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  • 101. Kazakos, K.
    et al.
    Asthana, S.
    Balaam, Madeline
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Duggal, M.
    Holden, A.
    Jamir, L.
    Kannuri, N. K.
    Kumar, S.
    Mamindla, A. R.
    Manikam, S. A.
    Murthy, G. V. S.
    Nahar, P.
    Phillimore, P.
    Sathyanath, S.
    Singh, P.
    Singh, M.
    Wright, P.
    Yadav, D.
    Olivier, P.
    A real-time IVR platform for community radio2016In: Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems - Proceedings, 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Interactive Voice Response (IVR) platforms have been widely deployed in resource-limited settings. These systems tend to afford asynchronous push interactions, and within the context of health, provide medication reminders, descriptions of symptoms and tips on self-management. Here, we present the development of an IVR system for resource-limited settings that enables real-time, synchronous interaction. Inspired by community radio, and calls for health systems that are truly local, we developed ’Sehat ki Vaani’. Sehat ki Vaani is a real-time IVR platform that enables hosting and participation in radio chat shows on community-led topics. We deployed Sehat ki Vaani with two communities in North India on topics related to the management of Type 2 diabetes and maternal health. Our deployments highlight the potential for synchronous IVR systems to offer community connection and localised sharing of experience, while also highlighting the complexity of producing, hosting and participating in radio shows in real time through IVR. We discuss the relative strengths and weaknesses of synchronous IVR systems, and highlight lessons learnt for interaction design in this area.

  • 102. Keenan, Fiona
    et al.
    Pauletto, Sandra
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Evaluating a Continuous Sonic Interaction: Comparing a Performable Acoustic and Digital Everyday Sound2019Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 103.
    Khan, Muhammad Sikandar Lal
    et al.
    Umea Univ, Dept Appl Phys & Elect, S-90187 Umea, Sweden..
    Halawani, Alaa
    Umea Univ, Dept Appl Phys & Elect, S-90187 Umea, Sweden.;Palestine Polytech Univ, Comp Engn Dept, Hebron 90100, Palestine..
    Rehman, Shafiq Ur
    Umea Univ, Dept Appl Phys & Elect, S-90187 Umea, Sweden..
    Li, Haibo
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Action Augmented Real Virtuality: A Design for Presence2018In: IEEE Transactions on Cognitive and Developmental Systems, ISSN 2379-8920, Vol. 10, no 4, p. 961-972Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper addresses the important question of how to design a video teleconferencing setup to increase the experience of spatial and social presence. Traditional video teleconferencing setups are lacking in presenting the nonverbal behaviors that humans express in face-to-face communication, which results in decrease in presence-experience. In order to address this issue, we first present a conceptual framework of presence for video teleconferencing. We introduce a modern presence concept called real virtuality and propose a new way of achieving this based on body or artifact actions to increase the feeling of presence, and we named this concept presence through actions. Using this new concept, we present the design of a novel action-augmented real virtuality prototype that considers the challenges related to the design of an action prototype, action embodiment, and face representation. Our action prototype is a telepresence mechatronic robot (TEBoT), and action embodiment is through a head-mounted display (HMD). The face representation solves the problem of face occlusion introduced by the HMD. The novel combination of HMD, TEBoT, and face representation algorithm has been tested in a real video teleconferencing scenario for its ability to solve the challenges related to spatial and social presence. We have performed a user study where the invited participants were requested to experience our novel setup and to compare it with a traditional video teleconferencing setup. The results show that the action capabilities not only increase the feeling of spatial presence but also increase the feeling of social presence of a remote person among local collaborators.

  • 104.
    Kondori, Farid Abedan
    et al.
    Umea Univ, Dept Appl Phys & Elect, Umea, Sweden..
    Liu, Li
    Umea Univ, Dept Appl Phys & Elect, Umea, Sweden..
    Li, Haibo
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Telelife: An Immersive Media Experience for Rehabilitation2014In: 2014 ASIA-PACIFIC SIGNAL AND INFORMATION PROCESSING ASSOCIATION ANNUAL SUMMIT AND CONFERENCE (APSIPA), IEEE , 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In recent years, emergence of telerehabilitation systems for home-based therapy has altered healthcare systems. Telerehabilitation enables therapists to observe patients status via Internet, thus a patient does not have to visit rehabilitation facilities for every rehabilitation session. Despite the fact that telerehabilitation provides great opportunities, there are two major issues that affect effectiveness of telerehabilitation: relegation of the patient at home, and loss of direct supervision of the therapist. Since patients have no actual interaction with other persons during the rehabilitation period, they will become isolated and gradually lose their social skills. Moreover, without direct supervision of therapists, rehabilitation exercises can be performed with bad compensation strategies that lead to a poor quality recovery. To resolve these issues, we propose telelife, a new concept for future rehabilitation systems. The idea is to use media technology to create a totally new immersive media experience for rehabilitation. In telerehabilitation patients locally execute exercises, and therapists remotely monitor patients' status. In telelife patients, however, remotely perform exercises and therapists locally monitor. Thus, not only telelife enables rehabilitation at distance, but also improves the patients' social competences, and provides direct supervision of therapists. In this paper we introduce telelife to enhance telerehabilitation, and investigate technical challenges and possible methods to achieve telelife.

  • 105.
    Kondori, Farid Abedan
    et al.
    Umeå Univ, SE-90187 Umea, Sweden..
    Yousefi, Shahrouz
    KTH.
    Ostovar, Ahmad
    Umeå Univ, SE-90187 Umea, Sweden..
    Liu, Li
    Umeå Univ, SE-90187 Umea, Sweden..
    Li, Haibo
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    A Direct Method for 3D Hand Pose Recovery2014In: 2014 22ND INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON PATTERN RECOGNITION (ICPR), IEEE COMPUTER SOC , 2014, p. 345-350Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents a novel approach for performing intuitive 3D gesture-based interaction using depth data acquired by Kinect. Unlike current depth-based systems that focus only on classical gesture recognition problem, we also consider 3D gesture pose estimation for creating immersive gestural interaction. In this paper, we formulate gesture-based interaction system as a combination of two separate problems, gesture recognition and gesture pose estimation. We focus on the second problem and propose a direct method for recovering hand motion parameters. Based on the range images, a new version of optical flow constraint equation is derived, which can be utilized to directly estimate 3D hand motion without any need of imposing other constraints. Our experiments illustrate that the proposed approach performs properly in real-time with high accuracy. As a proof of concept, we demonstrate the system performance in 3D object manipulation. This application is intended to explore the system capabilities in real-time biomedical applications. Eventually, system usability test is conducted to evaluate the learnability, user experience and interaction quality in 3D interaction in comparison to 2D touch-screen interaction.

