Change search
Refine search result
1234 101 - 150 of 198
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 101.
    Kassab, Zineb
    et al.
    Mohammed VI Polytech Univ UM6P, Mat Sci & Nanoengn Dept MSN, Lot 660 Hay Moulay Rachid, Benguerir 43150, Morocco.;Univ Hassan II Casablanca, Fac Sci Ben Msik, Lab Ingn & Mat LIMAT, BP 7955, Casablanca, Morocco..
    Boujemaoui, Assya
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Ben Youcef, Hicham
    Mohammed VI Polytech Univ UM6P, Mat Sci & Nanoengn Dept MSN, Lot 660 Hay Moulay Rachid, Benguerir 43150, Morocco..
    Hajlane, Abdelghani
    Mohammed VI Polytech Univ UM6P, Mat Sci & Nanoengn Dept MSN, Lot 660 Hay Moulay Rachid, Benguerir 43150, Morocco..
    Hannache, Hassan
    Mohammed VI Polytech Univ UM6P, Mat Sci & Nanoengn Dept MSN, Lot 660 Hay Moulay Rachid, Benguerir 43150, Morocco.;Univ Hassan II Casablanca, Fac Sci Ben Msik, Lab Ingn & Mat LIMAT, BP 7955, Casablanca, Morocco..
    El Achaby, Mounir
    Mohammed VI Polytech Univ UM6P, Mat Sci & Nanoengn Dept MSN, Lot 660 Hay Moulay Rachid, Benguerir 43150, Morocco..
    Production of cellulose nanofibrils from alfa fibers and its nanoreinforcement potential in polymer nanocomposites2019In: Cellulose (London), ISSN 0969-0239, E-ISSN 1572-882X, Vol. 26, no 18, p. 9567-9581Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Alfa fibers (Stipa Tenacissima) were effectively utilized in this study as a promising cellulose source for isolation of carboxy-functionalized cellulose nanofibrils (CNFs) using multiple treatments. Pure cellulose microfibers (CMFs) were firstly extracted by alkali and bleaching treatments. CNFs with an average nanofibrils diameter ranging from 1.4 to 4.6 nm and a crystallinity of 89% were isolated from CMFs by a combination of TEMPO-oxidation and mechanical disintegration processes. The morphology and physico-chemical properties of cellulosic materials were evaluated at different stages of treatments using several characterization techniques. Various CNF loadings (5-15 wt%) were incorporated into PVA polymer to evaluate the nanoreinforcement ability of CNFs and to produce CNF-filled PVA nanocomposite materials. The tensile and optical transmittance properties, as well as the morphological and thermal properties of the as-produced CNF-filled PVA nanocomposite films were investigated. It was found that the tensile modulus and strength of nanocomposites were gradually increased with increasing of CNF loadings, with a maximum increase of 90% and 74% was observed for a PVA nanocomposite containing 15 wt% CNFs, respectively. The optical transmittance was reduced from 91% (at 650 nm) for neat PVA polymer to 88%, 82% and 76% for PVA nanocomposites containing 5, 10 and 15 wt% CNFs, respectively. It was also found that the glass transition temperature was gradually increased from 76 degrees C for neat PVA to 89 degrees C for PVA nanocomposite containing 15 wt%. This study demonstrates the importance of Alfa fibers as annual renewable lignocellulosic material to produce CNFs with good morphology and excellent properties. These newly developed carboxy-functionalized CNFs could be considered as a potential nanofiller candidate for the preparation of nanocomposite materials of high transparency and good mechanical properties.Graphic abstract

  • 102.
    Kim, Hyeyun
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering, Applied Electrochemistry.
    Guccini, Valentina
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. Stockholm Univ, Dept Mat & Environm Chem, SE-10691 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Lu, Huiran
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering, Applied Electrochemistry. Northvolt AB, Gamla Brogatan 26, SE-11120 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Salazar-Alvarez, German
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Mat & Environm Chem, SE-10691 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Lindbergh, Göran
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering, Applied Electrochemistry. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Cornell, Ann M.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering, Applied Electrochemistry. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Lithium Ion Battery Separators Based On Carboxylated Cellulose Nanofibers From Wood2019In: ACS APPLIED ENERGY MATERIALS, ISSN 2574-0962, Vol. 2, no 2, p. 1241-1250Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Carboxylated cellulose nanofibers, prepared by TEMPO-mediated oxidation (TOCN), were processed into asymmetric mesoporous membranes using a facile paper-making approach and investigated as lithium ion battery separators. Membranes made of TOCN with sodium carboxylate groups (TOCN-COO-Na+) showed capacity fading after a few cycles of charging and discharging. On the other hand, its protonated counterpart (TOCN-COOH) showed highly improved electrochemical and cycling stability, displaying 94.5% of discharge capacity maintained after 100 cycles at 1 C rate of charging and discharging. The asymmetric surface porosity of the membranes must be considered when assembling a battery cell as it influences the rate capabilities of the battery. The wood-based TOCN-membranes have a good potential as an ecofriendly alternative to conventional fossil fuel-derived separators without adverse side effects.

  • 103.
    Kishani, Saina
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Wohlert, Jakob
    KTH.
    Vilaplana, Francisco
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Glycoscience.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Solubility and adsorption of different xyloglucan fractions to model surfaces2018In: Abstracts of Papers of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0065-7727, Vol. 255Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 104.
    Koivurova, Matias
    et al.
    Univ Eastern Finland, Inst Photon, POB 111, FI-80101 Joensuu, Finland..
    Vasileva, Elena
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Photonics.
    Li, Yuanyuan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Berglund, Lars
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Popov, Sergei
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Photonics.
    Complete spatial coherence characterization of quasi-random laser emission from dye doped transparent wood2018In: Optics Express, ISSN 1094-4087, E-ISSN 1094-4087, Vol. 26, no 10, p. 13474-13482Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We report on the experimental determination of the complete two coordinate spatial coherence function of light emitted by a quasi-random laser, implemented on recently introduced dye-doped transparent wood. The spatial coherence was measured by means of a double grating interferometer, which has some advantages over the standard Young's interferometer. Analysis of the spatial coherence reveals that emission from such a material can be considered as a superposition of several spatial modes produced by individual emitters within semi-ordered scattering medium. The overall degree of coherence, (gamma)over-bar, for this quasi-random laser was found to be 0.16 +/- 0.01, having possible applications in speckle free laser imaging and illumination.

  • 105.
    Koskela, Salla
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Glycoscience. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Wang, Shennan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Glycoscience.
    Xu, Dingfeng
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Glycoscience.
    Yang, Xuan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Li, Kai
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Glycoscience. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Berglund, Lars
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    McKee, Lauren S.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Glycoscience. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Bulone, Vincent
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Glycoscience.
    Zhou, Qi
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Glycoscience. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Lytic polysaccharide monooxygenase (LPMO) mediated production of ultra-fine cellulose nanofibres from delignified softwood fibres2019In: Green Chemistry, ISSN 1463-9262, E-ISSN 1463-9270, Vol. 21, no 21, p. 5924-5933Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The production of cellulose nanofibres (CNFs) typically requires harsh chemistry and strong mechanical fibrillation, both of which have negative environmental impacts. A possible solution is offered by lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases (LPMOs), oxidative enzymes that boost cellulose fibrillation. Although the role of LPMOs in oxidative modification of cellulosic substrates is rather well established, their use in the production of cellulose nanomaterials is not fully explored, and the effect of the carbohydrate-binding module (CBM) on nanofibrillation has not yet been reported. Herein, we studied the activity of two LPMOs, one of which was appended to a CBM, on delignified softwood fibres for green and energy-efficient production of CNFs. The CNFs were used to prepare cellulose nanopapers, and the structure and properties of both nanofibres and nanopapers were determined. Both enzymes were able to facilitate nanocellulose fibrillation and increase colloidal stability of the produced CNFs. However, the CBM-lacking LPMO was more efficient in introducing carboxyl groups (0.53 mmol/g) on the cellulose fibre surfaces and releasing CNFs with thinner width (4.3 ± 1.5 nm) from delignified spruce fibres than the modular LPMO (carboxylate content of 0.38 mmol/g and nanofibre width of 6.7± 2.5 nm through LPMO pretreatment followed by mild homogenisation. The prepared nanopapers showed improved mechanical properties (tensile strength of 262 MPa, and modulus of 16.2 GPa) compared to conventional CNFs preparation methods, demonstrating the potential of LPMOs as green alternatives for cellulose nanomaterials preparation.

