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  • 101. Hassel, B. I.
    et al.
    Modén, Carl S.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering.
    Berard, P.
    Berglund, Lars A.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Single cube apparatus - Shear properties determination and shear strain variation in natural density gradient materials2009In: ICCM-17 17th International Conference on Composite Materials, 2009Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Transversal shear of softwoods was studied with the single cube apparatus (SCA). Full field strain data and FEA were used to validate the device. Once a close to pure shear strain region was confirmed, the relationship between shear strain and radial density gradient was obtained; finally an improved FE model was created.

  • 102.
    Hassel, Ivon
    et al.
    Laboratory of Structural Function, Research Institute for Sustainable Humanosphere, Kyoto University.
    Berard, Pierre
    Laboratory of Sustainable Materials, Research Institute for Sustainable Humanosphere, Kyoto University.
    Modén, Carl S.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Lightweight Structures.
    Berglund, Lars
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites.
    The single cube apparatus for shear testing: Full-field strain data and finite element analysis of wood in transverse shear2009In: Composites Science And Technology, ISSN 0266-3538, E-ISSN 1879-1050, Vol. 69, no 7-8, p. 877-882Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The design and analysis of wood structures require accurate data for shear properties, where transverse shear in particular has been neglected in the past. The single cube apparatus (SCA) was applied to transverse shear of Norway spruce (Picea Abies), due to the importance of this species in wood structures, such as glulam, and also its allegedly low value of GRT . Full-field strain data and FEA were used to analyze the potential of the method. The presence of a large central region of homogeneous and close to pure shear strain was confirmed. The SCA method is therefore a strong candidate for improved shear test procedures in wood and other materials, where porosity (gripping problems), heterogeneity on mm-scale and polar orthotropy (annual ring curvature) may cause particular difficulties. In contrast to many other shear test studies, the accuracy of the present GRT data is supported by documented large and homogeneous specimen stress- and strain-fields in almost pure shear, direct measurements of strain field, and careful stress analysis based on FEA.

  • 103.
    Hassel, Ivon
    et al.
    Laboratory of Structural Function, Research Institute for Sustainable Humanosphere, Kyoto University.
    Modén, Carl S.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Lightweight Structures.
    Berglund, Lars
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites.
    Functional gradient effects explain the low transverse shear modulus in spruce: Full-field strain data and a micromechanics model2009In: Composites Science And Technology, ISSN 0266-3538, E-ISSN 1879-1050, Vol. 69, no 14, p. 2491-2496Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An important failure mechanism in glulam beams is cracking caused by out-of-plane transverse loads. It has been demonstrated that the low transverse shear modulus G(RT) in spruce contributes to large transverse strain inhomogeneities due to the annual ring structure in combination with shear coupling effects. In the present study, improved understanding of annual ring effects is achieved by the development of a micromechanical model. It relates the functional density gradient in spruce annual rings to shear modulus GRT. The geometrical basis is a hexagonal cell model, and in shear it is demonstrated to deform primarily by cell wall bending. Full-field strain measurements by digital speckle photography (DSP) show very strong correlation with predicted shear strains at the annual ring scale. Predictions are obtained by implementation of the micromechanics model in a finite element (FE) model developed for the single cube apparatus shear specimen. The low GRT of spruce is due to the strong dependence of GRT on relative density rho/rho(s)(G(RT) proportional to (rho/rho(s))(3)). This is particularly important in spruce. Even though average density is typically quite high, the functional gradient structure includes local densities as low as 200 kg/m(3).

  • 104.
    Henriksson, Marielle
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Berglund, Lars
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Structure and Properties of Cellulose Nanocomposite Films Containing Melamine Formaldehyde2007In: Journal of Applied Polymer Science, ISSN 0021-8995, E-ISSN 1097-4628, Vol. 106, no 4, p. 2817-2824Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Films of high Young's modulus and low density are of interest for application as loudspeaker membranes. In the present study nanocomposite films were prepared from microfibrillated cellulose (MFC) and from MFC in combination with melamine formaldehyde (MF). The prepared materials were Studied with respect to structure as well as physical and mechanical properties. Studies in SEM and calculation of porosity showed that these materials have a dense paper-like structure. The moisture sorption isotherms were measured and showed that Moisture content decreased in the presence of ME Mechanical properties were studied by dynamical mechanical thermal measurements as well as by tensile tests. Cellulose films showed an average Young's modulus of 14 GPa while the nanocomposites showed an average Young's modulus as high as 16.6 GPa and average tensile strength as high as 142 M.Pa. By controlling composition and structure, the range of properties of these materials can extend the property range available for existing materials. The combination of comparatively high mechanical damping and high sound propagation velocity is of technical interest.

  • 105. Henriksson, Marielle
    et al.
    Berglund, Lars A.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Bulone, Vincent
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Glycoscience.
    Zhou, Qi
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Glycoscience.
    Method of producing and the use of microfibrillated paper2009Patent (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    The present invention relates to a method of producing a cellulose based paper, the paper itself and the use thereof where the paper exhibits enhanced mechanical properties. The method involves providing a suspension of well dispersed modified cellulose at a low concentration. The properties and the chemical structure of the paper make it suitable for in vivo applications such as implant material.

  • 106.
    Henriksson, Marielle
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites.
    Berglund, Lars
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites.
    Bulone, Vincent
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Glycoscience.
    Zhou, Qi
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Glycoscience.
    Producing paper, useful as e.g. filter paper, speaker membrane and suture, comprises providing modified nanofibrils of cellulose, providing suspension of modified nanofibrils, and filtering, dewatering and drying the nanofibrils2009Patent (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    The present invention relates to a method of producing a cellulose based paper, the paper itself and the use thereof where the paper exhibits enhanced mechanical properties. The method involves providing a suspension of well dispersed modified cellulose at a low concentration. The properties and the chemical structure of the paper make it suitable for in vivo applications such as implant material.

  • 107.
    Henriksson, Marielle
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Berglund, Lars
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Isaksson, Per
    Solid Mechanics Department, Mid Sweden University, Sundsvall.
    Lindström, Tom
    STFI-Packforsk AB.
    Nishino, Takashi
    Chemical Science and Engineering Department, Faculty of Engineering, Kobe University.
    Cellulose nanopaper structures of high toughness2008In: Biomacromolecules, ISSN 1525-7797, E-ISSN 1526-4602, Vol. 9, no 6, p. 1579-1585Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cellulose nanofibrils offer interesting potential as a native fibrous constituent of mechanical performance exceeding the plant fibers in current use for commercial products. In the present study, wood nanofibrils are used to prepare porous cellulose nanopaper of remarkably high toughness. Nanopapers of different porosities and from nanofibrils of different molar mass are prepared. Uniaxial tensile tests are performed and structure-property relationships are discussed. The high toughness of highly porous nanopaper is related to the nanofibrillar network structure and high mechanical nanofibril performance. Also, molar mass correlates with tensile strength. This indicates that nanofibril fracture controls ultimate strength. Furthermore, the large strain-to-failure means that mechanisms, such as interfibril slippage, also contributes to inelastic deformation in addition to deformation of the nanofibrils themselves.