  • 106. Lampinen, Airi
    et al.
    McGregor, Moira
    Comber, Rob
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Brown, Barry
    Member-Owned Alternatives: Exploring Participatory Forms of Organising with Cooperatives2018In: Proceedings of the ACM on Human-Computer Interaction, ISSN 2573-0142, Vol. 2, no CSCW, p. 1-19Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cooperatives are member-owned organisations, run for the common benefit of their members. While cooperatives are a longstanding way of organising, they have received little attention in CSCW. In this paper, through interviews with 26 individuals from 24 different cooperatives, our focus is an exploratory inquiry on how cooperatives could expand thinking into what future economies can look like and the part technologies may play in them. We discuss (1) the work to make the co-op work, that is, the special effort involved in managing an enterprise in a democratic and inclusive way, (2) the multiple purposes that cooperatives can serve for their members, well beyond financial benefit, and (3) ICT usage within cooperatives as a site of tension and dialogue. We conclude by discussing the meaning and measures of success in alternative economies, and lessons learned for CSCW scholarship on civic and societal organisations.

  • 107.
    Lantz, Ann
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Gulliksen, Jan
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Walldius, Åke
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Sandblad, Bengt
    IT Uppsala universitet.
    Åborg, Carl
    Psykologiska institutionen, Uppsala universitet.
    Digitaliseringen och arbetsmiljön2018 (ed. 1:1)Book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 108.
    Latupeirissa, Adrian
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    MusiCushions: Prototyping an E-Textile Interface for Music Interaction in Home Environment2018Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents MusiCushions, a set of interactive sofa cushions used as an interface to music. Built on physical affordances of sofa cushions and e-textile technology, the artefact is used to explore how an e-textile interface can be used for music interaction at home. Challenges in prototyping e-textile interfaces would also be identified. Three cushions are prototyped with off-the-shelf e-textile and electronic components: in one cushion, its case is explored as an interactive surface; another cushion explores the softness and how it can be easily pressed; and the last cushion explores its portability. The set is then mapped to music interaction in two scenarios: as a remote control to a music player and as a musical instrument to control a synthesizer. Evaluation is conducted in two focus group discussions involving students in Media Technology. It is concluded that MusiCushions could be received as a new way to control media such as music player at home, with broader possible use to interact with other services and objects. As a musical instrument, however, it might not be accepted due to the lack of precision control.

  • 109.
    Latupeirissa, Adrian Benigno
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Frid, Emma
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Bresin, Roberto
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Sonic characteristics of robots in films2019In: Proceedings of the 16th Sound and Music Computing Conference, Malaga, Spain, 2019, p. 1-6, article id P2.7Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Robots are increasingly becoming an integral part of our everyday life. Expectations on robots could be influenced by how robots are represented in science fiction films. We hypothesize that sonic interaction design for real-world robots may find inspiration from sound design of fictional robots. In this paper, we present an exploratory study focusing on sonic characteristics of robot sounds in films. We believe that findings from the current study could be of relevance for future robotic applications involving the communication of internal states through sounds, as well for sonification of expressive robot movements. Excerpts from five films were annotated and analysed using Long Time Average Spectrum (LTAS). As an overall observation, we found that robot sonic presence is highly related to the physical appearance of robots. Preliminary results show that most of the robots analysed in this study have “metallic” voice qualities, matching the material of their physical form. Characteristics of robot voices show significant differences compared to voices of human characters; fundamental frequency of robotic voices is either shifted to higher or lower values, and the voices span over a broader frequency band.

  • 110.
    Lehti, Emil
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    It’s so hard to put words on it; an exploratory study on mediation of ambience2018Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Retrieving information regarding ambience is difficult since it’s often perceived at a physical location and cannot be easily mediated. This study aimed to explore how ambience at a restaurant or bar can be mediated via a smartphone app. The study was based on the conversation about the relationship of space and place in HCI and CSCW. Based on the research question “What means of mediation are best suited for mediating ambience at a restaurant via a smartphone app?”, a research through design approach was adopted to develop a mockup that favored browsing. The mockup was used as a way to test how different means of mediation mediated ambience. An evaluation was held where users were asked to think aloud when given tasks to perform, then complete an experience questionnaire. Finally, a semi structured debriefing was held. Photos and text-based reviews were the best means of mediation to mediate ambience at restaurants. 

  • 111.
    Lennartsson, Linnéa
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Reuterswärd, Hedvig
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Hur studenter använder blåljusfilter och hur de upplever tekniken2018Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This article examines and discusses the use of some of the blue light filters available on the market today. It is a quantitative survey conducted to get a result describing how our test subjects use blue light filters today and what they think should be improved for future development. The result is discussed and compared with the theories found in related research.

    The problem we look into in this essay is “How is blue light filters experienced and used?”. The method used to obtain a result was to send out a survey to 22 blue light filter users.

    You can see clear connections between users' results and theories that blue light filters help to counteract deterioration of sleep quality due to watching a screen for hours before going to sleep. We also see that many people want improvements in technology such as the ability to make the filter more personal according to their own lifestyle.

  • 112.
    Li, Rui
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Comparing Human-Robot Proxemics between Virtual Reality and the Real World2018Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Virtual Reality (VR) is gaining more and more popularity as a research tool in the field of Human-Robot Interaction (HRI). To fully deploy the potential of VR and benefit HRI studies, we need to establish the basic understanding of the relationship between the physical, real-world interaction (Live) and VR. This study compared Live and VR HRI with a focus on proxemics, as proxemics preference can reflect comprehensive human intuition, making it suitable to be used to compare Live and VR. To evaluate the influence of different modalities in VR, virtual scenes with different visual familiarity and spatial sound were compared as well. Lab experiments were conducted with a physical Pepper robot and its virtual copy. In both Live and VR, proxemics preferences, the perception of the robot (competence and discomfort) and the feeling of presence were measured and compared. Results suggest that proxemic preferences do not remain consistent in Live and in VR, which could be influenced by the perception of the robot. Therefore, when conducting HRI experiments in VR, the perceptions of the robot need be compared before the experiments. Results also indicate freedom within VR HRI as different VR settings are consistent with each other. 

  • 113. Liang, Rong-Hao
    et al.
    Chan, Liwei
    Tseng, Hung-Yu
    Kuo, Han-Chih
    Huang, Da-Yuan
    Yang, De-Nian
    Chen, Bing-Yu
    Grosse-Puppendahl, Tobias
    Beck, Sebastian
    Wilbers, Daniel
    Kuijper, Arjan
    Heo, Heejeong
    Park, Hyungkun
    Kim, Seungki
    Chung, Jeeyong
    Lee, Geehyuk
    Lee, Woohun
    Unander-Scharin, Carl
    Unander-Scharin, Åsa
    Höök, Kristina
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Elblaus, Ludvig
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Demo Hour2014In: interactions, ISSN 1072-5520, E-ISSN 1558-3449, Vol. 21, no 5, p. 6-9Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 114.
    Lindén, Edward
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Kernell, Carl
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Framtidens pekdon för ett mobilt spelande2018Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Future pointing devices for mobile gaming is a study of properties of a number of pointing devices, and how these properties make them suitable for gaming in a mobile environment. Today, most of all advanced computer games is played with a mouse, which make the laptop and its touch-pad bad for gaming. For many decades the optical computer mouse has been the leading pointing device for playing computer games, and its have been scientifically that players with a computer mouse out-perform players with a joy-stick or other pointing devices when playing games with importance of precision. A mouse can be plugged to a laptop, but not without compromising the mobility which is significant for the laptop. Two studies discovered the user experience and functional performance of playing a precision game with an optical computer mouse, joystick, eye-tracker, touchpad and accelerometer. Our studies showed that users preferred to use the mouse when playing precision computer games, with joystick and touchpad as second choices. The eye-tracker where very unfamiliar for the users but was performing almost as accurate as the touch-pad. The accelerometer was the worst pointing device according to the test persons, and by the functional study of the performance of the pointing devices. Their result was by the falling order of mouse, touchpad, joystick, eye-tracker and at last the accelerometer. An interesting way of developing a new pointing device would be to use the mobility and precision of an eye-tracker. The eye-tracker could state a region of interest of the screen where a complementary touch pad could be in use to release your eyes from being the pointing device. It would give you the opportunity to aim with the touchpad and letting you check your surrounding with your eyes.

