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  • 101.
    Ansari, Farhan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation.
    Berglund, Lars
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering.
    Medina, Lilian
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites.
    Epoxies can solve moisture problems in nanocellulose materials2017In: International Conference on Nanotechnology for Renewable Materials 2017, TAPPI Press , 2017, p. 1220-1227Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 102.
    Ansari, Farhan
    et al.
    Stanford Univ, Dept Mat Sci & Engn, Stanford, CA 94305 USA..
    Ding, Yichuan
    Stanford Univ, Dept Mat Sci & Engn, Stanford, CA 94305 USA..
    Berglund, Lars
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Dauskardt, Reinhold H.
    Stanford Univ, Dept Mat Sci & Engn, Stanford, CA 94305 USA..
    Toward Sustainable Multifunctional Coatings Containing Nanocellulose in a Hybrid Glass Matrix2018In: ACS Nano, ISSN 1936-0851, E-ISSN 1936-086X, Vol. 12, no 6, p. 5495-5503Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We report on a sustainable route to protective nanocomposite coatings, where one of the components, nanocellulose fibrils, is derived from trees and the glass matrix is an inexpensive sol-gel organic-inorganic hybrid of zirconium alkoxide and an epoxy-functionalized silane. The hydrophilic nature of the colloidal nanocellulose fibrils is exploited to obtain a homogeneous one-pot suspension of the nanocellulose in the aqueous sol-gel matrix precursors solution. The mixture is then sprayed to form nano composite coatings of a well-dispersed, random in-plane nano cellulose fibril network in a continuous organic inorganic glass matrix phase. The nanocellulose incorporation in the sol-gel matrix resulted in nanostructured composites with marked effects on salient coating properties including optical transmittance, hardness, fracture energy, and water contact angle. The particular role of the nanocellulose fibrils on coating fracture properties, important for coating reliability, was analyzed and discussed in terms of fibril morphology, molecular matrix, and nanocellulose/matrix interactions.

  • 103.
    Ansari, Farhan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation.
    Galland, Sylvain
    Fernberg, P.
    Berglund, Lars
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites.
    Stiff and ductile nanocomposites of epoxy reinforced with cellulose nanofibrils2013In: ICCM International Conferences on Composite Materials, International Committee on Composite Materials , 2013, p. 5575-5582Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 104.
    Ansari, Farhan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Salajkova, Michaela
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Zhou, Qi
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Berglund, Lars
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Cellulose nanocomposites - Controlling dispersion and material properties through nanocellulose surface modification2015In: ICCM International Conferences on Composite Materials, International Committee on Composite Materials , 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The use of cellulosic nanofibers as reinforcement in polymer composites offers great advantages over their petroleum counterparts. Apart from being strong, stiff and low density; they are obtained from naturally occurring resources and as such are favorable from an environmental point of view. A major problem while studying nanomaterials is their tendency to agglomerate, thus leading to inhomogeneous distribution within the polymer matrix. This often results in stress concentrations in the matrix rich regions when the material is subjected to load and therefore, limits the potential application of these materials. A common approach to circumvent this is by surface modification, which facilitates the dispersion in non-polar matrices. An environmental friendly approach, inspired by clay chemistry, was used to functionalize the CNC surface. It was shown that the CNC could be modified in a rather convenient way to attach a variety of functional groups on the surface. Primarily, the problem of cellulose nanocrystal (CNC) distribution in a hydrophobic polymer matrix is investigated. Composites prepared from modified CNC were studied and compared with unmodified CNC. The distribution of the CNC is carefully monitored at different stages via UV-Vis spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The mechanical properties of the resulting materials were characterized by dynamic mechanical as well as uniaxial tensile tests. It was shown that a homogeneous distribution of the CNC exposes a tremendous amount of surface area to interact with the matrix. In such a case, the stress transfer is much more efficient and perhaps, the matrix behavior is modified, which leads to significant improvements in the mechanical properties.

  • 105.
    Anthony, Diana
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems.
    Creating an Individualized Predictive Model of PAO2 and PACO2 Changes During Voluntary Static Apnea for Sedentary Subjects2018Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The primary aim of this study was to fill a gap in the literature in understanding maximal BH in untrained, non-divers by generating a predictive numerical model for PAO2 and PACO2 throughout BH. There have been little to no previous attempts at explicitly characterizing the influence of impermanent personal or environmental factors on PAO2 or PACO2 at BH breakpoint. The metabolic human consumption of O2 and production of CO2 as measured through alveolar partial pressures was observed over time during a voluntary maximum breath-hold for 18 members of the general population. The coefficient of determination was used to determine accuracy of the model in fitting participants’ BH data from this experiment. The volume of the last inhalation pre-BH, time to subjective breakpoint, and breath-to-breath calculated respiratory exchange ratio (RER) were identified as the most influential combination of key variables that improved PAO2 model fit (from R2 = 0.8591 to R2 = 0.8840). Clustering methods coupled with two sample t-tests or ANOVA were then used to identify survey responses most correlated to inter-BH similarities. These were barometric pressure, age, height, weight, resting HR, smoker/ freediver/scuba experience, and weekly frequency of engaging in physical exercise. The model was validated on testing data from an experienced free-diver, from non-rebreathing trials of a sample of the participants, and from simulated dives of 5 participants from research in the Environmental Physiology Department of Karolinska in 1994 [1]. It has been suggested that the presented model can be a valuable tool in developing safer free diving practices. Furthermore, interesting trends in continuous HR, starting PACO2 values, and O2 consumption were observed and analyzed using statistical analysis. Findings were discussed with connection to the underlying physiological principles that might explain the results obtained.

  • 106.
    Antonio, Capezza
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Andersson, Richard L.
    Ström, Valter
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering.
    Wu, Qiong
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites.
    Sacchi, Benedetta
    Univ Milan, Dept Chem, Via Golgi 19, I-20133 Milan, Italy.
    Farris, Stefano
    Univ Milan, DeFENS, Dept Food Environm & Nutr Sci, Packaging Div, Via Celoria 2, I-20133 Milan, Italy.
    Hedenqvist, Mikael S.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Olsson, Richard T.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Polymeric Materials.
    Preparation and Comparison of Reduced Graphene Oxide and Carbon Nanotubes as Fillers in Conductive Natural Rubber for Flexible Electronics2019In: Omega, ISSN 0030-2228, E-ISSN 1541-3764, Vol. 4, no 2Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Conductive natural rubber (NR) nanocomposites were prepared by solvent-casting suspensions of reduced graphene oxide(rGO) or carbon nanotubes (CNTs), followed by vulcanization of the rubber composites. Both rGO and CNT were compatible as fillers in the NR as well as having sufficient intrinsic electrical conductivity for functional applications. Physical (thermal) and chemical reduction of GO were investigated, and the results of the reductions were monitored by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy for establishing a reduction protocol that was useful for the rGO nanocomposite preparation. Field-emission scanning electron microscopy showed that both nanofillers were adequately dispersed in the main NR phase. The CNT composite displays a marked mechanical hysteresis and higher elongation at break, in comparison to the rGO composites for an equal fraction of the carbon phase. Moreover, the composite conductivity was always ca. 3-4 orders of magnitude higher for the CNT composite than for the rGO composites, the former reaching a maximum conductivity of ca. 10.5 S/m, which was explained by the more favorable geometry of the CNT versus the rGO sheets. For low current density applications though, both composites achieved the necessary percolation and showed the electrical conductivity needed for being applied as flexible conductors for a light-emitting diode. 

  • 107.
    Antonio, Capezza
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Newson, W.R.
    Olsson, R.T.
    Hedenquist, M.S:
    Johansson, E
    Advances in the use of protein-based materials: towards sustainable naturally sourced absorbent materials2019In: American Chemical Society Symposium Series (ACS), ISSN 0097-6156, E-ISSN 1947-5918, Vol. 7, no 5Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Superabsorbent polymers (SAPs) are important in the health-care and personal care industries. Products like bed pads and diapers improve the comfort and sanitary conditions for people all over the world, with SAPs reaching yearly production volumes of ca. 2 million tons. However, recent sustainability issues have questioned the high negative footprint of polymers from nonrenewable resources. Biomacromolecules, especially when functionalized, have properties that make them an attractive alternative for the production of biobased SAPs. Proteins are a particularly interesting alternative due to their high variability and because of their relatively low price, being available as side streams from the agricultural industries. Due to the harsh extraction conditions, these side stream proteins are not competing with the food industry and alternative source-effective uses are advantageous in a circular bioeconomy. As the properties of a SAP material come from a combination of neutralized functional groups to promote polar liquid uptake and intermolecular cross-links to prevent dissolution, proteins offer unique opportunities due to their variability in polymerization. An increased understanding of the protein characteristics and how these can be tuned through functionalization is therefore a prerequisite for the successful development of a commercial biobased SAP that utilizes industrial and nontoxic wastes toward more sustainable products. This review focuses on proteins as biomacromolecules with relevant characteristics for superabsorbent functions, and discusses the opportunities that they may offer toward sustainable SAPs utilizing nontoxic chemicals and following the green chemistry principles.

  • 108.
    Antypas, H.
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Neurosci, Swedish Med Nanosci Ctr, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Veses-Garcia, M.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Neurosci, Swedish Med Nanosci Ctr, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Weibull, Emelie
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science.
    Svahn Andersson, Helene
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Nano Biotechnology.
    Richter-Dahlfors, A.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Neurosci, Swedish Med Nanosci Ctr, Stockholm, Sweden..
    A universal platform for selection and high-resolution phenotypic screening of bacterial mutants using the nanowell slide2018In: Lab on a Chip, ISSN 1473-0197, E-ISSN 1473-0189, Vol. 18, no 12, p. 1767-1777Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Petri dish and microtiter plate are the golden standard for selection and screening of bacteria in microbiological research. To improve on the limited resolution and throughput of these methods, we developed a universal, user-friendly platform for selection and high-resolution phenotypic screening based on the nanowell slide. This miniaturized platform has an optimal ratio between throughput and assay complexity, holding 672 nanowells of 500 nl each. As monoclonality is essential in bacterial genetics, we used FACS to inoculate each nanowell with a single bacterium in 15 min. We further extended the protocol to select and sort only bacteria of interest from a mixed culture. We demonstrated this by isolating single transposon mutants generated by a custom-made transposon with dual selection for GFP fluorescence and kanamycin resistance. Optical compatibility of the nanowell slide enabled phenotypic screening of sorted mutants by spectrophotometric recording during incubation. By processing the absorbance data with our custom algorithm, a phenotypic screen for growth-associated mutations was performed. Alternatively, by processing fluorescence data, we detected metabolism-associated mutations, exemplified by a screen for -galactosidase activity. Besides spectrophotometry, optical compatibility enabled us to perform microscopic analysis directly in the nanowells to screen for mutants with altered morphologies. Despite the miniaturized format, easy transition from nano- to macroscale cultures allowed retrieval of bacterial mutants for downstream genetic analysis, demonstrated here by a cloning-free single-primer PCR protocol. Taken together, our FACS-linked nanowell slide replaces manual selection of mutants on agar plates, and enables combined selection and phenotypic screening in a one-step process. The versatility of the nanowell slide, and the modular workflow built on mainstream technologies, makes our universal platform widely applicable in microbiological research.