  • 108.
    Henriksson, Marielle
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Fogelström, Linda
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Berglund, Lars A.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Johansson, Mats
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Hult, Anders
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    New nanocomposite concept based on crosslinking of hyperbranched polymers in cellulose nanopaper templates2010In: International Conference on Nanotechnology for the Forest Products Industry 2010, 2010, p. 880-897Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 109.
    Henriksson, Marielle
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Fogelström, Linda
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    Berglund, Lars A.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Johansson, Mats K. G.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Hult, Anders
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Novel nanocomposite concept based on cross-linking of hyperbranched polymers in reactive cellulose nanopaper templates2011In: Composites Science And Technology, ISSN 0266-3538, E-ISSN 1879-1050, Vol. 71, no 1, p. 13-17Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cellulosic fibers offer interesting possibilities for good interfacial adhesion due to the high density of hydroxyl groups at the surface. in the present study, the potential of a new nanocomposite concept is investigated, where a porous cellulose nanofiber network is impregnated with a solution of reactive hyperbranched polyester. The polymer is chemically cross-linked to form a solid matrix. The resulting nanocomposite structure is unique. The matrix surrounds a tough nanopaper structure consisting of approximately 20 nm diameter nanofibers with an average interfiber distance of only about 6 nm. The cross-linked polymer matrix shows strongly altered characteristics when it is cross-linked in the confined space within the nanofiber network, including dramatically increased T-g, and this must be due to covalent matrix-nanofiber linkages.

  • 110.
    Henriksson, Marielle
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Fogelström, Linda
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Johansson, Mats K. G.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Hult, Anders
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Berglund, Lars
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    A new nanocomposites approach for strong attachment of polymer matrices to cellulose nanofibril networksManuscript (Other academic)
  • 111.
    Henriksson, Marielle
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Henriksson, Gunnar
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Berglund, Lars
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Lindström, Tom
    STFI-Packforsk AB.
    An environmentally friendly method for enzyme-assisted preparation of microfibrillated cellulose (MFC) nanofibers2007In: European Polymer Journal, ISSN 0014-3057, E-ISSN 1873-1945, Vol. 43, no 8, p. 3434-3441Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Microfibrillated cellulose nanofibers (MFC) provide strong reinforcement in polymer nanocomposites. In the present study, cellulosic wood fiber pulps are treated by endoglucanases or acid hydrolysis in combination with mechanical shearing in order to disintegrate MFC from the wood fiber cell wall. After successful disintegration, the MFC nanofibers were studied by atomic force microscopy (AFM). Enzyme-treatment was found to facilitate disintegration, and the MFC nanofibers produced also showed higher average molar mass and larger aspect ratio than nanofibers resulting from acidic pretreatment.

  • 112.
    Hergenröder, Björn
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Lightweight Structures.
    Modén, Carl S.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Lightweight Structures.
    Berglund, Lars
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites.
    Method to determine the transverse shear modulus (GRT) of softwoods using full field strain measurements in off-axis compressionIn: Composites. Part A, Applied science and manufacturing, ISSN 1359-835X, E-ISSN 1878-5840Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 113.
    Herrera, Martha
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Thitiwutthisakul, Kasinee
    SCG Packaging Publ Co Ltd, Prod & Technol Dev Ctr, Ban Pong 70110, Ratchaburi, Thailand..
    Yang, Xuan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Rujitanaroj, Pim-on
    SCG Packaging Publ Co Ltd, Prod & Technol Dev Ctr, Ban Pong 70110, Ratchaburi, Thailand..
    Rojas, Ramiro
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Berglund, Lars
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites.
    Preparation and evaluation of high-lignin content cellulose nanofibrils from eucalyptus pulp2018In: Cellulose (London), ISSN 0969-0239, E-ISSN 1572-882X, Vol. 25, no 5, p. 3121-3133Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    High Klason lignin content (23 wt%) cellulose nanofibrils (LCNF) were successfully isolated from eucalyptus pulp through catalyzed chemical oxidation, followed by high-pressure homogenization. LCNFs had a diameter of ca. 13 nm according to AFM evaluation. Dense films were obtained through vacuum filtration (nanopaper) and subjected to different drying methods. When drying under heat and mild vacuum (93 degrees C, 95 kPa) a higher water contact angle, lower roughness and oxygen transmission rate were observed, compared to those drying at room temperature under compression conditions. DSC experiments showed difference in signals associated to T-g of LCNF compared to CNF produced from spruce bleached pulp through enzymatic pre-treatment. The LCNF-based nanopaper showed mechanical properties slightly lower than for those made from cellulose nanofibrils, yet with increased hydrophobicity. In summary, the high-lignin content cellulose nanofibrils proved to be a suitable material for the production of low oxygen permeability nanopaper, with chemical composition close to native wood.

  • 114. Ikkala, Olli
    et al.
    Ras, Robin H. A.
    Houbenov, Nikolay
    Ruokolainen, Janne
    Pääkkö, Marjo
    Laine, Janne
    Leskelä, Markku
    Berglund, Lars A.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Lindström, Tom
    ten Brinke, Gerrit
    Iatrou, Hermis
    Hadjichristidis, Nikos
    Faul, Charl F. J.
    Solid state nanofibers based on self-assemblies: from cleaving from self-assemblies to multilevel hierarchical constructs2009In: Faraday discussions (Online), ISSN 1359-6640, E-ISSN 1364-5498, Vol. 143, p. 95-107Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 115. Ikkala, Olli
    et al.
    Walther, Andreas
    Ras, Robin
    Berglund, Lars A.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites.
    Native cellulose nanofibers: From biomimetic nanocomposites to functionalized gel spun fibers and functional aerogels2012In: Abstract of Papers of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0065-7727, Vol. 243Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 116. Jin, H.
    et al.
    Pääkkö, M.
    Netral, Julia
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Berglund, Lars A.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Neagu, C.
    Bourban, P. -E
    Ankerfors, M.
    Lindström, T.
    Ikkala, O.
    Effects of different drying methods on textural properties of nanocellulose aerogels2009In: ICCM-17 17th International Conference on Composite Materials, 2009Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is increasing research interest in nanocellulose aerogels because they have low density, hierarchical structure and they are biodegradable and biocompatible. Typically, aerogels are made by supercritical drying, freeze drying and vacuum drying. This work will report the effects that different drying methods have on textural properties of aerogels.