  • 115.
    Linger, Oscar
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Designing a User-Centered Music Experience for the Smartwatch2018Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    With a rapid growth in smartwatch and smartwatch audio technologies, there is a lack of knowledge regarding user needs for smartwatch audio experiences and how those needs can be satisfied through user-centered design. Previous smartwatch user behavior studies suggest that audio app usage is not a primary use case for the smartwatch. However, audio applications are increasingly incorporated into smartwatches, which leads to the question of the apps’ purpose, validity, overlooked contexts and use cases. This thesis aims to understand what kind of audio experience(s) a user-centered design process might generate for the smartwatch.

    The design process generated insights from smartwatch users of audio applications, that were used as design guidelines for Context Awareness, Micro-interactions, and Device Ecosystem. The resulting prototype HeartBeats considers Context Awareness with heart rate music recommendations, Micro-interactions with one-handed song skipping and Quickplay music, and Device Ecosystem with speaker access and phone battery support.

  • 116. Ljungdahl Eriksson, Martin
    et al.
    Pareto, Lena
    Atienza, Ricardo
    University of Arts, Crafts and Design, Institutionen för Konst (K)..
    Hansen, Kjetil Falkenberg
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    My Sound Space: An attentional shield for immersive redirection2018In: Audio Mostly 2018: Sound in Immersion and Emotion, New York: Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2018, article id 09Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the context of extended reality, the term immersion is commonly used as a property denoting to which extent a technology can deliver an illusion of reality while occluding the users’ sensory access to the physical environment. In this paper we discuss an alternative interpretation of immersion, used in the My Sound Space project. The project is a research endeavor aiming to develop a sound environment system that enables a personalized sound space suitable for individual work places. The medium, which in our case is sound, is transparent and thus becomes an entangled part of the surrounding environment. This type of immersion is only partly occluding the users sensory access to physical reality. The purpose of using the sound space is not to become immersed by the sounds, rather to use the sounds to direct cognitive attention to get immersed in another cognitive activity.

  • 117.
    Lon, Hansson
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Exploring Concerns and Expectations of Future Smart Systems for Managing Domestic Water Services2018Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    With our growing population, we are facing great challenges when it comes to our water consumption. As Stockholm is growing in both population and size, the city’s provider of drinking water, Stockholm Water and Waste, is looking into approaches like smart systems and persuasive strategies that tries to help citizens use water for domestic purposes in more sustainable ways. Some see these approaches as a natural part of the future of urban development and they have already been implemented at several locations around the globe. However, smart systems and persuasive strategies have seen an upswing in critique lately and it have been argued that they tend to treat householders as something separated from the socio-technical context they live in. As a response to this critique, a wide range of suggestions for future development of smart systems and persuasive strategies have been made. While a lot of these suggestions are based on studies that evaluates already existing systems and tend to focus on how to improve them, they still convey a scenario where these systems are a natural part of our future urban lives. However, little research has been made that tries to understand the citizens’ perspective on these systems before they are implemented. By using a future study approach that includes citizens in reflective and exploratory activities of non-existing future smart systems for managing domestic water services, this study aims at exploring their concerns and expectations of said systems and questions the wants and needs for them begin with. This study reveals that citizens might have great concerns when it comes to questions of privacy and control and how smart systems and persuasive strategies run the risk of problematizing individuals. This study also reveals that citizens might be more interested in negotiating and improving current services and infrastructure than having technology negotiate their everyday lives.

  • 118.
    Lou, Yi
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Lundström, Anders
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Bogdan, Cristi
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Gaming at work to save energy - Supporting behavioural change of occupants through cooperative games2019Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 119. Lu, G.
    et al.
    Yang, C.
    Yang, W.
    Yan, J.
    Li, Haibo
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Micro-expression recognition based on LBP-TOP features2017In: Nanjing Youdian Daxue Xuebao (Ziran Kexue Ban)/Journal of Nanjing University of Posts and Telecommunications (Natural Science), Vol. 37, no 6, p. 1-7Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Micro-expressions are involuntary facial expressions revealing true feelings when a person tries to conceal facial expressions.Compared with normal facial expressions,the most significant characteristic of micro-expressions is their short duration and weak intensity,thus it is diffcult to be recognized.In this paper,a micro-expression recognition method based on local binary pattern from three orthogonal plane(LBP-TOP) features and support vector machine (SVM)-based classifier is proposed.Firstly,the LBP-TOP operators are used to extract micro-expression features.Then,the feature selection algorithm combining the ReliefF with manifold learning algorithm based on locally linear embedding (LLE) is proposed to reduce the dimensionality of extracted LBP-TOP feature vectors.Finally,the SVM-based classifier with radial basis function (RBF) kernel is used to classify test samples into five categories of micro-expressions:happiness,disgust,repression,surprise,and others.Experiments are carried out on the micro-expression database CASME II using leave-one-subject-out cross validation (LOSO-CV) method.The classification accuracy can reach 58.98%.Experimental results show the effectiveness of the proposed method. 

  • 120. Lucero, A.
    et al.
    Desjardins, A.
    Neustaedter, C.
    Höök, Kristina
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Hassenzahl, M.
    Cecchinato, M. E.
    A sample of one: First-person research methods in HCI2019In: DIS 2019 Companion - Companion Publication of the 2019 ACM Designing Interactive Systems Conference, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2019, p. 385-388Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    First-person research (i.e., research that involves data collection and experiences from the researcher themselves) continues to become a viable addition and, possibly even, alternative to more traditional HCI methods. While we have seen the benefits of using methods such as autoethnography, autobiographical design, and autoethnographical research through design, we also see the need to further explore, define, and investigate the practices, techniques, tactics, and implications of first-person research in HCI. To address this, this one-day workshop aims to bring together a community of researchers, designers, and practitioners who are interested in exploring and reimagining research in HCI and interaction design, with an emphasis on first-person methods.

  • 121. Mangaroska, K.
    et al.
    Tahir, R.
    Lorås, Madeleine
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Mavroudi, Anna
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    What do we know about learner assessment in technology-rich environments?: a systematic review of systematic reviews2018In: Proceedings - IEEE 18th International Conference on Advanced Learning Technologies, ICALT 2018, Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE), 2018, p. 16-20, article id 8433321Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Assessment in technology-rich environments has on one hand attracted the interest of many researchers, but on the other hand still remains an intriguing and open research issue. This paper is a systematic review of systematic reviews of studies that are focusing on the topic. The method followed included a search strategy, inclusion and exclusion criteria, and quality assessment indicators. A dedicated tool was used for the establishment of the latter. Eleven systematic reviews were included in the study. The focus of the study is in five innovative areas of interest, namely (1) adaptive or personalized learning, (2) data-informed or evidence-based approaches, (3) blending formal and informal learning, (4) cultivation of 21st century skills, and (5) game-based learning. The research questions revolve around the types of assessment used, the research methodologies or strategies, the social aspects/ planes, and future research directions.