  • 109.
    Appadurai, Tamilselvan
    et al.
    Univ Madras, Natl Ctr Nanosci & Nanotechnol, Guindy Campus, Chennai 600025, Tamil Nadu, India..
    Subramaniyam, Chandrasekar M.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Kuppusamy, Rajesh
    Univ Madras, Dept Phys Chem, Guindy Campus, Chennai 600025, Tamil Nadu, India..
    Karazhanov, Smagul
    Inst Energy Technol IFE, Dept Solar Energy, N-2027 Kjeller, Norway..
    Subramanian, Balakumar
    Univ Madras, Natl Ctr Nanosci & Nanotechnol, Guindy Campus, Chennai 600025, Tamil Nadu, India..
    Electrochemical Performance of Nitrogen-Doped TiO2 Nanotubes as Electrode Material for Supercapacitor and Li-Ion Battery2019In: Molecules, ISSN 1420-3049, E-ISSN 1420-3049, Vol. 24, no 16, article id 2952Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Electrochemical anodized titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanotubes are of immense significance as electrochemical energy storage devices owing to their fast electron transfer by reducing the diffusion path and paving way to fabricating binder-free and carbon-free electrodes. Besides these advantages, when nitrogen is doped into its lattice, doubles its electrochemical activity due to enhanced charge transfer induced by oxygen vacancy. Herein, we synthesized nitrogen-doped TiO2 (N-TiO2) and studied its electrochemical performances in supercapacitor and as anode for a lithium-ion battery (LIB). Nitrogen doping into TiO2 was confirmed by Raman spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) techniques. The electrochemical performance of N-TiO2 nanotubes was outstanding with a specific capacitance of 835 mu F cm(-2) at 100 mV s(-1) scan rate as a supercapacitor electrode, and it delivered an areal discharge capacity of 975 mu A h cm(-2) as an anode material for LIB which is far superior to bare TiO2 nanotubes (505 mu F cm(-2) and 86 mu A h cm(-2), respectively). This tailor-made nitrogen-doped nanostructured electrode offers great promise as next-generation energy storage electrode material.

  • 110.
    Arafa, Wael Abdelgayed Ahmed
    et al.
    Jouf Univ, Coll Sci, Chem Dept, POB 72341, Sakaka, Aljouf, Saudi Arabia.;Fayoum Univ, Fac Sci, Chem Dept, POB 63514, Fayoum City, Egypt..
    Abdel-Magied, Ahmed Fawzy
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry. Nucl Mat Author, POB 530, Cairo, Egypt..
    An eco-compatible access to diversified bisoxazolone and bisimidazole derivatives2018In: ARKIVOC, ISSN 1551-7004, E-ISSN 1551-7012, p. 338-353Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An efficient, straight-forward and eco-friendly synthetic strategy for the assembly of novel bisoxazolones via a four-component, sequential reaction of dialdehydes, glycine, benzoyl chloride and acetic anhydride, using ultrasound radiation, is described. Additionally, a diverse group of new bisimidazoles has been synthesized in good yields by the sonication of diamines and (Z)-4-arylidene-2-phenyloxazol-5(4H)-ones. These approaches have resulted in a number of successful routes for the facile synthesis of bis-oxazolone and bis-imidazole frameworks within minutes of irradiation. Excellent outcomes using these environmentally-friendly parameters make these synthetic schemes ideal, sustainable, green-chemistry procedures and provide simple access towards the preparation of bisheterocycles. [GRAPHICS] .

  • 111.
    Arfaoui, Yousef K.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH).
    Evaluation of a new instrument for measuring segmented radial force of SE-stents implemented in the LGF2018Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Endovascular surgery is a relatively new, rapidly growing, clinical technique and research area. A new endovascular tool has been developed by Endovascular Development AB, the Liungman Guidewire Fixator (LGF) that secures the distal position of a guidewire. The design of the LGF resembles a nitinol (Nickel-Titanium) stent and exerts a radial force against the blood vessel wall. It is desirable to have a well-founded understanding of all the mechanical characteristics of the product from a medical technology safety perspective.

     

    There are different methods for uniformly measure the radial force of an object, i.e. where one single total radial force represents the entire object.

    This report investigates the possibility for segmented radial force measurement by the development of a new measuring instrument. A prototype of the measuring instrument has been produced to test if the proposed method can be implemented or not.

     

    The prototype has been designed, developed and constructed to measure the radial force of individual segments of the stent. The stent segments were created using iris diaphragms and their resistance to radial change were measured using strain gauges. The concept was to measure the radial force differences between each segment with respect to the diameter of the stent. The results show a large and high intensity variation of data due to the strain gauge application. The variation is due to disturbances and flaws in the manufacturing process. On the other hand, one can see that the values for the radial forces of the segments for them different LGFs provide reasonable magnitudes. Some experiments also presents results similar to previous experiments. However, at the same time, no statistically significant conclusion can be drawn. The concept and the theory should work if the errors are changed. In summary, the proposal is to further develop the prototype and complement the experiment using finite element analysis.

  • 112. Armstronga, D. A.
    et al.
    Huie, R. E.
    Lymar, S.
    Koppenol, W. H.
    Merényi, Gabor
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Applied Physical Chemistry.
    Neta, P.
    Stanbury, D. M.
    Steenken, S.
    Wardman, P.
    Standard electrode potentials involving radicals in aqueous solution: Inorganic radicals2013In: BioInorganic Reaction Mechanisms, ISSN 2191-2491, Vol. 9, no 1-4, p. 59-61Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Inorganic radicals, such as superoxide and hydroxyl, play an important role in biology. Their tendency to oxidize or to reduce other compounds has been studied by pulse radiolysis; electrode potentials can be derived when equilibrium is established with a well-known reference compound. An IUPAC Task Group has evaluated the literature and produced the recommended standard electrode potentials for such couples as (O2/O2 ·-), (HO·, H+/H2O), (O3/O3 ·-), (Cl2/Cl2 ·-), (Br2 ·-/2Br-), (NO2 ·/NO2 -), and (CO3 ·-/CO3 2-). 

  • 113.
    Arone Blanco, Maria
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH).
    Effects of herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) infection on nuclear amyloid aggregation2018Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Huntington’s disease (HD) and Spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA) are incurable neurodegenerative diseases that affect the central nervous system. Amyloids, highly organized protein aggregates, are a hallmark for many neurodegenerative diseases. The presence and accumulation of amyloids are toxic and constitute the major cause of neuron cell death. Both genetic and environmental factors contribute to the onset and progression of these diseases. However, despite intensive research, the underlying cause remains unclear. The role of viral infection as an environmental factor in the context of neurodegenerative diseases has not received much attention. The purpose of this study is to investigate the effects of Herpes Simplex Virus 1 (HSV-1) infection on nuclear amyloid aggregation in model cell lines of HD and SCA. The research process consists mainly of laboratory work which involved the use of several molecular techniques used in the field of biotechnology. The work comprises cultivating cells, infecting cells with HSV-1, Fluorescence microscopy, Western Blot and isolation and detection of amyloids. Western Blot is used for the analysis of specific proteins associated with protein aggregation in HD and SCA. The techniques used for detecting amyloids are Dot Blot and Antibody-staining of amyloids in cells. The results from Western Blot showed that aggregates changed in the presence of the virus. This pattern is observed for both HD and SCA1 cell lines. A big effort is done in this study to optimize Dot Blot as it is method that could be applied in every lab. Normalization of samples proved to be the most challenging part with Dot Blot. No definitive conclusions can be drawn from the Dot Blot results as reproducibility and sensitivity were lacking. This work addresses some of the difficulties encountered when working with detection of amyloids especially Dot Blot. Antibody-staining of amyloids showed that amyloids were formed in the presence of virus in comparison to non-infected. To conclude, aggregates changed, and amyloids were formed in the presence of virus. These results point to the fact that HSV-1 infection could be involved in the process of nuclear amyloid aggregation. The data presented in this thesis will need further investigation and characterization to identify the precise role of viral-induced amyloid formation in HD and SCA patient cells.

  • 114.
    Arousell, Anna
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems.
    Engdahl, Ylva
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems.
    Can Surface Scanning Improve the Workflow of Elekta Linac Treatments?2019Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the project was to compare the workflow for an Elekta Linac with and without the surfacescanning system Catalyst and describe pros and cons with both workflows. The findings in the reportcan be used as decision support in development of Elekta products and workflow improvements.

    The method for the project was to do interviews, observations and time measurements at Södersjukhuset(not using Catalyst) and Sundsvalls sjukhus (using Catalyst). The workflows were graded in an as-sessment protocol covering time efficiency, comfort, noise, resources, reliability, cost, dosage and sideeffects. Different workflow scenarios were simulated in AnyLogic.

    The result of the project was that, according to our protocol, the workflow with Catalyst was ratedhigher than without it. The simulations in Anylogic showed that minimizing gaps in the treatment sched-ule generated the same number of patients treated per day, if the positioning could not be done faster.The simulations also showed that removing position verification with cone beam computer tomography(CBCT), an imaging system which is used in addition to the Catalyst system, would increase the numberof treated patients with approximately 33%.

    The conclusion was that there were no great differences in time efficiency between the workflows. How-ever, considering the higher reliability and comfort for the patient, optical surface scanning can improvethe positioning for Elekta Linac and is therefore worth implementing. Minimizing treatment gaps wouldnot improve the workflow. Removing the use of CBCT would increase the number of treated patientsper day.

  • 115.
    Arrhenius Håkansson, Isabella
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH).
    Miljöprestandan hos dagens solceller - produktion av solceller och förslag till alternativa produktionsprocesser2018Independent thesis Basic level (professional degree), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The solar cell industry is one of the fastest growing industries in the world. This is due to thedeclining prices of solar cells and that many countries now try to reduce their greenhouse gasemissions. The growing industry leads to an increased range of variants and suppliers of solarcells on the market. The environmental problems of solar cells occur during the production ofthe various components, as well as in the recovery of the used solar cells.

    The studied solar cells are mono- and multi-crystalline silicon cells, cadmium telluride (CdTe)and CIGS/CIS. The mono- and multi-crystalline solar cells are produced from purified siliconwhich achieves a purity of 6N (SG-Si), where silicon is doped with phosphorus to produce nsemiconductorand the p-semiconductor is doped with boron.

    For thin film solar cell CdTe, CdS is used as the n-semiconductor and the p-semiconductorconsists of cadmium and tellurium. For thin film solar cell CIGS/CIS, copper, indium, galliumand selenium are used as p-semiconductors and CdS as n-semiconductors.