  • 117. Jin, Hua
    et al.
    Cao, Anyuan
    Shi, Enzheng
    Seitsonen, Jani
    Zhang, Luhui
    Ras, Robin H. A.
    Berglund, Lars A.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Ankerfors, Mikael
    Walther, Andreas
    Ikkala, Olli
    Ionically interacting nanoclay and nanofibrillated cellulose lead to tough bulk nanocomposites in compression by forced self-assembly2013In: Journal of Materials Chemistry B, ISSN 2050-750X, Vol. 1, no 6, p. 835-840Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Several approaches have recently been shown for self-assembled biomimetic composite films, aiming at combinations of high toughness, strength, and stiffness. However, it remains challenging to achieve high toughness using simple processes especially for bulk materials. We demonstrate that ionically interacting cationic native nanofibrillated cellulose (C-NFC) and anionic nanoclay, i.e. montmorillonite (MTM), allow local self-assemblies by a simple centrifugation process to achieve 3D bulk materials. The composite with MTM/C-NFC of 63/37 w/w has a high compressive strain to failure of 37% with distinct plastic deformation behaviour, a high work to fracture of 23.1 MJ m(-3), and a relatively high compression strength of 76 MPa. Unlike the conventionally used sequential deposition methods to achieve well-defined layers for the oppositely charged units as limited to films, the present one-step method allows quick formation of bulk materials and leads to local self-assemblies, however, having a considerable amount of nanovoids and defects between them. We suggest that the nanovoids and defects promote the plastic deformation and toughness. Considering the simple preparation method and bio-based origin of NFC, we expect that the present tough bulk nanocomposites in compression have potential in applications for sustainable and environmentally friendly materials in construction and transportation.

  • 118.
    Joby Kochumalayil, Jose
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation.
    Bergenstråhle-Wohlert, Malin
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Utsel, Simon
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Zhou, Qi
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Berglund, Lars
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Bioinspired and highly oriented clay nanocomposites with a xyloglucan biopolymer matrix: Extending the range of mechanical and barrier properties2013In: Biomacromolecules, ISSN 1525-7797, E-ISSN 1526-4602, Vol. 14, no 1, p. 84-91Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The development of clay bionanocomposites requires processing routes with nanostructural control. Moreover, moisture durability is a concern with water-soluble biopolymers. Here, oriented bionanocomposite coatings with strong in-plane orientation of clay platelets are for the first time prepared by continuous water-based processing. Montmorillonite (MTM) and a "new" unmodified biological polymer (xyloglucan (XG)) are combined. The resulting nanocomposites are characterized by FE-SEM, TEM, and XRD. XG adsorption on MTM is measured by quartz crystal microbalance analysis. Mechanical and gas barrier properties are measured, also at high relative humidity. The reinforcement effects are modeled. XG dimensions in composites are estimated using atomistic simulations. The nanostructure shows highly oriented and intercalated clay platelets. The reinforcement efficiency and effects on barrier properties are remarkable and are likely to be due to highly oriented and well-dispersed MTM and strong XG-MTM interactions. Properties are well preserved in humid conditions and the reasons for this are discussed.

  • 119.
    Joby Kochumalayil, Jose
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation.
    Morimune, Seira
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Nishino, Takashi
    Walther, Andreas
    Ikkala, Olli
    Berglund, Lars
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Nacre-mimetic xyloglucan/clay bionanocomposites prepared from hydrocolloidal suspension – a chemical modification route for preserved performance at high humidityManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 120.
    Joby Kochumalayil, Jose
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation.
    Zhou, Qi
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Glycoscience. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Kasai, Wakako
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Wood Chemistry and Pulp Technology.
    Berglund, Lars
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Regioselective modification of a xyloglucan hemicellulose for high-performance biopolymer barrier films2013In: Carbohydrate Polymers, ISSN 0144-8617, E-ISSN 1879-1344, Vol. 93, no 2, p. 466-472Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Biobased polymers such as starch and hemicelluloses from wood are of interest for packaging applications, but suffer from limitations in performance under moist conditions. Xyloglucan from industrial tamarind seed waste offers potential, but its Tg is too high for thermal processing applications. Regioselective modification is therefore performed using an approach involving periodate oxidation followed by reduction. The resulting polymer structures are characterized using MALDI-TOF-MS, size-exclusion chromatography, FTIR and carbohydrate analysis. Films are cast from water and characterized by thermo-gravimetry, dynamic mechanical thermal analysis, dynamic water vapor sorption, oxygen transmission and tensile tests. Property changes are interpreted from structural changes. These new polymers show much superior performance to current petroleum-based polymers in industrial use. Furthermore, this regioselective modification can be carefully controlled, and results in a new type of cellulose derivatives with preserved cellulose backbone without the need for harmful solvents.

  • 121.
    Kaldéus, Tahani
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    Träger, Andrea
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Berglund, Lars
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering.
    Malmström, Eva
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Lo Re, Giada
    Chalmers University of Technology.
    Molecular engineering of cellulose-PCL bio-nanocomposite interface by reactive amphiphilic copolymer nanoparticles2019In: Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 122.
    Kaldéus, Tahani
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Träger, Andrea
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH).
    Berglund, Lars
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH).
    Malmström, Eva
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Lo Re, Giada
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites.
    Molecular Engineering of the Cellulose-Poly(Caprolactone) Bio-Nanocomposite Interface by Reactive Amphiphilic Copolymer Nanoparticles2019In: ACS NANO, Vol. 13, no 6, p. 6409-6420Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A molecularly engineered water-borne reactive compatibilizer is designed for tuning of the interface in melt-processed thermoplastic poly(caprolactone) (PCL)-cellulose nanocomposites. The mechanical properties of the nanocomposites are studied by tensile testing and dynamic mechanical analysis. The reactive compatibilizer is a statistical copolymer of 2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate and 2-hydroxy methacrylate, which is subsequently esterified and quaternized. Quaternized ammonium groups in the reactive compatibilizer electrostatically match the negative surface charge of cellulose nanofibrils (CNFs). This results in core-shell CNFs with a thin uniform coating of the compatibilizer. This promotes the dispersion of CNFs in the PCL matrix, as concluded from high-resolution scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy. Moreover, the compatibilizer "shell" has methacrylate functionalities, which allow for radical reactions during processing and links covalently with PCL. Compared to the bio-nanocomposite reference, the reactive compatibilizer (<4 wt %) increased Young's modulus by about 80% and work to fracture 10 times. Doubling the amount of peroxide caused further improved mechanical properties, in support of effects from higher cross-link density at the interface. Further studies of interfacial design in specific nanocellulose-based composite materials are warranted since the detrimental effects from CNFs agglomeration may have been underestimated.

  • 123.
    Kanoth, Bipinbal Parambath
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Claudino, Mauro
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Johansson, Mats
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Berglund, Lars A.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Zhou, Qi
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Glycoscience. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Biocomposites from Natural Rubber: Synergistic Effects of Functionalized Cellulose Nanocrystals as Both Reinforcing and Cross-Linking Agents via Free-Radical Thiol-ene Chemistry2015In: ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces, ISSN 1944-8244, E-ISSN 1944-8252, Vol. 7, no 30, p. 16303-16310Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Natural rubber/cellulose nanocrystals (NR/CNCs) form true biocomposites from renewable resources and are demonstrated to show significantly improved thermo-mechanical properties and reduced stress-softening. The nanocomposites were prepared from chemically functionalized CNCs bearing thiols. CNCs served as both reinforcing and cross-linking agents in the NR matrix, and the study was designed to prove the cross-linking function of modified CNCs. CNCs were prepared from cotton, and the cross-linkable mercapto-groups were introduced onto the surface of CNCs by esterification. Nanocomposite films were prepared by dispersing the modified CNCs (m-CNCs) in NR matrix by solution casting. The cross-links at the filler matrix (m-CNCs NR) interface were generated by photochemically initiated thiol-ene reactions as monitored by real-time FTIR analysis. The synergistic effects of reinforcement and chemical cross-linking at the m-CNCs NR interface on structure, thermo-mechanical, and stress-softening behavior were investigated. Methods included field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), swelling tests, dynamic mechanical analysis, and tensile tests. Compared to biocomposites from NR with unmodified CNCs, the NR/m-CNCs nanocomposites showed 2.4-fold increase in tensile strength, 1.6-fold increase in strain-to-failure, and 2.9-fold increase in work-of-fracture at 10 wt % of m-CNCs in NR.

  • 124.
    Karim, Zoheb
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    De-Castro, Daniele Oliveira
    KTH.
    Svedberg, A.
    Söderberg, Daniel
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH.
    Berglund, Lars
    KTH.
    Forming a cellulose based nanopaper using XPM2017In: International Conference on Nanotechnology for Renewable Materials 2017, TAPPI Press , 2017, p. 399-407Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 125. Keshavarzi, Neda
    et al.
    Rad, Farshid Mashayekhy
    Mace, Amber
    Ansari, Farhan
    Akhtar, Farid
    Nilsson, Ulrika
    Berglund, Lars
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Bergstrom, Lennart
    Nanocellulose-Zeolite Composite Films for Odor Elimination2015In: ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces, ISSN 1944-8244, E-ISSN 1944-8252, Vol. 7, no 26, p. 14254-14262Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Free standing and strong odor-removing composite films of cellulose nanofibrils (CNF) with a high content of nanoporous zeolite adsorbents have been colloidally processed. Thermogravimetric desorption analysis (TGA) and infrared spectroscopy combined with computational simulations showed that commercially available silicalite-1 and ZSM-5 have a high affinity and uptake of volatile odors like ethanethiol and propanethiol, also in the presence of water. The simulations showed that propanethiol has a higher affinity, up to 16%, to the two zeolites compared with ethanethiol. Highly flexible and strong free-standing zeolite CNF films with an adsorbent loading of 89 w/w% have been produced by Ca-induced gelation and vacuum filtration. The CNF-network controls the strength of the composite films and 100 mu m thick zeolite CNF films with a CNF content of less than 10 vol % displayed a tensile strength approaching 10 MPa. Headspace solid phase microextraction (SPME) coupled to gas chromatography mass spectroscopy (GC/MS) analysis showed that the CNF zeolite films can eliminate the volatile thiol-based odors to concentrations below the detection ability of the human olfactory system. Odor removing zeolite-cellulose nanofibril films could enable improved transport and storage of fruits and vegetables rich in odors, for example, onion and the tasty but foul-smelling South-East Asian Durian fruit.

  • 126. Kislev, T.
    et al.
    Marom, G.
    Berglund, Lars A.
    Joffe, R.
    Nairn, J. A.
    Wagner, H. D.
    On the nature of opaque cylindrical regions formed at fibre break sites in a fragmentation test2002In: Advanced Composites Letters, ISSN 0963-6935, Vol. 11, no 1, p. 7-13Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    When a single-fibre composite test is performed to obtain information about the interfacial adhesion in a composite, a gradual strain increase often causes an opaque (black) cylinder to nucleate at, and grow from, the fibre failure sites. The nature of the opaque cylinder is difficult to ascertain using optical microscopy. This is the subject of the present note. To study the inside of the opaque cylinder we use several experimental methods based on imaging the failed region: optical microscopy, laser Raman spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Mechanical models, including FEM analysis and analytic equations based on the shear-lag, approach, are used to discuss the experimental work. The nature and growth mechanism of the opaque cylinder are of importance in defining the parameters and/or contributions that appear in both the force balance and the. energy balance schemes.

  • 127.
    Kochumalayil, Joby J.
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Berglund, Lars A.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Moisture-stable clay-xyloglucan nanocomposites prepared from hydrocolloidal suspensions2014In: Abstract of Papers of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0065-7727, Vol. 247, p. 204-CELL-Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 128.
    Kochumalayil, Joby J.
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites.
    Berglund, Lars A.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Water-soluble hemicelluloses for high humidity applications - enzymatic modification of xyloglucan for mechanical and oxygen barrier properties2014In: Green Chemistry, ISSN 1463-9262, E-ISSN 1463-9270, Vol. 16, no 4, p. 1904-1910Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Bio-based polymers are of increasing interest in packaging applications as alternatives to petroleum-based polymers. Xyloglucan (XG) derived from tamarind seed waste was recently explored as a high performance biopolymer for packaging applications. Xyloglucan films have high strength, stiffness and oxygen barrier performance, but suffer from limitations in properties under high humidity conditions. This aspect is addressed in the present work using XG modification by enzymatic removal of side chain galactose residues. The modified XG was characterized using carbohydrate analysis and MALDI-TOF MS analysis for sugar and oligosaccharide compositions respectively. The consequence of galactose removal for XG chain packing was theoretically predicted using a group contribution method and the estimation of Hansen's solubility parameters. The properties of films made from modified XG in terms of tensile, oxygen transmission rate, and thermo-mechanical behaviour were measured and related to the structure of modified XGs. Modified XG films preserved the Young's modulus at high humidity at a level of 4.3 GPa at 92% relative humidity. Moreover, the oxygen permeability of modified XG samples was very low and was about 1.5 cc mu m [m(2) day](-1) kPa(-1) at 80% relative humidity, more than 80% lower than that for native XG. The main reason is that modified XG absorbs less moisture, due to a decreased solubility. Decreased free volume may also contribute, as galactose residues are removed and XG branches become shorter.

  • 129.
    Kochumalayil, Joby Kochumalayil
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites.
    Morimune, Seira
    Nishino, Takashi
    Ikkala, Olli
    Walther, Andreas
    Berglund, Lars A.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Nacre-Mimetic Clay/Xyloglucan Bionanocomposites: A Chemical Modification Route for Hygromechanical Performance at High Humidity2013In: Biomacromolecules, ISSN 1525-7797, E-ISSN 1526-4602, Vol. 14, no 11, p. 3842-3849Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Nacre-mimetic bionanocomposites of high montmorillonite (MTM) clay content, prepared from hydra. colloidal suspensions, suffer from reduced strength and stiffness at high relative humidity. We address this problem by chemical modification of xyloglucan in (XG)/MTM nacremimetic nanocomposites, by subjecting the XG to regioselective periodate oxidation of side chains to enable it to form covalent cross-links to hydroxyl groups in neighboring XG chains or to the MTM surface. The resulting materials are analyzed by FTIR spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, carbohydrate analysis, calorimetry, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, tensile tests, and oxygen barrier properties. We compare the resulting mechanical properties at low and high relative humidity. The periodate oxidation leads to a strong increase in modulus and strength of the materials. A modulus of 30 GPa for cross-linked composite at 50% relative humidity compared with 13.7 GPa for neat XG/MTM demonstrates that periodate oxidation of the XG side chains leads to crucially improved stress transfer at the XG/MTM interface, possibly through covalent bond formation. This enhanced interfacial adhesion and internal cross-linking of the matrix moreover preserves the mechanical properties at high humidity condition and leads to a Young's modulus of 21 GPa at 90%RH.

  • 130.
    Kochumalayil, Joby
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation.
    Sehaqui, Houssine
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites.
    Zhou, Qi
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Centres, Swedish Center for Biomimetic Fiber Engineering, BioMime. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Berglund, Lars
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Tamarind seed xyloglucan: a promising biopolymer matrix for bioinspired nanocomposite materials2010Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 131.
    Kochumalayil, Joby
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation.
    Sehaqui, Houssine
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites.
    Zhou, Qi
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites. KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Centres, Swedish Center for Biomimetic Fiber Engineering, BioMime.
    Berglund, Lars
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Xyloglucan films2009Patent (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    The present invention pertains to films comprising xyloglucan, processes for preparing films comprising xyloglucan, as well as various uses of said films as for instance packaging material. Specifically, the present invention relates to xyloglucan films having advantageous properties relating to inter alia tensile strength, elastic modulus, and strain-to-failure.

  • 132.
    Kochumalayil, Joby
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation.
    Sehaqui, Houssine
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Zhou, Qi
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Glycoscience.
    Berglund, Lars A.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites.
    Tamarind seed xyloglucan: a thermostable high-performance biopolymer from non-food feedstock2010In: Journal of Materials Chemistry, ISSN 0959-9428, E-ISSN 1364-5501, Vol. 20, no 21, p. 4321-4327Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Polysaccharide biopolymers from renewable resources are of great interest as replacements for petroleum-based polymers since they have lower cradle-to-grave non-renewable energy use and greenhouse gas emissions. Starch is widely used as a packaging material but is based on food resources such as potato or corn, and suffers from high sensitivity to water vapor even under ambient conditions. For the first time, xyloglucan (XG) from tamarind seed waste is explored as an alternative high-performance biopolymer from non-food feedstock. XG is purified, and dissolved in water to cast films. Moisture sorption isotherms, tensile tests and dynamic mechanical thermal analysis are performed. Glycerol plasticization toughening and enzymatic modification (partial removal of galactose in side chains of XG) are attempted as means of modification. XG films show much lower moisture sorption than the amylose component in starches. Stiffness and strength are very high, with considerable ductility and toughness. The thermal stability is exceptionally high and is approaching 250 degrees C. Glycerol plasticization is effective already at 10% glycerol. These observations point towards the potential of XG as a "new'' biopolymer from renewable non-food plant resources for replacement of petroleum-based polymers.

  • 133.
    Kochumalayil, Joby
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation.
    Zhou, Qi
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Centres, Swedish Center for Biomimetic Fiber Engineering, BioMime. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Berglund, Lars
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation.
    Nanostructured high-performance biocomposites based on Tamarind seed polysaccharide2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 134.
    Kochumalayil, Joby
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation.
    Zhou, Qi
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Centres, Swedish Center for Biomimetic Fiber Engineering, BioMime. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites.
    Berglund, Lars
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation.
    Nanostructured high-performance biocomposites based on Tamarind seed xyloglucan2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 135.
    Koivurova, Matias
    et al.
    Univ Eastern Finland, Inst Photon, POB 111, FI-80101 Joensuu, Finland..
    Vasileva, Elena
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Photonics.
    Li, Yuanyuan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Berglund, Lars
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Popov, Sergei
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Photonics.
    Complete spatial coherence characterization of quasi-random laser emission from dye doped transparent wood2018In: Optics Express, ISSN 1094-4087, E-ISSN 1094-4087, Vol. 26, no 10, p. 13474-13482Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We report on the experimental determination of the complete two coordinate spatial coherence function of light emitted by a quasi-random laser, implemented on recently introduced dye-doped transparent wood. The spatial coherence was measured by means of a double grating interferometer, which has some advantages over the standard Young's interferometer. Analysis of the spatial coherence reveals that emission from such a material can be considered as a superposition of several spatial modes produced by individual emitters within semi-ordered scattering medium. The overall degree of coherence, (gamma)over-bar, for this quasi-random laser was found to be 0.16 +/- 0.01, having possible applications in speckle free laser imaging and illumination.

  • 136. Kornmann, X.
    et al.
    Lindberg, H.
    Berglund, Lars A.
    Synthesis of epoxy-clay nanocomposites: influence of the nature of the clay on structure2001In: Polymer, ISSN 0032-3861, E-ISSN 1873-2291, Vol. 42, no 4, p. 1303-1310Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Epoxy-clay nanocomposites were synthesised using two montmorillonite clays (MMT) with different cation-exchange capacities (CEC) (94 and 140 meg/100 g). The purpose was to investigate the influence of the CEC of the clay on the synthesis and structure of epoxy-clay nanocomposites. The dispersion of the 1 nm thick clay layers was investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Although XRD data did not show any apparent order of the clay layers in the nanocomposite, TEM revealed parallel clay layers with interlamellar spacing of 90 Angstrom (MMT of high CEC) and 110 Angstrom (MMT of lower CEC) and the presence of remnant multiplets of non-exfoliated layers. A mechanism responsible for the influence of CEC on nanocomposite interlamellar spacing is discussed. The dispersion of the clay was investigated by SEM and found to be finer in the nanocomposites as compared with in conventional composites although the nanocomposites still have clay aggregates at the microscale rather than a monolithic structure.

  • 137. Kornmann, X.
    et al.
    Lindberg, H.
    Berglund, Lars A.
    Synthesis of epoxy-clay nanocomposites. Influence of the nature of the curing agent on structure2001In: Polymer, ISSN 0032-3861, E-ISSN 1873-2291, Vol. 42, no 10, p. 4493-4499Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Epoxy-clay nanocomposites were synthesised by swelling an organophilic montmorillonite in a diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A resin with subsequent polymerisation. Three different curing agents were used: an aliphatic diamine and two cycloaliphatic diamines. The cure kinetics of these systems was evaluated by differential scanning calorimetry and the structure of the nanocomposites was characterised by X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. Successful nanocomposite synthesis was dependent not only on the cure kinetics of the epoxy system but also on the rate of diffusion of the curing agent into the galleries because it affects the intragallery cure kinetics. The nature of the curing agent influences these two phenomena substantially and therefore the resulting structure of the nanocomposite. The curing temperature controls the balance between the extragallery reaction rate of the epoxy system and the diffusion rate of the curing agent into the galleries. Thus, the choice of curing agent and curing conditions controls the extent of exfoliation of the clay in the material.

  • 138. Kornmann, X.
    et al.
    Thomann, R.
    Mulhaupt, R.
    Finter, J.
    Berglund, Lars A.
    High performance epoxy-layered silicate nanocomposites2002In: Polymer Engineering and Science, ISSN 0032-3888, E-ISSN 1548-2634, Vol. 42, no 9, p. 1815-1826Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    High performance epoxy-layered silicate nanocomposites based on tetra-glycidyl 4,4'-diamino-diphenyl methane (TGDDM) resin cured with 4,4'-diaminodiphenyl sulfone (DDS) have been successfully synthesized. Fluorohectorites modified by means of interlayer cation exchange of sodium cations for protonated dihydro-imidazolines and octadecylamine were used. Fluorohectorite exchanged with 1-methyl-2-norstearyl-3-stearnoacid-amidoethyl-dihydro-imidazolinium ions was immiscible with the epoxy matrix. In contrast, fluorohectorites exchanged with hydroxyethyl-dihydro-imidazolinium (HEODI) and ricinyl-dihydro-imidazolinium ions (RDI) favored the formation of a nanocomposite structure. This is most likely due to the presence of -OH groups in their molecular structure, which has a catalytic effect on the polymerization occurring between the silicate layers. The diffusion of epoxy and curing agent molecules between the silicate layers is also promoted. Microscopy observations revealed that the dispersion of the silicate aggregates on a microscale was proportional to the degree of separation of the silicate layers on a nanoscale. Decreased apparent glass transition temperature was observed in all the nanocomposites. Finally, mechanical property studies showed that epoxy-layered silicate nanocomposite formation could simultaneously improve fracture toughness and Young's modulus, without adversely affecting tensile strength.

  • 139. Kornmann, X.
    et al.
    Thomann, R.
    Mulhaupt, R.
    Finter, J.
    Berglund, Lars A.
    Synthesis of amine-cured, epoxy-layered silicate nanocomposites: The influence of the silicate surface modification on the properties2002In: Journal of Applied Polymer Science, ISSN 0021-8995, E-ISSN 1097-4628, Vol. 86, no 10, p. 2643-2652Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Fluorohectorites were rendered organophilic through the cation exchange of sodium intergallery cations for protonated monoamine, diamine, and triamine oligopropyleneoxides and octadecylamine, benzylamine, and adducts of octadecylamine and benzylamine with diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A (DGEBA). The influence of the silicate surface modification and compatibility on the morphology and thermal and mechanical properties was examined. Surface modification with protonated octadecylamine and its adduct with DGEBA promoted the formation of microscale domains of silicate layers separated by more than 50 Angstrom, as evidenced by transmission electron microscopy and wide-angle X-ray scattering. Young's modulus of these two nanocomposites increased parabolically with the true silicate content, whereas conventionally filled composites exhibited a linear relationship. The highest fracture toughness was observed for conventionally filled composites.

  • 140.
    Koskela, Salla
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Glycoscience. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Wang, Shennan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Glycoscience.
    Xu, Dingfeng
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Glycoscience.
    Yang, Xuan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Li, Kai
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Glycoscience. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Berglund, Lars
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    McKee, Lauren S.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Glycoscience. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Bulone, Vincent
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Glycoscience.
    Zhou, Qi
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Glycoscience. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Lytic polysaccharide monooxygenase (LPMO) mediated production of ultra-fine cellulose nanofibres from delignified softwood fibres2019In: Green Chemistry, ISSN 1463-9262, E-ISSN 1463-9270, Vol. 21, no 21, p. 5924-5933Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The production of cellulose nanofibres (CNFs) typically requires harsh chemistry and strong mechanical fibrillation, both of which have negative environmental impacts. A possible solution is offered by lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases (LPMOs), oxidative enzymes that boost cellulose fibrillation. Although the role of LPMOs in oxidative modification of cellulosic substrates is rather well established, their use in the production of cellulose nanomaterials is not fully explored, and the effect of the carbohydrate-binding module (CBM) on nanofibrillation has not yet been reported. Herein, we studied the activity of two LPMOs, one of which was appended to a CBM, on delignified softwood fibres for green and energy-efficient production of CNFs. The CNFs were used to prepare cellulose nanopapers, and the structure and properties of both nanofibres and nanopapers were determined. Both enzymes were able to facilitate nanocellulose fibrillation and increase colloidal stability of the produced CNFs. However, the CBM-lacking LPMO was more efficient in introducing carboxyl groups (0.53 mmol/g) on the cellulose fibre surfaces and releasing CNFs with thinner width (4.3 ± 1.5 nm) from delignified spruce fibres than the modular LPMO (carboxylate content of 0.38 mmol/g and nanofibre width of 6.7± 2.5 nm through LPMO pretreatment followed by mild homogenisation. The prepared nanopapers showed improved mechanical properties (tensile strength of 262 MPa, and modulus of 16.2 GPa) compared to conventional CNFs preparation methods, demonstrating the potential of LPMOs as green alternatives for cellulose nanomaterials preparation.

  • 141.
    Koskela, Salla
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Glycoscience.
    Wang, Shennan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Glycoscience.
    Yang, Xuan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Li, Kai
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Glycoscience.
    Srivastava, Vaibhav
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Glycoscience.
    McKee, Lauren S.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Glycoscience.
    Berglund, Lars
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Bulone, Vincent
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Glycoscience.
    Zhou, Qi
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Glycoscience.
    Enzyme-assisted preparation of nanocellulose from wood holocellulose fibers2019Other (Other academic)
  • 142.
    Kupka, Vojtech
    et al.
    Brno Univ Technol, CEITEC Cent European Inst Technol, Brno 61200, Czech Republic..
    Zhou, Qi
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Ansari, Farhan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Tang, Hu
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH). Royal Inst Technol KTH, AlbaNova Univ Ctr, Sch Biotechnol, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Slouf, Miroslav
    Acad Sci Czech Republ, Inst Macromol Chem, CR-16206 Prague, Czech Republic..
    Vojtova, Lucy
    Brno Univ Technol, CEITEC Cent European Inst Technol, Brno 61200, Czech Republic.;SCITEG As, U Vodarny 2965-2, Brno 61600, Czech Republic..
    Berglund, Lars
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Jancar, Josef
    Brno Univ Technol, CEITEC Cent European Inst Technol, Brno 61200, Czech Republic.;SCITEG As, U Vodarny 2965-2, Brno 61600, Czech Republic..
    Well-dispersed polyurethane/cellulose nanocrystal nanocomposites synthesized by a solvent-free procedure in bulk2019In: Polymer Composites, ISSN 0272-8397, E-ISSN 1548-0569, Vol. 40, p. E456-E465Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Polyurethane (PU) nanocomposites utilizing cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) as nanofiller and amorphous PU matrix were synthesized in a novel solvent-free bulk process. A green nanofiller, CNCs, was studied as reinforcement and was further modified by grafting poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) on the CNC surface (CNC-PEG). Transmission electron microscopy revealed an excellent dispersion of the PEGylated CNC nanoparticles in the PU matrix, whereas as-received CNCs formed agglomerates. The results indicated strong improvements in tensile properties with Young's modulus increasing up to 50% and strength up to 25% for both, PU/CNC and PU/CNC-PEG nanocomposites. The enhanced tensile modulus was attributed to stiff particle reinforcement together with an increase in glass transition temperature.

  • 143. Lang, A. W.
    et al.
    Li, Yuanyuan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    De Keersmaecker, M.
    Shen, D. E.
    Österholm, A.M.
    Berglund, Lars
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Reynolds, J. R.
    Transparent Wood Smart Windows: Polymer Electrochromic Devices Based on Poly(3,4-Ethylenedioxythiophene):Poly(Styrene Sulfonate) Electrodes2018In: ChemSusChem, ISSN 1864-5631, E-ISSN 1864-564X, Vol. 11, no 5, p. 854-863Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Transparent wood composites, with their high strength and toughness, thermal insulation, and excellent transmissivity, offer a route to replace glass for diffusely transmitting windows. Here, conjugated-polymer-based electrochromic devices (ECDs) that switch on-demand are demonstrated using transparent wood coated with poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrene sulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) as a transparent conducting electrode. These ECDs exhibit a vibrant magenta-to-clear color change that results from a remarkably colorless bleached state. Furthermore, they require low energy and power inputs of 3 mWh m−2 at 2 W m−2 to switch due to a high coloration efficiency (590 cm2 C−1) and low driving voltage (0.8 V). Each device component is processed with high-throughput methods, which highlights the opportunity to apply this approach to fabricate mechanically robust, energy-efficient smart windows on a large scale. 

  • 144. Larsson, Karolina
    et al.
    Berglund, Lars A.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Ankerfors, Mikael
    Lindström, Tom
    Polylactide latex/nanofibrillated cellulose bionanocomposites of high nanofibrillated cellulose content and nanopaper network structure prepared by a papermaking route2012In: Journal of Applied Polymer Science, ISSN 0021-8995, E-ISSN 1097-4628, Vol. 125, no 3, p. 2460-2466Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Previous attempts to use polylactide (PLA) latex particles and nanofibrillated cellulose (NFC) in papermaking processing have been limited to low NFC content. In the present study, a bionanocomposite material was successfully produced using a PLA latex and NFC. The components were mixed using a wet mixing method and bionanocomposite films were made by filtration followed by hot pressing. In composite materials, the dispersion of the reinforcing component in the matrix is critical for the material properties. Biopolymers such as PLA are non-polar and soluble only in organic solvents; NFC is, however, highly hydrophilic. By utilizing latex, i.e., an aqueous dispersion of biopolymer micro-particles, wet mixing is possible and the problem of aggregation of the hydrophilic nanocellulose in organic solvent is avoided. The properties of the resulting NFC/PLA latex bionanocomposite films were analyzed. Thorough blending resulted in good dispersion of the reinforcing component within the matrix. Adding increasing amounts of NFC improved the Young's modulus, tensile strength, and strain at break of the bionanocomposite material. The increase in the tensile properties was linear with increasing NFC content as a result of the good dispersion. The NFC also improved the thermal stability of the bionanocomposite material.

  • 145.
    Larsson, Per A.
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation.
    Berglund, Lars A.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Ductile All-Cellulose Nanocomposite Films Fabricated from Core-Shell Structured Cellulose Nanofibrils2014In: Biomacromolecules, ISSN 1525-7797, E-ISSN 1526-4602, Vol. 15, no 6, p. 2218-2223Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cellulosic materials have many desirable properties such as high mechanical strength and low oxygen permeability and will be an important component in a sustainable biomaterial-based society, but unfortunately they often lack the ductility and formability offered by petroleum-based materials. This paper describes the fabrication and characterization of nanocomposite films made of core-shell modified cellulose nanofibrils (CNEs) surrounded by a shell of ductile dialcohol cellulose, created by heterogeneous periodate oxidation followed by borohydride reduction of the native cellulose in the external parts of the individual fibrils. The oxidation with periodate selectively produces dialdehyde cellulose, and the process does not increase the charge density of the material. Yet the modified cellulose fibers could easily be homogenized to CNFs. Prior to film fabrication, the CNF was shown by atomic force microscopy to be 0.5-2 mu m long and 4-10 nm wide. The films were fabricated by filtration, and besides uniaxial tensile testing at different relative humidities, they were characterized by scanning electron microscopy and oxygen permeability. The strength-at-break at 23 degrees C and 50% RH was 175 MPa, and the films could, before rupture, be strained, mainly by plastic deformation, to about 15% and 37% at 50% RH and 90% RH, respectively. This moisture plasticization was further utilized to form a demonstrator consisting of a double-curved structure with a nominal strain of 24% over the curvature. At a relative humidity of 80%, the films still acted as a good oxygen barrier, having an oxygen permeability of 5.5 mL-mu L/(m(2).24 h.kPa). These properties indicate that this new material has a potential for use as a barrier in complex-shaped structures and hence ultimately reduce the need for petroleum-based plastics.

  • 146.
    Larsson, Per A.
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation.
    Berglund, Lars A.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Highly ductile fibres and sheets by core-shell structuring of the cellulose nanofibrils2014In: Cellulose (London), ISSN 0969-0239, E-ISSN 1572-882X, Vol. 21, no 1, p. 323-333Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A greater ductility of cellulosic materials is important if they are to be used in increasingly advanced applications. This study explores the potential for using chemical core-shell structuring on the nanofibril level to alter the mechanical properties of cellulose fibres and sheets made thereof. The structuring was achieved by a selective oxidation of the cellulose C2-C3 bonds with sodium periodate, followed by a reduction of the aldehydes formed with sodium borohydride, i.e. locally transforming cellulose to dialcohol cellulose. The resulting fibres were morphologically characterised and the sheets made of these modified fibres were mechanically tested. These analyses showed a minor decrease in the degree of polymerisation, a significantly reduced cellulose crystal width and a greater ductility. At 27 % conversion of the available C2-C3 bonds, sheets could be strained 11 %, having a stress at break of about 90 MPa, and consequently a remarkable tensile energy absorption at rupture of about 9 kJ/kg, i.e. 3-4 times higher than a strong conventional paper. Zero-span tensile measurements indicated that the treatment increased the ductility not only of sheets but also of individual fibres. This suggests that the amorphous and molecularly more mobile dialcohol cellulose is located as a shell surrounding the crystalline core of the cellulose fibrils, and that, at deformations beyond the yield point, this facilitates plastic deformation both within and between individual fibres.

  • 147.
    Larsson, Per A.
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation.
    Berglund, Lars
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation.
    Ductile cellulose nanocomposite films fabricated from nanofibrillated cellulose after partial conversion to dialcohol cellulose2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ductile nanofibrillar nanocomposite films with a strain at break of 18%, and a tensile strength of 185 MPa, have been fabricated from nanofibrillated bleached kraft fibres partially converted to dialcohol cellulose prior to homogenisation. The conversion to dialcohol cellulose was performed by oxidation with sodium periodate to a degree of oxidation of ca. 30%, followed by reduction with sodium borohydride, and the fabricated films consequentially had one stiff cellulose phase and one flexible dialcohol cellulose phase. The liberated nanofibrils were characterised by AFM, after adsorption onto a silica surface, and imaging in tapping mode showed a blend of elementary fibrils with a width of 5 nm and inter-entangled fibril aggregates with a width of 15-20 nm. Besides good mechanical properties, the films also provided good barrier properties; at 0% RH the oxygen permeability was 2 ml·µm/(m2·d·kPa).

  • 148.
    Larsson, Per A.
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Riazanova, Anastasiia
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Ciftci, Goksu Cinar
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Rojas, Ramiro
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Ovrebo, Hans Henrik
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Berglund, Lars
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Towards optimised size distribution in commercial microfibrillated cellulose: a fractionation approach2019In: Cellulose (London), ISSN 0969-0239, E-ISSN 1572-882X, Vol. 26, no 3, p. 1565-1575Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    For the successful commercialisation of microfibrillated cellulose (MFC) it is of utmost importance to carefully characterise the constituent cellulose particles. This could for instance lead to the development of MFC grades with size distributions tailored for specific applications. Characterization of MFC is challenging due to the heterogeneous chemical and structural nature of MFC. This study describes a fractionation approach that combines two steps of physical sieving of larger particles and a final centrifugation step to separate out the smallest, colloidally stable particles, resulting in four distinctly different size fractions. The properties, such as size and charge, of each fraction were studied, as well as MFC filtration time, film formation, and film properties (mechanical and optical). It was found that virtually all surface charges, determined by polyelectrolyte adsorption, are located in the colloidally stable fraction of the MFC. In addition, the amount of available surface charges can be used as an estimate of the degree of fibrillation of the MFC. The partly fibrillated particles frequently displayed a branching, fringed morphology. Mechanical testing of films from the different fractions revealed that the removal of large particles may be more important for strength than achieving full fibrillation. Overall, this study demonstrates that by controlling the size distribution in MFC grades, property profiles including dewatering time to make films by filtration, rheology, film strength and optical transmittance could be optimised. [GRAPHICS] .

  • 149. Lee, Koon-Yang
    et al.
    Aitomaki, Yvonne
    Berglund, Lars A.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Oksman, Kristiina
    Bismarck, Alexander
    Utilising the full potential of bacterial cellulose in composite materials: Can it be done?2014In: Abstract of Papers of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0065-7727, Vol. 247, p. 309-CELL-Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 150. Lee, Koon-Yang
    et al.
    Aitomäki, Yvonne
    Berglund, Lars A.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Oksman, Kristiina
    Bismarck, Alexander
    On the use of nanocellulose as reinforcement in polymer matrix composites2014In: Composites Science And Technology, ISSN 0266-3538, E-ISSN 1879-1050, Vol. 105, p. 15-27Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Nanocellulose is often being regarded as the next generation renewable reinforcement for the production of high performance biocomposites. This feature article reviews the various nanocellulose reinforced polymer composites reported in literature and discusses the potential of nanocellulose as reinforcement for the production of renewable high performance polymer nanocomposites. The theoretical and experimentally determined tensile properties of nanocellulose are also reviewed. In addition to this, the reinforcing ability of BC and NFC is juxtaposed. In order to analyse the various cellulose-reinforced polymer nanocomposites reported in literature, Cox-Krenchel and rule-of-mixture models have been used to elucidate the potential of nanocellulose in composite applications. There may be potential for improvement since the tensile modulus and strength of most cellulose nanocomposites reported in literature scale linearly with the tensile modulus and strength of the cellulose nanopaper structures. Better dispersion of individual cellulose nanofibres in the polymer matrix may improve composite properties.

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