  • 122.
    Manuel, Jennifer
    et al.
    Newcastle Univ, Open Lab, Newcastle Upon Tyne, Tyne & Wear, England..
    Vigar, Geoff
    Newcastle Univ, Open Lab, Newcastle Upon Tyne, Tyne & Wear, England..
    Bartindale, Tom
    Newcastle Univ, Open Lab, Newcastle Upon Tyne, Tyne & Wear, England..
    Comber, Rob
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. Newcastle Univ, Open Lab, Newcastle Upon Tyne, Tyne & Wear, England..
    Participatory Media: Creating Spaces for Storytelling in Neighbourhood Planning2017In: PROCEEDINGS OF THE 2017 ACM SIGCHI CONFERENCE ON HUMAN FACTORS IN COMPUTING SYSTEMS (CHI'17), ASSOC COMPUTING MACHINERY , 2017, p. 1688-1701Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Neighbourhood planning devolves power to communities to create their own planning policy but traditional forms of participation are still relied upon. And despite the ubiquitous nature of technology in society, digital participation methods are rarely used. In this paper, we outline fieldwork with two neighbourhood planning groups who used participatory media technology to improve engagement though the art of storytelling. We focus on the configuration of participatory media as a way to widen participation and enable story creation and sharing amongst citizens. We highlight that storytelling using media technology can provide a model of and a model for the way we 'do' neighbourhood planning whilst emphasising the challenges of ensuring processes are linked to tangible actions and encouraging the multiplicity of stories.

  • 123.
    Mavroudi, Anna
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. Univ Cyprus, POB 20537, CY-1678 Nicosia, Cyprus.
    Tsagari, Dina
    Univ Cyprus, POB 20537, CY-1678 Nicosia, Cyprus.;OsloMet Oslo Metropolitan Univ, POB 364 Alnabru, N-0614 Oslo, Norway..
    Profiling of English language teachers as trainees in an online course and ensuing implications2018In: Computers and education, ISSN 0360-1315, E-ISSN 1873-782X, Vol. 126, p. 1-12Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The main objective of this paper is to demonstrate the importance of profiling English Language Teachers' preferences and experiences of Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) in order to inform the design of an online teacher training programme in Language Testing and Assessment and the relevant teacher training research. The findings revealed that the participant teachers received very well a variety of formats and also, they indicated methods as well as types of tasks and activities they would find most favourable in an online training course. Teachers were diverse but mediocre on average with regard to the level of confidence of their competencies in using ICT in their classrooms. Small differences were also revealed between teachers with regard to their ICT competency levels on the basis of their previous participation in online training courses but strong correlations among the different ICT competencies investigated. The findings point to the need to incorporate scaffolds in the design of online training environments that will help teachers feel confident in the online training environment and especially empower those that have not participated in such training courses before. Overall the study advocates for good practices that can be relevant and informative for higher education authorities and teacher training institutions responsible for designing (blended or online) professional training schemes for pre- and in-service English language teachers.

  • 124. Michie, L.
    et al.
    Balaam, Madeline
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    McCarthy, J.
    Osadchiy, T.
    Morrissey, K.
    From her story, to our story: Digital storytelling as public engagement around abortion rights advocacy in Ireland2018In: CHI '18 Proceedings of the 2018 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2018, Vol. 2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite the divisive nature of abortion within the Republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland, where access to safe, legal abortion is severely restricted, effecting legislative reform demands widespread public support. In light of a building pro-choice counter-voice, this work contributes to a growing body of HCI research that takes an activist approach to design. We report findings from four design workshops with 31 pro-choice stakeholders across Ireland in which we positioned an exploratory protosite, HerStoryTold, to engender critical conversations around the use of sensitive abortion narratives as a tool for engagement. Our analysis shows how digital storytelling can help reject false narratives and raise awareness of the realities of abortion laws. It suggests design directions to curate narratives that provoke empathy, foster polyvocality, and ultimately expand the engaged community. Furthermore, this research calls for designers to actively support community mobilization through providing 'stepping stones' to activism.

  • 125.
    Misgeld, Olof
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. Royal College of Music (KMH), Stockholm, Sweden.
    Holzapfel, André
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Towards the study of embodied meter in Swedish folk dance2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The interrelation of playing and dancing is central for understanding performance practice in Swedish folk music, as it plays an important role for the metric and rhythmic qualities of spelmansmusik, and playing for dancing is considered a key competence for musicians in this tradition. As part of a research project into performance practice, sound, video and motion capture (MoCap) data were recorded from live performances of three musicians and two dancers in different combinations. In addition, dancing to two recordings by an influential musician and to live and pre-recorded beat clapping was recorded. This paper incorporates measurements and visualizations of performance data in combination with performer participation and interviews. As a starting point for our project, we focus on metric qualities in a historical recording, and on the dance movement patterns to a Swedish polska style with asymmetrical beat patterns. For this paper - as a preliminary investigation into the material - the recordings of one dancer dancing to an isochronous clapped beat, and to a recording by an influential player have been used for comparison of a central movement pattern in dancing. The findings show that asymmetric beat patterns contained in the recording cause wider variation among the movement patterns when compared to the patterns observed to isochronous clapping. Considering the performers reactions towards using MoCap as a tool for viewing and discussing their performances, we propose further investigations by combining scientific, ethnomusicological and artistic research methods into the research of performance practice in folk music.

  • 126.
    Misgeld, Olof
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Holzapfel, André
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Ahlbäck, Sven
    Dancing Dots - Investigating the Link between Dancer and Musician in Swedish Folk Dance2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The link between musicians and dancers is generally described as strong in many traditional musics and this holds also for Scandinavian Folk Music - spelmansmusik. Understanding the interaction of music and dance has potential for developing theories of performance strategies in artistic practice and for developing interactive systems. In this paper we investigate this link by having Swedish folk musicians perform to animations generated from motion capture recordings of dancers. The different stimuli focus on motions of selected body parts as moving white dots on a computer screen with the aim to understand how different movements can provide reliable cues for musicians. Sound recordings of fiddlers playing to the "dancing dot" were analyzed using automatic alignment to the original music performance related to the dance recordings. Interviews were conducted with musicians and comments were collected in order to shed light on strategies when playing for dancing. Results illustrate a reliable alignment to renderings showing full skeletons of dancers, and an advantage of focused displays of movements in the upper back of the dancer.