  • 106.
    Kupka, Vojtech
    et al.
    Brno Univ Technol, CEITEC Cent European Inst Technol, Brno 61200, Czech Republic..
    Zhou, Qi
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Ansari, Farhan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Tang, Hu
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH). Royal Inst Technol KTH, AlbaNova Univ Ctr, Sch Biotechnol, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Slouf, Miroslav
    Acad Sci Czech Republ, Inst Macromol Chem, CR-16206 Prague, Czech Republic..
    Vojtova, Lucy
    Brno Univ Technol, CEITEC Cent European Inst Technol, Brno 61200, Czech Republic.;SCITEG As, U Vodarny 2965-2, Brno 61600, Czech Republic..
    Berglund, Lars
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Jancar, Josef
    Brno Univ Technol, CEITEC Cent European Inst Technol, Brno 61200, Czech Republic.;SCITEG As, U Vodarny 2965-2, Brno 61600, Czech Republic..
    Well-dispersed polyurethane/cellulose nanocrystal nanocomposites synthesized by a solvent-free procedure in bulk2019In: Polymer Composites, ISSN 0272-8397, E-ISSN 1548-0569, Vol. 40, p. E456-E465Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Polyurethane (PU) nanocomposites utilizing cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) as nanofiller and amorphous PU matrix were synthesized in a novel solvent-free bulk process. A green nanofiller, CNCs, was studied as reinforcement and was further modified by grafting poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) on the CNC surface (CNC-PEG). Transmission electron microscopy revealed an excellent dispersion of the PEGylated CNC nanoparticles in the PU matrix, whereas as-received CNCs formed agglomerates. The results indicated strong improvements in tensile properties with Young's modulus increasing up to 50% and strength up to 25% for both, PU/CNC and PU/CNC-PEG nanocomposites. The enhanced tensile modulus was attributed to stiff particle reinforcement together with an increase in glass transition temperature.

  • 107.
    Kvist, Patric
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, 412 96, Sweden.
    Gebäck, T.
    Muzamal, M.
    Rasmuson, Anders
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, 412 96, Sweden.
    Lattice Boltzmann simulations of diffusion in steam-exploded wood2019In: Wood Science and Technology, ISSN 0043-7719, E-ISSN 1432-5225, Vol. 53, no 4, p. 855-871Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Diffusion of large molecules throughout the porous microstructure of wood pretreated with steam explosion was investigated by using the lattice Boltzmann method for simulations. Wood samples were investigated with high-resolution X-ray tomography to effectively reconstruct an accurate geometry of the structural changes that ensue after pretreatment. Samples of approximately 1 mm3 with voxel sizes from 0.5 to 1 μm were examined with X-ray imaging. These large volumes, relative to what reasonably can be simulated, were divided into sub-volumes and were further reconstructed into geometries suited for the LBM simulations. The transient development of the concentration was investigated, and the effective diffusion coefficient at steady state was computed. Diffusion rates were found to increase significantly in the transversal direction due to the steam explosion pretreatment. The increase was observed both in the time needed for solutes to diffuse throughout the pores and in the effective diffusion coefficient. A shorter diffusion pathway and a higher connectivity between pores were found for the pretreated samples, even though the porosity was similar and the pore size distribution narrower than the native sample. These results show that local mass transport depends not only on porosity but also, in a complex manner, on pore structure. Thus, a more detailed analysis of pore space structure using tomography data, in combination with simulations, enables a more general understanding of the diffusional process.

  • 108.
    Kvist, Patric
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. Chalmers Univ Technol, Dept Chem & Chem Engn, S-41296 Gothenburg, Sweden.;Chalmers Univ Technol,;Chalmers Univ Technol, SuMo Biomat, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Schuster, Erich
    RISE Agrifood & Biosci, Prod Design & Percept, Box 5401, S-40229 Gothenburg, Sweden.;Chalmers Univ Technol, SuMo Biomat, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Loren, Niklas
    Chalmers Univ Technol, Dept Chem & Chem Engn, S-41296 Gothenburg, Sweden.;RISE Agrifood & Biosci, Prod Design & Percept, Box 5401, S-40229 Gothenburg, Sweden.;Chalmers Univ Technol, SuMo Biomat, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Rasmuson, Anders
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. Chalmers Univ Technol, Dept Chem & Chem Engn, S-41296 Gothenburg, Sweden.;Chalmers Univ Technol, .
    Using fluorescent probes and FRAP to investigate macromolecule diffusion in steam-exploded wood2018In: Wood Science and Technology, ISSN 0043-7719, E-ISSN 1432-5225, Vol. 52, no 5, p. 1395-1410Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Diffusion of fluorescently labeled dextran of varying molecular weight in wood pretreated by steam explosion was studied with a confocal microscope. The steam explosion experiments were conducted at relatively mild conditions relevant for materials biorefinery at a pressure of 14 bars for 10 min. The method of fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) was used to perform diffusion measurements locally in the wood microstructure. It was found that the FRAP methodology can be used to observe differences in the diffusion coefficient based on localization in the microstructure, i.e., earlywood, latewood, and cell wall. Microscopic changes due to steam explosion were seen to increase diffusion of the smaller 3-kDa dextran diffusion probe in the earlywood, while the latewood structure was not affected in any significant way. Macroscopic changes to the structure in the form of ruptures due to the steam explosion pretreatment were observed to increase the rate of diffusion for the larger 40-kDa dextran probe.

  • 109.
    Larsson, Per Tomas
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. Innventia AB, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Karlsson, Pernilla
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Swelling behavior of cellulose rich materials in water2019In: Abstracts of Papers of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0065-7727, Vol. 257Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 110.
    Li, Jing
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Glycoscience.
    Wang, Damao
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Glycoscience.
    Xing, Xiaohui
    Adelaide Glycomics, School of Agriculture, Food and Wine, University of Adelaide, Waite Campus, Urrbrae, SA 5064, Australia.
    Cheng, Ting-Jen Rachel
    Genomics Research Centre, Academia Sinica, Sec. 2, 128 Academia Road, Nankang, Taipei 115, Taiwan.
    Liang, Pi-Hui
    School of Pharmacy, College of Medicine, National Taiwan University, Taipei 100, Taiwan.
    Bulone, Vincent
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Glycoscience. Adelaide Glycomics, School of Agriculture, Food and Wine, University of Adelaide, Waite Campus, Urrbrae, SA 5064, Australia.
    Park, Jeong Hill
    College of Pharmacy and Research Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Seoul National University, Seoul, 08826, Republic of Korea.
    Hsieh, Yves S. Y.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Glycoscience. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Structural analysis and biological activity of cell wall polysaccharides extracted from Panax ginseng marc2019In: International Journal of Biological Macromolecules, ISSN 0141-8130, E-ISSN 1879-0003, Vol. 135, p. 29-37Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ginseng marc is a major by-product of the ginseng industry currently used as animal feed or fertilizer. This fibrous, insoluble waste stream is rich in cell wall polysaccharides and therefore a potential source of ingredients for functional food with health-promoting properties. However, the extraction of these polysaccharides has proved problematic and their exact composition remains unknown. Here we have analysed the composition, structure and biological activity of polysaccharides from ginseng root, stem and leaf marc fractionated using a chelator and alkali solutions. The pectic fraction has been extracted from root marc in high abundance and can activate the production of interleukine-1α and the hematopoietic growth factor by RAW 264.7 murine macrophage cells, which are important immune regulators of T-cells during inflammatory responses and infection processes. Our study reveals the potential to increase the value of ginseng marc by generating carbohydrate-based products with a higher value than animal feed.