    For the monocrystalline solar cells, a recovery rate of 96% can be achieved, which is doneeconomically and environmentally. For CdTe, a 95% recycled material is obtained for glass,90% for CdTe and 90% for CdS. While for CIGS/CIS, glass, EVA, selenium, aluminium,indium and gallium materials can be recycled.

    The chemicals used during the processes have been classified within a risk categorization,where the majority of the chemicals used are classified as high- and very high risk. The greaterimpact on the environment at the production location is due to the energy supply used sinceonly transport accounts for 1,6 to 2,8 % of carbondioxide emissions from solar cells.

    The parameters that were considered to have a major impact on the environment are the loadfrom critical material extraction, the power supply used during production, the hazardouschemicals used during production and recycling, and the air and waterborne emissions thatarise during production and recycling.

    For all solar cells, non-virgin aluminium should be used as construction material for the frame,or it should be without frames. Manufacturers of solar cells should clean the waterconsumption that occurs and recycle water to the their utmost ability. The factories should alsouse a recycling center for their trash and residues, or recycle at the factory. A clear follow-upand residual product plan should exist for the produced solar cells, which can be done throughPV CYCLE. Companies should work actively in matters relating to health, safety, humanrights, labour law and comply with the rules prevailing in the current country.

  • 116.
    Arseneault, Mathieu
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Granskog, Viktor
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Khosravi, Sara
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Heckler, Ilona
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Antunez, Pablo Mesa
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Hult, Daniel
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Zhang, Yuning
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Malkoch, Michael
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    The Dawn of Thiol-Yne Triazine Triones Thermosets as a New Material Platform Suited for Hard Tissue Repair2018In: Advanced Materials, ISSN 0935-9648, E-ISSN 1521-4095, Vol. 30, no 52, article id 1804966Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The identification of a unique set of advanced materials that can bear extraordinary loads for use in bone and tooth repair will inevitably unlock unlimited opportunities for clinical use. Herein, the design of high-performance thermosets is reported based on triazine-trione (TATO) monomers using light-initiated thiol-yne coupling (TYC) chemistry as a polymerization strategy. In comparison to traditional thiol-ene coupling (TEC) systems, TYC chemistry has yielded highly dense networks with unprecedented mechanical properties. The most promising system notes 4.6 GPa in flexural modulus and 160 MPa in flexural strength, an increase of 84% in modulus and 191% in strength when compared to the corresponding TATO system based on TEC chemistry. Remarkably, the mechanical properties exceed those of polylactide (PLA) and challenge poly(ether ether ketone) PEEK and today's methacrylate-based dental resin composites. All the materials display excellent biocompatibility, in vitro, and are successfully: i) molded into medical devices for fracture repair, and ii) used as bone adhesive for fracture fixation and as tooth fillers with the outstanding bond strength that outperform methacrylate systems used today in dental restoration application. Collectively, a new era of advanced TYC materials is unfolded that can fulfill the preconditions as bone fixating implants and for tooth restorations.

  • 117.
    Arseneault, Mathieu
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    Granskog, Viktor
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    Khosravi, Sara
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    Heckler, Ilona
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    Mesa-Antunez, Pablo
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    Hult, Daniel
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    Zhang, Yuning
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    Malkoch, Michael
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    Highly crosslinked triazine-trione materials for fracture fixation based on TEC and TYC chemistryManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 118.
    Arumuganainar, Ganesh Prasanth
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH).
    Simulation of Lower Limb Muscle Activity During Inclined Slope Walking2019Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Robotic exoskeletons are designed to assist patients with motor dysfunctions. Recent researches focus on extending the robotic assistance to patient activities other than ground level walking. This study aims to analyse the lower limb muscle activity during inclined slope walking contrasting with that of ground level walking. Two different angles of inclination were chosen: 9 degrees and 18 degrees. 9 degrees inclined slope is the universal ramp size for wheelchairs. The hypothesis is that muscle activation, and ultimately metabolic cost, in inclined slope walking is different from that of ground level walking. Collected motion data and simulation in OpenSim prove that the difference in metabolic cost is because of increased activity of ankle dorsiflexors and hip extensors and reduced activity of knee extensors. Finally, muscle activities along with other criteria such as kinematic alignment and joint range of motion are summed up as biomechanical considerations for robotic exoskeleton design.

  • 119.
    Ashour, Radwa M.
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Functional Materials, FNM. Nuclear Materials Authority, Egypt.
    El-sayed, R.
    Abdel-Magied, A. F.
    Abdel-khalek, A. A.
    Ali, M. M.
    Forsberg, Kerstin
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering, Resource recovery.
    Uheida, Abdusalam
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Functional Materials, FNM.
    Muhammed, Mamoun
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Functional Materials, FNM.
    Dutta, Joydeep
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Functional Materials, FNM.
    Selective separation of rare earth ions from aqueous solution using functionalized magnetite nanoparticles: kinetic and thermodynamic studies2017In: Chemical Engineering Journal, ISSN 1385-8947, E-ISSN 1873-3212, Vol. 327, p. 286-296Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Separation of rare earth ions (RE3+) from aqueous solution is a tricky problem due to their physico-chemical similarities of properties. In this study, we investigate the influence of the functionalized ligands on the adsorption efficiency and selective adsorption of La3+, Nd3+, Gd3+ and Y3+ from aqueous solution using Magnetite (Fe3O4) nanoparticles (NPs) functionalized with citric acid (CA@Fe3O4 NPs) or L-cysteine (Cys@Fe3O4 NPs). The microstructure, thermal behavior and surface functionalization of the synthesized nanoparticles were studied. The general adsorption capacity of Cys@Fe3O4 NPs was found to be high (98 mg g−1) in comparison to CA@Fe3O4 NPs (52 mg g−1) at neutral pH 7.0. The adsorption kinetic studies revealed that the adsorption of RE3+ ions follows a pseudo second-order model and the adsorption equilibrium data fits well to the Langmuir isotherm. Thermodynamic studies imply that the adsorption process was endothermic and spontaneous in nature. Controlled desorption within 30 min of the adsorbed RE3+ ions from both Cys@Fe3O4 NPs and CA@Fe3O4 NPs was achieved with 0.5 M HNO3. Furthermore, Cys@Fe3O4 NPs exhibited a higher separation factor (SF) in the separation of Gd3+/La3+, Gd3+/Nd3+, Gd3+/Y3+ ions compared to CA@Fe3O4 NPs.

  • 120.
    Ashour, Radwa
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering. Nuclear Materials Authority, P.O. Box 530, 11381 El Maadi, Cairo, Egypt.
    Samouhos, Michail
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Department of Molecular Sciences, Uppsala BioCentre.
    Polido Legaria, Elizabeth
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Department of Molecular Sciences, Uppsala BioCentre.
    Svärd, Michael
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering, Transport Phenomena.
    Högblom, Joakim
    AkzoNobel, Pulp and Performance Chemicals AB.
    Forsberg, Kerstin
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering.
    Palmlöf, Magnus
    Kessler, Vadim G.
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Department of Molecular Sciences, Uppsala BioCentre.
    Seisenbaeva, Gulaim A.
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Department of Molecular Sciences, Uppsala BioCentre.
    Rasmuson, Åke C.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering.
    DTPA-Functionalized Silica Nano- and Microparticles for Adsorption and Chromatographic Separation of Rare Earth Elements2018In: ACS Sustainable Chemistry & Engineering, ISSN 2168-0485, Vol. 6, no 5, p. 6889-6900Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Silica nanoparticles and porous microparticles have been successfully functionalized with a monolayer of DTPA-derived ligands. The ligand grafting is chemically robust and does not appreciably influence the morphology or the structure of the material. The produced particles exhibit quick kinetics and high capacity for REE adsorption. The feasibility of using the DTPA-functionalized microparticles for chromatographic separation of rare earth elements has been investigated for different sample concentrations, elution modes, eluent concentrations, eluent flow rates, and column temperatures. Good separation of the La(III), Ce(III), Pr(III), Nd(III), and Dy(III) ions was achieved using HNO3 as eluent using a linear concentration gradient from 0 to 0.15 M over 55 min. The long-term performance of the functionalized column has been verified, with very little deterioration recorded over more than 50 experiments. The results of this study demonstrate the potential for using DTPA-functionalized silica particles in a chromatographic process for separating these valuable elements from waste sources, as an environmentally preferable alternative to standard solvent-intensive processes.

  • 121.
    Askfors, Ylva
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Health Informatics.
    Samverkan för innovation: En fallstudie av mötet mellan akademi, industri och sjukvård2018Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Samverkan kan leda till innovation, konkurrenskraftiga företag, förstklassig forskning samt välfungerande myndigheter och institutioner. I den politiska debatten idag finns en förväntan att Sverige ska upprätthålla sin konkurrenskraft och bemöta samhällets utmaningar genom innovation och att vägen till innovation går via samverkan. Avhandlingen bygger på en studie av ett samverkansprojekt vars syfte var att skapa innovation för att minska antalet vårdrelaterade infektioner i Sverige. Projektet som studerats ses som en transdisciplinär ansats med aktörer som representerade akademi, industri samt hälso- och sjukvård.

    Syftet med avhandlingen är att vidareutveckla kunskapen om interorganisatorisk samverkan för innovation. Detta görs genom ett tredelat bidrag, till teoribildningen kring samverkan för innovation som börjat växa fram, till den samverkande praktiken inom både privat och offentlig sektor samt till politiker och beslutsfattare som styr fördelning av statliga anslag till forskning och innovation.

    Fallstudien som ligger till grund för avhandlingen är baserad på en etnografiskt inspirerad studie. Empiriskt material samlades in och skapades tillsammans med aktörerna i projektet under drygt två års tid genom intervjuer och deltagande observation.

    Studien visar att interorganisatorisk samverkan består av flera dimensioner och kan förstås på flera nivåer. Interorganisatorisk samverkan innebär inte bara att det är olika organisationer som ska göra en gemensam ansträngning. Organisationerna består av olika människor med olika discipliner och professioner vilka bygger på olika utgångspunkter och sätt att se på världen. Samverkan kan ses som ett sätt att fylla mellanrummen mellan organisationer istället för att bygga broar över gränser. I de organisatoriska mellanrummen kan aktörer från olika organisationer, med olika discipliner och professioner mötas utan institutionaliserade roller, i en receptiv kontext där innovation kan skapas.

  • 122.
    Askfors, Ylva
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Health Informatics.
    Fornstedt, Helena
    Uppsala universitet.
    The clash of managerial and professional logics in public procurement: Implications for innovation in the health-care sector.2018In: Scandinavian Journal of Management, ISSN 0956-5221, E-ISSN 1873-3387, Vol. 34, no 1, p. 78-90Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article addresses the enactment of public procurement and its influence on adoption and diffusion of innovation, using a case study of public procurement of a low-tech medical device innovation in Swedish healthcare. Based on interviews and documentation, the article illustrates the various perspectives of the different professions involved in the complex task of setting the requirement specification for the tender. The technology identities of the medical device (innovation) are constructed and negotiated by the actors: procurement administrators, health-care professionals and suppliers within the adoption space. Examining the enactment of the procurement process as part of the adoption space is a way to deepen our understanding of the social component within public procurement.

  • 123.
    Aslani, Kosovare Valle
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH).
    Gazay, Usama
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH).
    Design av en medicinteknisk utrustning i syfte att diagnostisera nyfödda2018Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The primary motivation of this bachelor thesis was to address the acute lack of affordablemedical technologies in low-resource settings in order to reduce child mortality in theneonatal period. It is essential to develop affordable medical devices for empowering healthworkers and village doctors and train them to use smart devices and appropriate ICT tools,and connect them to the medical experts to manage the serious health problems. The workincludes: a) developing programs for safe use of devices and manage consultation with themedical experts and b) developing appropriate e-Learning content on health education fordisease prevention.

    A handheld, safe and user friendly heart rate monitor has been developed using smart andlow cost sensors. The device consists of two major parts. First, low cost sensors (piezo andoptical) interfaced with analog front-end circuits including capacitors, resistors andamplifiers. Second, the filtered and amplified signal is digitally processed and converted toprovide statistically significant information about the patient’s heart rate and presentirregularity report in the heart activity if any. The piezoelectric sensor head is placed onthe point where the radial artery crosses the bones of the wrist, whereas the photoelectricsensor head is placed on a fingertip in order to detect the arterial pulse rate.

    At present, the interpretation of sensor readings is focused towards determining the heartrate and dynamics of heart functional characteristics. This low cost handheld device isbeing further enhanced with more sensors to provide additional relevant vital parametersfor quality treatment guidelines.

  • 124.
    Asp, Michaela
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Gene Technology.
    Spatially Resolved Gene Expression Analysis2018Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Spatially resolved transcriptomics has greatly expanded our knowledge of complex multicellular biological systems. To date, several technologies have been developed that combine gene expression data with information about its spatial tissue context. There is as yet no single spatial method superior to all others, and the existing methods have jointly contributed to progress in this field of technology. Some challenges presented by existing protocols include having a limited number of targets, being labor extensive, being tissue-type dependent and having low throughput or limited resolution. Within the scope of this thesis, many aspects of these challenges have been taken into consideration, resulting in a detailed evaluation of a recently developed spatial transcriptome-wide method. This method, termed Spatial Transcriptomics (ST), enables the spatial location of gene activity to be preserved and visually links it to its histological position and anatomical context. Paper I describes all the details of the experimental protocol, which starts when intact tissue sections are placed on barcoded microarrays and finishes with high throughput sequencing. Here, spatially resolved transcriptome-wide data are obtained from both mouse olfactory bulb and breast cancer samples, demonstrating the broad tissue applicability and robustness of the approach. In Paper II, the ST technology is applied to samples of human adult heart, a tissue type that contains large proportions of fibrous tissue and thus makes RNA extraction substantially more challenging. New protocol strategies are optimized in order to generate spatially resolved transcriptome data from heart failure patients. This demonstrates the advantage of using the technology for the identification of lowly expressed biomarkers that have previously been seen to correlate with disease progression in patients suffering heart failure. Paper III shows that, although the ST technology has limited resolution compared to other techniques, it can be combined with single-cell RNA-sequencing and hence allow the spatial positions of individual cells to be recovered. The combined approach is applied to developing human heart tissue and reveals cellular heterogeneity of distinct compartments within the complete organ. Since the ST technology is based on the sequencing of mRNA tags, Paper IV describes a new version of the method, in which spatially resolved analysis of full-length transcripts is being developed. Exploring the spatial distribution of full-length transcripts in tissues enables further insights into alternative splicing and fusion transcripts and possible discoveries of new genes.  

  • 125.
    Asp, Michaela
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Gene Technology.
    Borgström, Erik
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Gene Technology.
    Stuckey, Alexander
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Gene Technology.
    Gruselius, Joel
    Carlberg, Konstantin
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Gene Technology.
    Andrusivova, Zaneta
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Gene Technology.
    Salmén, Fredrik
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Käller, Max
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Gene Technology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Ståhl, Patrik
    Lundeberg, Joakim
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Spatial Isoform Profiling within Individual Tissue SectionsManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Spatial Transcriptomics has been shown to be a persuasive RNA sequencing

    technology for analyzing cellular heterogeneity within tissue sections. The

    technology efficiently captures and barcodes 3’ tags of all polyadenylated

    transcripts from a tissue section, and thus provides a powerful platform when

    performing quantitative spatial gene expression studies. However, the current

    protocol does not recover the full-length information of transcripts, and

    consequently lack information regarding alternative splice variants. Here, we

    introduce a novel protocol for spatial isoform profiling, using Spatial

    Transcriptomics barcoded arrays.

  • 126.
    Asp, Michaela
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Gene Technology.
    Giacomello, Stefania
    Fürth, Daniel
    Reimegård, Johan
    Wärdell, Eva
    Custodio, Joaquin
    Salmén, Fredrik
    Sundström, Erik
    Åkesson, Elisabet
    Bienko, Magda
    Månsson‐Broberg, Agneta
    Ståhl, Patrik
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Gene Technology.
    Sylvén, Christer
    Lundeberg, Joakim
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Gene Technology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    An organ‐wide gene expression atlas of the developing human heartManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The human developing heart holds a greater proportion of stem-cell-like cells than the adult heart. However, it is not completely understood how these stem cells differentiate into various cardiac cell types. We have performed an organ-wide transcriptional landscape analysis of the developing heart to advance our understanding of cardiac morphogenesis in humans. Comprehensive spatial gene expression analyses identified distinct profiles that correspond not only to individual chamber compartments, but also distinctive regions within the outflow tract. Furthermore, the generated spatial expression reference maps facilitated the assignment of 3,787 human embryonic cardiac cells obtained from single-cell RNA-sequencing to an in situlocation. Through this approach we reveal that the outflow tract contains a wider range of cell types than the chambers, and that the epicardium expression profile can be traced to several cell types that are activated at different stages of development. We also provide a 3D spatial model of human embryonic cardiac cells to enable further studies of the developing human heart. 

  • 127.
    Astaraki, Mehdi
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Medical Imaging.
    Wang, Chunliang
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Medical Imaging.
    Buizza, G.
    Toma-Dasu, I.
    Lazzeroni, M.
    Smedby, Örjan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Medical Imaging.
    Early survival prediction in non-small cell lung cancer with PET/CT size aware longitudinal pattern2019In: Radiotherapy and Oncology, ISSN 0167-8140, E-ISSN 1879-0887, ISSN 0167-8140, Vol. 133, p. S208-S209Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 128.
    Astaraki, Mehdi
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Medical Imaging. Karolinska Inst, Dept Oncol Pathol, Karolinska Univ Sjukhuset, SE-17176 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Wang, Chunliang
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Medical Imaging.
    Buizza, Giulia
    Politecn Milan, Dept Elect Informat & Bioengn, Piazza Leonardo da Vinci 42, I-20133 Milan, Italy..
    Toma-Dasu, Iuliana
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Oncol Pathol, Karolinska Univ Sjukhuset, SE-17176 Stockholm, Sweden.;Stockholm Univ, Dept Phys, SE-10691 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Lazzeroni, Marta
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Oncol Pathol, Karolinska Univ Sjukhuset, SE-17176 Stockholm, Sweden.;Stockholm Univ, Dept Phys, SE-10691 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Smedby, Örjan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Medical Imaging.
    Early survival prediction in non-small cell lung cancer from PET/CT images using an intra-tumor partitioning method2019In: Physica medica (Testo stampato), ISSN 1120-1797, E-ISSN 1724-191X, Vol. 60, p. 58-65Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: To explore prognostic and predictive values of a novel quantitative feature set describing intra-tumor heterogeneity in patients with lung cancer treated with concurrent and sequential chemoradiotherapy. Methods: Longitudinal PET-CT images of 30 patients with non-small cell lung cancer were analysed. To describe tumor cell heterogeneity, the tumors were partitioned into one to ten concentric regions depending on their sizes, and, for each region, the change in average intensity between the two scans was calculated for PET and CT images separately to form the proposed feature set. To validate the prognostic value of the proposed method, radiomics analysis was performed and a combination of the proposed novel feature set and the classic radiomic features was evaluated. A feature selection algorithm was utilized to identify the optimal features, and a linear support vector machine was trained for the task of overall survival prediction in terms of area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUROC). Results: The proposed novel feature set was found to be prognostic and even outperformed the radiomics approach with a significant difference (AUROC(sALop) = 0.90 vs. AUROC(radiomic) = 0.71) when feature selection was not employed, whereas with feature selection, a combination of the novel feature set and radiomics led to the highest prognostic values. Conclusion: A novel feature set designed for capturing intra-tumor heterogeneity was introduced. Judging by their prognostic power, the proposed features have a promising potential for early survival prediction.

  • 129.
    Atapour, Masoud
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Wei, Zheng
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Chaudhary, Himanshu
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Applied Physical Chemistry.
    Lendel, Christofer
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Applied Physical Chemistry.
    Odnevall Wallinder, Inger
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Hedberg, Yolanda
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Metal release from stainless steel 316L in whey protein - And simulated milk solutions under static and stirring conditions2019In: Food Control, ISSN 0956-7135, E-ISSN 1873-7129, Vol. 101, p. 163-172Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Stainless steel is an important transport and processing contact material for bovine milk and dairy products. Release (migration) of metals, ions, complexes or wear debris/particles, and metal-induced protein aggregation in such environments are hence important to consider both from a corrosion and food safety perspective. This study aims on investigating the release of iron (Fe), chromium (Cr), and nickel (Ni) from AISI 316L stainless steel in contact with whey protein solutions relevant for protein drinks, and on how the whey proteins are influenced by stirring with a magnetic stir bar and metal release. Mechanistic insight is gained by parallel investigations of metal release from two reference non-protein containing solutions, a metal-complexing (citrate-containing) simulated milk solution (SMS) and a low complexing phosphate buffered saline solution (PBS). All immersion exposures were conducted at pH 6.8 for 0.5, 4, 24 and 48 hat room temperature at static and stirring conditions. All solutions and samples were investigated using different chemical, spectroscopic, microscopic, and electrochemical methods. Significantly higher amounts of Fe, Cr, and Ni were released into the whey protein solution (80 g/L) as compared to SMS and PBS. Strong enrichment of Cr in the surface oxide and reduction of the surface oxide thickness were associated with a higher amount of Ni release in the metal-complexing solutions (SMS and whey protein) compared with PBS. Stirring conditions resulted in higher amounts of metal release, enrichment of Cr in the surface oxide, and clear signs of wear of the 316L surface in all solutions compared to static conditions. The wear mechanism in the whey protein solution was different as compared to corresponding processes in SMS and PBS, involving an etching-like process and larger-sized wear debris. Electrochemical measurements at static conditions confirmed observed differences between the solutions, with the lowest corrosion resistance observed for coupons exposed in the whey protein solution, followed by SMS and PBS. Released metals in solution from the 316L coupons in contact with the whey protein solution resulted in enhanced rates of protein aggregation and precipitation of protein aggregates from solution. Further studies should be made to investigate other relevant test conditions and assess toxicological risks.

  • 130.
    Atasoy, Merve
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering, Resource recovery.
    Eyice, Ozge
    Queen Mary Univ London, Sch Biol & Chem Sci, London E1 4NS, England..
    Schnurer, Anna
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Dept Mol Sci, Bioctr, SE-75007 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Cetecioglu, Zeynep
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering, Resource recovery.
    Volatile fatty acids production via mixed culture fermentation: Revealing the link between pH, inoculum type and bacterial composition2019In: Bioresource Technology, ISSN 0960-8524, E-ISSN 1873-2976, Vol. 292, article id 121889Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the study was to investigate the effects of operational parameters, inoculum type and bacterial community on mixed culture fermentation to produce one dominant acid type in the mixture of volatile fatty acids (VFA). The study was performed using three different inocula (large&small granular and slurry) with glucose under various initial pH. The VFA production efficiency reached to 0,97 (gCOD/gSCOD) by granular sludge. VFA composition was changed by initial pH: in neutral conditions, acetic acid; in acidic conditions, acetic and butyric acids, in alkali conditions butyric acid were dominated, respectively. The VFA production was positively affected by the high relative abundance of Firmicutes. On the contrary, a negative correlation was seen between VFA production and the relative abundance of Chloroflexi. The results revealed the physical sludge structure of inoculum was the key factor for production efficiency, whereas, pH was the most important parameter to affect VFA composition.

  • 131.
    Atasoy, Merve
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering, Resource recovery.
    Owusu-Agyeman, Isaac
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering, Resource recovery.
    Plaza, Elzbieta
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
    Cetecioglu, Zeynep
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering, Resource recovery.
    Bio-based volatile fatty acid production and recovery from waste streams: Current status and future challenges2018In: Bioresource Technology, ISSN 0960-8524, E-ISSN 1873-2976, Vol. 268, p. 773-786Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Bio-based volatile fatty acid (VFA) production from waste-stream is getting attention due to increasing market demand and wide range usage area as well as its cost-effective and environmentally friendly approach. The aim of this paper is to give a comprehensive review of bio-based VFA production and recovery methods and to give an opinion on future research outlook. Effects of operation conditions including pH, temperature, retention time, type of substrate and mixed microbial cultures on VFA production and composition were reviewed. The recovery methods in terms of gas stripping with absorption, adsorption, solvent extraction, electrodialysis, reverse osmosis, nanofiltration, and membrane contractor of VFA were evaluated. Furthermore, strategies to enhance bio-based VFA production and recovery from waste streams, specifically, in-line VFA recovery and bioaugmentation, which are currently not used in common practice, are seen as some of the approaches to enhance bio-based VFA production.

  • 132.
    Augusto, Ohara
    et al.
    Univ Sao Paulo, Inst Quim, Dept Bioquim, BR-5508000 Sao Paulo, Brazil..
    Goldstein, Sara
    Hebrew Univ Jerusalem, Chem Inst, IL-91904 Jerusalem, Israel..
    Hurst, James K.
    Oregon State Univ, Dept Biochem & Biophys, Corvallis, OR 97331 USA..
    Lind, Johan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH).
    Lymar, Sergei, V
    Brookhaven Natl Lab, Dept Chem, Upton, NY 11973 USA..
    Merényi, Gabor
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Applied Physical Chemistry.
    Radi, Rafael
    Univ Republica, Dept Bioquim, Fac Med, Montevideo 11800, Uruguay.;Univ Republica, Ctr Free Rad & Biomed Res, Fac Med, Montevideo 11800, Uruguay..
    Carbon dioxide-catalyzed peroxynitrite reactivity - The resilience of the radical mechanism after two decades of research2019In: Free Radical Biology & Medicine, ISSN 0891-5849, Vol. 135, p. 210-215Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Peroxynitrite, ONOO-, formed in tissues that are simultaneously generating NO center dot and O-2(center dot-), is widely regarded as a major contributor to oxidative stress. Many of the reactions involved are catalyzed by CO2 via formation of an unstable adduct, ONOOC(O)O-, that undergoes O-O bond homolysis to produce NO2 center dot and CO3 center dot- radicals, whose yields are equal at about 0.33 with respect to the ONOO- reactant. Since its inception two decades ago, this radical-based mechanism has been frequently but unsuccessfully challenged. The most recent among these [Serrano-Luginbuehl et al. Chem. Res. Toxicol. 31: 721-730; 2018] claims that ONOOC(O)O- is stable, predicts a yield of NO2 center dot/CO3 center dot- of less than 0.01 under physiological conditions and, contrary to widely accepted viewpoints, suggests that radical generation is inconsequential to peroxynitrite-induced oxidative damage. Here we review the experimental and theoretical evidence that support the radical model and show this recently proposed alternative mechanism to be incorrect.

  • 133. Aung, S. H.
    et al.
    Zhao, L.
    Nonomura, K.
    Oo, T. Z.
    Zakeeruddin, S. M.
    Vlachopoulos, N.
    Sloboda, Tamara
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Applied Physical Chemistry.
    Svanström, S.
    Cappel, Ute B.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Applied Physical Chemistry.
    Hagfeldt, A.
    Grätzel, M.
    Toward an alternative approach for the preparation of low-temperature titanium dioxide blocking underlayers for perovskite solar cells2019In: Journal of Materials Chemistry A, ISSN 2050-7488, Vol. 7, no 17, p. 10729-10738Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The anodic electrodeposition method is investigated as an alternative technique for the preparation of a titanium oxide (TiO 2 ) blocking underlayer (UL) for perovskite solar cells (PSCs). Extremely thin Ti IV -based films are grown from aqueous acidic titanium(iii) chloride in an electrochemical cell at room temperature. This precursor layer is converted to the UL (ED-UL), in a suitable state for PSC applications, by undertaking a sintering step at 450 °C for half an hour. PSCs with the composition of the light-absorbing material FA 0.85 MA 0.10 Cs 0.05 Pb(I 0.87 Br 0.13 ) 3 (FA and MA denote the formamidinium and methylammonium cations, respectively) based on the ED-UL are compared with PSCs with the UL of a standard type prepared by the spray-pyrolysis method at 450 °C from titanium diisopropoxide bis(acetylacetonate) (SP-UL). We obtain power conversion efficiencies (PCEs) of over 20% for mesoscopic perovskite devices employing both ED-ULs and SP-ULs. Slightly higher fill factor values are observed for ED-UL-based devices. In addition, ED-ULs prepared by the same method have also been applied in planar PSCs, resulting in a PCE exceeding 17%, which is comparable to that for similar PSCs with an SP-UL. The preparation of ED-ULs with a lower sintering temperature, 150 °C, has also been examined. The efficiency of a planar PSC incorporating this underlayer was 14%. These results point out to the possibility of applying ED-ULs in flexible planar PSCs in the future.

  • 134.
    Ayan, Hilal
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Industrial Biotechnology.
    Identify synthetic polymers used in cosmetics and further test their biodegradation in aqueous setup in order to assess their impact on the environment2017Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Plastics have a wide application field, where cosmetic products are one of them. Polymers which are building blocks to plastics exists in many variants, overall they can be categorized into two groups; microplastics and water soluble polymers. Both polymer types are important to study and understand since polymers in general are not covered by any legislation. To gain a more profound understanding of their impact on environment this study was conducted. In collaboration with SSNC (Naturskyddsföreningen), a database containing hundreds cosmetic products was processed. The most occurring polymers were quantified and prevalent ingredients having “poly” in their name were selected for further investigation namely Nylon 12-20 (microplast) and Acrylates C/10-30 Alkyl-crosspolymer (water soluble). A standardized analysis method OECD 301 F was performed to test the polymers biodegrading ability. Results from biodegradation method showed that, neither of the two polymers is readily biodegradable in aqueous environment, despite their different properties. In connection with the obtained results, a filtration analysis was performed, with the purpose to determine the possibility to capture the polymers using microfilters. Results mainly showed flowthrough of both polymers. Relating the results to reality implies that these polymers are not captured in waste water treatment plant due to inefficient filtration and thereby spread to the environment. In addition more research should be devoted to water-soluble polymers and their impact on nature. Based on all compiled results, it is proposed that legislation addressing microplastics should be edited and revised in such a way that water soluble polymers are included in future prohibitions (against microplastics).

  • 135.
    Ayoglu, Burcu
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Affinity Proteomics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Nilsson, Peter
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Affinity Proteomics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Schwenk, Jochen M.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Affinity Proteomics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Multiplexed antigen bead arrays for the assessment of antibody selectivity and epitope mapping2018In: Epitope Mapping Protocols, Humana Press Inc. , 2018, p. 239-248Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    With the increasing number of binding reagents for affinity-based investigations of the human proteome, high-throughput tools for the characterization of the used reagents become essential. For the analysis of binding selectivity, bead-based antigen arrays offer a miniaturized and parallelized assay platform to meet such needs, as they enable two-dimensional multiplexing to analyze up to 384 samples against up to 500 analytes in a single round of analysis. In this chapter, we describe our protocols for the generation of multiplex bead arrays built on immobilized protein fragments, as well as biotinylated peptides. Combined together, these two versions of antigen arrays offer a versatile approach for multiplexed characterization of antibody binding selectivity, off-target interactions, as well as mapping for the amino acids of epitopes involved in antibody binding.

  • 136.
    Azeem, Muhammad
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry. Department of Chemistry, COMSATS University Islamabad, Abbottabad Campus, Abbottabad 22060, Pakistan.
    Barba Aliaga, Marina
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Industrial Biotechnology.
    Borg-Karlson, Anna-Karin
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Organic chemistry. Division of Organic Chemistry, Institute of Technology, Tartu University, Tartu 50411, Estonia.
    Terenius, O.
    Broberg, A.
    Rajarao, Gunaratna Kuttuva
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Industrial Biotechnology.
    Heterobasidion-growth inhibiting Bacillus subtilis A18 exhibits medium- and age-dependent production of lipopeptides2019In: Microbiology Research, ISSN 0944-5013, E-ISSN 1618-0623, Vol. 223-225, p. 129-136Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Heterobasidion annosum s.s. and H. parviporum are severe pathogens of conifers causing butt rot and root rot thus reducing the economic value of timber. Here, the antifungal activity of Bacillus subtilis isolate A18 against these two Heterobasidion species was investigated. Five different culture media with different culture age were investigated to study the effect of substrate composition and culture age for metabolite production. Bacterial cultures and cell-free culture filtrates were tested for antifungal activity. Inhibition of fungal growth was analysed using the agar disc-diffusion method. MALDI-TOF and LC-HRMS analyses were used to identify the antifungal metabolites. Substrate composition and age of culture were found to be active variables with direct effect on the antifungal activity of bacterial culture extracts. High anti-fungal activity was observed when B. subtilis was cultured in PDB, SGB and LB media for four days. Mass-spectrometry analysis showed the presence of lipopeptides in culture filtrates identified as members of the surfactins, polymixins, kurstakins and fengycins. A culture filtrate containing fengycin-type lipopeptides showed the highest bioactivity against Heterobasidion species. Bacterial cultures had higher bioactivity compared to their respective cell free culture filtrates. The results of the present study suggest that B. subtilis A18 is a powerful biocontrol agent against Heterobasidion infections of tree wounds and stumps.

  • 137.
    Baath, Jenny Arnling
    et al.
    Chalmers Univ Technol, Div Ind Biotechnol, Dept Biol & Biol Engn, S-41296 Gothenburg, Sweden.;Chalmers Univ Technol, Wallenberg Wood Sci Ctr, S-41296 Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Martinez-Abad, Antonio
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Glycoscience.
    Berglund, Jennie
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Larsbrink, Johan
    Chalmers Univ Technol, Div Ind Biotechnol, Dept Biol & Biol Engn, S-41296 Gothenburg, Sweden.;Chalmers Univ Technol, Wallenberg Wood Sci Ctr, S-41296 Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Vilaplana, Francisco
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Glycoscience. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Olsson, Lisbeth
    Chalmers Univ Technol, Div Ind Biotechnol, Dept Biol & Biol Engn, S-41296 Gothenburg, Sweden.;Chalmers Univ Technol, Wallenberg Wood Sci Ctr, S-41296 Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Mannanase hydrolysis of spruce galactoglucomannan focusing on the influence of acetylation on enzymatic mannan degradation2018In: Biotechnology for Biofuels, ISSN 1754-6834, E-ISSN 1754-6834, Vol. 11, article id 114Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Galactoglucomannan (GGM) is the most abundant hemicellulose in softwood, and consists of a backbone of mannose and glucose units, decorated with galactose and acetyl moieties. GGM can be hydrolyzed into fermentable sugars, or used as a polymer in films, gels, and food additives. Endo-beta-mannanases, which can be found in the glycoside hydrolase families 5 and 26, specifically cleave the mannan backbone of GGM into shorter oligosaccharides. Information on the activity and specificity of different mannanases on complex and acetylated substrates is still lacking. The aim of this work was to evaluate and compare the modes of action of two mannanases from Cellvibrio japonicus (CjMan5A and CjMan26A) on a variety of mannan substrates, naturally and chemically acetylated to varying degrees, including naturally acetylated spruce GGM. Both enzymes were evaluated in terms of cleavage patterns and their ability to accommodate acetyl substitutions. Results: CjMan5A and CjMan26A demonstrated different substrate preferences on mannan substrates with distinct backbone and decoration structures. CjMan5A action resulted in higher amounts of mannotriose and mannotetraose than that of CjMan26A, which mainly generated mannose and mannobiose as end products. Mass spectrometric analysis of products from the enzymatic hydrolysis of spruce GGM revealed that an acetylated hexotriose was the shortest acetylated oligosaccharide produced by CjMan5A, whereas CjMan26A generated acetylated hexobiose as well as diacetylated oligosaccharides. A low degree of native acetylation did not significantly inhibit the enzymatic action. However, a high degree of chemical acetylation resulted in decreased hydrolyzability of mannan substrates, where reduced substrate solubility seemed to reduce enzyme activity. Conclusions: Our findings demonstrate that the two mannanases from C. japonicus have different cleavage patterns on linear and decorated mannan polysaccharides, including the abundant and industrially important resource spruce GGM. CjMan26A released higher amounts of fermentable sugars suitable for biofuel production, while CjMan5A, producing higher amounts of oligosaccharides, could be a good candidate for the production of oligomeric platform chemicals and food additives. Furthermore, chemical acetylation of mannan polymers was found to be a potential strategy for limiting the biodegradation of mannan-containing materials.

  • 138.
    Baban, Hanna
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems.
    Grauning, Olivia
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems.
    Using Fetal Myocardial Velocity Recordings to Evaluate an AI Platform to Predict High-risk Deliveries2019Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Diagnosing abnormal fetal cardiac function using ultrasound is a complicated procedure which makes it difficult to obtain high quality results from ultrasound examinations that are performed shortly before delivery. Color tissue Doppler imaging (cTDI) is the echocardiographic technique that has been used to obtain the data for this project. Subtle changes in the fetal cardiac function caused by a variety of complications can possibly be detected using cTDI. Fetuses suffering from these complications are often involved in high-risk deliveries. Combining the data obtained from cTDI with Artificial Intelligence (AI) may improve precision and accuracy when it comes to diagnosing pathological conditions involving fetal cardiac function before delivery. AI uses machines to perform and execute tasks that are characteristic of human intelligence. AI can be achieved by using deep learning. Deep learning uses algorithms called artificial neural networks that are inspired by the biological structure and function of the human brain. The neural networks classify information in a similar manner to the human brain. A platform that uses deep learning can make statements or predictions based on the data fed to it. The AI platform Peltarion uses deep learning to perform tasks. The aim of this project was to use Peltarion to evaluate the possibility of predicting high-risk deliveries with abnormal perinatal outcome by using data obtained by cTDI velocity recordings of the fetal heart. The data included myocardial velocity recordings from 107 pregnancies, out of the 107 pregnancies 82 of the babies were born healthy while 25 babies had an adverse perinatal outcome. The data was uploaded in the platform and three models were built and trained in order to evaluate the performance of the platform using the data. The parameters that have been used to determine the results are loss, accuracy and precision. The results showed that the accuracy parameter was measured to be 0.8 in all cases which means that the model correctly predicts if a fetal heart is healthy or likely to have an adverse outcome 80% of the time. The precision parameter was measured to be around 0.4 which means out of all the times the model predicted a fetal heart to have an adverse outcome, only 40% truly had an adverse outcome. It was concluded that a substantially larger amount of evenly distributed data is required to appropriately evaluate the possibility of using fetal myocardial velocity recordings as data for the AI platform Peltarion to predict high-risk deliveries.

  • 139. Babapour, Maral
    et al.
    Rolfö, Linda
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Ergonomics.
    Policies in Activity-based Flexible Offices: ‘I am sloppy with clean-desking. We don’t really know the rules.’2018In: Ergonomics, ISSN 0014-0139, E-ISSN 1366-5847Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Activity-based Flexible Offices (A-FOs) are offices with unassigned desks that provide a variety of workspaces. This paper presents desk-sharing and speech rules identified in A-FOs in four Swedish organisations, the emergence of and compliance with these rules, and their consequences for work conditions. Data collection involved 105 semi-structured interviews, document analyses, and observations. The identified rules were: (1) to remove belongings, (2) temporal restrictions on using the same workstations, (3) temporal restrictions on using scarce zones, (4) restrictions on verbal interactions, and (5) restrictions on phone conversations. The cases with extensive user involvement in their planning process had explicit unambiguous rules. A better compliance with rules occurred when (i) the employees were well-prepared and had a unified understanding regarding how and why to follow the rules, (ii) the rules were explicitly communicated and were regarded as easy to follow, and (iii) following the rules facilitated work and improved work conditions.

  • 140.
    Badal Tejedor, Maria
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science. RISE Res Inst Sweden, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Nordgren, Niklas
    RISE Res Inst Sweden, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Schuleit, Michael
    Novartis Pharma AG, Basel, Switzerland..
    Millqvist-Fureby, Anna
    RISE Res Inst Sweden, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Rutland, Mark W.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science. RISE Res Inst Sweden, Stockholm, Sweden..
    AFM colloidal probe measurements implicate capillary condensation in punch-particle surface interactions during tableting2019In: Abstracts of Papers of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0065-7727, Vol. 257Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 141.
    Badal Tejedor, Maria
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science. RISE Research Intitutes of Sweden.
    Pazesh, Samaneh
    Nordgren, Niklas
    Schuleit, Michael
    Rutland, Mark W.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science. RISE Research Intitutes of Sweden.
    Alderborn, Göran
    Millqvist-Fureby, Anna
    Milling induced amorphisation andrecrystallization of α-lactose monohydrate2018In: International Journal of Pharmaceutics, ISSN 0378-5173, E-ISSN 1873-3476, Vol. 537, no 1-2, p. 140-147Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Preprocessing of pharmaceutical powders is a common procedure to condition the materials for a better manufacturing performance. However, such operations may induce undesired material properties modifications when conditioning particle size through milling, for example. Modification of both surface and bulk material structure will change the material properties, thus affecting the processability of the powder. Hence it is essential to control the material transformations that occur during milling. Topographical and mechanical changes in surface properties can be a preliminary indication of further material transformations. Therefore a surface evaluation of the alpha-lactose monohydrate after short and prolonged milling times has been performed. Unprocessed alpha-lactose monohydrate and spray dried lactose were evaluated in parallel to the milled samples as reference examples of the crystalline and amorphous lactose structure. Morphological differences between un-processed a-lactose, 1 h and 20 h milled lactose and spray dried lactose were detected from SEM and AFM images. Additionally, AFM was used to simultaneously characterize particle surface amorphicity by measuring energy dissipation. Extensive surface amorphicity was detected after 1 h of milling while prolonged milling times showed only a moderate particle surface amorphisation. Bulk material characterization performed with DSC indicated a partial amorphicity for the 1 h milled lactose and a fully amorphous thermal profile for the 20 h milled lactose. The temperature profiles however, were shifted somewhat in the comparison to the amorphous reference, particularly after extended milling, suggesting a different amorphous state compared to the spraydried material. Water loss during milling was measured with TGA, showing lower water content for the lactose amorphized through milling compared to spray dried amorphous lactose. The combined results suggest a surface-bulk propagation of the amorphicity during milling in combination with a different amorphous structural conformation to that of the amorphous spray dried lactose. The hardened surface may be due to either surface crystallization of lactose or to formation of a low-water glass transition.

  • 142. Bai, Q.
    et al.
    Guo, Z.
    Li, H.
    Yang, Xiaohu
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE).
    Jin, L.
    Yan, Jerry
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering, Energy Processes.
    Experimental investigation on the solidification behavior of phase change materials in open-cell metal foams2017In: Energy Procedia, Elsevier Ltd , 2017, Vol. 142, p. 3703-3708Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study presented an experimental investigation on solidification behavior of fluid saturated in highly porous open-cell copper foams. Particular attention has been made on the effect of pore parameters (pore density and porosity) on the solidification behavior. A purposely-designed apparatus was built for experimental observations. Results showed that the copper foam had a great effect on solidification and the full solidification time can be saved up to 50%, especially preventing the decrease in solidification rate during the later stage of phase change. The smaller the porosity is, the faster the solidification rate will be. Pore density was found to have little influence upon the solidification rate. In addition, the local natural convection does exist but it has a slight effect on solidification, leading to the slant of the solid-liquid interface.

  • 143.
    Banerjee, Indradumna
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Nano Biotechnology.
    Point of care microfluidic tool development for resource limited settings2019Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The development of point of care diagnostics using recent advances in microfluidics have the potential to transform health care in several ways, especially in resource limited settings with limited access to advanced health care infrastructure. However, translating a point of care device to reality is often a challenging task because of the complexities involved in integrating a number of diverse engineering concepts into an easy to use, accurate and portable device. This thesis focuses on miniaturization of crucial diagnostic laboratory tools, that can be used in a portable point of care format without compromising on the accuracy or performance. The first part of the thesis (Paper I-III) focuses on understanding and applying elasto-inertial microfluidics, which is a label-free and passive bio-particle sorting and separation method. A basic understanding of particle trajectories in both inertial (Paper I) and visco-elastic flows (Paper II) is established, followed by an investigation on the combined effects of inertia and elasticity (Paper III). The second part of the thesis (Paper IV-VI) focuses on developing integrated microfluidic platforms, each of which addresses different aspects of point of care diagnostic applications. The applications include neonatal diagnostics using a hand-driven Slipdisc technique (Paper IV), rapid nucleic acid quantification using a novel precipitate-based detection on a centrifugal microfluidics platform (Paper V), and hematocrit level measurement in blood using a portable lab-on- Disc platform operated by a mobile phone (Paper VI). The proof of concept microfluidic tools presented in the scope of this thesis have the potential to replace a number of functions of standard laboratory equipment, at a fraction of the price and without compromising performance. Hence, the different methods developed should contribute towards decentralization of medical testing laboratories, making healthcare accessible to one and all.

  • 144.
    Banerjee, Indradumna
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science.
    Aralaguppe, S. G.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Lab Med, Div Clin Microbiol, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Lapins, Noa
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science.
    Zhang, W.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science. Karolinska Inst, Dept Lab Med, Div Clin Microbiol, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Kazemzadeh, Amin
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science.
    Sönnerborg, A.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Lab Med, Div Clin Microbiol, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Neogi, Ujjwal
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science. Karolinska Inst, Dept Lab Med, Div Clin Microbiol, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Russom, Aman
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science.
    Microfluidic centrifugation assisted precipitation based DNA quantification2019In: Lab on a Chip, ISSN 1473-0197, E-ISSN 1473-0189, Vol. 19, no 9, p. 1657-1664Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Nucleic acid amplification methods are increasingly being used to detect trace quantities of DNA in samples for various diagnostic applications. However, quantifying the amount of DNA from such methods often requires time consuming purification, washing or labeling steps. Here, we report a novel microfluidic centrifugation assisted precipitation (mu CAP) method for single-step DNA quantification. The method is based on formation of a visible precipitate, which can be quantified, when an intercalating dye (GelRed) is added to the DNA sample and centrifuged for a few seconds. We describe the mechanism leading to the precipitation phenomenon. We utilize centrifugal microfluidics to precisely control the formation of the visible and quantifiable mass. Using a standard CMOS sensor for imaging, we report a detection limit of 45 ng mu l(-1). Furthermore, using an integrated lab-on-DVD platform we recently developed, the detection limit is lowered to 10 ng mu l(-1), which is comparable to those of current commercially available instruments for DNA quantification. As a proof of principle, we demonstrate the quantification of LAMP products for a HIV-1B type genome containing plasmid on the lab-on-DVD platform. The simple DNA quantification system could facilitate advanced point of care molecular diagnostics.

  • 145.
    Banerjee, Indradumna
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Nano Biotechnology.
    Aralaguppe, Shambhu Prasad
    Division of Clinical Microbiology, Department of Laboratory Medicine, Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Lapins, Noa
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Nano Biotechnology.
    Kazemzadeh, Amin
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Nano Biotechnology.
    Sönneborg, Anders
    Division of Clinical Microbiology, Department of Laboratory Medicine, Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Neogi, Ujjwal
    Division of Clinical Microbiology, Department of Laboratory Medicine, Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Russom, Aman
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Nano Biotechnology.
    MicroCAP: Microfluidic Centrifuge Assisted Precipitation for DNA Quantification on Lab-on-DVD2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We report for the first time the MicroCAP technique, for rapid DNA detection and quantification, that does not require any purification or fluorescent labelling of DNA. The invention is based on DNA interacting with a detection dye (Gelred) to form a complex, that forms a visible precipitate within seconds of centrifugation. MicroCAP can be used for DNA quantification, when combined with the Lab-on-DVD with inbuilt centrifugation and sub- micron imaging resolution. We quantify PCR and LAMP assay products using MicroCAP on the integrated Lab-on- DVD platform, and demonstrate a detection limit of 10 ng/!".

    KEYWORDS: MicroCAP, DNA detection, Centrifuge,Precipitate, LAMP, PCR.

    INTRODUCTION

    Detection of amplified DNA is often based on measurement of turbidity, fluorescence (after staining with a detec- tion dye) or absorbance. Commercially available instruments for DNA quantitation can be broadly divided into two categories: UV instruments based on absorbance (such as spectrophotometers, e.g. Nanodrop or Nanophotometer) and instruments based on measurement of a fluorescent dye (such as plate readers). One bottleneck in quantifying amplified DNA in a nucleic acid amplification test (NAAT) reaction, based on absorbance measurement technique, is the bias introduced due to the presence of the isothermal amplification buffer, dNTPs and other reagents. Each reagent or buffer may have an absorbance density at around 260 nm, elevating the apparent concentration measured by the device compared to the actual value. Hence, for most quantitation based NAATs, it is important to include an extra DNA purification step, which may result in non-negligible loss of the amplified product and increases the cost of the purification kit. Measurements based on fluorescence mostly use fluorescent dyes that are potentially hazardous for handling. In addition, fluorescence based quantitation methods require time consuming labelling and washing steps.

    In this report, we describe a new method, termed microfluidic centrifugation assisted precipitation (microCAP), involving quantification and detection of DNA based on precipitation of nucleic acids. The basis of the method is formation of a visible precipitate when GelRed, a nucleic acid intercalacting dye commonly used in gel electropho- resis, is mixed with DNA and centrifuged. A visible precipitate is formed after just a few seconds of centrifugation and enables rapid detection of the presence of DNA in a sample. To the best of our knowledge, the visible precipitate formed as a product of centrifuging GelRed mixed with DNA has not been reported before. We showed that the DNA GelRed complex is dense enough compared to water to precipitate upon centrifugation. Further, we extended the μCAP method to the Lab-on-DVD platform1 to quantify the DNA concentration from images generated using the optical DVD reader instrument. The modified DVD player was able to image the precipitate formed up to a detection limit of 10 ng/μl of DNA. For calibration of the images, known quantities of a purified PCR product were used to identify the relationship between the amounts of DNA and precipitate formed. We applied the method to quantify an unknown quantity of LAMP amplicons from a LAMP assay for a HIV-1B type genome containing plasmid on the Lab-on-DVD platform. A sensitivity limit of 10 ng/μl of DNA was achieved, comparable with that of a Nanophotometer.18 The results demonstrated that the method is able to quantitatively detect the presence of DNA in a sample in a few seconds without any purification step.

    EXPERIMENTAL

    The Lab-on-DVD system was employed for spinning and imaging the precipitate product using a modified DVD drive, as mentioned in our previous report.1 We began by dispensing the sample in the design chamber, adding GelRed dye (at a concentration of 4000X in water) and centrifuging the mixture at 1200 rpm. Figure 1a and 1b

    show schematics of the DNA sample precipitation process conducted in test tubes and the DVD platform, respec- tively. We used known amounts of a PCR product to calibrate the quantity of precipitate to the DNA concentration. We used a HIV genome amplified from 50 ng of plasmid pNL4.3 using the primers 0776F and 6231R.2 To evaluate the sensitivity of DNA detection of our system, we used the amplified products from a LAMP assay. The sensitivity of LAMP primers was tested on DNA from pNL4.3 (a HIV-1B genome containing plasmid). A 25X LAMP primer mix was prepared according to Curtis et al.,3 using the same template DNA sequence, set of primers and DNA polymerase. Eight concentrations (each being 5 μl volume) of the HIV-1B genome containing plasmid (pNL4.3) were tested, starting from 1 ng/!" serially diluted to 1 fg/!". Two negative controls were also prepared, one without DNA and primers and one without primers. The total reaction volume was increased to 30 μl (instead of 25 μl used in Curtis et al.3) by multiplying every component volume in the reaction by a factor of 1.2. Fabrication of the multi- layer microfluidic Disc followed the same procedure as described in our previous report.1 The Lab-on-DVD system was used to generate images of the precipitation zone. To quantify the amount of precipitate, an image processing script was written in MATLAB software (Mathworks, USA).

    RESULTS AND DISCUSSION

    MicroCAP was found to be suitable for determining the presence of DNA in a sample, We carried out the LAMP assay in Eppendorf tubes in an oven set at 65°C. After 45 minutes, 3 μl of 10,000X GelRed in water was added to two tubes of 30 μl volume each, one having an unknown concentration of LAMP amplified DNA and the other one with no DNA template as a control. After centrifugation for approximately 5 seconds, a visible precipitate was formed in the tube containing amplified DNA, whereas no precipitate was formed in the control tube (Fig. 2a). 10 μl volume of DNA was inserted into a U shaped channel of the DVD alongwith 1 μl of 10,000X GelRed in water, which was the same ratio of DNA sample to Gelred as used in the test tube. An imageable precipitate was observed in the Lab on DVD custom imaging software (fig.2b).

    A Matlab script was used for image analysis in which an original image(fig.3a) was transformed into a binary image (fig.3b) by defining a threshold pixel value, exploiting the difference in intensity of the precipitate from its background. The entire area to the left of the threshold line in the histogram (Fig. 3c), i.e. from value 0 to the threshold value (normally 90), was summed to estimate the total area of the precipitate.

    For DNA quantification, known concentrations of a PCR product was used for calibration. The initial concentration of purified PCR product was 129 ng/μl, measured with a Nanophotometer (in triplicates) after purification with a GeneJet PCR purification kit. The purified PCR product was subsequently diluted serially several times and each diluted concentration was measured again with the Nanophotometer (in triplicate). The measurements were then repeated with the Lab-on-DVD method. Fig. 4a shows four images recorded at four known concentrations together with their binary threshold images. Fig. 4b shows the precipitation area calculated from the images plotted against the known DNA concentrations, showing a linear relationship. 10 ng/μl was the lowest concentration detectable in the DVD images.

    For quantification of unknown quantities of nucleic acids, we carried out the LAMP assay on HIV-1B genome containing plasmid DNA using serial dilutions (10-fold dilutions from 1 ng/μl to 0.1 fg/μl) to evaluate the limit of detection (Fig.5). Two negative controls were also prepared, one comprising primers and no DNA template and second, no DNA template and no primers.

    Fig. 6 shows the precipitation area plotted against the starting concentration of DNA template. It shows that the amplification in the LAMP assay is not linear for all the starting concentrations of DNA template. The error bars in the figure show the standard deviation for a particular concentration. For a LAMP assay, which fluctuates somewhat in its yield of amplified prod- ucts, we believe that this error range is acceptable.

    The precipitation area was converted to an actual yield of DNA products for each of the concentrations. This conversion was based on the linear empirical equation generated from the calibration curve presented earlier in Fig. 4b, given by:

    y= 9.61x – 4.05 (1) Here, y denotes the precipitation area in arbitrary units while x denotes the DNA concentration.

    CONCLUSION

    We demonstrated an extremely fast visual DNA quantification method (μCAP) that can be made quantifiable on a Lab-on-DVD platform. The approach was based on DNA forming a precipitate upon centrifugation when in contact with the GelRed dye. Results using HIV-1B genome containing plasmid DNA revealed a detection limit of 0.01 pg/μl or total amount of 0.1 pg of starting DNA template, which is an acceptable standard for resource limited settings. The limit of detection of DNA with the Lab-on-DVD platform was found to be 10 ng/μl, which is almost comparable to the detection limits reported by commercially available instruments, such as the Nanophotometer. However, the μCAP method offers a distinct advantage over other state-of-the-art techniques as it does not require additional purification of the DNA. We believe the μCAP technique combined with the Lab-on-DVD platform provides a simple and low cost technology that can fulfil the need for a point-of-care device for DNA quantification.

    REFERENCES

    1. [1]  H. Ramachandraiah, M. Amasia, J. Cole, P. Sheard, S. Pickhaver, C. Walker, V. Wirta, P. Lexow, R. Lione and A. Russom, "Lab-on-DVD: standard DVD drives as a novel laser scanning microscope for image based point of care diagnostics."Lab. Chip, 2013, 13, 1578–1585.

    2. [2]  S. Grossmann, P. Nowak, and U. Neogi, “ Subtype-independent near full-length HIV-1 genome sequencing and assembly to be used in large molecular epidemiological studies and clinical man- agement.” Journal of the International AIDS Society, 2015,18(1), 20035.

    3. [3]  K. A. Curtis, D. L. Rudolph, I. Nejad, J. Singleton, A. Beddoe, B. Weigl, P. LaBarre and S. M. Owen, "Rapid detection of HIV-1 by reverse-transcription, loop-mediated isothermal amplification (RT- LAMP)." PLoS ONE, , DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0031432.

    CONTACT

    *A. Russom; phone: +46-87909863; aman@kth.se

  • 146.
    Banerjee, Indradumna
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Nano Biotechnology.
    Ganeshappa Aralaguppe, Shambhu Prasad
    Division of Clinical Microbiology, Department of Laboratory Medicine, Karolinska Institute, Sweden..
    Lapins, Noa
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Nano Biotechnology.
    Zhang, Wang
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Nano Biotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Division of Clinical Microbiology, Department of Laboratory Medicine, Karolinska Institute, Sweden..
    Kazemzadeh, Amin
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Nano Biotechnology.
    Sönnerborg, Anders
    Division of Clinical Microbiology, Department of Laboratory Medicine, Karolinska Institute, Sweden..
    Neogi, Ujjwal
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Nano Biotechnology. Division of Clinical Microbiology, Department of Laboratory Medicine, Karolinska Institute, Sweden..
    Russom, Aman
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Nano Biotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Microfluidic Centrifugation Assisted Precipitation based DNA QuantificationManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Nucleic acid amplification methods are increasingly being used to detect trace quantities of DNA in samples for various diagnostic applications. However, quantifying the amount of DNA from such methods often require time consuming purification, washing or labeling step. Here, we report a novel microfluidic centrifugation assisted precipitation (uCAP) method for single-step DNA quantification. The method is based on formation of a visible precipitate, that can be quantified, when an intercalating dye (GelRed) is added to DNA sample and centrifuged for few seconds. We describe the mechanism leading to the precipitation phenomenon. We utilize centrifugal microfluidics to precisely control the formation of visible and quantifiable mass. Using a standard CMOS sensor for imaging, we report a detection limit of 45 ng/ul. Furthermore, using an integrated Lab-on-DVD platform we recently developed, the detection limit was lowered to 10 ng/ul, which is comparable to current commercially available instruments for DNA quantification. As a proof of principle, we demonstrate the quantification of LAMP products for a HIV-1B type genome containing plasmid on the Lab-on-DVD platform. The simple DNA quantification system could facilitate advanced molecular diagnosis at point of care.

  • 147.
    Banerjee, Indradumna
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Nano Biotechnology.
    Rosti, Marco E.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics.
    Kumar, Tharagan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Nano Biotechnology.
    Brandt, Luca
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics.
    Russom, Aman
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Nano Biotechnology.
    Particle focusing dynamics in extended elasto inertial flow2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Elasto Inertial microfluidics has been exploited recently for a number of industrial and biological applications. Recently, we experimentally showed that it is possible to achieve single stream focusing of particles even at higher flow rates in the elasto inertial regime, relevant to flow cytometry applications, and , based on this concept, built a silica fibre based micro flow cytometer.1 However, the physics behind the focusing of particles is still poorly understood, specially for combinations of higher Reynolds (Re) and Weissenberg numbers(Wi).

    In the present study, for the first time, we seek to understand both experimentally and with numerical simulations, particle focusing across elasticity regimes. We vary the concentration of PEO (200 ppm to upto 10000 ppm) in PBS solution at sufficiently high flow rates of 100!l/min or above. We introduce a parameter, focusing bandwidth (F) to evaluate the extent of single stream focusing of 15 !m particles in a 75 !m diameter circular channel. Fig.1 shows the flow setup(fig.1a) along with images demonstrating the focused (fig.1b) and unfocused cases(fig.1c), as well as how F is calculated(fig.1d). We evaluate particle focusing by identifying the flow conditions for each concentration that leads to the minimum value of F. Fig.2 shows the variation of the focusing bandwidth(fig.2a) when changing PEO concentration, and the variation in Re along with Wi (fig.2b) and Elasticity number(El). The results show that for identical mass flow conditions across the different regimes the focusing bandwidth slowly shifts to a narrow single stream with increasing elasticity. We validated our experimental results as well as gained new insights into particle focusing with 3D numerical simulations based on a FENE P model. We studied the decoupled effects of Reynolds number and Weissenberg number on particle focusing, as well as the particle trajectories and migration dynamics as the particles reach equilibrium. Interestingly, enough we find a combination of high Re(Re=400) and sufficiently high Wi(Wi=3) for which the particles achieve a single stream focusing (fig.3a). The entire dynamics of particle migration in a circular cross section is also shown (in fig.3b) by changing Wi for a constant Re(Re=200). It can be seen that the particle goes through a longer amount of oscillations to reach its final equilibrium position as Wi is increased. Fig.4a shows the equilibrium position of the particle moving closer to the center with an increase in Wi at the same Re(Re=200). However, in the Non Newtonian cases, the particle has a slight oscillatory behaviour as it reaches its equilibrium position as compared to the Newtonian one. We introduced the particle at two different positions(at Re=200, We=0 and 1) and observed the same equilibrium positions in both cases (Fig.4b).

  • 148.
    Banerjee, Indradumna
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Nano Biotechnology.
    Rosti, Marco Edoardo
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics.
    Kumar, Tharagan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Nano Biotechnology.
    Brandt, Luca
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics.
    Russom, Aman
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Nano Biotechnology.
    Analog particle position tuning in Elasto-inertial microfluidic flowsManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    We observe for the first time an analog trend in particle focusing in a high throughput weakly viscoelastic regime, where it is possible to tune particles into multiple intermediate focusing positions that lie between the "Segre-Silberberg annulus" and the center of a circular microcapillary. The "Segre-Silberberg annulus" (0.6 times the pipe radius), that describes particle equilibrium in a predominantly inertial flow, shrinks consistently closer to the center for increasing elasticity in extremely dilute PEO concentrations (ranging from 0.001 wt% to 0.05wt%). The experimental observations are supported by direct numerical simulations, where an Immersed Boundary Method is used to account for the presence of particles and a FENE-P model is used to simulate the presence of polymers in a Non-Newtonian fluid. The numerical simulations study the dynamics and stability of finite size particles and are further used to analyze particle behavior at Reynolds number higher than what is allowed by the present experimental setup. In particular, we are able to report the entire migration trajectories of the particles as they reach their final equilibrium positions and extend our predictions to other geometries such as the square cross-section. We believe complex effects originate due to a combination of inertia and elasticity in a weakly viscoelastic regime, where neither inertia nor elasticity are able to mask each other's effect completely, thus leading to a number of intermediate focusing positions. The present study provides a new understanding into the mechanism of particle focusing in elasto-inertial flows and opens up new possibilities for exercising analog control in tuning the particle focusing positions.

  • 149.
    Banerjee, Indradumna
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Nano Biotechnology.
    Russom, Aman
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Nano Biotechnology.
    Lab-on-DVD: Optical Disk Drive-Based Platforms for Point-of-Care Diagnostics2018In: Frugal Innovation in Bioengineering for the Detection of Infectious Diseases / [ed] AK Chavali, R Ramji, Switzerland: Springer, 2018, 2, p. 23-38Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is a growing demand for simple, affordable, reliable and quality-assured point-of-care (POC) diagnostics for use in resource-limited settings. Among the top ten leading causes of death worldwide, three are infectious diseases, namely, respiratory infections, HIV/AIDS and diarrheal diseases (World Health Organization 2012). Although high-quality diagnostic tests are available, these are often not available to patients in developing countries. While recent development in microfluidics and “lab-on-a-chip” devices has the potential to spur the development of protocols and affordable instruments for diagnosis of infectious disease at POC, integration of complex sample preparation and detection into automated molecular and cellular systems remain a bottleneck for implementation of these systems at resource-limited settings. Towards this, we describe here how low-cost optical drives can, with minor modifications, be turned into POC diagnostic platforms. A DVD drive is essentially a highly advanced and low-cost optical laser-scanning microscope, with the capability to deliver high-resolution images for biological applications. Furthermore, the inherent centrifugal force on rotational discs is elegantly used for sample preparation and integration. Hence, the merging of low-cost optical disc drives with centrifugal microfluidics is feasible concept for POC diagnostics, specifically designed to meet the needs at resource-limited settings.

  • 150.
    Banerjee, Indradumna
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Nano Biotechnology.
    Russom, Aman
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Nano Biotechnology.
    MicroCAP2018Patent (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

1234567 101 - 150 of 2492
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