  • 127.
    Modin Larsson, Lina
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    A GDPR compliant address infrastructure mobile application for Ugandan and Rwandan users2018Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    More than half of the world's population are negatively affected by inadequate addresses. In Uganda and Rwanda, efforts have been done to implement a national address system but the effectiveness of those efforts have been prevented, due to lack of understanding and fears regarding its impact. With the help of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), because of its knowledge-generating foundation and substantial growth in East Africa, traditional address initiatives could be streamlined. However, negative consequences with ICT, such as surveillance, could cause the already existing reluctance to accept a system that not only registers a location but also an identity, to increase. Privacy, security and trust are therefore key factors to consider when developing a system that target areas characterized by distrust in organizations and government. This paper argues that the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) provides a strong framework when accomplishing this. By evaluating the user rights defined in GDPR from an interaction design perspective, this research aims to propose design guidelines that gives users agency of their personal information. This paper argues that redefining the rights as potential user actions gives the users control to manage their personal information, and further, that interest and understanding are important to enable conscious actions. With a Research through Design approach, user studies were conducted in Uganda and Rwanda, to evaluate how to design actions and information in order to enhance interest and understanding, and resulted in three design guidelines: User actions, Action layers and Information layers.

  • 128.
    Moll, Jonas
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Uppsala.
    Rexhepi, Hanife
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. The Informatics Research Centre.
    Cajander, Åsa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction..
    Grünloh, Christiane
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Huvila, Isto
    Åbo Akademi University, Faculty of Social Sciences and Economics.
    Hägglund, Maria
    Uppsala University, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Myreteg, Gunilla
    Uppsala University, Department of Information Technology, Department of Business Studies.
    Scandurra, Isabella
    Örebro University.
    Åhlfeldt, Rose-Mharie
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. The Informatics Research Centre.
    Patients’ Experiences of Accessing Their Electronic Health Records: Results of a National Patient Survey in SwedenIn: Journal of Medical Internet Research, ISSN 1438-8871, E-ISSN 1438-8871Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Internationally, there is a movement toward providing patients online access to their electronic health records (EHRs). In Sweden, Region Uppsala was the first to introduce patient-accessible EHRs (PAEHRs) in 2012. By the summer of 2016, 17 of 21 county councils had given citizens the possibility to access their medical information online. Studies on the effect of PAEHRs on the work environment of health care professionals have been conducted, but up until now, few extensive studies have been conducted regarding patients’ experiences of using PAEHRs in Sweden or Europe, more generally.

    Objectives: The objective of our study was to investigate patients’ experiences of accessing their EHRs through the Swedish national patient portal. In this study, we have focused on describing user characteristics, usage, and attitudes toward the system.

    Methods: A national patient survey was designed, based on previous interview and survey studies with patients and health care professionals. Data were collected during a 5-month period in 2016. The survey was made available through the PAEHR system, called Journalen, in Sweden. The total number of patients that logged in and could access the survey during the study period was 423,141. In addition to descriptive statistics reporting response frequencies on Likert scale questions, Mann-Whitney tests, Kruskal-Wallis tests, and chisquare tests were used to compare answers between different county councils as well as between respondents working in health care and all other respondents.

    Results: Overall, 2587 users completed the survey with a response rate of 0.61% (2587/423,141). Two participants were excluded from the analysis because they had only received care in a county council that did not yet show any information in Journalen. The results showed that 62.97% (1629/2587) of respondents were women and 39.81% (1030/2587) were working or had been working in health care. In addition, 72.08% (1794/2489) of respondents used Journalen about once a month, and the main reason for use was to gain an overview of one’s health status. Furthermore, respondents reported that lab results were the most important information for them to access; 68.41% (1737/2539) of respondents wanted access to new information within a day, and 96.58% (2454/2541) of users reported that they are positive toward Journalen.

    Conclusions: In this study, respondents provided several important reasons for why they use Journalen and why it is important for them to be able to access information in this way—several related to patient empowerment, involvement, and security. Considering the overall positive attitude, PAEHRs seem to fill important needs for patients.

  • 129. Mueller, Florian "Floyd"
    et al.
    Andres, Josh
    Marshall, Joe
    Svanæs, Dag
    schraefel, m. c.
    Gerling, Kathrin
    Tholander, Jakob
    Martin-Niedecken, Anna Lisa
    Segura, Elena Márquez
    van den Hoven, Elise
    Graham, Nicholas
    Höök, Kristina
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Sas, Corina
    Body-centric Computing: Results from a Weeklong Dagstuhl Seminar in a German Castle2018In: interactions, ISSN 1072-5520, E-ISSN 1558-3449, Vol. 25, no 4, p. 34-39Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 130.
    Möller, Jacob
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Bergqvist, Hugo
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Inventariesystem för minskat matsvinn i hushåll: En teknisk designstudie med teoretisk grund i beteendevetenskap2019Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The climate change is an important issue that requires efforts in several sectors in order to achieve sustainable levels of greenhouse emissions. One of these sectors is the food industry, where the consumption of food for an average Swedish consumer constitutes about 25 % of the total emissions. An opportunity for improvement in this area is the reduction of food waste. This study focuses on how increased awareness of their inventory of household food can contribute to reduced food waste and how to best design a system for this purpose. For the study, a digital inventory system was developed in the form of a barcode scanner and a web application adapted to mobile units where the current inventory is presented together with a shopping list. A test group of eight participants divided into four households received a system during a two-week period. After the study, they also had to attend an interview about their experience of motivation to use the system, where qualitative data was collected. The basic theory behind the study consists primarily of The Behavior Change Wheel which was used during the design process of the system that were developed, since the system would require a behavioral change.

    The result showed a positive attitude towards the system, where all participating test persons considered that the system could contribute to reduced food waste in households. The result also showed that the system facilitated knowledge raising around the user's food inventory. The new behavior changed to routine with the majority of the test persons and even though some new functions and improvements were desired, the majority could also imagine using the system afterwards. However, this study is in itself too short to be able to draw any concrete conclusions about the permanent behavioral changes to the use of the system.

  • 131.
    Nardi, Bonnie
    et al.
    Univ Calif Irvine, Dept Informat, Irvine, CA 92697 USA..
    Tomlinson, Bill
    Univ Calif Irvine, Dept Informat, Irvine, CA 92697 USA.;Victoria Univ Wellington, Sch Informat Management, Wellington, New Zealand..
    Patterson, Donald J.
    Westmont Coll, Dept Math & Comp Sci, Santa Barbara, CA USA..
    Chen, Jay
    NYU Abu Dhabi, Dept Comp Sci, Abu Dhabi, U Arab Emirates..
    Pargman, Daniel
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Raghavan, Barath
    Univ Southern Calif, Comp Sci, Los Angeles, CA USA..
    Penzenstadler, Birgit
    Calif State Univ Long Beach, Dept Comp Engn & Comp Sci, Long Beach, CA 90840 USA..
    Computing within Limits2018In: Communications of the ACM, ISSN 0001-0782, E-ISSN 1557-7317, Vol. 61, no 10, p. 86-93Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    COMPUTING RESEARCHERS AND practitioners are often seen as inventing the future. As such, we are implicitly also in the business of predicting the future. We plot trajectories for the future in the problems we select, the assumptions we make about technology and societal trends, and the ways we evaluate research. However, a great deal of computing research focuses on one particular type of future, one very much like the present, only more so. This vision of the future assumes that current trajectories of ever-increasing production and consumption will continue. This focus is perhaps not surprising, since computing machinery as we know it has existed for only 80 years, in a period of remarkable industrial and technological expansion. But humanity is rapidly approaching, or has already exceeded, a variety of planet-scale limits related to the global climate system, fossil fuels, raw materials, and biocapacity. (28,32,38) It is understandable that in computing we would not focus on limits. While planetary limits are obvious in areas such as extractive capacity in mining or fishing,