  • 111. Li, T.
    et al.
    Song, J.
    Zhao, X.
    Yang, Z.
    Pastel, G.
    Xu, S.
    Jia, C.
    Dai, J.
    Dai, C.
    Gong, A.
    Jiang, F.
    Yao, Y.
    Fan, T.
    Yang, B.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Yang, R.
    Hu, L.
    Anisotropic, lightweight, strong, and super thermally insulating nanowood with naturally aligned nanocellulose2018In: Science Advances, ISSN 0036-8156, E-ISSN 2375-2548, Vol. 4, no 3, article id eaar3724Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There has been a growing interest in thermal management materials due to the prevailing energy challenges and unfulfilled needs for thermal insulation applications. We demonstrate the exceptional thermal management capabilities of a large-scale, hierarchal alignment of cellulose nanofibrils directly fabricated fromwood, hereafter referred to as nanowood. Nanowood exhibits anisotropic thermal properties with an extremely low thermal conductivity of 0.03W/m·K in the transverse direction (perpendicular to the nanofibrils) and approximately two times higher thermal conductivity of 0.06W/m·K in the axial direction due to the hierarchically aligned nanofibrilswithin the highly porous backbone. The anisotropy of the thermal conductivity enables efficient thermal dissipation along the axial direction, thereby preventing local overheating on the illuminated side while yielding improved thermal insulation along the backside that cannot be obtained with isotropic thermal insulators. The nanowood also shows a low emissivity of <5% over the solar spectrum with the ability to effectively reflect solar thermal energy. Moreover, the nanowood is lightweight yet strong, owing to the effective bonding between the aligned cellulose nanofibrils with a high compressive strength of 13 MPa in the axial direction and 20MPa in the transverse direction at 75% strain, which exceeds other thermal insulation materials, such as silica and polymer aerogels, Styrofoam, and wool. The excellent thermal management, abundance, biodegradability, high mechanical strength, low mass density, and manufacturing scalability of the nanowood make this material highly attractive for practical thermal insulation applications. 

  • 112.
    Li, Yuanyuan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Cheng, Ming
    Jungstedt, Erik
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Xu, Bo
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Organic chemistry. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Centre of Molecular Devices, CMD.
    Sun, Licheng
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Organic chemistry. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Centre of Molecular Devices, CMD.
    Berglund, Lars
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Optically Transparent Wood Substrate for Perovskite Solar Cells2019In: ACS Sustainable Chemistry and Engineering, ISSN 2168-0485, Vol. 7, no 6, p. 6061-6067Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Transparent wood is a candidate for use as an energy-saving building material due to its low density (ca. 1.2 g/cm(3)), high optical transmittance (over 85% at 1 mm thickness), low thermal conductivity (0.23 W m(-1) K-1), and good load-bearing performance with tough failure behavior (no shattering). High optical transmittance also makes transparent wood a candidate for optoelectronic devices. In this work, for the first time, perovskite solar cells processed at low temperature (<150 degrees C) were successfully assembled directly on transparent wood substrates. A power conversion efficiency up to 16.8% was obtained. The technologies demonstrated may pave the way for integration of solar cells with light transmitting wood building structures for energy-saving purposes.

  • 113.
    Li, Yuanyuan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Vasileva, Elena
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics.
    Sychugov, Ilya
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics.
    Popov, Sergei
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics.
    Berglund, Lars
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Optically Transparent Wood: Recent Progress, Opportunities, and Challenges2018In: Advanced Optical Materials, ISSN 2162-7568, E-ISSN 2195-1071, Vol. 6, no 14, article id 1800059Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Transparent wood is an emerging load-bearing material reinvented from natural wood scaffolds with added light management functionalities. Such material shows promising properties for buildings and related structural applications, including its renewable and abundant origin, interesting optical properties, outstanding mechanical performance, low density, low thermal conductivity, and great potential for multifunctionalization. In this study, a detailed summary of recent progress on the transparent wood research topic is presented. Remaining questions and challenges related to transparent wood preparation, optical property measurements, and transparent wood modification and applications are discussed.

  • 114.
    Liu, Jun
    et al.
    Abo Akad Univ, Johan Gadolin Proc Chem Ctr, Lab Wood & Paper Chem, Porthansgatan 3-5, FI-20500 Turku, Finland.;Jiangsu Univ, Dept Environm & Safety, Biofuels Inst, Zhenjiang 212013, Peoples R China..
    Leppanen, Ann-Sofie
    Abo Akad Univ, Johan Gadolin Proc Chem Ctr, Lab Wood & Paper Chem, Porthansgatan 3-5, FI-20500 Turku, Finland..
    Kisonen, Victor
    Abo Akad Univ, Johan Gadolin Proc Chem Ctr, Lab Wood & Paper Chem, Porthansgatan 3-5, FI-20500 Turku, Finland..
    Willfor, Stefan
    Abo Akad Univ, Johan Gadolin Proc Chem Ctr, Lab Wood & Paper Chem, Porthansgatan 3-5, FI-20500 Turku, Finland..
    Xu, Chunlin
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. Abo Akad Univ, Johan Gadolin Proc Chem Ctr, Lab Wood & Paper Chem, Porthansgatan 3-5, FI-20500 Turku, Finland..
    Vilaplana, Francisco
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Centres, Albanova VinnExcellence Center for Protein Technology, ProNova. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Glycoscience.
    Insights on the distribution of substitutions in spruce galactoglucomannan and its derivatives using integrated chemo-enzymatic deconstruction, chromatography and mass spectrometry2018In: International Journal of Biological Macromolecules, ISSN 0141-8130, E-ISSN 1879-0003, Vol. 112, p. 616-625Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Accurate determination of the distribution of substitutions in the primary molecular structure of heteropolysaccharides and their derivatives is a prerequisite for their increasing application in the pharmaceutical and biomedical fields, which is unfortunately hindered due to the lack of effective analytical techniques. Acetylated galactoglucomannan (GGM) is an abundant plant polysaccharide as the main hemicellulose in softwoods, and therefore constitutes an important renewable resource from lignocellulosic biomass for the development of bioactive and functional materials. Here we present a methodology for profiling the intramolecular structure of spruce GGM and its chemical derivatives (cationic, anionic, and benzoylated) by combining chemo-enzymatic hydrolysis, liquid chromatography, and mass spectrometry. Fast identification and qualitative mass profiling of GGM and its derivatives was conducted using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-ToF-MS) and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). Tandem mass fragmentation analysis and its hyphenation with hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC-ESI-MS/MS) provide further insights on the substitution placement of the GGM oligosaccharides and its derivatives. This method will be useful in understanding the structure-function relationships of native GGM and their derivatives, and therefore facilitate their potential application. 

  • 115.
    Liu, Yingxin
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. Stockholm Univ, Dept Mat & Environm Chem, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Strong and Flexible Nanocomposites of Carboxylated Cellulose Nanofibril Dispersed by Industrial Lignin2018In: ACS Sustainable Chemistry and Engineering, ISSN 2168-0485, Vol. 6, no 4, p. 5524-5532Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We demonstrated that industrial lignin can be facilely processed with carboxylated cellulose nanofibril (CNF) to obtain strong, flexible, and transparent nanocomposites via film casting of dispersions. The tensile strength and strain to failure of lignin-CNF nanocomposites (245 MPa and 15%, respectively at 7.7 wt % of lignin) are superior to previously reported polymer/nanoparticle-CNF composites with polymer contents below SO wt %, such as poly(vinyl alcohol)CNF films and even reduced graphene oxide-CNF films. The excellent mechanical properties of lignin-CNF nanocomposite films are related to the lignin-enhanced colloidal stability and dispersity of CNF in aqueous dispersions supported by measurements of rheology and dynamic light scattering, which accordingly suppresses the excess fibril aggregates during film formation. Moreover, lignin in the nanocomposites benefits an efficient functionalization of gold/iron oxide nanoparticles on the surface of nanocomposites. This study illustrates the great potential of industrial lignin in developing nanocellulose-based materials with advanced properties and functionalities.

  • 116.
    Liu, Yingxin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. Stockholm Univ, Dept Mat & Environm Chem, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Agthe, Michael
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Mat & Environm Chem, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden.;Univ Hamburg, Ctr Free Electron Laser Sci, D-22761 Hamburg, Germany..
    Salajkova, Michaela
    Univ Oslo, Dept Biosci, N-0371 Oslo, Norway..
    Gordeyeva, Korneliya
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Mat & Environm Chem, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Guccini, Valentina
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. Stockholm Univ, Dept Mat & Environm Chem, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Fall, Andreas
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Mat & Environm Chem, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden.;RISE Bioecon, Box 5604, S-11486 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Salazar-Alvarez, German
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. Stockholm Univ, Dept Mat & Environm Chem, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Schuetz, Christina
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. Stockholm Univ, Dept Mat & Environm Chem, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden.;Univ Luxembourg, Phys & Mat Sci Res Unit, L-1511 Luxembourg, Luxembourg..
    Bergstrom, Lennart
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Mat & Environm Chem, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Assembly of cellulose nanocrystals in a levitating drop probed by time-resolved small angle X-ray scattering2018In: Nanoscale, ISSN 2040-3364, E-ISSN 2040-3372, Vol. 10, no 38, p. 18113-18118Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Assembly of bio-based nano-sized particles into complex architectures and morphologies is an area of fundamental interest and technical importance. We have investigated the assembly of sulfonated cellulose nanocrystals (CNC) dispersed in a shrinking levitating aqueous drop using time-resolved small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). Analysis of the scaling of the particle separation distance (d) with particle concentration

