styrda. Däremot behandlade bolagen projekt med låg grad av förnyelse, ändringsprojekt, helt annorlunda. Dessa projekt var inte alls lika strukturerade och arbetssättet var inte lika integrerat, eftersom man inte ville ha onödiga administrationskostnader. För ändringsprojekten var kontrollbehovet inte alls lika stort och därför var styrningen av dessa projekt mer decentraliserad. Sammanfattningsvis kan det konstateras att graden av förnyelsen påverkar hur bolag bedriver projektarbete i praktiken. Dock kan resultatet kritiseras sett till om graden av förnyelse verkligen är det mest relevanta begreppet för att förklara varför bolag anpassar sin IPU. Exempelvis skulle ändringen i kundupplevelse kunna vara en mer relevant parameter

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  • 106. Beskow, C
    et al.
    Hovmark, S
    Norell Bergendahl, Margareta
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Dialogue conferences as a means to improve co-operation in industrial product development1997In: International Conference on Engineering Design ICED 1997, Tampere, 1997Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 107. Beskow, C
    et al.
    Hovmark, S
    Norell Bergendahl, Margareta
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Improving Co-operation in project teams1997In: The sixth international conference on management of technology, MOT 1997, Göteborg, 1997Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 108. Beskow, C
    et al.
    Johansson, J
    Norell Bergendahl, Margareta
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Changing the Product Development Process: A Study of QFD Implementations in Swedish Industry1998Report (Refereed)
  • 109.
    Björk, Jennie
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Idéskapande nätverk: en kollektiv innovationspotential2011In: Management of Technology, ISSN 1102-5581, no 1, p. 3-4Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 110.
    Björk, Jennie
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Knowledge Domain Spanners in Ideation2012In: Creativity and Innovation Management, ISSN 0963-1690, E-ISSN 1467-8691, Vol. 21, no 1, p. 17-27Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ideation is increasingly receiving attention as a management issue, and we can at present witness the emergence and diffusion of a range of different proactive approaches towards ideation. This development is hardly surprising in the light of the changed nature of innovation activities, including a higher reliance also on external sources for innovation and more focus on non-technological types of innovation, such as business model innovations. Firms need to handle both a larger number of sources for innovation and more different types of innovations. This article investigates how spanning different knowledge domains influences individuals' ideation performance. A study has been performed using data on all ideas created within an organization during three years. From this data, two broad set of knowledge domains are identified and the influence on ideation of the individuals spanning these domains the knowledge domain spanners in ideation are investigated. The empirical results show that knowledge domain spanners in ideation have higher ideation performance than individuals engaged in only one knowledge domain.

  • 111.
    Björk, Jennie
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Nätverk stödjer idéprocessen2011In: Entré : forskning om entreprenörskap & småföretag, ISSN 1650-1691, no 2, p. 9-Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 112.
    Björk, Jennie
    et al.
    Chalmers University of Technology.
    Boccardelli, P
    Magnusson, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Ideation capabilities for continuous innovation2009Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 113.
    Björk, Jennie
    et al.
    Center for Business Innovation, Chalmers University of Technology.
    Boccardelli, P.
    Magnusson, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Ideation capabilities for continuous innovation2010In: Creativity and Innovation Management, ISSN 0963-1690, E-ISSN 1467-8691, Vol. 19, no 4, p. 385-396Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper explores ideation capabilities in large organizations. Based on the dynamic capabilities framework, it is seen that ideation capabilities are managerial and organizational processes for the stimulation, identification, selection and implementation of ideas. In order to explore how these capabilities are manifested and used in firms, case studies of four Swedish companies have been performed. The results of the study show that there are different approaches to ideation. In terms of the nature of innovative ideas, the observations lead to the suggestion that ideation presents some seemingly paradoxical issues to management. Firms with an explicit focus on building ideation practices experience that there are some negative consequences of the resultant formalization. Furthermore, the extent to which many employees should be involved in ideation is a difficult aspect, even though new technologies make this more viable. Also the degree to which the search for ideas should be directed is a non-trivial question, as the ideation processes can be facilitated by both freedom and limitations. It is nevertheless seen that firms can benefit from more deliberate approaches to ideation, in particular if these are broad and balanced and focus on both building capabilities that formalize the informal, in terms of establishing explicit processes, roles and systems, and building capabilities needed to manage informal structures in new ways.