  • 132.
    Nayyar, Raghu
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Visualising Autonomous Warehouse Data Streams Through User-Centered Design2018Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis aims to develop and evaluate a dashboard design that visualizes a stream of data from the different entities involved in autonomous warehouses, a subset of cyber-physical systems. I created this dashboard through User-Centered Design (UCD) methodologies based on two feedback iterations with the stakeholders employing semi-structured expert opinion interviews. This thesis also discusses the different stages involved in building this dashboard design, the design decisions, the technical aspects of the libraries used, and the feedback session towards the end of the project. It also presents the implemented dashboard as a proof of development efforts and explains its different functionalities. The project concludes with evaluating the dashboard through a semi-structured interview with the respective stakeholders and suggests features for further development.

  • 133.
    Nayyar, Raghu
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Gürdür, Didem
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Mechatronics.
    Vulgarakis Feljan, Aneta
    Ericsson Research, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Visualizing Autonomous Warehouse Data Streams Through User-Centered Design2019In: Proceedings of The Fifth International Conference on Big Data, Small Data, Linked Data and Open DataALLDATA 2019, 2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper summarizes the work is done, which is carried out to develop and evaluate a dashboard design that visualizes a stream of data from different entities involved in autonomous warehouses, as a subset of cyber-physical systems. The dashboard is designed and developed through User- Centered Design (UCD) methodologies based on two iterations of feedback sessions with the stakeholders. During these sessions, semi-structured expert opinion interviews are conducted. The paper discusses the different stages involved in building the proposed dashboard design, the design decisions, the technical aspects of the libraries used, and the results of the feedback sessions towards the end of the project. It also presents the implemented dashboard as proof of development efforts and explains its different functionalities. The study concludes by evaluating the dashboard through the semi-structured interviews with the respective stakeholders and suggests features for further development.

  • 134. Nouri, Jalal
    et al.
    Ebner, Martin
    Ifenthaler, Dirk
    Saqr, Mohammed
    Malmberg, Joana
    Khalil, Mohammad
    Bruun, Jesper
    Viberg, Olga
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Conde González, M
    Papamitsiou, Z
    Berthelsen, O
    Efforts in Europe for Data-Driven Improvement of Education: A Review of Learning Analytics Research in Six Countries2019In: International Journal of Learning Analytics and Artificial Intelligence for Education, Vol. 1, no 1, p. 8-27Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 135.
    Nowik, Martyna
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Promoting Digital Transformation in Digitally Developing Industries: A case study on strategic action points driving digital transformation in the real estate industry2018Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The digital transformation of businesses has come a long way; however, research and reports are showing how some industries has fallen behind in the progress. This research aimed at identifying driving factors that are essential in the progression of digitalization and use of digital capabilities. The central research question was as follows: What strategic action points should businesses within the real estate industry adopt individually and together in order to support a steady development towards becoming a digitally dextrous industry? The research was performed as a case study, using the real estate industry as an example. The case study consisted of 8 semi structured interviews, performed with representatives of various companies from the real estate value chain. Using Soule et. al.s (2016) M-PWR model as an analytical foundation, three action points, essential for businesses in digitally laggarding industries, were defined: 1. Reforming the organizational structure for better agility and empowerment of the workforce. 2. Create channels and methods encouraging collaborations between various actors. 3. Develop structured processes for identifying, extracting and managing available resources. 

  • 136. Odom, W.
    et al.
    Lindley, Siân
    Pschetz, Larissa
    Tsaknaki, Vasiliki
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Vallgårda, Anna
    Wiberg, Mikael
    Yoo, Daisy
    Time, temporality, and slowness: Future directions for design research2018In: DIS 2018 - Companion Publication of the 2018 Designing Interactive Systems Conference, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2018, p. 383-386Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A diverse set of research and design initiatives related to time, temporality, and slowness has emerged in the DIS and HCI communities. The goals of this workshop are to: 1. bring together researchers to reflect on conceptual, methodological, and practice-based outcomes and issues and 2. to develop an agenda for future research in this growing area.

  • 137.
    Palm, Jenny
    et al.
    Lund Univ, IIIEE, Box 196, SE-22100 Lund, Sweden..
    Eriksson, Elina
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC, Green Leap.
    Residential solar electricity adoption: how households in Sweden search for and use information2018In: Energy, Sustainability and Society, ISSN 2192-0567, Vol. 8, no 1, article id 14Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: As a renewable energy solution, photovoltaics (PVs) are crucial in the transition to a more sustainable energy system. Besides large PV installations, household adoption of PVs will be an important contribution to this transition. However, the adoption of PVs on a household level faces many barriers, with gathering and understanding information being one of the major barriers. The aim of this article is to do an in-depth analysis of how households search for and interpret information about PVs and to discuss how to reach different groups with information. Methods: The results in this paper are based on three interview studies made between autumn 2013 and autumn 2016. In the first interview study, seven non-adopters of photovoltaics were interviewed. In the second study, seven adopters of photovoltaics were addressed. In the third study, a total of 44 households were interviewed, with a mix of non-adopters and adopters. In total, 58 households were interviewed. Results: From the interviews, we developed four ideal types for PV adoption. The non-adopters use few sources of information, find the information complicated, and have a tendency to emphasize barriers rather than enablers for PV adoptions. The environmentally engaged adopters search a lot of information but find it difficult to know when they have enough or the right information. They also find information too technical and complicated and find it hard to compare quotes. The professionally skilled group easily accesses information but also experienced problems in comparing quotes and are critical to that many problems occur during the installation process. The accidental adopters more or less happen to get a PV system and needed little information. They usually took the offer from the provider first met. Conclusions: We can conclude that when dividing the households into different ideal types, it is possible to detect what kind of information measures different groups need. To get a future increase of the number of installed PVs, it is important to develop different measures in parallel, to meet the needs from the different groups.

  • 138.
    Pan, Leyang
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Exploring the Applicability of Gamification in Online Booking Negotiation: Design Process and Evaluation2018Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Negotiation is an essential part of the user journey in online booking experiences, while it is often perceived as non-engaging and stressful because of the great amount of details that need to be taken care of, which would result in frustration and other negative experience. Aiming to increase the user engagement in the booking negotiation process, this study explored the applicability of gamification in an online booking negotiation tool for booking artists, by following the MDA game design framework (mechanics, dynamics, aesthetics) and taking a three-round user-centred iteration. The resulting gamification design was built as hi-fi clickable prototype and was evaluated by 30 participants with both qualitative and quantitative methods, in comparison to a prototype of conventional negotiation tool with the same functionality but without gamified elements. Although limitation existed in the study due to the given resources, the results showed an overall advantageous performance of the gamified version over the conventional version, and therefore indicated a positive influence of gamification upon user engagement, when being applied to an online booking context. The findings from the design iteration as well as the results from the final evaluation provided implications for future studies.