  • 117.
    Liu, Yingxin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. Stockholm Univ, Dept Mat & Environm Chem, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Schütz, Christina
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry, Stockholm University, Stockholm.
    Salazar, German
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry, Stockholm University, Stockholm.
    Bergström, Lennart
    Assembly, Gelation, and Helicoidal Consolidation of Nanocellulose spersions2019In: Langmuir, ISSN 0743-7463, E-ISSN 1520-5827, Vol. 35, no 10, p. 3600-3606Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The ability to probe the assembly, gelation, and helicoidal nsolidation of cellulose nanocrystal (CNC) dispersions at high ncentrations can provide unique insight into the assembly and can sist optimized manufacturing of CNC-based photonic and structural terials. In this Feature Article, we review and discuss the ncentration dependence of the structural features, characterized by e particle separation distance and the helical pitch, at CNC ncentrations (c) that range from the isotropic state, over the phasic range, to the fully liquid crystalline state. The structure olution of CNC dispersions probed by time resolved small-angle X-ray attering during evaporation-induced assembly highlighted the portance of gelation and consolidation at high concentrations. We iefly discuss how the homogeneity of helicoidal nanostructures in dry

  • 118.
    Liu, Yingxin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. Stockholm Univ, Dept Mat & Environm Chem, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Stoeckel, Daniela
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Mat & Environm Chem, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Gordeyeva, Korneliya
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Mat & Environm Chem, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Agthe, Michael
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Mat & Environm Chem, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden.;Univ Hamburg, Ctr Free Electron Laser Sci, DE-22761 Hamburg, Germany..
    Schutz, Christina
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Mat & Environm Chem, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden.;Univ Luxembourg, Phys & Mat Res Unit, L-1511 Luxembourg, Luxembourg..
    Fall, Andreas B.
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Mat & Environm Chem, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden.;RISE Bioecon, Box 5604, SE-11486 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Bergstrom, Lennart
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Mat & Environm Chem, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Nanoscale Assembly of Cellulose Nanocrystals during Drying and Redispersion2018In: ACS Macro Letters, E-ISSN 2161-1653, Vol. 7, no 2, p. 172-177Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We have followed the structural evolution during evaporation-induced self-assembly of sulfonated cellulose nanocrystal (CNC) in the presence of H+ and Li+ counterions by small-angle X-ray scattering. Drying of CNC-H dispersions results in ordered films that could not be readily redispersed, while the CNC-Li films were disordered and prone to reswelling and redispersion. The scaling of the separation distance (d) between CNC particles and the particle concentration (c) shows that the CNC-H dispersions display a unidimensional contraction of the nematic structure (d alpha c(-1)) during drying, while the CNC-Li dispersions consolidate isotropically (d alpha c(-1/3)), which is characteristic for hydrogels with no preferential orientation. Temporal evolution of the structure factor and complementary dynamic light-scattering measurements show that CNC-Li is more aggregated than CNC-H during evaporation-induced assembly. Insights on the structural evolution during CNC assembly and redispersion can promote development of novel and optimized processing routes of nanocellulose-based materials.

  • 119.
    Liu, Yingxin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. Stockholm Univ, Dept Mat & Environm Chem, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Yu, Shu-Hong
    Univ Sci & Technol China, CAS Ctr Excellence Nanosci, Collaborat Innovat Ctr Suzhou Nano Sci & Technol, Div Nanomat & Chem,Hefei Natl Lab Phys Sci, Hefei 230026, Anhui, Peoples R China..
    Bergström, Lennart
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. Stockholm Univ, Dept Mat & Environm Chem, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Transparent and Flexible Nacre-Like Hybrid Films of Aminoclays and Carboxylated Cellulose Nanofibrils2018In: Advanced Functional Materials, ISSN 1616-301X, E-ISSN 1616-3028, Vol. 28, no 27, article id 1703277Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Nacre and other biological composites are important inspirations for the design and fabrication of multifunctional composite materials. Transparent, strong, and flexible hybrid films of aminoclays (AC) and carboxylated cellulose nanofibrils (CNF) with a nacre-like microstructure at AC contents up to 60 wt% are prepared. The high transmittance of visible light is attributed to the high homogeneity of the hybrid films and to the relatively small refractive index contrast between the CNF-based matrix and synthetic AC. The strength and strain to failure of the hybrids are significantly higher than biogenic nacre and other nacre-mimicking nanocellulose-based materials, e.g., montmorillonite-CNF and graphene oxide-CNF composite films. The excellent mechanical properties are related to the ionic bonds between the negatively charged carboxylic groups on the CNF and the positively charged amine groups on the AC nanoparticles. This work illustrates the significance of tailoring the interactions between small clay particles and biopolymers in multifunctional materials with potential applications as printable barrier coatings and sub-strates for optoelectronics.

  • 120.
    Lo Re, Giada
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites.
    Engström, Joakim
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Wu, Qiong
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites.
    Malmström, Eva
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Gedde, Ulf W.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Polymeric Materials.
    Olsson, Richard
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Polymeric Materials.
    Berglund, Lars
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    Improved Cellulose Nanofibril Dispersion in Melt-Processed Polycaprolactone Nanocomposites by a Latex-Mediated Interphase and Wet Feeding as LDPE Alternative2018In: ACS Applied Nano Materials, ISSN 2574-0970, Vol. 1, no 6, p. 2669-2677Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This work reports the development of a sustainable and green one-step wet-feeding method to prepare tougher and stronger nanocomposites from biodegradable cellulose nanofibrils (CNF)/polycaprolactone (PCL) constituents, compatibilized with reversible addition fragmentation chain transfer-mediated surfactant-free poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) latex nanoparticles. When a PMMA latex is used, a favorable electrostatic interaction between CNF and the latex is obtained, which facilitates mixing of the constituents and hinders CNF agglomeration. The improved dispersion is manifested in significant improvement of mechanical properties compared with the reference material. The tensile tests show much higher modulus (620 MPa) and strength (23 MPa) at 10 wt % CNF content (compared to the neat PCL reference modulus of 240 and 16 MPa strength), while maintaining high level of work to fracture the matrix (7 times higher than the reference nanocomposite without the latex compatibilizer). Rheological analysis showed a strongly increased viscosity as the PMMA latex was added, that is, from a well-dispersed and strongly interacting CNF network in the PCL.

  • 121.
    Lo Re, Giada
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Spinella, Stephen
    NYU Tandon School of Engineering, Six Metrotech Center, Brooklyn, New York 11201, United States.
    Boujemaoui, Assya
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Vilaseca, Fabiola
    BIMATEC Group, Department of Chemical Engineering, Agricultural and Food Technology, University of Girona, C/Maria Aurèlia Capmany 61, 17003 Girona, Spain.
    Larsson, Per Tomas
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. RISE Bioeconomy, Teknikringen 56, Stockholm, SE-100 44, Sweden.
    Adås, Fredrik
    RISE Bioeconomy, Teknikringen 56, Stockholm, SE-100 44, Sweden.
    Berglund, Lars
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites.
    Poly(ε-caprolactone) Biocomposites Based on Acetylated Cellulose Fibers and Wet Compounding for Improved Mechanical Performance2018In: ACS Sustainable Chemistry & Engineering, ISSN 2168-0485, Vol. 5, no 6, p. 6753-6760Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Poly(epsilon-caprolactone) (PCL) is a ductile thermoplastic, which is biodegradable in the marine environment. Limitations include low strength, petroleum-based origin, and comparably high cost. Cellulose fiber reinforcement is therefore of interest although uniform fiber dispersion is a challenge. In this study, a one-step wet compounding is proposed to validate a sustainable and feasible method to improve the dispersion of the cellulose fibers in hydrophobic polymer matrix as PCL, which showed to be insensitive to the presence of the water during the processing. A comparison between unmodified and acetylated cellulosic wood fibers is made to further assess the net effect of the wet feeding and chemical modification on the biocomposites properties, and the influence of acetylation on fiber structure is reported (ATR-FTIR, XRD). Effects of processing on nano fibrillation, shortening, and dispersion of the cellulose fibers are assessed as well as on PCL molar mass. Mechanical testing, dynamic mechanical thermal analysis, FE-SEM, and X-ray tomography is used to characterize composites. With the addition of 20 wt % cellulosic fibers, the Young's modulus increased from 240 MPa (neat PCL) to 1850 MPa for the biocomposites produced by using the wet feeding strategy, compared to 690 MPa showed for the biocomposites produced using dry feeling. A wet feeding of acetylated cellulosic fibers allowed even a greater increase, with an additional 46% and 248% increase of the ultimate strength and Young's modulus, when compared to wet feeding of the unmodified pulp, respectively.