  • 114.
    Björk, Jennie
    et al.
    Chalmers University of Technology.
    Di Vincenzo, F
    Magnusson, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Mascia, D
    Ideation Potential of Internal Networks: Does Social Capital Matter?2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 115.
    Björk, Jennie
    et al.
    Chalmers University of Technology, Center for Business Innovation.
    Di Vincenzo, F
    Magnusson, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Mascia, D
    The Impact of Social Capital on Ideation: untapping the knowledge creation potential of internal networks2010Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper examines the impact of social capital on the quality of ideas generated by individuals at work. Two dimensions of social capital are compared – the degree (i.e. the size) of an individual’s network of work relations, and the structural holes (i.e. gaps between nodes) of those relations. Analyzing a database from a Swedish company which has worked systematically with idea management, and which today has a well-established information technology system that collects ideas from a large number of employees, this study presents evidence indicating that the larger is the size of an individual’s’ ego network – specifically the number of social interactions with other actors – the larger this individual’s innovative performance in terms of high quality ideas, whereas the larger is the number of structural holes in the ego network, the lower is the quality of ideas generated by the individual. Our findings support the conclusion that individuals’ relationships within firms play a key role for value-creating behavior, and thereby contribute to a deeper understanding of how social capital influences idea generation.

  • 116.
    Björk, Jennie
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Di Vincenzo, Fausto
    Department of Economic Studies, Faculty of Economics, G. d'Annunzio University, Pescara, Italy.
    Magnusson, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Mascia, Daniele
    Department of Public Health, Catholic University of the Sacred Heart, Rome, Italy.
    The Impact of Social Capital on Ideation2011In: Industry and Innovation, ISSN 1366-2716, E-ISSN 1469-8390, Vol. 18, no 6, p. 631-647Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper examines the impact of social capital on the quality of ideas generated by individuals at work. Two dimensions of social capital are investigated—the degree (i.e. size) of individuals' networks of ideation relations, and the structural holes (i.e. gaps between nodes) of those relations. Previous research has presented different and even conflicting empirical results concerning the effect of structural holes on innovation activities, and has not dealt specifically with the ideation phase of the innovation process. By drawing upon an idea database from a Swedish company that has worked systematically with idea management for an extensive period, this study investigates the interrelationship between social capital and ideation. The empirical study reveals that the larger the size of an individual's ego network, the higher is this individual's innovative performance in terms of high-quality ideas, whereas the larger the number of structural holes in an ego network, the lower is the quality of ideas generated by the individual in question. These findings support the conclusion that social capital, in terms of individuals' relationships with fellow employees within firms, has a positive influence on idea-generating behavior. Moreover, the results reveal that the presence of structural holes is negative for ideation performance, thus providing important new input to the recent debate on the interrelationship between structural holes and innovation in general.

  • 117.
    Björk, Jennie
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Hoelze, Katharina
    Univ Potsdam, Potsdam, Germany..
    Editorial2019In: Creativity and Innovation Management, ISSN 0963-1690, E-ISSN 1467-8691, Vol. 28, no 3, p. 289-290Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 118.
    Björk, Jennie
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Holzle, Katharina
    Univ Potsdam, Potsdam, Germany..
    Editorial2018In: Creativity and Innovation Management, ISSN 0963-1690, E-ISSN 1467-8691, Vol. 27, no 4, p. 373-374Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 119.
    Björk, Jennie
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Holzle, Katharina
    Univ Potsdam, Hasso Plattner Inst, Potsdam, Germany..
    Boer, Harry
    Aalborg Univ, Ctr Ind Prod, Aalborg, Denmark..
    What will we learn from the current crisis?2021In: Creativity and Innovation Management, ISSN 0963-1690, E-ISSN 1467-8691, Vol. 30, no 2, p. 231-232Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 120.
    Björk, Jennie
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Holzle, Katharina
    Univ Potsdam, Hasso Plattner Inst, Potsdam, Germany..
    Goduscheit, Rene Chester
    Aarhus Univ, Dept Business Dev & Technol, Aarhus, Denmark..
    Boer, Harry
    Aalborg Univ, Ctr Ind Prod, Fibigerstraede 10, DK-9220 Aalborg, Denmark..
    Looking back and forward: Light in and at the end of the tunnel2021In: Creativity and Innovation Management, ISSN 0963-1690, E-ISSN 1467-8691, Vol. 30, no 3, p. 437-438Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 121.
    Björk, Jennie
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Karlsson, Magnus
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Magnusson, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Turning ideas into innovation: the need for collaborative demand-driven innovation2011In: Proceedings of the 18th International Product Development Conference, 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 122.
    Björk, Jennie
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Karlsson, Magnus P.
    New Business Development and Innovation, Group Function Strategy, Telefonaktiebolaget LM Ericsson.
    Magnusson, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Turning ideas into innovations: introducing demand-driven collaborative ideation2014In: International Journal of Innovation and Regional Development, ISSN 1753-0660, E-ISSN 1753-0679, Vol. 5, no 4/5Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Web-enabled tools for ideation are becoming increasingly diffused in companies, but their true impact on innovation performance has been questioned. A factor that can explain some of the so far missing performance of these firm-internal systems for ideation is a lack of attention to the demand-side of ideation. Frequently, the focus of ideation is put more or less unilaterally on the supply-side, with the aim to generate as many or as good ideas as possible, instead of focusing on innovation needs. The aim of this article is to describe and analyse demand-driven collaborative ideation, with a particular emphasis on its management aspects. In order to empirically investigate how to manage this new approach to ideation, a case study of Ericsson, a Swedish multi-national corporation, has been performed. The results highlight that incentives, visibility and resources are three main components of demand-driven collaborative ideation and outline key challenges with this new approach to ideation.