  • 139.
    Panariello, Claudio
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Sköld, Sköld
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. KMH Royal College of Music.
    Frid, Emma
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Bresin, Roberto
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    From vocal sketching to sound models by means of a sound-based musical transcription system2019In: Proceedings of the 16th Sound and Music Computing Conference, Malaga, Spain, 2019, p. 1-7, article id S2.5Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper explores how notation developed for the representation of sound-based musical structures could be used for the transcription of vocal sketches representing expressive robot movements. A mime actor initially produced expressive movements which were translated to a humanoid robot. The same actor was then asked to illustrate these movements using vocal sketching. The vocal sketches were transcribed by two composers using sound-based notation. The same composers later synthesized new sonic sketches from the annotated data. Different transcriptions and synthesized versions of these were compared in order to investigate how the audible outcome changes for different transcriptions and synthesis routines. This method provides a palette of sound models suitable for the sonification of expressive body movements.

  • 140.
    Pargman, Daniel
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Eriksson, Elina
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Bates, Oliver
    Univ Lancaster, Sch Comp & Commun, Lancaster LA1 4WA, England..
    Kirman, Ben
    Univ York, Dept Theatre Film & Televis, York YO10 5GB, N Yorkshire, England..
    Comber, Robert
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Hedman, Anders
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    van den Broeck, Martijn
    Umea Univ, Umea Inst Design, Fac Sci & Technol, SE-90187 Umea, Sweden..
    The future of computing and wisdom: Insights from Human-Computer Interaction2019In: Futures: The journal of policy, planning and futures studies, ISSN 0016-3287, E-ISSN 1873-6378, Vol. 113, article id UNSP 102434Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we present a structured report on a dialogue on the Future of Computing and Wisdom. The dialogue consists of a recorded and transcribed discussion between researchers and practitioners in the field of Human-Computer Interaction that was held at workshop in conjunction with the 10th Nordic Conference on Human-Computer Interaction in September 2018. However, the dialogue also encompasses workshop participants' preparatory work with writing "fictional abstracts" - abstracts of yet-to-be-written research papers that will be published in 2068. The polyvocal dialogue that is reported upon thus includes not just the voices of researchers and practitioners who attended the workshop, but also includes the voices of the future researchers of 2068 who wrote the abstracts in question as well as the voices of the organisms, individuals, intelligent agents and communities who are the subjects, victims, beneficiaries and bystanders of wise (or unwise) future computing systems.

  • 141.
    Pargman, Daniel
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Eriksson, Elina
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Comber, Robert
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Kirman, Ben
    Bates, Oliver
    The futures of computing and wisdom2018In: Proceedings of the 10th Nordic Conference on Human-Computer Interaction - NordiCHI ’18, ACM Press, 2018, p. 960-963Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There has been an increasing interest in discussing the consequences of the technologies we invent and study in HCI. Whether it is climate change, ethical computing, capitalist and neo-liberal models of commerce and society, grassroots movements, big data or alternative paradigms in distributed systems, this workshop will invite participants to explore these consequences and ask how we move forward with responsibility and new forms of knowing and knowledge. We invite participants to join us, as we cast forward fifty years to 2068 to imagine the future of wisdom, and to reflect on how we got there. By writing Fictional Abstracts, an abstract from a research paper yet to be written, we will unpick critical tensions in the advancement of computing over the next decades. The workshop will develop perspectives on the futures of computing and critically reflect on the assumptions, methods, and tools for enabling (and disabling) such futures.

  • 142.
    Pargman, Daniel
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Ringenson, Tina
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Strategic Sustainability Studies.
    Rivera, Miriam Börjesson
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Strategic Sustainability Studies.
    Schmitz, Lisa
    KTH.
    Krinaki, Maria
    KTH.
    Prekratic, Nino
    KTH.
    Lundkvist, Björn
    KTH.
    Smart magic city run: Exploring the implications of public augmented reality games2018In: 9th International Conference on Intelligent Technologies for Interactive Entertainment, INTETAIN 2017, Springer, 2018, Vol. 215, p. 151-158Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents an augmented reality smart city gaming concept, Magic Run. Magic Run has entertainment value and fulfills its’ original brief, but several aspects of the game were found to be problematic during a workshop with smart city researchers. We present problematic aspects of the game as well as ideas for how to redesign the game to control or ameliorate problematic interaction between future smart city players and bystanders.

  • 143.
    Pauletto, Sandra
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Invisible Seams: the Role of Foley and Voice Postproduction Recordings in the Design of Cinematic Performances2019In: Foundations in Sound Design for Linear Media: A Multidisciplinary Approach / [ed] Michael Filimowicz, Routledge, 2019Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 144.
    Persson, Sebastian
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Simplify Bidding on the Day-Ahead Electricity Market Nordpool through Structured Time-Series2018Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    In Sweden, electricity is purchased on a so-called day-ahead spot market (Nordpool). The electricity is based on a predicted hourly need for the upcoming day [4, 5]. Production and consumption of electricity need to be balanced since it is hard to store electricity [25]. Today, electricity companies struggle to uphold this balance using currently available tools. A potential solution would be to support bidders by visualizing time-series. Then they could identify time-series lacking data crucial to the prediction phase and resolve them. In this thesis, a prototype was implemented consisting of different views/use-cases, aimed at simplifying the bidding process for balance responsible parties (BRPs). The prototype consisted of structured time-series and presents predicted data in a way that makes the decision making easier when placing bids. Results from a study using the prototype with BRPs and professionals showed that the use-cases/views are useful in terms of 1) getting a better structure, 2) identifying incomplete time series, 3) better quality assurance of the time-series and 4) lowering the time-consumption. Additionally, the bidders suggested that the addition of references, in terms of other prediction methods than the one that was used could improve their decision making.

  • 145.
    Polak, Rainer
    et al.
    Max Planck Institute for Empirical Aesthetics, Frankfurt, Germany.
    Jacoby, Nori
    Columbia University.
    Fischinger, Timo
    Max Planck Institute for Empirical Aesthetics, Frankfurt, Germany.
    Goldberg, Daniel
    University of Connecticut.
    Holzapfel, Andre
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    London, Justin
    Rhythmic Prototypes Across Cultures: A Comparative Study of Tapping Synchronization2018In: Music perception, ISSN 0730-7829, E-ISSN 1533-8312, Vol. 36, no 1, p. 1-23Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    IT HAS LONG BEEN ASSUMED THAT RHYTHM cognition builds on perceptual categories tied to prototypes defined by small-integer ratios, such as 1:1 and 2:1. This study aims to evaluate the relative contributions of both generic constraints and selected cultural particularities in shaping rhythmic prototypes. We experimentally tested musicians' synchronization (finger tapping) with simple periodic rhythms at two different tempi with participants in Mali, Bulgaria, and Germany. We found support both for the classic assumption that 1:1 and 2:1 prototypes are widespread across cultures and for culture-dependent prototypes characterized by more complex ratios such as 3:2 and 4:3. Our findings suggest that music-cultural environments specify links between music performance patterns and perceptual prototypes.

  • 146.
    Poole, Erika S.
    et al.
    Penn State Univ, Coll Informat Sci & Technol, University Pk, PA 16802 USA..
    Comber, Robert
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. Newcastle Univ, Culture Lab, Newcastle Upon Tyne NE1 7RU, Tyne & Wear, England..
    Hoonhout, Jettie
    Philips Res, Eindhoven, Netherlands..
    Disruption as a Research Method for Studying Technology Use in Homes2015In: Interacting with computers, ISSN 0953-5438, E-ISSN 1873-7951, Vol. 27, no 1, p. 13-20Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we present disruption of household routines as a method to study home technology usage. Using three case studies as guidance, we show how disrupting household practices-either through changing the technology, task or division of labor-can provide valuable insight into current and future technology usage, and can guide the design of future technologies. Based on our case studies, we outline best practices and challenges with respect to the pragmatics of disruptive research methods.

  • 147.
    Qarabash, Haneen
    et al.
    Baghdad Univ, Baghdad, Iraq..
    Heslop, Philip
    Newcastle Univ, Newcastle Upon Tyne, Tyne & Wear, England..
    Kharrufa, Ahmed
    Newcastle Univ, Newcastle Upon Tyne, Tyne & Wear, England..
    Balaam, Madeline
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Devlin, Marie
    Newcastle Univ, Newcastle Upon Tyne, Tyne & Wear, England..
    Group tagging: Using video tagging to facilitate reflection on small group activities2019In: British Journal of Educational Technology, ISSN 0007-1013, E-ISSN 1467-8535, Vol. 50, no 4, p. 1913-1928Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Collaborative learning in class-based teaching presents a challenge for a tutor to ensure every group and individual student has the best learning experience. We present Group Tagging, a web application that supports reflection on collaborative, group-based classroom activities. Group Tagging provides students with an opportunity to record important moments within the class-based group work and enables reflection on and promotion of professional skills such as communication, collaboration and critical thinking. After class, students use the tagged clips to create short videos showcasing their group work activities, which can later be reviewed by the teacher. We report on a deployment of Group Tagging in an undergraduate Computing Science class with 48 students over a semester. Through our analysis of interviews and log data, we show that Group Tagging helped the students remain attentive and on-task during group work, and encouraged them to participate more during group activities.

  • 148.
    Richiello, Isabella
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Women's experience of a sexual and reproductive health chatbot2018Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Chatbots are increasing in popularity and interacting with humans via written language. Previous research has looked at chatbots within several domains, but not towards women’s general sexual and reproductive health. This offers a need to extend the small body of current research.  This report aimed to do so by describing women’s experiences of a sexual and reproductive health chatbot used as a decision support tool. The chatbot was designed based on a user-centered approach, allowing women to express desired personality traits in a person when discussing the topic. This resulted in the design creation of two chatbots with two different personalities. Exploratory Wizard of Oz studies were conducted with 6 users by simulating interaction with both chatbots operated by a human. Users were followed up with a survey and interview creating insights to their experiences with each chatbot. Findings resulted in contributing to research with proposed guidelines for how to design a sexual and reproductive health chatbot.

  • 149.
    Riese, Emma
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Theoretical Computer Science, TCS.
    Bälter, Olle
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Hedin, Björn
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Kann, Viggo
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Theoretical Computer Science, TCS.
    Programme Integrating Courses Fighting to Get Engineers to Reflect on Non-technical Topics2019In: ITiCSE '19 Proceedings of the 2019 ACM Conference on Innovation and Technology in Computer Science Education, New York, NY, USA: ACM Digital Library, 2019, p. 133-139Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Programme Integrating Courses (PICs) aim to tie students, teachers and courses in education programmes closer together. In this study, we investigate three PICs, as part of engineering programmes in computer science and media technology. The purpose of this study was to gain a deeper understanding of how students and mentors experience the PICs with a focus on the assessment and the relationship between students, and students and mentors. We used a mixed method approach, interviewed 22 students and 6 mentors, and sent out questionnaires to all 25 mentors and all students from two of the three courses (630+470 students). The results showed that the students and mentors appreciated the social aspects of the courses, getting to know each other and share experiences. However, some were uncomfortable reflecting upon the given non-technical topics. On a general level, the students stated that their mentors assessed their reflections correctly but they were sceptical towards being graded on a scale other than pass/fail.

  • 150.
    Riese, Emma
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Computer Science, Theoretical Computer Science, TCS.
    Bälter, Olle
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Computer Science, Theoretical Computer Science, TCS. KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Mosavat, Vahid
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Computer Science, Theoretical Computer Science, TCS.
    Don’t get stuck in the tool, use the method!: Lessons learned by teaching test driven program development2019In: KTH SoTL 2019, Stockholm: KTH Royal Institute of Technology , 2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Since 2014, we have embedded Test Driven Development (TDD) in an introductory programming course. TDD is common industry practice for developing code, and has also become a part of curriculums at different levels and proven beneficial in educational settings (Kollanus and Isomöttönen, 2008). The method itself is rather simple: you start with writing test cases for your program (what output you expect for certain input) and then you write code that fullfils these tests. In that way, the use of the TDD enables you to test your code immediately and throughout the development, in opposed to the more traditional way in which you first finish the code and then write test cases to verify it. Teaching this method in an introductory course would also enable students to use it in later courses and be well accustomed to the method when they graduate. Researchers that conducted a previous study on this recommends that TDD should be mandatory (Marrero and Settle, 2005).

    TDD has during the years 2014-2017 been a mandatory part of an introductory programming course offered to non-computer science majors. The approach to teaching TDD has evolved and been a bit different each year. However, since TDD have been a mandatory part of the course, it was also part of what the students were assessed on, in coherent with constructive alignment (Biggs, 1996). Making it part of the assessment was also believed to motivate students to use the method, since the assessments can make students take part in learnings situations they otherwise would not (Ramsden, 2003). Hence, the students were required to not only submit and present their code, but also their test cases, that had to be written in a standard tool, doctest, that was presented and explained during lectures. In 2017, all 64 students that presented their final assignment during the spring filled out a survey about their experiences with TDD and in addition, nine of the students were interviewed.

    From the open-ended questions on the surveys and from the interviews, it became evident that many of the students had not understood nor used the method TDD, but had instead used the testing tool to create test cases when their program was already finished. They had handed in test cases since that was a requirement to pass the course, but they had forgotten all about the method. From these results, the lesson we learned was that even though our intention had been to make TDD mandatory, and we planned the assessment with that in mind, we had actually only made the use of the testing tool mandatory. 

    We did try to convince the students that using the TDD method would be beneficial in the development of the program, but failed. One of the benefits of TDD is for code maintenance, but the structure of our courses does not easily lend itself to requiring adjustments of a student project say six months after the first submission, especially for students who are non-CS majors.

    When teaching your students a method through the usage of a tool, you need to make sure your students can distinguish between the method and the tool. You will also have to emphasize the method and plan the assessment in such a way that the use of the method, the process, is assessed. If the focus is only on the finished product, it will more likely be an assessment of how well the students used the tool and the students are at risk of neglecting the method altogether.

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