  • 122. Lombardo, S.
    et al.
    Chen, Pan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Larsson, Per A.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Thielemans, W.
    Wohlert, Jakob
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Svagan, Anna J.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Toward Improved Understanding of the Interactions between Poorly Soluble Drugs and Cellulose Nanofibers2018In: Langmuir, ISSN 0743-7463, E-ISSN 1520-5827, Vol. 34, no 19, p. 5464-5473Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cellulose nanofibers (CNFs) have interesting physicochemical and colloidal properties that have been recently exploited in novel drug-delivery systems for tailored release of poorly soluble drugs. The morphology and release kinetics of such drug-delivery systems heavily relied on the drug-CNF interactions; however, in-depth understanding of the interactions was lacking. Herein, the interactions between a poorly soluble model drug molecule, furosemide, and cationic cellulose nanofibers with two different degrees of substitution are studied by sorption experiments, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. Both MD simulations and experimental results confirmed the spontaneous sorption of drug onto CNF. Simulations further showed that adsorption occurred by the flat aryl ring of furosemide. The spontaneous sorption was commensurate with large entropy gains as a result of release of surface-bound water. Association between furosemide molecules furthermore enabled surface precipitation as indicated by both simulations and experiments. Finally, sorption was also found not to be driven by charge neutralization, between positive CNF surface charges and the furosemide negative charge, so that surface area is the single most important parameter determining the amount of sorbed drug. An optimized CNF-furosemide drug-delivery vehicle thus needs to have a maximized specific surface area irrespective of the surface charge with which it is achieved. The findings also provide important insights into the design principles of CNF-based filters suitable for removal of poorly soluble drugs from wastewater.

  • 123.
    Lu, Huiran
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering, Applied Electrochemistry.
    Hagberg, Johan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering, Applied Electrochemistry.
    Lindbergh, Göran
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering, Applied Electrochemistry.
    Cornell, Ann M.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering, Applied Electrochemistry. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Flexible and Lightweight Lithium-Ion Batteries Based on Cellulose Nanofibrils and Carbon Fibers2018In: BATTERIES-BASEL, ISSN 2313-0105, Vol. 4, no 2, article id 17Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Flexible, low-weight electrodes with integrated current collectors based on chopped polyacrylonitrile carbon fibers (CF) were produced using an easy, aqueous fabrication process, where only 4 wt% of TEMPO-oxidized cellulose nanofibrils (CNF) were used as the binder. A flexible full cell was assembled based on a LiFePO4 (LFP) positive electrode with a CF current collector and a current collector-free CF negative electrode. The cell exhibited a stable specific capacity of 121 mAh g(-1) based on the LFP weight. The CF in the negative electrode acted simultaneously as active material and current collector, which has a significant positive impact on energy density. Stable specific capacities of the CF/CNF negative electrode of 267 mAh g(-1) at 0.1 C and 150 mAh g(-1) at 1 C are demonstrated. The LFP/CNF with CF/CNF, as the current collector positive electrode (LFP-CF), exhibited a good rate performance with a capacity of -150 mAh g(-1) at 0.1 C and 133 mAh g(-1) at 1 C. The polarization of the LFP-CF electrode was similar to that of a commercial Quallion LFP electrode, while much lower compared to a flexible LFP/CNF electrode with Al foil as the current collector. This is ascribed to good contact between the CF and the active material.

  • 124.
    MacKenzie, Jordan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Söderberg, Daniel
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Swerin, Agne
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science. RISE Research Institutes of Sweden.
    Lundell, Fredrik
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Turbulent stress measurements of fibre suspensions in a straight pipe2018In: Physics of fluids, ISSN 1070-6631, E-ISSN 1089-7666, Vol. 30, no 2, article id 025104Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The focus of the present work is an experimental study of the behaviour of semi-dilute, opaque fibre suspensions in fully developed cylindrical pipe flows. Measurements of the normal and turbulent shear stress components and the mean flow were acquired using phase-contrast magnetic resonance velocimetry. Two fibre types, namely, pulp fibre and nylon fibre, were considered in this work and are known to differ in elastic modulus. In total, three different mass concentrations and seven Reynolds numbers were tested to investigate the effects of fibre interactions during the transition from the plug flow to fully turbulent flow. It was found that in fully turbulent flows of nylon fibres, the normal, < u(z)u(z)>(+), and shear, < u(z)u(z)>(+) (note that <.> is the temporal average, u is the fluctuating velocity, z is the axial or streamwise component, and r is the radial direction), turbulent stresses increased with Reynolds number regardless of the crowding number (a concentration measure). For pulp fibre, the turbulent stresses increased with Reynolds number when a fibre plug was present in the flow and were spatially similar in magnitude when no fibre plug was present. Pressure spectra revealed that the stiff, nylon fibre reduced the energy in the inertial-subrange with an increasing Reynolds and crowding number, whereas the less stiff pulp fibre effectively cuts the energy cascade prematurely when the network was fully dispersed.

  • 125.
    Malmström, Eva
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Larsson, Emma
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Kaldéus, Tahani
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Pendergraph, Samuel
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Carlmark, Anna
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Versatile modification of cellulose by UV-induced surface-initiated ATRP2015In: Abstracts of Papers of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0065-7727, Vol. 249Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 126.
    Malmström, Eva
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology. KTH Royal Inst Technol, Fibre & Polymer Technol, Stockholm, Sweden.;KTH Royal Inst Technol, Wallenberg Wood Sci Ctr, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Telaretti Leggieri, Rosella
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology. KTH Royal Inst Technol, Fibre & Polymer Technol, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Kaldéus, Tahani
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH Royal Inst Technol, Fibre & Polymer Technol, Stockholm, Sweden.;KTH Royal Inst Technol, Wallenberg Wood Sci Ctr, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Polymer modification of nanocellulose in water: A versatile approach to new materials2019In: Abstracts of Papers of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0065-7727, Vol. 257Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 127.
    Martinez-Abad, Antonio
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Glycoscience. AlbaNova University Centre.
    Giummarella, Nicola
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Lawoko, Martin
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Vilaplana, Francisco
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Glycoscience. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Differences in extractability under subcritical water reveal interconnected hemicellulose and lignin recalcitrance in birch hardwoods2018In: Green Chemistry, ISSN 1463-9262, E-ISSN 1463-9270Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Hardwoods constitute an essential renewable resource for the production of platform chemicals and bio-based materials. A method for the sequential extraction of hemicelluloses and lignin from hardwoods is proposed using subcritical water in buffered conditions without prior delignification. This allows the cascade isolation of mannan, xylan and lignin-carbohydrate complexes based on their extractability and recalcitrance in birch lignocellulose. The time evolution of the extraction was monitored in terms of composition, oligomeric mass profiling and sequencing of the hemicelluloses, and molecular structure of the lignin and lignin-carbohydrate complexes (LCCs) by heteronuclear single quantum coherence nuclear magnetic resonance (2D HSQC NMR). The minor mannan and pectin populations are easily extractable at short times (<5 min), whereas the major glucuronoxylan (GX) becomes enriched at moderate extraction times. Longer extraction times results in major hydrolysis exhibiting GX fractions with tighter glucuronation spacing and lignin enrichment. The pattern of acetylation and glucuronation in GX is correlated with extractability and with connectivity with lignin through LCCs. This interconnected molecular heterogeneity of hemicelluloses and lignin has important implications for their supramolecular assembly and therefore determines the recalcitrance of hardwood lignocellulosic biomass.