  • 123.
    Björk, Jennie
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Magnusson, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Where do good innovation ideas come from?: Exploring the influence of network connectivity on innovation idea quality2009In: The Journal of product innovation management, ISSN 0737-6782, E-ISSN 1540-5885, Vol. 26, no 6, p. 662-670Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper aims to add to innovation management theory and practice by exploring the interrelationship between innovation idea quality and idea providers' network connectivity, using social network analysis. The study uses a database from a company that has worked systematically with idea management over a long period of time and today has a well-established information technology system that collects ideas from a large number of employees. In addition to the idea database, a number of interviews with key individuals within innovation were conducted to create rich contextual knowledge and understand more in detail how ideas are handled in the company. The analysis indicated that there is a clear interrelationship between the network connectivity and the quality of the innovation ideas created. The analysis was done for all the innovation ideas and then for ideas created by single individuals and by groups, respectively. In all three analyses the proportion of high-quality innovation ideas increased, as a step function, between the least connected group and the group thereafter. There is apparently a need for a certain amount of relations to increase the proportion of high-quality innovation ideas generated. Regarding only ideas provided by single individuals, more connections within the network resulted in a higher proportion of high-quality ideas. A different pattern was seen for ideas provided by groups as the proportion of high-quality innovation ideas grew with some increase in the connectivity of groups but declined with a further increase in connectivity. The findings suggest a number of implications for ideation management. To increase the number of high-quality innovation ideas created by individuals, the possibility to interact with other people should be supported and facilitated. However, in these settings, where individuals work with others in different groups, the most connected groups perform worst in terms of the proportion of high-quality ideas generated, which points to the necessity to consider a multitude of factors when managing ideation.

  • 124. Björkdahl, J.
    et al.
    Magnusson, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Integrating Information and Communication Technologies in Established Products: A New Managerial Challenge?2005In: Proceedings of the 6th CINet conference, September 6-9, 2005, Brighton, UK, 2005Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 125.
    Björkdahl, J
    et al.
    Chalmers Tekniska Högskola.
    Magnusson, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Managerial challenges when integrating ICTS in established products2012In: International Journal of Learning and Intellectual Capital, ISSN 1479-4853, E-ISSN 1479-4861, Vol. 9, no 3, p. 307-320Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    By adding information and communication technologies (ICTs) into established mechanical engineering products, the customer value provided by these products can be substantially increased, thereby offering an interesting means of differentiation. At the same time, the specific task of integrating ICTs in established products poses new challenges to management. In order to explore these challenges, an in-depth case study of this type of development has been performed at the Swedish multinational company Alfa Laval. The results from the study indicate that the integration of ICTs has consequences for management, particularly in terms of the handling of technological competences and the reformulation of existing business models. Even though most firms developing and manufacturing traditional mechanical engineering products rely on external providers for the integrated ICT components and systems, they nevertheless need to build up absorptive capacity in order to facilitate coordination. The integration of ICTs opens up new opportunities to create value for customers. However, to realise this value and also allow for the appropriation of parts of it, it may be necessary to change the established way of doing business, in terms of the business models used.

  • 126. Boccardelli, P.
    et al.
    Annosi, M. C.
    Brunetta, F.
    Magnusson, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development. KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Product Innovation Technology.
    Learning and innovation in hybrid organizations: Strategic and organizational insights2017Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Reflecting the emergence of new organizational forms and hybrid organizations, this edited collection explores the processes of exchange, collaboration and technological management that have changed organizational structures. By investigating the impact that inter-organizational collaboration can have on the production and implementation of ideas within new firms, this study contributes to the growing field of innovation and responds to the need for a greater understanding of renewed processes. The authors argue that collaborations need to go beyond existing practices to create emerging paths such as bricolage, experimentation, effectuation and learning. Drawing together a diverse body of literature on the internal dynamics that drive organizational change, Learning and Innovation in Hybrid Organizations presents multiple perspectives on combining organizational flexibility with learning and innovation, and provides implications for future practice. 

  • 127. Boer, H
    et al.
    Caffyn, S
    Chapman, R
    Corso, M
    Coughlan, P
    Gieskes, J
    Hyland, P
    Magnusson, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Pavesi, S
    Ronchi, S
    Sundgren, N
    Continuous Product Innovation and Knowledge Management: the CIMA Supporting Methodology1999In: Proceedings of the 6th International Product Development Management Conference, Cambridge, United Kingdom, 1999Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 128.
    Bogatov Wilkman, Dennis
    et al.
    KTH. Atlas Copco ITBA .
    Tang, Lifei
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development. Atlas Copco ITBA.
    Morozovska, Kateryna
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Sustainability, Industrial Dynamics & Entrepreneurship.
    Bragone, Federica
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Computer Science, Computational Science and Technology (CST).
    Self-Supervised Transformer Networks for Error Classification of Tightening Traces2022In: 2022 21st IEEE International Conference on Machine Learning and Applications (ICMLA), IEEE conference proceedings, 2022Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Transformers have shown remarkable results in the domains of Natural Language Processing and Computer Vision. This naturally raises the question of whether the success could be replicated in other domains. However, due to Transformers being inherently data-hungry and sensitive to weight initialization, applying the Transformer to new domains is quite a challenging task. Previously, the data demands have been met using large-scale supervised or self-supervised pre-training on a similar task before supervised fine-tuning on a target downstream task. We show that Transformers are applicable for the task of multi-label error classification of trace data and that masked data modelling based on self-supervised learning methods can be used to leverage unlabelled data to increase performance compared to a baseline supervised learning approach.

  • 129. Bogers, M.
    et al.
    Zobel, A. -K
    Afuah, A.
    Almirall, E.
    Brunswicker, S.
    Dahlander, L.
    Frederiksen, L.
    Gawer, A.
    Gruber, M.
    Haefliger, S.
    Hagedoorn, J.
    Hilgers, D.
    Laursen, K.
    Magnusson, Mats G.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Majchrzak, A.
    McCarthy, I. P.
    Moeslein, K. M.
    Nambisan, S.
    Piller, F. T.
    Radziwon, A.
    Rossi-Lamastra, C.
    Sims, J.
    Ter Wal, A. L. J.
    The open innovation research landscape: established perspectives and emerging themes across different levels of analysis2017In: Industry and Innovation, ISSN 1366-2716, E-ISSN 1469-8390, Vol. 24, no 1, p. 8-40Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper provides an overview of the main perspectives and themes emerging in research on open innovation (OI). The paper is the result of a collaborative process among several OI scholars–having a common basis in the recurrent Professional Development Workshop on ‘Researching Open Innovation’ at the Annual Meeting of the Academy of Management. In this paper, we present opportunities for future research on OI, organised at different levels of analysis. We discuss some of the contingencies at these different levels, and argue that future research needs to study OI–originally an organisational-level phenomenon–across multiple levels of analysis. While our integrative framework allows comparing, contrasting and integrating various perspectives at different levels of analysis, further theorising will be needed to advance OI research. On this basis, we propose some new research categories as well as questions for future research–particularly those that span across research domains that have so far developed in isolation.

  • 130. Bourelos, E.
    et al.
    Magnusson, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    McKelvey, M.
    Moving beyond the paradox: Searching for the key factors in research commercialization2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 131. Bourelos, Evangelos
    et al.
    Magnusson, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    McKelvey, Maureen
    Investigating the complexity facing academic entrepreneurs in science and engineering: the complementarities of research performance, networks and support structures in commercialisation2012In: Cambridge Journal of Economics, ISSN 0309-166X, E-ISSN 1464-3545, Vol. 36, no 3, p. 751-780Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The relative importance, and specific role, of academic entrepreneurship in society has long focused upon productivity in terms of the commercialisation of research. Public policy is an instrument used in different countries to stimulate start-up companies, including attempts to influence national institutions, university structures and the incentives for individual researchers. This paper contributes with an analysis of Sweden, which has retained the 'professor's privilege', whereby the individual retains inventor rights and can choose to allocate ownership rights. The descriptive results of the survey revealed that academics have positive attitudes to commercialisation and relatively satisfactory commercialisation output. This paper examines the complementarities of research performance, networks and support structure in explaining commercialisation amongst university researchers in science and engineering in Sweden. The results show that publishing is positively correlated with commercialisation and that support structures play an important role through technology transfer offices, courses and incubators. The paper ends by using these results in order to discuss the implications for public policy.

  • 132.
    Buck, L. S.
    et al.
    KTH.
    Nilsson, Susanne
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.).
    Ritzén, Sofia
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Improving exploration capability by interacting with start-ups2017In: Proceedings of the International Conference on Engineering Design, ICED, Design Society , 2017, no DS87-2, p. 417-426Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper describes and analyses an exploration-capability model that is currently being introduced in an automotive OEM. An increasingly high environmental dynamism as well as a new level of competition in the automotive industry call for an improved capability to explore and realise more radical innovations to complement the established OEMs exploitation skills and present focus on incremental innovation. The model that is target for the study offers the employees in the OEM five different forms of interactions with start-ups as a way to develop the capability to explore. The different forms of interaction are found to make use of different modes of balancing ambidexterity and to introduce different means to improve and establish individual, entrepreneurial skills, as well as influence the innovation culture of the OEM. The paper lays the foundation for future research by describing how and why an OEM is designing a new model to develop its exploration capability through interacting with start-ups by analysing the model in relation to theory, and presenting propositions that will act as a baseline for further studies.