  • 128.
    Martinez-Abad, Antonio
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Glycoscience. Univ Alicante, Analyt Chem Nutr & Food Sci, Alicante, Spain.
    Jimenez-Quero, Amparo
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Glycoscience.
    Wohlert, Jakob
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Vilaplana, Francisco
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Glycoscience. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Spruce hemicelluloses (galactoglucomannan and arabinoglucuronoxylan): Interplay with cellulose and lignin in softwoods2019In: Abstracts of Papers of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0065-7727, Vol. 257Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 129.
    Martinez-Abad, Antonio
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Glycoscience.
    Quero, Amparo Jimenez
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Glycoscience.
    Berglund, Jennie
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Giummarella, Nicola
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Henriksson, Gunnar
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Lindström, Mikael
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology. Wallenberg Wood Sci Ctr, Stockholm, Sweden.;KTH Royal Inst Technol, Fibre & Polymer Technol, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Wohlert, Jakob
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Lawoko, Martin
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Vilaplana, Francisco
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Glycoscience. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Influence of the molecular structure of wood hemicelluloses on the recalcitrance of lignocellulosic biomass2018In: Abstract of Papers of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0065-7727, Vol. 255Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 130.
    Mattsson, Tuve
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. Chalmers Univ Technol, Dept Chem & Chem Engn, SE-41296 Gothenburg, Sweden.;Chalmers Univ Technol,.
    Lewis, William J. T.
    Univ Bath, Dept Chem Engn, Bath BA2 7AY, Avon, England..
    Chew, Y. M. John
    Univ Bath, Dept Chem Engn, Bath BA2 7AY, Avon, England..
    Bird, Michael R.
    Univ Bath, Dept Chem Engn, Bath BA2 7AY, Avon, England..
    The use of fluid dynamic gauging in investigating the thickness and cohesive strength of cake fouling layers formed during cross-flow microfiltration2018In: Separation and Purification Technology, ISSN 1383-5866, E-ISSN 1873-3794, Vol. 198, p. 25-30Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A common challenge during membrane filtration is cake fouling, whereby the build-up of material on the membrane surface reduces the permeate flux. Such fouling layers can also alter the selectivity of the separation. In this study, fluid dynamic gauging (FDG) is used in situ to investigate the cake fouling formed during cross-flow filtration of a model material: softwood Kraft lignin. FDG was used to estimate (i) the thickness of the cake layers (in the gm scale) and (ii) the local cohesive strength at different depths in the cake layer. Fouling layers formed at different transmembrane pressure (TMP) values were investigated. The estimated thickness of the cake layers increased with increasing TMP. However, it was difficult to capture the full cake thickness for the more loosely formed cakes layers. An increase in the cohesive strength of the cake was found to occur with increasing TMP values.

  • 131.
    Medina, Lilian
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Ansari, Farhan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Carosio, Federico
    Salajkova, Michaela
    Berglund, Lars
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Nanocomposites from Clay, Cellulose Nanofibrils, and Epoxy with Improved Moisture Stability for Coatings and Semi-Structural Applications2019In: ACS Applied Nano Materials, E-ISSN 2574-0970Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A new type of high reinforcement content clay-cellulose-thermoset nanocomposite was proposed, where epoxy precursors diffused into a wet porous clay-nanocellulose mat, followed by curing. The processing concept was scaled to > 200 µm thickness composites, the mechanical properties were high for nanocomposites and the materials showed better tensile properties at 90% RH compared with typical nanocellulose materials. The nanostructure and phase distributions were studied using transmission electron microscopy; Young’s modulus, yield strength, ultimate strength and ductility were determined as well as moisture sorption, fire retardancy and oxygen barrier properties. Clay and cellulose contents were varied, as well as the epoxy content. Epoxy had favorable effects on moisture stability, and also improved reinforcement effects at low reinforcement content. More homogeneous nano- and mesoscale epoxy distribution is still required for further property improvements. The materials constitute a new type of three-phase nanocomposites, of interest as coatings, films and as laminated composites for semi-structural applications.

  • 132.
    Medina, Lilian
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites.
    Carosio, Federico
    Politecnico di Torino.
    Berglund, Lars
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Recyclable Nanocomposite Foams of Poly(vinyl alcohol), Clay and Cellulose Nanofibrils - Mechanical Properties and Flame RetardancyManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 133.
    Medina, Lilian
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Carosio, Federico
    Politecn Torino, Dipartimento Sci Appl & Tecnol, Viale Teresa Michel 5, Alessandria, Italy..
    Berglund, Lars
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Recyclable nanocomposite foams of Poly(vinyl alcohol), clay and cellulose nanofibrils - Mechanical properties and flame retardancy2019In: Composites Science And Technology, ISSN 0266-3538, E-ISSN 1879-1050, Vol. 182, article id 107762Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Foam-like clay-nanocellulose hybrids are of great interest as load-bearing structural foams with excellent fire retardancy, due to unique effects from clay on thermal cellulose degradation. For the first time, the fire retardancy of clay-nanocellulose foams are studied in detail, in particular the effect of a third polymer phase, poly(vinyl alcohol). The composition with optimum mechanical properties and fire retardancy is identified and analyzed. Foams are prepared by freeze-drying and the compositions are varied systematically. Thermogravimetric analysis is performed on foam degradation. Mechanical properties from compression tests and fire retardancy data from cone calorimetry are reported, together with cellular structures from SEM and relative density estimates for the foams. Self-extinguishing foams are obtained with superior flame retardancy to commercial polymer foams. Addition of poly(vinyl alcohol) is beneficial for mechanical properties of clay-nanocellulose foams, but impedes the fire retardancy by reducing clay-cellulose synergies and cellulose charring during degradation.

  • 134.
    Medina, Lilian
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Nishiyama, Yoshiharu
    Univ. Grenoble Alpes, CNRS,CERMAV, 38000 Grenoble, France.
    Daicho, Kazuho
    University of Tokyo, Japan.
    Saito, Tsuguyuki
    University of Tokyo, Japan.
    Yan, Min
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI).
    Berglund, Lars
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Nanostructure and Properties of Nacre-Inspired Clay/Cellulose Nanocomposites—Synchrotron X-ray Scattering Analysis2019In: Macromolecules, ISSN 0024-9297, E-ISSN 1520-5835, Vol. 52, no 8, p. 3131-3140Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Nacre-inspired clay nanocomposites have excellent mechanical properties, combined with optical transmittance, gas barrier properties, and fire retardancy, but the mechanical properties are still below predictions from composite micromechanics. The properties of montmorillonite clay/nanocellulose nanocomposite hybrids are investigated as a function of clay content and show a maximum Young’s modulus as high as 28 GPa. Ultimate strength, however, decreases from 280 to 125 MPa between 0 and 80 wt % clay. Small-angle and wide-angle X-ray scattering data from synchrotron radiation are analyzed to suggest nanostructural and phase interaction factors responsible for these observations. Parameters discussed include effective platelet modulus, platelet out-of-plane orientation distribution, nanoporosity, and platelet agglomeration state.

  • 135.
    Mittal, Nitesh
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Fluid Physics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH Royal Institute of Technology.
    Water-Induced Structural Rearrangements on the Nanoscale in Ultrathin Nanocellulose Films2019In: Macromolecules, ISSN 0024-9297, E-ISSN 1520-5835Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 136.
    Mittal, Nitesh
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Ansari, Farhan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, United States.
    Gowda, Krishne, V
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Brouzet, Christophe
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Chen, Pan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Larsson, Per Tomas
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. RISE Bioeconomy, P.O. Box 5604, Stockholm, SwedenRISE Bioeconomy, P.O. Box 5604, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Roth, Stephan Volkher
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Lundell, Fredrik
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Kotov, Nicholas Alexander
    Söderberg, Daniel
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Multiscale Control of Nanocellulose Assembly: Transferring Remarkable Nanoscale Fibril Mechanics to Macroscale Fibers2018In: ACS Nano, ISSN 1936-0851, E-ISSN 1936-086X, Vol. 12, no 7, p. 6378-6388Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Nanoscale building blocks of many materials exhibit extraordinary mechanical properties due to their defect-free molecular structure. Translation of these high mechanical properties to macroscopic materials represents a difficult materials engineering challenge due to the necessity to organize these building blocks into multiscale patterns and mitigate defects emerging at larger scales. Cellulose nanofibrils (CNFs), the most abundant structural element in living systems, has impressively high strength and stiffness, but natural or artificial cellulose composites are 3-15 times weaker than the CNFs. Here, we report the flow-assisted organization of CNFs into macroscale fibers with nearly perfect unidirectional alignment. Efficient stress transfer from macroscale to individual CNF due to cross-linking and high degree of order enables their Young's modulus to reach up to 86 GPa and a tensile strength of 1.57 GPa, exceeding the mechanical properties of known natural or synthetic biopolymeric materials. The specific strength of our CNF fibers engineered at multiscale also exceeds that of metals, alloys, and glass fibers, enhancing the potential of sustainable lightweight high-performance materials with multiscale self-organization.

  • 137.
    Mittal, Nitesh
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Lundell, Fredrik
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Hedhammar, My
    Söderberg, Daniel
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Flow-assisted organization of nanostructured bio-based materials2018In: Abstract of Papers of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0065-7727, Vol. 255Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 138.
    Montanari, Celine
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites. KTH Royal Inst Technol, Fibre & Polymer Technol, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Li, Yuanyuan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology. KTH Royal Inst Technol, Fibre & Polymer Technol, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Berglund, Lars
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH Royal Inst Technol, Fibre & Polymer Technol, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Multifunctional transparent wood for thermal energy storage applications2019In: Abstracts of Papers of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0065-7727, Vol. 257Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 139.
    Montanari, Celine
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Li, Yuanyuan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Chen, Hui
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Yan, Max
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics.
    Berglund, Lars A.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Transparent Wood for Thermal Energy Storage and Reversible Optical Transmittance2019In: ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces, ISSN 1944-8244, E-ISSN 1944-8252, Vol. 11, no 22, p. 20465-20472Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Functional load-bearing materials based on phase-change materials (PCMs) are under rapid development for thermal energy storage (TES) applications. Mesoporous structures are ideal carriers for PCMs and guarantee shape stability during the thermal cycle. In this study, we introduce transparent wood (TW) as a TES system. A shape-stabilized PCM based on polyethylene glycol is encapsulated into a delignified wood substrate, and the TW obtained is fully characterized; also in terms of nano- and mesoscale structures. Transparent wood for thermal energy storage (TW-TES) combines large latent heat (similar to 76 J g(-1)) with switchable optical transparency. During the heating process, optical transmittance increases by 6% and reaches 68% for 1.5 mm thick TW-TES. Characterization of the thermal energy regulation performance shows that the prepared TW-TES composite is superior to normal glass because of the combination of good heat-storage and thermal insulation properties. This makes TW-TES composites interesting candidates for applications in energy-saving buildings.

  • 140.
    Mushi, Ngesa Ezekiel
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, College of Engineering and Technology, University of Dar Es Salaam, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania.
    Nishino, Takashi
    Kobe Univ, Dept Chem Sci & Engn, Kobe, Hyogo 6578501, Japan..
    Berglund, Lars A.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Zhou, Qi
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Glycoscience. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Strong and Tough Chitin Film from alpha-Chitin Nanofibers Prepared by High Pressure Homogenization and Chitosan Addition2019In: ACS Sustainable Chemistry and Engineering, ISSN 2168-0485, Vol. 7, no 1, p. 1692-1697Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Chitin nanofibers are an interesting biological nanomaterial for advanced applications, for example, in medicine, electronics, packaging and water purification. The challenge is to separate chitin nanofibers from protein in the exoskeleton structure of arthropods and avoid nanofibril aggregation to realize the mechanical potential of chitin. In this work, we developed a new method for the preparation of chitin nanofibers from lobster shell exoskeleton using 10 wt % chitosan as a sacrificial polymer. The addition of chitosan in the raw chitin colloidal suspension during high pressure homogenization process at pH 3 significantly reduced the agglomeration of chitin nanofibers as revealed by dynamic light scattering and transmission electron microscopy. Chitin film prepared from the chitin nanofiber suspension by vacuum filtration exhibited a true nanofibrils network structure without fibril aggregations as characterized by scanning electron microscopy. The presence of chitosan not only improves the colloidal stability of chitin nanofibers suspension but also facilitates the formation of chitin nanofiber network structure in the film as indicated by wide-angle X-ray diffraction analysis. The chitin nanofiber film with 4 +/- 1 wt % residual chitosan showed high tensile strength (187.2 +/- 5.6 MPa) and high work of fracture (12.1 +/- 0.4 MJ/m(3)), much higher than those chitin and chitosan films reported previously in the literature.

  • 141.
    Nechyporchuk, Oleksandr
    et al.
    RISE Res Inst Sweden, Div Mat & Prod, POB 104, SE-43122 Molndal, Sweden..
    Hakansson, Karl M. O.
    RISE Bioecon, POB 5604, SE-11486 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Gowda, Krishne, V
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Lundell, Fredrik
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Hagstrom, Bengt
    RISE Res Inst Sweden, Div Mat & Prod, POB 104, SE-43122 Molndal, Sweden..
    Kohnke, Tobias
    RISE Res Inst Sweden, Div Mat & Prod, POB 104, SE-43122 Molndal, Sweden..
    Continuous Assembly of Cellulose Nanofibrils and Nanocrystals into Strong Macrofibers through Microfluidic Spinning2019In: ADVANCED MATERIALS TECHNOLOGIES, ISSN 2365-709X, Vol. 4, no 2, article id 1800557Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Microfluidic fiber spinning is a promising technique for assembling cellulose nanomaterials into macroscopic fibers. However, its implementation requires upscalabe fabrication processes while maintaining high strength of the fibers, which could not be previously achieved. Herein, a continuous wet spinning process based on microfluidic flow focusing is developed to produce strong fibers from cellulose nanofibrils (CNFs) and nanocrystals (CNCs). Fibers with an average breaking tenacity as high as 29.5 cN tex(-1) and Young's modulus of 1146 cN tex(-1) are reported for the first time, produced from nonhighly purified CNF grades. Using the same developed method, wet spinning of fibers from CNCs is achieved for the first time, reaching an average Young's modulus of 1263 cN tex(-1) and a breaking tenacity of 10.6 cN tex(-1), thus exhibiting strength twice as high as that of common CNC films. A rather similar stiffness of CNC and CNF spun fibers may originate from similar degrees of alignment, as confirmed by wide-angle X-ray scattering (WAXS) and birefringence measurements, whereas lower strength may primarily arise from the shorter length of CNCs compared to that of CNFs. The benefit of CNCs is their higher solids content in the dopes. By combining both CNCs and CNFs, the fiber properties can be tuned.

  • 142.
    Nordenström, Malin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Nystrom, Gustav
    Empa, Lab Appl Wood Mat, Dubendorf, Switzerland..
    Fall, Andreas
    Res Inst Sweden, RISE, Bioecon, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Colloidal gels and glasses from nanocelluloses2019In: Abstracts of Papers of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0065-7727, Vol. 257Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 143.
    Ohm, Wiebke
    et al.
    DESY, Hamburg, Germany..
    Rothkirch, Andre
    DESY, Hamburg, Germany..
    Pandit, Pallavi
    DESY, Hamburg, Germany..
    Koerstgens, Volker
    Tech Univ Munich, Garching, Germany..
    Mueller-Buschbaum, Peter
    Tech Univ Munich, Garching, Germany..
    Rojas, Ramiro
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Yu, Shun
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Brett, Calvin
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Fluid Physics.
    Söderberg, Daniel
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Fluid Physics.
    Roth, Stephan V.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites. DESY, Hamburg, Germany..
    Morphological and crystalline properties of airbrush spray-deposited enzymatic cellulose thin films2019In: Abstracts of Papers of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0065-7727, Vol. 257Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 144.
    Oliveira de Castro, Danielle
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Heat and Power Technology.
    Karim, Zoheb
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Medina, Lilian
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites.
    Svedberg, A.
    Wågberg, Lars
    Söderberg, Daniel
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics.
    Berglund, Lars
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Scale up of nanocellulose/hybrid inorganic films using a pilot web former2017In: International Conference on Nanotechnology for Renewable Materials 2017, TAPPI Press , 2017, p. 408-418Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 145.
    Olsen, Peter
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Jawerth, Marcus
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Lawoko, Martin
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Johansson, Mats
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Berglund, Lars
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Transforming technical lignins to structurally defined star-copolymers under ambient conditions2019In: Green Chemistry, ISSN 1463-9262, E-ISSN 1463-9270, Vol. 21, no 9, p. 2478-2486Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Transforming biomass derived components to materials with controlled and predictable properties is a major challenge. Current work describes the controlled synthesis of starcopolymers with functional and degradable arms from the Lignoboost (R) process. Macromolecular control is achieved by combining lignin fractionation and characterization with ring-opening copolymerization (ROCP). The cyclic monomers used are epsilon-caprolactone (epsilon CL) and a functional carbonate monomer, 2-allyloxymethyl-2-ethyltrimethylene carbonate (AOMEC). The synthesis is performed at ambient temperature, under bulk conditions, in an open flask, and the graft composition and allyl functionality distribution are controlled by the copolymerization kinetics. Emphasis is placed on understanding the initiation efficiency, structural changes to the lignin backbone and the final macromolecular architecture. The present approach provides a green, scalable and cost effective protocol to create well-defined functional macromolecules from technical lignins.