  • 133.
    Buck, Lennart
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Arekrans, Johan
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Gordin, Philip
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Nilsson, Susanne
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Ritzén, Sofia
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Increasing Exploration Capabilities Through Employee Entrepreneur Interaction2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The automotive industry is in a time of great environmental change. Due to new competitors and new technologies, the established OEMs are looking for ways to increase their exploration capability. One of the measures that are taken is the collaboration with start-ups.

    Within this study 13 interviews were performed and analyzed to see the effects of these collaborations. The objective was to see what challenges the employees of the OEM were facing and how they were acting during these collaborations with a focus on if these behaviors were entrepreneurial.

    Different challenges were found. Lack of organizational support, bureaucracy, hierarchy, and processes, the motivation of employees, as well as the experience at the company. Employees showed entrepreneurial behavior in two different ways during the collaborations. By being an ambassador for the start-up within the corporation and by adapting ways of working from the start-ups.

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  • 134.
    Buck, Lennart
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Nilsson, Susanne
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Ritzén, Sofia
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    The role of ambassador in start-up collaborations2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The goal of this research is to see which challenges the individuals on the OEM’s side meet during asymmetrical collaborations and which approaches they use to overcome them.

    Literature was focused very much on the managerial view of solving challenges in these collaborations. This study shows that individuals could play a major role in resolving challenges that occur in asymmetrical collaborations. The profound effect of individuals could resemble that of individuals in other fields, e.g. champions in innovation.

    To gain insight, 34 interviews within an automotive OEM were performed with project leaders of collaborations that were done with start-ups. These interviews were investigated by coding. These codes were analyzed once via text mining to get an overarching view, and once with traditional coding to get more nuanced and detailed insights.

    Four major challenges were found. Mismatches in processes, lack of time and capacity, potentially unknown stakeholders, and the assessment of the start-up. These challenges were approached through a variety of measures by the interviewees. Coaching the start-up, designing a proof-of-project, using the personal network, effective communication, explaining and shielding of the start-up, and implementing new processes in the start-up. The role that is described by these tasks shall be called the ambassador role. Implementing this role in a company enables individuals to facilitate asymmetrical collaborations. However, it is suggested that there should also be an institution established that is aware of the best-practices and therefore able to educate new ambassadors.

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  • 135.
    Bunea, Robert
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Ivarsson, Kajsa
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Insamling och användning av data för vidareutveckling av spel: Med fokus på multiplayer datorspel2021Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Digital games have become an increasingly common means of entertainment where the industry has seen a huge increase in users, something that is likely to continue in the future. These games have increased in complexity in line with technological developments from the 1990s to the present day, where the Internet has had a major impact and introduced new possibilities. One of these opportunities is the collection of different types of data with different purposes and different uses within a game development company. The industry has thus attracted a lot of research regarding processes and methods involved in the creation of these complex products, where the pre-processing and actual creation of digital games is in the vast majority of studies compared to the further development of these digital games after launch. The aim of this paper is therefore to contribute knowledge to the less explored area of the post-launch development process of online multiplayer games, as well as the investigation of data collection and its integration into the further development process. The first important part of the report is a theory section, created through literature review where this consisted of identifying and finding scientific articles with knowledge on the topic, where these were important to create a theoretical basis for this study. This was mainly done through scientific databases and search services, using keywords related to important theories. The second important part is empirical studies in the form of semi-structured interviews based on an interview guide with respondents from different game development companies. The companies the respondents worked for were Ghost Ship Games, Jagex, and Bohemia Interactive. These interviews were then analysed and important themes were identified based on the respondents’ answers. Respondents mentioned different types of data that could cover different parts of the company, but when it comes to further game development, three types were mentioned to have the most impact. These types were data points on how the game is used by individuals, quality data of the game's performance, and feedback from users. The methods for collecting the aforementioned data types consist mainly of surveys, which all respondents mentioned that the respective companies use to collect feedback, report bugs or suggest areas for improvement. In addition, more general information is also collected through digital tools or the game client for the respective game. Where these tools are created within the company or managed by a separate company. Ghost Ship Games has an ideal image of how the game should be balanced that the company strives for, which is taken into account when decisions are made by the developers themselves that cover the respective issues. Within Jagex, the whole team decides together on changes or additions to the game. An interesting aspect is that within Jagex, users are a part of the decision making process through opinion polls. Decision-making within Bohemia Interactive is mainly done through the Quality Assurance department, where they filter collected information and then delegate identified problems to the appropriate developers within the company. Further development within the companies is mainly done through balancing using the game engine for each game. Ghost Ship Games may also focus on further development of existing features, systems and tools, by reworking some of the previously mentioned elements. In Bohemia Interactive regarding Arma 3, are hotfixes or completely new game content through DLC used for example. Similar is also done in Jagex in the form of hotpatches. Overall, the further development process is similar between the companies, through the different steps identified in this report. These can be described as an iterative process in which companies identify problems or proposals for further development, collect data or investigate existing data, implement the solution or proposal, collect feedback and act on the feedback. 

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  • 136.
    Butz, Mathias
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Investigation of user involvement and collaboration processes in current and future innovative medical technology environments2010Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    AbstractCurrently the MedTech industry is worldwide driven by the need for innovations. Basing on a long history which produced radical innovations such as the pacemaker, the Swedish MedTech industry in specific has a special reputation. Over the last decades the innovation process advanced thereby by shifting the focus more and more from the company‟s to the user‟s needs and also to an integrated approach of involving them. Especially in the MedTech industry this aspect is given great attention. As a continuation of this, a new medical site called Innovationsplatsen is going to be established within the Karolinska Institute in Huddinge near Stockholm. There different stakeholders such as engineers from companies, medical professionals from the Karolinska institute and researchers from the Royal Institute of Technology can work closely together with an intensive knowledge and idea exchange.Facing this exceptional setting, it is investigated with this thesis how MedTech companies currently perform, measure and document user involvement in the collaboration process. Subsequently an approach and tools are proposed, to support these processes and to overcome the identified drawbacks of the state of the art. By supporting the acquisition of the relevant data, results can be derived then from a subsequent analysis which allows managing the collaboration in the Innovationsplatsen and identifying best practices in a comparison with other similar settings.To investigate the state of the art and answer the question how user involvement is currently performed and measured, six experts in four MedTech companies are consulted repeatedly by means of guided expert interviews. Following to that a closer look at the process documentation of one of these companies is taken, to reveal what information is documented and can be used to investigate the collaboration processes with a network analysis, as well as what information is missing here for proper results. The ensuing development of the proposed approach follows then the Munich Process Model, to ensure a systematic procedure. Here the investigation of the state of the art is picked up and transformed into specific requirements forwhich finally solutions can be identified and adapted. The evaluation of the approach in an expert workshop completes this at last.The findings from the interviews reveal that, although various implementations of user involvement are common practice even within a company, the influence and impact on the value of different strategies is unknown. This can be attributed to the lack of the process documentation which is mainly used to document information for legal reasons. In addition, the evaluation of ideas and input by different actors as well as retrospective analyses of the processes are very often only examined informally. As conclusion the proposed approach introduces then an innovation value system and assessment tool, to weight every actor‟s influence, a continuous data acquisition as well as databases which allow connecting the actors and their properties to another and their ideas in the innovative environment. The proposed approach contributes thereby to collect the relevant data in future development environments and compare them to another. By this means best practices of user involvement can be revealed the communication and collaboration can be improved.

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    Investigation of user involvement and collaboration processes in current and future innovative medical technology environments
  • 137.
    Catulli, Maurizio
    et al.
    Univ Hertfordshire, Business Sch, Hatfield AL10 9AB, Herts, England..
    Sopjani, Liridona
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Reed, Nick
    Univ Hertfordshire, Sch Life & Med Sci, Hatfield AL10 9AB, Herts, England..
    Tzilivakis, John
    Univ Hertfordshire, Sch Life & Med Sci, Hatfield AL10 9AB, Herts, England..
    Green, Andrew
    Univ Hertfordshire, Sch Life & Med Sci, Hatfield AL10 9AB, Herts, England..
    A socio-technical experiment with a resource efficient product service system2021In: Resources, Conservation and Recycling, ISSN 0921-3449, E-ISSN 1879-0658, Vol. 166, article id 105364Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper describes a socio-technical experiment relating to a sustainable innovation project conducted in a protected niche or "living lab" and evaluates the ability of the experiment to generate learning and strategic direction. The study focused on a Product Service System (PSS) for renting infant mobility products to consumers. A PSS is a resource efficient system of products and services supported by networks and infrastructure. In the experiment, refurbished products were rented to 1044 families, with some products being reutilized three times. Learnings were generated through five stages: combining competences and resources, steering and facilitating change, engaging users at early stages, offering users opportunities to modify practices through trial and capturing and mediating mutual learning through knowledge co-creation. The observed environmental benefits included reduction of particulate plastic matter released into the environment and transportation of materials. Considerable barriers to the implementation of the PSS in the open market were identified, including attrition through loss or damage, product liability and consumer distrust in sharing products due to fear of contagion.

  • 138. Christensen, C
    et al.
    Magnusson, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Zetherström, M. B.
    Implementation and Use of Collaborative Product Development2003In: Proceedings from the 10th EurOMA-POMS conference, 2003Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 139. Colombo, M. C.
    et al.
    Laursen, K.
    Magnusson, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Rossi-Lamastra, C.
    Organizing Intra- and Inter-firm Networks: What is the Impact on Innovation Performance?2011In: Industry and Innovation, ISSN 1366-2716, E-ISSN 1469-8390, Vol. 18, no 6, p. 531-538Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 140. Colombo, Massimo G.
    et al.
    Laursen, Keld
    Magnusson, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Rossi-Lamastra, Cristina
    Introduction: Small Business and Networked Innovation: Organizational and Managerial Challenges2012In: Journal of small business management (Print), ISSN 0047-2778, E-ISSN 1540-627X, Vol. 50, no 2, p. 181-190Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this article is to provide an introduction to the special issue. We briefly consider the organizational and managerial challenges that small and medium-sized enterprises encounter in networked innovation, thereby building a background to the articles included in the special issue. We then present the main findings of these articles and highlight their novel contributions.

  • 141. Colombo, Massimo G.
    et al.
    Laursen, Keld
    Magnusson, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Rossi-Lamastra, Cristina
    Organizing Inter- and Intra-Firm Networks: What is the Impact on Innovation Performance? Introduction2011In: Industry and Innovation, ISSN 1366-2716, E-ISSN 1469-8390, Vol. 18, no 6, p. 531-538Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 142.
    Corsini, Filippo
    et al.
    stituto di Management, Scuola Superiore Sant’Anna, 56127 Pisa, Italy.
    Laurenti, Rafael
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Meinherz, Franziska
    Laboratory for Human-Environment Relations in Urban Systems, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne EPFL, Station 2, CH-1015 Lausanne, Switzerland.
    Appio, Francesco Paolo
    Research Center, Léonard de Vinci Pôle Universitaire, 92916 Paris La Défense, France.
    Mora, Luca
    The Business School, Edinburgh Napier University, Edinburgh EH14 1DJ, UK.
    The Advent of Practice Theories in Research on Sustainable Consumption: Past, Current and Future Directions of the Field2019In: Sustainability, ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 11, no 2Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The application of practice theories in the domain of sustainability research in consumer studies is increasingly advocated based on the premise that this allows to analyse consumption as a social phenomenon. Consequently, the applications of social practice theories to this field are expanding geometrically and to date, little retrospective work on this evolution has been made. We conduct a bibliometric analysis of applications of practice theories in the domain of sustainability research in consumer studies. Our results show a temporal succession of research trends: ‘consumer identity’ dominated the field between 2009 and 2012, ‘business and governance’ between 2012 and 2014, ‘sustainable consumption and production’ between 2013 and 2014, ‘urban living and policy’ between 2014 and 2015 and ‘household energy’ from 2015 until the present. We see a high potential of future applications of practice theories in the fields of the sharing and circular economy, as well as in research on smart cities. We provide new insights into the evolution and future trends of applications of social practice theory to domains that are relevant for research on sustainability and consumer studies

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  • 143. Costal, D.
    et al.
    Lopez, L.
    Morandini, M.
    Siena, A.
    Annosi, Maria Carmela
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Gross, D.
    Mendez, L.
    Franch, Xavier
    Susi, Angelo
    Aligning Business Goals and Risks in OSS Adoption2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 144. Costal, D.
    et al.
    Lopez, L.
    Morandini, M.
    Siena, A.
    Annosi, Maria Carmela
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Gross, D.
    Mendez, L.
    Franch, Xavier
    Susi, Angelo
    OSS Ecosystem Risk-Driven Analysis2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 145.
    Cotrim, Joao Miguel
    et al.
    BRU IUL, ISCTE IUL, P-1649026 Lisbon, Portugal..
    Nunes, Francisco
    BRU IUL, ISCTE IUL, P-1649026 Lisbon, Portugal..
    Laurenti, Rafael
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Making Sense of the Sharing Economy: A Category Formation Approach2020In: Sustainability, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 12, no 24, article id 10648Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The sharing economy (SE) has drawn significant attention from several society stakeholders in the last five years. While business actors are interested in financial opportunities to meet consumer needs, new business models, academia and governmental organisations are concerned with potential unintended effects on society and the environment. Despite its notable global growth, there is still a lack of more solid ground in understanding its origins and respective mechanisms through which it has been evolving as a category. This research addresses the problematics of the origins and ascendency of the SE by examining the process by which it is arising as a new category, searching for conceptual clarification, and pinpointing the legitimacy granted by stakeholders. Our guiding research questions are: how the SE was formed and evolved as a category, and as a category, is the SE legitimate? Additionally, we attempt to identify the nature of the SE as a category. Making a historical analysis of the expression SE and its equivalents, this paper deepens the discussion about the SE's nature by providing evidence that it has predominantly been formed by emergence processes, comprising social movement, similarity clustering, and truce components, which render the SE a particular case of category formation and allow communication, entrepreneurship, regulation, and research about what it is. Moreover, the findings reveal a generalised legitimacy granted to the SE by a vast number of stakeholders, although still lacking the consolidation of socio-political legitimation. The SE's nature seems to fall into a metaphorical approach, notably, the notion of radial categories.

  • 146. Coughlan, P
    et al.
    Harbison, A
    Corso, M
    Pavesi, S
    Ronchin, S
    Caffyn, S
    Magnusson, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Sundgren, N
    Boer, H
    Gieskes, J
    Chapman, R
    Hyland, P
    Developing Continuous Innovation as an Organization-wide Process2000In: Proceedings of the 7th EurOMA conference, 2000Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 147.
    Croy, Rickard
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Wieselblad, Anton
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Enhancing Innovation Through Asymmetric Partnerships: How a big corporation can improve its prerequisites for opportunistic adaptation2018Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The accelerating technology trends of autonomous systems, electric drivetrains and an ever so connected fleet of vehicles in conjunction with increasing demand on green transports and sophisticated logistic systems set new prerequisites for the business environment in the transport industry. At the same time, the costs for most corporations’ R&D activities are staggering, which prone for new ways to find synergies with potential partners to innovate together, adopting the concept of open innovation. With this background, Scania has set up a vision to become the leader of partnership driven sustainable innovation in order to address the forthcoming opportunities. The purpose of this study is to analyze if, and how, Scania should utilize asymmetric collaborations in relation to small, fast growing companies, in order to increase its innovativeness. Both practitioners and researchers have for a long time tried to combine the characteristics of big stable corporations and small agile startups. However, the configuration and objectives for such partnerships are unique for every corporations’ individual prerequisites and needs. Through an empirical study of in total 26 managers, from different functions of the organization, the conclusion was made that Scania’s most prominent innovation needs was to increase its performance in transformational innovation by understanding emerging markets and increase the company’s organizational adaptability. By reviewing the literature on the subject, in combination with a case study of four other corporations with experience of asymmetric partnerships the analysis was made that to utilize asymmetric partnerships in the form of a project-based startup program, with the objective to focus on learning rather than specific innovation outputs would be one possible solution to address Scania’s needs. As a final recommendation, a process-based framework of how Scania should implement the proposed startup program has been designed. This framework takes into account recommendations for how to identify, create the perquisites and maintain the partnerships in the program, through a centralized interface, in order to generate a fruitful outcome. More explicitly to gain insights in emerging markets & businesses and promote an entrepreneurial culture spillover effect from explorative, immature and entrepreneurial startup firms. 

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  • 148.
    Davéus, Isabella
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Ramberg, Edvin
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Holm Öste, Sofia Charlotta
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Planeringens inverkan på produktutvecklingstiden: Utmaningar vid hög komplexitet2021Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Companies that develop products strive to shorten their development time to maintain competitiveness and realize profits faster. Simultaneously, technical development has resulted in an increase in the complexity of products. This has meant that the uncertainty at the beginning of projects and the dependence between development activities has increased. The result of this will be greater difficulties in efficiently and adequately planning development projects and setting deadlines. The purpose of this report is to examine what affects and complicates planning for a product development company and how it affects product development time. Initially, a literature study was conducted, which formed the basis for our interview guide. Data collection was then carried out with the support of the interview guide at a company that develops complex products. Based on the collected data, difficulties and factors affecting product development were identified. Due to the scope of the results, an in-depth literature study was required to be able to compare results with theory. Overall difficulties and factors that were identified and analyzed were schedule, objectives, formal methods, and activities' interdependence. The results are largely in line with the theory presented on the subject in the report. The challenges that should be considered when planning for the development of complex products are mainly management of objectives and dependent activities. Without clear objectives and a dynamic process, development risks taking longer than it needs to. Finally, companies that develop complex products should strive to use a formal method developed specifically for their own company, so that successful projects can be easily repeated. 

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  • 149.
    de Kwant, Colin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    Rahi, Fazle
    University of Gävle.
    Laurenti, Rafael
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    The role of product design in circular business models: An analysis of challenges and opportunities for electric vehicles and white goods2021In: Sustainable Production and Consumption, ISSN 2352-5509Article in journal (Refereed)
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  • 150. Di Vincenzo, F.
    et al.
    Hemphälä, Jens
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Magnusson, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Mascia, D.
    Exploring the role of structural holes in learning: an empirical study of Swedish pharmacies2012In: Journal of Knowledge Management, ISSN 1367-3270, E-ISSN 1758-7484, Vol. 16, no 4, p. 576-591Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: There is a lack of studies investigating the role of the structural configuration of social capital - more specifically, structural holes - for employees' individual learning. The objective of this paper is to address this gap in the literature, ultimately enhancing understanding of the link between the structural configuration of social capital and individual learning. Design/methodology/approach: An online questionnaire survey was administered to employees affiliated to 22 pharmacies in Sweden to gather attributional and relational data on the individual level. Social network analysis techniques were used to describe salient structural characteristics of individuals' social capital. The impact of social capital on individual learning was explored through ordinal logistic regression models based on maximum likelihood estimations. Findings: The presence of structural holes initially increases the degree of individual learning, then reaches a maximum and begins to gradually decrease. Practical implications: The results of the study provide valuable input for the development and management of networks within firms, in order to improve learning and innovation. In addition, given the close proximity between learning, as conceptualized in this study, and other job attitudes, human resource management practices in general could benefit greatly from the results. Originality/value: In this paper, the authors focus on the structural configuration of social capital, more specifically structural holes, and its inter-relationship with learning. Although prior literature has analyzed various beneficial effects of social capital, this study is the first of its kind to investigate the role of the structural configuration of the social capital for employees' individual learning.

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