  • 146.
    Panzer, Matthew B.
    et al.
    Univ Virginia, Ctr Appl Biomech, Charlottesville, VA USA..
    Giudice, J. Sebastian
    Univ Virginia, Ctr Appl Biomech, Charlottesville, VA USA..
    Caudillo, Adrian
    Univ Virginia, Ctr Appl Biomech, Charlottesville, VA USA..
    Mukherjee, Sayak
    Univ Virginia, Ctr Appl Biomech, Charlottesville, VA USA..
    Kong, Kevin
    Univ Virginia, Ctr Appl Biomech, Charlottesville, VA USA..
    Cronin, Duane S.
    Univ Waterloo, Waterloo, ON, Canada..
    Barker, Jeffrey
    Univ Waterloo, Waterloo, ON, Canada..
    Gierczycka, Donata
    Univ Waterloo, Waterloo, ON, Canada..
    Bustamante, Michael
    Univ Waterloo, Waterloo, ON, Canada..
    Bruneau, David
    Univ Waterloo, Waterloo, ON, Canada..
    Corrales, Miguel
    Univ Waterloo, Waterloo, ON, Canada..
    Halldin, Peter
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Neuronic Engineering.
    Fahlstedt, Madelen
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Neuronic Engineering.
    Arnesen, Marcus
    Jungstedt, Erik
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Gayzik, F. Scott
    Wake Forest Univ, Bowman Gray Sch Med, Winston Salem, NC USA..
    Stitzel, Joel D.
    Wake Forest Univ, Bowman Gray Sch Med, Winston Salem, NC USA..
    Decker, William
    Wake Forest Univ, Bowman Gray Sch Med, Winston Salem, NC USA..
    Baker, Alex M.
    Wake Forest Univ, Bowman Gray Sch Med, Winston Salem, NC USA..
    Ye, Xin
    Wake Forest Univ, Bowman Gray Sch Med, Winston Salem, NC USA..
    Brown, Philip
    Wake Forest Univ, Bowman Gray Sch Med, Winston Salem, NC USA..
    NUMERICAL CROWDSOURCING OF NFL FOOTBALL HELMETS2018In: Journal of Neurotrauma, ISSN 0897-7151, E-ISSN 1557-9042, Vol. 35, no 16, p. A148-A148Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 147.
    Paulraj, Thomas
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Riazanova, A. V.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Svagan, A. J.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Bioinspired capsules based on nanocellulose, xyloglucan and pectin - The influence of capsule wall composition on permeability properties2018In: Acta Biomaterialia, ISSN 1742-7061, E-ISSN 1878-7568, Vol. 69, p. 196-205Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Materials based on renewable biopolymers, selective permeability and stimuli-responsive release/loading properties play an important role in biomedical applications. Here, in order to mimic the plant primary cell-wall, microcapsules have been fabricated using cell wall polysaccharides, namely pectin, xyloglucan and cellulose nanofibers. For the first time, a large amount of xyloglucan was successfully included in such capsules. These capsules demonstrated stimuli-responsive (ON/OFF) permeability and biocompatibility. The live cell staining revealed that the microcapsules' surface enhanced cell growth and also the non-toxic nature of the microcapsules. In water, the microcapsules were completely and partially permeable to fluorescent dextrans with an average molecular weight of 70 kDa (hydrodynamic diameter of ca. 12 nm) and 2000 kDa (ca. 54 nm), respectively. On the other hand, the permeability dropped quickly when the capsules were exposed to 250 mM NaCl solution, trapping a fraction of the 70 kDa dextrans in the capsule interior. The decrease in permeability was a direct consequence of the capsule-wall composition, i.e. the presence of xyloglucan and a low amount of charged molecules such as pectin. The low permeability of capsules in saline conditions (and in a model biological medium), combined with a capsule wall that is made from dietary fibers only, potentially enables their use in biological applications, such as colon targeted delivery in the gastro-intestinal tract. 

  • 148.
    Peterson, Anna
    et al.
    Chalmers Univ Technol, Dept Chem & Chem Engn, S-41296 Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Ostergren, Ida
    Chalmers Univ Technol, Dept Chem & Chem Engn, S-41296 Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Lotsari, Antiope
    Chalmers Univ Technol, Dept Chem & Chem Engn, S-41296 Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Venkatesh, Abhijit
    Chalmers Univ Technol, Dept Ind & Mat Sci, S-41296 Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Thunberg, Johannes
    Chalmers Univ Technol, Dept Ind & Mat Sci, S-41296 Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Strom, Anna
    Chalmers Univ Technol, Dept Chem & Chem Engn, S-41296 Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Rojas, Ramiro
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Andersson, Martin
    Chalmers Univ Technol, Dept Chem & Chem Engn, S-41296 Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Berglund, Lars
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Boldizar, Antal
    Chalmers Univ Technol, Dept Ind & Mat Sci, S-41296 Gothenburg, Sweden.;Chalmers Univ Technol, Wallenberg Wood Sci Ctr, S-41296 Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Mueller, Christian
    Chalmers Univ Technol, Dept Chem & Chem Engn, S-41296 Gothenburg, Sweden.;Chalmers Univ Technol, Wallenberg Wood Sci Ctr, S-41296 Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Dynamic Nanocellulose Networks for Thermoset-like yet Recyclable Plastics with a High Melt Stiffness and Creep Resistance2019In: Biomacromolecules, ISSN 1525-7797, E-ISSN 1526-4602, Vol. 20, no 10, p. 3924-3932Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many polymers, including polyethylene, feature a relatively low melting point and hence must be cross-linked to make them viable for applications that demand a high stiffness and creep resistance at elevated temperatures. The resulting thermoset plastics cannot be recycled, and therefore alternative materials with a reconfigurable internal network structure are in high demand. Here, we establish that such a thermoset-like yet recyclable material can be realized through the addition of a nanocellulose reinforcing agent. A network consisting of cellulose nanocrystals, nano- or microfibrils imparts many of the characteristics that are usually achieved through chemical cross-linking. For instance, the addition of only 7.5 wt % of either nanocellulose material significantly enhances the melt stiffness of an otherwise molten ethylene-acrylate copolymer by at least 1 order of magnitude. At the same time, the nanocellulose network reduces the melt creep elongation to less than 10%, whereas the neat molten matrix would rupture. At high shear rates, however, the molten composites do not display a significantly higher viscosity than the copolymer matrix, and therefore retain the processability of a thermoplastic material. Repeated re-extrusion at 140 degrees C does not compromise the thermomechanical properties, which indicates a high degree of recyclability. The versatility of dynamic nanocellulose networks is illustrated by 3D printing of a cellulose composite, where the high melt stiffness improves the printability of the resin.

  • 149.
    Pettersson, Torbjörn
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Erlandsson, Johan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Larsson, Per
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    On the mechanism of freeze-induced crosslinking of aerogels made from periodate-oxidised cellulose nanofibrils2018In: Abstracts of Papers of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0065-7727, Vol. 255Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 150. Pham, Trang A.T.
    et al.
    Schwerdt, Julian G.
    Shirley, Neil J.
    Xing, Xiaohui
    Hsieh, Yves S. Y.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Glycoscience. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Srivastava, Vaibhav
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Glycoscience.
    Bulone, Vincent
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Glycoscience.
    Little, Alan
    Analysis of cell wall synthesis and metabolism during early germination of Blumeria graminis f. sp. hordei conidial cells induced in vitro2019In: The Cell Surface, ISSN 2468-2330, Vol. 5, p. 100030-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As an obligate biotroph, Blumeria graminis f. sp. hordei (Bgh) cannot be grown in an axenic culture, and instead must be cultivated on its host species, Hordeum vulgare (barley). In this study an in vitro system utilizing n-hexacosanal, a constituent of the barley cuticle and known inducer of Bgh germination, was used to cultivate Bgh and differentiate conidia up to the appressorial germ tube stage for analysis. Transcriptomic and proteomic profiling of the appressorial germ tube stage revealed that there was a significant shift towards energy and protein production during the pre-penetrative phase of development, with an up-regulation of enzymes associated with cellular respiration and protein synthesis, modification and transport. Glycosidic linkage analysis of the cell wall polysaccharides demonstrated that during appressorial development an increase in 1,3- and 1,4-linked glucosyl residues and xylosyl residues was detected along with a significant decrease in galactosyl residues. The use of this in vitro cultivation method demonstrates that it is possible to analyse the pre-penetrative processes of Bgh development in the absence of a plant host.

1234 101 - 150 of 198
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf