kth.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
1234 101 - 150 of 191
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 101.
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    et al.
    Information Technology Group, Wageningen University, Netherlands.
    Hofstede, Gert Jan
    Wageningen University.
    Beers, George
    Wageningen University.
    Omta, S.W.F. (Onno)
    Wageningen University.
    Trust and Tracing game: learning about transactions and embeddedness in a trade network2006In: Production planning & control (Print), ISSN 0953-7287, E-ISSN 1366-5871, Vol. 17, no 6, p. 569-583Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper introduces a gaming simulation, the Trust and Tracing game, for learning about the relation between social structure and the co-ordination of transactions in a trade network. This paper describes experiences from 15 sessions with the game. Its model allows the use of network and market coordination mechanisms by participating groups. During debriefing participants typically indicated they learned that prior relationships were more important to the course of the session than economic theory predicts. Number of participants, language barriers, nationality, perceived group membership, and prior experience determined which transaction governance mechanism emerged in the game.

  • 102.
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    et al.
    Delft University of Technology, Delft, the Netherlands .
    Mayer, Igor
    Van Luipen, Jelle
    Weitenberg, Natasha
    Gaming Rail Cargo Capacity Management: Exploring and Validating Alternative Modes of Organization2012In: Journal Simulation & Gaming, ISSN 1046-8781, E-ISSN 1552-826X, Vol. 43, no 1, p. 85-101Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Stakeholders in the Netherlands’ rail cargo sector exhibit strategic behavior that causes irregularity and unpredictability in freight trains. This leads to the suboptimal use of scarce rail capacity. The authors present the results of a research project that used gaming to explore and validate alternative organizational methods for the management of rail cargo capacity with decision makers and subject matter experts from ProRail, the Netherlands’ railway infrastructure manager. Various scenarios for the organization of rail cargo capacity management were played out, tested, and extensively debriefed in three project phases. The gaming sessions demonstrated that open information sharing among stakeholders does not depend on the introduction of price mechanisms and is, indeed, a more effective way of managing capacity. The authors conclude that it is vital to introduce gaming gradually and build up organizational acceptance for this method. However, once acceptance has been achieved, gaming can generate valuable insight into strategic behavior and the performance of sociotechnical infrastructures.

  • 103.
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Health Informatics and Logistics.
    Olejniczak, Karol
    Institute of Social Sciences, SWPS University of Social Sciences and Humanities, Warsaw, Poland.
    Raghothama, Jayanth
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Health Informatics and Logistics.
    Public Policy and Engineering Systems Synergy2022In: Handbook of Engineering Systems Design / [ed] Maier, A., Oehmen, J., Vermaas, P.E., Springer Nature , 2022, p. 987-1010Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Engineering systems cannot be seen separate from the context they work in. Increasing complexity of society makes that larger systems no longer just concern technical aspects but include social and even societal aspects. Particularly, the societal aspects can be subject to public policy as a part of engineering systems design. This chapter provides a discussion of the nature of public policy and the role it plays in engineering systems, as well as the role that engineering systems methods play for public policy design. The mutual relationship is positioned in a historic overview, where particularly the role of participatory methods has grown over time to capture human complex thinking in a world dominated by mathematic modelling approaches. It positions engineering systems to encompass public policy as an integral part of design, so that the traditional divide between engineering and societal contexts can be bridged.

  • 104.
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Traffic and Logistics.
    Omta, S.W.F. (Onno)
    Wageningen University.
    Beers, George
    Wageningen University.
    Hofstede, Gert Jan
    Wageningen University.
    The organization of transactions: research with the Trust and Tracing Game2009In: Leadership, innovation and entrepreneurship: Proceedings of the 8th International Conference on Management in AgriFood Chains and Networks. - Wageningen, Wageningen: Wageningen Academic Publishers, 2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 105.
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Traffic and Logistics.
    Poelman, Ronald
    Supervisor: a 3D serious game for hazard recognition training in the oil industry2012In: Bonds & Bridges: Facing the Challenges of the Globalizing World with the Use of Simulation and Gaming. / [ed] Bielecki, Witold; Gandziarowska-Ziołecka, Jagoda; Pikos, Anna; Wardaszko, Marcin, Warschau, Poland, 2012, p. 209-221Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 106.
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Traffic and Logistics.
    Raghothama, Jayanth
    King, Robin
    Disentangling the complexity of India’s agricultural sector2012In: APSTRACT: Applied Studies In Agribusiness And Commerce, ISSN 1789-221X, E-ISSN 1789-7874, Vol. 06, no 1-2, p. 35-43Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Agricultural policies in India directly impact the livelihoods of close to two thirds of India’s population. Through policies, thegovernment manages food security, urban and rural poverty, energy, and infrastructure, among others. Given the current state of India’sgovernance, the connection between policy making and its results in society becomes a key issue for research. This paper presents a game foruse as a research instrument. The game can facilitate research into the policy making process at various levels of the government in India. Thedesign is intended to understand the complexity of the institutional arrangement that defines and implements agricultural policies. The gameintegrates with other games that simulate other aspects of the agricultural system in India. The paper presents the verification and validationcycles followed, and identifies further steps for field validation.

  • 107.
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    et al.
    TUDelft, Netherlands.
    Raghothama, Jayanth
    King, Robin
    Palavalli, Bharath
    Indian food supply chains: a game and model to study economic behavior2011In: Emergent Results of Artificial Economics, Heidelberg, Germany, 2011, p. 201-212Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Food supply chains are vital for the societal welfare in India. Given the tremendous issues on food safety and security, more insight in the function of Indian food markets is needed. This paper introduces the multi-agent model on which the Mango Mandi Gaming Simulation is build. The model holds the major roles present in the Indian mango markets, and is in both it structure and processes built upon case studies of these markets. The interaction with human players, who can take over a role in the simulation model, is specified. Applications are identified, and a road map for validation is laid out.

  • 108.
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    et al.
    Delft University of Technology, Delft, the Netherlands .
    Raghothama, Jayanth
    King, Robin
    Verbraeck, Alexander
    Supply chain gaming simulation for Indian food supply chains: a review of the need for and introduction of a new design2010In: Proceedings of the 9th Wageningen International Conference on Chain and Network Management, 2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 109.
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Traffic and Logistics.
    Rovers, Geert
    Verheij, Tanja
    Wenzler, Ivo
    Teaching consulting to academics: Reflections on Professionals Supporting an Academic Teaching Program2013In: Exploring the Professional Identity of Management Consultants / [ed] Anthony F. Buono, Leon de Caluwe, Annemieke Stoppelenburg, Information Age Publishing , 2013Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 110.
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    et al.
    Delft University of Technology, Delft, Netherlands.
    Van der Kracht, Peter
    ProRail.
    Van Luipen, Jelle
    ProRail.
    Schaafsma, Alfons
    ProRail.
    Studying a control concept for high-frequency train transport2009In: Infrastructure Systems and Services: Developing 21st Century Infrastructure Networks, (INFRA), 2009 Second International Conference on / [ed] E Subrahmanian & J Schueler, Chennai: IEEE conference proceedings, 2009, p. 1-6Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the forthcoming decade the capacity of railway passenger transport on the major Dutch corridors has to accommodate a 50% growth. ProRail, The Netherlands' railway manager aims to enable a high-frequency schedule by the year 2012. To safeguard the quality and manageability of traffic, a new steering and control concept has been worked out. The current paper reports on a pre-field test of the concept to identify its usefulness and to come to real-world procedures. The test was in the format of a gaming simulation session involving train drivers, train dispatchers and network controllers. The results show that the control and steering concept has potential, and should be worked out for both the train dispatcher and network controller level. Critical success factors on the train dispatcher level have been identified, which include simple information representation, reduction of the number of telephone calls and an update of the communication protocols with the network controllers.

  • 111.
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Traffic and Logistics.
    Van Luipen, Jelle
    ProRail.
    Mayer, Igor
    Delft University of Technology.
    Weitenberg, Natasha
    ProRail.
    Gaming Rail Cargo Capacity Management: Exploring and Validating Alternative Modes of Organization2009In: Learn to Game - Game to Learn / [ed] GY Kin & Y Cai, Singapore: National University Singapore , 2009, p. 26-40Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 112.
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    et al.
    Delft University of Technology, Delft, the Netherlands .
    Veen, Wim
    Serious rigor for serious games2011In: Enabling Innovation: Innovative Capability - German and International Views / [ed] Sabina Jeschke, Ingrid Isenhardt, Frank Hees, Sven Trantow, Springer-Verlag , 2011Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 113.
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Traffic and Logistics.
    Verwaart, Tim
    Wageningen University and Research.
    Feasibility of Multi-agent Simulation for the Trust and Tracing Game2005In: Lecture Notes in Computer Science, ISSN 0302-9743, E-ISSN 1611-3349, Vol. 3533, no 1, p. 187-188Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Trust is an important issue in trade. For instance in food trade, market actors have to rely on their trade partner’s quality statements. The roles of trust and deception in supply networks in various cultural and organisational settings are subject of research in the social sciences. The Trust And Tracing game is an instrument for that type of study. It is a game for human players. Conducting experiments is time-consuming and expensive. Furthermore, it is hard to formulate hypotheses and to test effects of parameter changes, as this requires many participants. For these reasons the project reported in this paper investigated the feasibility of multi-agent simulation of the game and delivered a prototype. This paper briefly describes the game and introduces the process composition of the agents. The prototype uses simple, but effective models. The paper concludes with directions for refinement of models for agent behaviour.

  • 114.
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Traffic and Logistics.
    Zuniga-Arias, Guillermo
    Wageningen University.
    Sterrenburg, Sietse
    Wageningen University.
    Experiences with the Mango Chain Game2005In: Proceedings of the 9th international workshop of the IFIP Wg 5.7 SIG on Experimental learning in Industrial Management, Helsinki, 2005 / [ed] R. Smeds, Helsinki University Press, 2005Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The mango chain game is a simulation game used for research purposes. It facilitated studying the bargaining power of Costa Rican mango producers in international supply chains of mango. The game simulates a simplified mango export chain in which real world local producers can play the role of producer association, multinational, independent exporter or retailer. The game is an operationalisation of a conceptual model of a netchain build upon theories from multiple disciplines, including transaction cost economics, bargaining theory and cultural dimensions. The design is a board game, using simple forms, coins and pieces as game material. After series of test sessions in a university environment, five sessions have been played in the field. This paper presents results fro experiences porting a game from a university environment to the field, learning experiences in a research game and existing relationships versus bargaining

  • 115. Middelkoop, D.
    et al.
    Steneker, J.
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Traffic and Logistics.
    Sehic, E.
    Mazzarello, M.
    Simulation backbone for gaming simulation in railways: A case study2012In: Simulation Conference (WSC), Proceedings of the 2012 Winter, IEEE , 2012, p. 6465195-Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Dutch railway is one of the world's busiest. Innovative measures are necessary, to cope with the projected growth of transport demand. The impact of innovations brings uncertainty to the decision makers and experts involved. To reduce this uncertainty, ProRail, the Dutch rail infrastructure manager, has introduced a combined gaming and simulating approach, called the Railway Gaming Suite. The development started by coupling existing simulators using High Level Architecture. It should lead to a flexible and scalable backbone to support the gaming and simulation approach. This way, the traditional application field of the simulators is extended from supporting capacity analysis, timetable robustness and construction to supporting decision making and enhancing insight in the operations. The current Railway Gaming Suite consists of three simulators. The aim of this paper is to give an overview of the approach and the underlying toolbox, applied to the concrete case: the Den Bosch station reconstruction.

  • 116.
    Moustaid, Elhabib
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Health Informatics and Logistics.
    Kornevs, Maksims
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Health Informatics and Logistics.
    Lindencrona, Fredrik
    SKL.
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Health Informatics and Logistics.
    A System of Systems of Mental Health in Cities: Digging Deep into the Origins of Complexity2020In: Administration and Policy in Mental Health and Mental Health Services Research, ISSN 0894-587X, E-ISSN 1573-3289, Vol. 47, no 6, p. 961-971Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mental health in urban environments is often treated from a healthcare provision perspective. Research in recent decades showed that mental illness in cities is a result of dysfunctional coordination between different city systems and structures. Given the nature of the city as a system of systems, this work builds participatorily a general system dynamic model of factors that affect mental health in urban and regional environments. Through this method, we investigated the challenges of the application of such methodology to identify important factors, feedback loops, and dependencies between systems to move forward in planning for mental health in cities. The outcome is a general model that showed the importance of factors that vary from individuals, families to communities and feedback loops that span multiple systems such as the city physical infrastructures, social environments, schools, labor market, and healthcare provision.

    Download full text (pdf)
    A system of systems of MH
  • 117.
    Moustaid, Elhabib
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH).
    Kornevs, Maksims
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Health Informatics and Logistics.
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Health Informatics and Logistics.
    Sensitivity Analysis of policy options for urban mental health using system dynamics and fuzzy cognitive maps2019In: Proceedings of the 2019 Winter Simulation Conference / [ed] N. Mustafee, K.-H.G. Bae, S. Lazarova-Molnar, M. Rabe, C. Szabo, P. Haas, and Y.-J. Son, eds., 2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Urban mental health challenges call for new ways of designing policies to address the ongoing mental health issues in cities. Policymaking for mental health in cities is extremely difficult due to the complex nature of mental health, the structure of cities, and their multiple subsystems. This paper presents a general system dynamic model of factors affecting mental health and a method to test the sensitivity of the model to policy options using an approach combining system dynamics and fuzzy cognitive maps. The method is developed and tested to evaluate policies built around feedback loops. The approach succeeded in identifying the factors that substantially improve the mental health of the city population for specific contexts. It also suggests the coordination needed between different subsystems to reach these objectives.

  • 118.
    Moustaid, Elhabib
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH).
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Health Informatics and Logistics.
    A hybrid approach for building models and simulations for smart cities: Expert knowledge and low dimensionality2017In: Proceedings of the 2017 Winter Simulation Conference, Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE), 2017, p. 1551-1562Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In face of high urbanization and increasing mobility, models and simulations are used to find answers for urban planning problems. However, simulations face criticism for over-simplifying complex reality, having models disconnected from the context of their use or excluding policy-makers from the building of models. Smart city approaches did not overcome that reality even if they relied more and more on microscopic models, together with data available through technology. This article describes a hybrid approach combining the expert knowledge on the city and its limits in terms of data, with models having the right dimensionality to provide policy-makers and urban managers with the necessary information for understanding and managing the city. This approach has been applied in Venice, but it describes in more general terms a way of bridging the world of theoretically sound models with their potential use.

  • 119.
    Moustaid, Elhabib
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH).
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Health Informatics and Logistics.
    A Simulation Study of the Effect of Information on Waiting Times and Quality of Care in Major Emergency Departments in the Stockholm RegionManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Emergency departments in metropolitan environments face challenges in providing urban populations with the best services. Stockholm, as one of the fastest-growing metropolitan areas in Europe, is challenged to respond to increasing demand for emergency care. This paper studies, through the use of an agent-based simulation, the effect of information on the waiting times and the quality of care in the largest emergency care departments in the Stockholm region. The analysis of the simulation shows the outcomes of informing groups of patients with the expected time to seeing a doctor on the waiting times and the treatment times at emergency departments. The results show the effects of different information strategies and their second-order effects. The aggregation of the results by hospital, municipality, or level of adherence shows the potential winners and losers of the redistribution of patients resulting from such an information system.

  • 120.
    Moustaid, Elhabib
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Health Informatics and Logistics.
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Health Informatics and Logistics.
    A System Approach to Study Waiting Times at Emergency Departments in Metropolitan Environments2019In: Proceedings of the 2019 Winter Simulation Conference / [ed] N. Mustafee, K.-H.G. Bae, S. Lazarova-Molnar, M. Rabe, C. Szabo, P. Haas, and Y.-J. Son, Piscataway, New Jersey: Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) , 2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Providing quality emergency care is one of the biggest challenges faced in healthcare today. This article lays the groundwork for operating and planning emergency care provision in metropolitan environments using a system approach that goes beyond studying each emergency department in isolation. The approach consists of the development of an agent-based simulation using a bottom-up approach modeling patients, doctors, hospitals, and their interactions. The simulation is validated against real historical data of waiting times in the Stockholm region. Through experimentation with the simulation, changing the way patients choose emergency departments in metropolitan areas through the provision of information in real-time is shown to have generally a positive effect on waiting times and the quality of care. The simulation analysis shows that the effects are not uniform over the whole system and its agents.

  • 121.
    Moustaid, Elhabib
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Health Informatics and Logistics.
    Richard, Romain
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Health Informatics and Logistics.
    Agent-Based Modeling of a Network of Emergency Departments in Urban Environments2018In: The CSCI'18 International Conference on Computational Science and Computational Intelligence / [ed] Hamid R. Arabnia, Leonidas Deligiannidis, Fernando G. Tinetti, and Quoc-Nam Tran, Piscataway, New Jersey, 2018, p. 697-702Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Modeling the workload of emergency departments traditionally looks into single hospitals. Today, in a world of high urbanization and increasing levels of exchange of flows of information and patients, it is important to have a systems approach when planning or managing emergency care. This paper presents a low-dimensional Agent-Based Simulation to model the provision of emergency care in a metropolitan environment. The model explores the patient choice of emergency departments and its effects on waiting times. Through the Stockholm use-case, the model is shown to be a good fit against data. The model showed also consistent results when tried with another predictable scenario. 

  • 122. Naweed, A.
    et al.
    Wardaszko, M.
    Leigh, E.
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Health Informatics.
    Preface2018In: 21st Annual Simulation Technology and Training Conference, SimTecT 2016 and 47th International Simulation and Gaming Association Conference, ISAGA 2016 Held as Part of the 1st Australasian Simulation Congress, ASC 2016, Springer Verlag , 2018, p. v-viConference paper (Refereed)
  • 123. Nefs, Merten
    et al.
    Gerritsen, Paul
    Dooghe, David
    Mayer, Igor
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    TUDelft, Netherlands.
    Gaming the interrelation between rail infrastructure and station area development: Part 1 - Modeling the serious game 'SprintCity'2010In: 3rd International Conference on Next Generation Infrastructure Systems for Eco-Cities, INFRA 2010 - Conference Proceedings, IEEE , 2010, p. 5679221-Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The authors discuss and analyze the complex interplay between rail infrastructure development and land use development of railway station areas in the Netherlands. They argue that although this interrelation has been theorized and studied in the academic literature, the underlying complex and dynamic mechanisms, and the appropriate planning and management responses, are still insufficiently understood. This is particularly relevant for local, regional and national policymakers in the various subsystems, because a lack of network understanding and interconnectedness may produce suboptimal, unsustainable spatial and rail infrastructure planning. In order to better understand and manage the dynamic interrelations between rail infrastructure and urban development in the Delta Metropolis, the serious game SprintCity was developed. The game is played with the real stakeholders (administrators, planners, politicians, interest groups, experts and consultants, etc.). In this paper, the authors describe and analyze why and how the complexity of the real world system was modeled into a serious game.

  • 124. Nefs, Merten
    et al.
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    TUDelft, Netherlands.
    Gerritsen, Paul
    Dooghe, David
    Mayer, Igor
    Gaming the Interrelation between Rail Infrastructure and Station Area Development: Part 2 – Insights from the serious game ‘SprintCity’2010In: 3rd International Conference on Next Generation Infrastructure Systems for Eco-Cities, INFRA 2010 - Conference Proceedings, IEEE , 2010, p. 5679218-Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The authors analyze the complex interplay between rail infrastructure development and railway station area development in the Netherlands through the method of gaming-simulation, or serious gaming. The serious game SprintCity was developed in order to better understand and manage the dynamic interrelations between rail infrastructure and urban development of the Delta Metropolis in the Netherlands. So far, the game has been played in nine independent game sessions, with a total of around 70 stakeholders as players. The authors describe the design of the game in some detail and present the preliminary insights and results. Data before, during and after the game sessions are gathered through in-game participant questionnaires, data logging, observations and transcripts of end-of-game (debriefing) discussions between participants and the facilitator. The main conclusion is that the current prototype version of the game is supported by the stakeholder-players, significantly enhances the development and use of the underlying infrastructure-space model and generates questions for further scientific and policy research.

  • 125.
    Nilsson, Maria
    et al.
    Umeå Univ, Dept Epidemiol & Global Hlth, Umeå, Sweden..
    Emilsson, Cecilia
    Royal Swedish Acad Sci, Swedish Inst Global Hlth Transformat Sight, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Jonsson, Annie
    Univ Skövde, Sch Biosci, Skövde, Sweden..
    Tomson, Goran
    Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Health Informatics and Logistics.
    Ostman, Leif
    Uppsala Univ, Dept Educ, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Magnusson, Ulf
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Dept Clin Sci, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Stronger efforts are needed to safeguard the nutrition of school aged children2022In: BMJ. British Medical Journal, ISSN 0959-8146, E-ISSN 0959-535X, Vol. 376, article id o623Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 126. Olejniczak, K.
    et al.
    Newcomer, K. E.
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Health Informatics and Logistics.
    Advancing Evaluation Practice With Serious Games2020In: American Journal of Evaluation, ISSN 1098-2140, E-ISSN 1557-0878Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Evaluation professionals need to be nimble and innovative in their approaches in order to be relevant and provide useful evidence to decision-makers, stakeholders, and society in the crowded public policy landscape. In this article, we offer serious games as a method that can be employed by evaluators to address three persisting challenges in current evaluation practice: inclusion of stakeholders, understanding of causal mechanisms, and utilization of evaluation findings. We provide a framework that distinguishes among games along two crucial aspects of evaluation inquiry - its function and the nature of the evaluand. We offer examples of successfully implemented games in each set of the four arenas we delineate: teaching knowables, testing retention, crash-testing mechanisms, and exploring systems. We explain how games can be employed to promote learning about and among stakeholders, and to collect valuable intelligence about the operations of programs and policies. 

  • 127. Ortt, Roland
    et al.
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Traffic and Logistics.
    Trevino Barbosa, Sandra
    Sequences of market niches prior to large-scale diffusion.2012In: Proceedings of IAMOT 2012, Taiwan, 2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 128.
    Raghothama, Jayanth
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH).
    Azhari, Mohammed
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH).
    Carretero, Miguel Ramos
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH).
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH).
    Architectures for distributed, interactive and integrated traffic simulations2015In: Models and Technologies for Intelligent Transportation Systems (MT-ITS), 2015 International Conference on, IEEE , 2015, p. 387-394Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The rapid development of Intelligent Transport Systems has created new objectives and requirements for traffic simulation models. The development of visualization, procedural modeling, decision support requirements mean that simulation models need to satisfy different requirements. The chapter presents methods and tools to create distribute, integrated and interactive transport simulations, to enable the holistic exploration of complex transport systems, to test different strategies for monitoring and control and for training personnel. The integrated simulation is built leveraging gaming technologies, integrating commercial or off-the-shelf simulations using methods from distributed simulation and procedural modeling techniques.

  • 129.
    Raghothama, Jayanth
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Health Informatics and Logistics.
    Baalsrud Hauge, Jannicke
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Sustainable production development.
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Health Informatics and Logistics.
    Curating Player Experience Through Simulations in City Games2022In: Urban Planning, E-ISSN 2183-7635, Vol. 7, no 2, p. 253-263Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The use of games as a method for planning and designing cities is often associated with visualisation, from simplistic to immersive environments. They can also include complex and sophisticated models which provide an evidence base. The use of such technology as artefacts, aids, or mechanics curates the player experience in different and very often subtle ways, influencing how we engage with (simulated) urban phenomena, and, therefore, how the games can be used. In this article, we aim to explore how different aspects of technology use in city games influence the player experience and game outcomes. The article describes two games built upon the same city gaming framework, played with professionals in Rome and Haifa, respectively. Using a mixed-method, action research approach, the article examines how the high-tech, free form single-player games elicit the mental models of players (traffic controllers and planners in both cases). Questionnaires and the players' reflections on the gameplay, models used, and outcomes have been transcribed and analysed. Observations and results point to several dimensions that are critical to the outcomes of digital city games. Agency, exploration, openness, complexity, and learning are aspects that are strongly influenced by technology and models, and in turn, determine the outcomes of the game. City games that balance these aspects unlock player expertise to better understand the game dynamics and enable their imagination to better negotiate and resolve conflicts in design and planning.

  • 130.
    Raghothama, Jayanth
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Health Care Logistics.
    Baalsrud Hauge, Jannicke
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM).
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Health Care Logistics.
    Evaluating City Operations Design using Interactive SimulationsIn: Journal Simulation & Gaming, ISSN 1046-8781, E-ISSN 1552-826XArticle in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background. Games and simulations are evaluated for serving different functions, such as learning, design, communication and collaboration. Research on the relationship between the constructs of games and their outcomes can provide insights on the design of future games, to steer towards particular outcomes.

     

    Aim. The article aims to relate the constructs of two high fidelity, high tech and free form games to a conceptual evaluation framework, to better understand the relationships between constructs such as fidelity, validity and the functions a game is meant to serve.

     

    Method. The games are built for designing operational procedures for city management. The games are built using the ProtoWorld framework, and simulate the cities of Rome and Haifa through the integration of simulations. The framework enables run time interaction and intervention within the simulated city, such that players can manage and design procedures for their cities through a large scale, realistic simulation system. Controllers from both cities play the games for their respective cities, and attempt to design and manage their simulated cities. As experts on the system, their reflections on the use of such tools in their planning practice and the outcomes of the game sessions are analyzed to evaluate the games and game sessions.

     

    Results. Results point to the free form nature of the game enabling the design of tangible outcomes, which can be immediately validated and implemented in practice. The high fidelity nature of the simulation restricts facilitation, but enhances the players’ ability to comprehend complexity. The agency of the players enables their identification with the simulation, but restricts their creativity in the game. 

  • 131.
    Raghothama, Jayanth
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Health Care Logistics.
    Hanchi, Hamza
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Health Care Logistics.
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Health Care Logistics.
    Hybrid, composable approach to simulations in healthcare operations and management2017In: Proceedings of the 2017 Winter Simulation Conference / [ed] W. K. V. Chan, A. D'Ambrogio, G. Zacharewicz, N. Mustafee, G. Wainer, and E. Page, ACM Digital Library, 2017, Vol. F134102, p. 2857-2868Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Simulation has been used for modeling in healthcare for many decades. Ranging from the modeling of physiological processes to group dynamics to the modeling of strategic and system-wide models of healthcare provision, simulation promises to be an effective approach to analyze healthcare operations. Effective application of simulations in healthcare operations requires that simulation deal with wide variability and unpredictability in workflow processes, the complexity of healthcare organizations and enables the participation of human experts in the modeling and operations processes. In this paper, based on requirements drawn from a participatory simulation with healthcare practitioners, we define a hybrid, composable approach to healthcare simulations. Both the participatory simulation and the composable simulation are applied in the context of the New Karolinska Solna hospital in Sweden, a highly specialized new hospital. Results point to the need to accounting for variability in workflow processes and integration with existing IT infrastructure in hospitals. 

  • 132.
    Raghothama, Jayanth
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Health Care Logistics.
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Health Care Logistics.
    Complexity and Context: Meta-requirements for Simulation GamesIn: Simulation and Gaming, ISSN 10468781Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background. Simulations and models mediate between actors, and between actors and reality. Researching their context of use in policy making and their interpretation by policy makers is essential, since it might lead to different requirements and considerations for a modeler and the modeling process. 

     

    Aim. In this article, we investigate and attempt to define the demands and requirements policy makers might have from simulation models, especially in the context of decision making in complex systems. Another goal of this article is to contribute to the ongoing discussion on fidelity and validity, and their relationship with representation of systems in models.

     

    Method. Policy makers have expert knowledge of the systems they work with, as well as considerable experience in working with analytical tools such as simulations that provide them with evidence to support their policy processes. As potential clients and users of simulations, the reflections of 18 policy makers on the use of simulations are triggered through structured, play based exploration of a systems dynamics model. The system dynamics model simulates is specific to the local context and simulates the region they work in. It is implemented within Democracy 3, a commercially available game. This model is explored through game play in a workshop. Through forms and debriefing, insights were gathered from the players’ reflections on the use of models and simulations in policy practice.

     

    Results. Our results point to different requirements from policy makers on simulations and models. Policy makers prefer complete, open models which are flexible and facilitate exploration. Results also demonstrate the linked nature of fidelity and validity. 

  • 133.
    Raghothama, Jayanth
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH).
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH).
    Distributed, integrated and interactive traffic simulations2015In: Proceedings of the 2015 Winter Simulation Conference / [ed] L. Yilmaz, W. K. V. Chan, I. Moon, T. M. K. Roeder, C. Macal, and M. D. Rossetti, IEEE , 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mainstream discourse in urban planning is in transition, due to shifts from a technical to a communicativeperspective, and increased scrutiny and criticism of models and simulations. The cognizance of complexityin urban systems is imposing limitations on modeling. The added benefits of today’s data and compu-tational power make simulations harder to validate and understand. Reconciling the movements towardsa communicative and exploratory approach as compared to a technical and predictive approach requiresnew methods for planning process and posits new requirements and functions for simulations. Based ondistributed simulation and gaming simulation, the paper presents a framework to support the exploration ofsimulated and realistic virtual worlds in a participatory fashion, enabling new approaches to urban planning.The development and evaluation of the framework casts simulations in a new perspective and explores thecontext of use of simulations in planning and design.

  • 134.
    Raghothama, Jayanth
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering.
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering.
    Gaming, urban planning and transportation design process2015In: Lecture Notes in Geoinformation and Cartography, 2015, Vol. 213, p. 297-312Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In today’s urban planning, two perspectives dominate the discourse: a technical-rational perspective and a communicative rational perspective. Bridging the dichotomy between the two perspectives and situating new planning support methods within the context of complexity theories leads to new structures for planning support systems. The implications of the inherent complex nature of planning when bridging these perspectives should be taken into account for new planning processes and support systems. The development of such methods requires an iterative cycle between methodological and technological aspects of tool development. The chapter presents a technical framework that enables the development of methods integrating both perspectives. The framework derives its requirements from the integration of the two perspectives, and is evaluated in the context of two design case studies in the cities of Stockholm and Paris. The development of the framework and method has implications for the design of tools in urban planning. The tools need to reflect the open nature of the complex systems they represent and operate in. Such methods also expand the boundaries of the design space, allowing for previously unknown configurations.

  • 135.
    Raghothama, Jayanth
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Health Informatics and Logistics.
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Health Informatics and Logistics.
    Rigor in Gaming for Design: Conditions for Transfer Between Game and Reality2018In: Journal Simulation & Gaming, ISSN 1046-8781, E-ISSN 1552-826X, Vol. 49, no 3, p. 246-262Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background. The increasing cognizance of complexity in systems has brought into focus important questions about the methods and tools we use to address them. Games for design, where games and computer simulations are used together to create concrete and tangible designs in a pluralistic way, with multiple stakeholders within the game is a new area for simulation gaming. Aim. In this article about gaming for design, embedded in the design science approach towards game science, we raise important philosophical questions about this new area, as well as attempt to address practical questions at the application level. We attempt to bridge the analytical science and design science approaches to games, and analyze them through meta-constructs of games such as fidelity, abstraction and resolution. Results. Results from two applications, through analysis of game play and debriefing of game sessions from two applications, COMPLEX and ProtoWorld are gathered and analyzed to understand the respresentational requirements for simulations and games. Conclusion. Results point to the need for rigor in gaming, particularly when modeling reference systems and rigor in assessing effects, both during game play and while debriefing. Results also point to expanded definitions of meta-constructs of games, as well as to their linked nature.

  • 136.
    Raghothama, Jayanth
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Traffic and Logistics.
    Meijer, Sebastiaan A.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Traffic and Logistics.
    A review of gaming simulation in transportation2014In: Frontiers in Gaming Simulation: 44th International Simulation and Gaming Association Conference, ISAGA 2013 and 17th IFIP WG 5.7 Workshop on Experimental Interactive Learning in Industrial Management, Stockholm, Sweden, June 24-28, 2013. Revised Selected Papers, Springer, 2014, p. 237-244Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Gaming simulation has proven to be an invaluable method for experimentation and learning and exploring scenarios in various fields of policy making. In this paper, we present a case for the use of gaming simulation in transportation analysis. We also present a review of games and gaming simulation in transportation analysis. We observe that gaming simulation is not widely used in transportation, despite its wide use in associated fields.

  • 137.
    Raghothama, Jayanth
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering.
    Moustaid, Elhabib
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering.
    Magal Shreenath, Vinutha
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering.
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering.
    Bridging borders: Integrating data analytics, modeling, simulation, and gaming for interdisciplinary assessment of health aspects in city networks2017In: City Networks: Collaboration and Planning for Health and Sustainability, Springer, 2017, p. 137-155Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The health perspective in urban science brings new methodological challenges to planning of city networks. Due to the system of systems nature of healthcare, new methods are needed to facilitate disciplinary integration and management of models and models-of-models. Participation of stakeholders and policy makers demands the uptake of new methods and a new perspective on the use of interfaces and boundary objects. In this chapter, the authors discuss evidence from five projects that use gaming, simulation, modeling, and data analytics in unconventional ways for design of large-scale urban systems to provide a methodological path forward for overcoming traditional engineering approach issues.

  • 138.
    Raghothama, Jayanth
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Health Care Logistics.
    Shreenath, Vinutha Magal
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Health Care Logistics.
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Health Care Logistics.
    Analytics on public transport delays with spatial big data2016In: Proceedings of the 5th ACM SIGSPATIAL International Workshop on Analytics for Big Geospatial Data, BigSpatial 2016, ACM Digital Library, 2016, p. 28-33Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The increasing pervasiveness of location-aware technologies is leading to the rise of large, spatio-temporal datasets and to the opportunity of discovering usable knowledge about the behaviors of people and objects. Applied extensively in transportation, spatial big data and its analytics can deliver useful insights on a number of different issues such as congestion, delays, public transport reliability and so on. Predominantly studied for its use in operational management, spatial big data can be used to provide insight in strategic applications as well, from planning and design to evaluation and management. Such large scale, streaming spatial big data can be used in the improvement of public transport, for example the design of public transport networks and reliability. In this paper, we analyze GTFS data from the cities of Stockholm and Rome to gain insight on the sources and factors influencing public transport delays in the cities. The analysis is performed on a combination of GTFS data with data from other sources. The paper points to key issues in the analysis of real time data, driven by the contextual setting in the two cities.

  • 139. Roungas, B.
    et al.
    de Wijse, M.
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    KTH.
    Verbraeck, A.
    Pitfalls for debriefing games and simulations: Theory and practice2018In: 21st Annual Simulation Technology and Training Conference, SimTecT 2016 and 47th International Simulation and Gaming Association Conference, ISAGA 2016 Held as Part of the 1st Australasian Simulation Congress, ASC 2016, Springer Verlag , 2018, p. 101-115Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Debriefing is considered, by many scholars, to be a fundamental part of learning through games and simulations. Despite its significance, there is a lack of research in the area of debriefing, which results in unaddressed factors that inhibit debriefing. Research in the field is complicated by many influencing factors varying from context to game, the purpose of the game, conditions and player specifics, facilitators etc. Insight in the role of these influencing factors can aid in understanding how debriefing can be optimized. In doing this research so far two viewpoints are relevant, the first is the design of debriefing and the second one is the actual execution of the debriefing. The aim of this study is to identify, on the basis of literature, the influence of factors and their interrelation, and subsequently, to categorize them based on expert opinions, so as to determine which pitfalls have the highest influence on inefficiency and ineffectiveness of debriefing. Based on 12 pitfalls identified in literature, and through the use of an online questionnaire, facilitation experts evaluated the extent to which these pitfalls occur due to the design or the execution of the debriefing, and the extent to which they are influenced by the rules of games and simulations. All 12 pitfalls seem to occur in practice, to some extent, due to both the design and the execution of the debriefing. Nevertheless, some pitfalls appear to be more influenced either by design or by execution. Moreover, the results on the extent to which the pitfalls are influenced by the rules of games and simulations are inconclusive, due to the contradiction between the answers on the pre-defined questions and the comments of the experts. A method for further extending the list of pitfalls and verifying the results, hence minimizing the threat to the internal validity of the study, is proposed, which includes a more extensive literature review, interviews, and case studies. 

  • 140. Roungas, B.
    et al.
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Health Informatics and Logistics.
    Verbraeck, A.
    Knowledge management of games for decision making2018In: 48th conference of the International Simulation and Gaming Association, ISAGA 2017, Springer, 2018, Vol. 10825, p. 24-33Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Games for decision making have developed into a powerful tool for corporations. Irrespective of their size, corporations have been increasingly using these games in order to evaluate and ascertain impactful business decisions and strategies. Despite their proven added value to the decision making process, there is still lack of research on whether, and if so how, these games can be used by researchers and practitioners to build evidents on systems’ behavior, as part of a larger scheme. To this effect, this paper proposes a framework to determine the different artifacts of games that should be logged and stored for future use.

  • 141. Roungas, B.
    et al.
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering.
    Verbraeck, A.
    Validity of railway microscopic simulations under the microscope: Two case studies2018In: International Journal of System of Systems Engineering, ISSN 1748-0671, E-ISSN 1748-068X, Vol. 8, no 4, p. 346-364Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Simulations are the core of every railway system. Changes in the timetable and the infrastructure, or even in the internal processes of a railway company should be, and usually are, first tested through simulations. Given their significance and potential impact, simulations should be primarily validated; validation ensures-at least to some extent-that the returned results are credible and can be used for the intended purpose. This study is a detailed report on two case studies from the railway sector. The aim of this paper is to identify critical factors that can advance or hinder the validity and the effective usage of simulation models.

  • 142.
    Roungas, Bill
    et al.
    Delft Univ Technol, Dept Multiactor Syst, Jaffalaan, Delft, Netherlands.;ALBA Grad Business Sch, Athens, Greece..
    Bekius, Femke
    Delft Univ Technol, Dept Multiactor Syst, Jaffalaan, Delft, Netherlands..
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Health Informatics and Logistics. Delft Univ Technol, Fac Technol Policy & Management, Jaffalaan, Delft, Netherlands.;KTH Royal Inst Technol, Dept Hlth Syst Engn, Stockholm, Sweden..
    The Game Between Game Theory and Gaming Simulations: Design Choices2019In: Journal Simulation & Gaming, ISSN 1046-8781, E-ISSN 1552-826X, Vol. 50, no 2, p. 180-201Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background. The abstraction of complex systems, which is required by default when modelling gaming simulations, is a convoluted and time-consuming process. For gaming simulations to be efficient and effective, the problem of the real system they imitate needs to be narrowed down and simplified as much as possible. Additionally, even after abstraction of the real system, multiple design decisions need to be made and these may differ depending on the gaming simulation. Aim. This article proposes a framework for formalizing, and consequently standardizing, expediting and simplifying, the modelling of gaming simulations. Method. The proposed framework applies game concepts pertaining to game theory in the abstraction of the real system and the game design decisions. Results. Application of the framework in three case studies reveals several advantages of incorporating game theory into game design, such as formally defining the game design elements and identifying the worst-case scenarios in the real-systems, to name but two. Conclusions. Given the framework's advantages in general, and the game design recommendations it offers in particular, it is safe to conclude that, for the cases presented in this article, the framework make positive contributions towards the development of gaming simulations.

  • 143.
    Roungas, Bill
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Health Informatics and Logistics.
    Bekius, Femke
    Verbraeck, Alexander
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Health Informatics and Logistics.
    Improving the decision-making qualities of gaming simulations2020In: Journal of Simulation, ISSN 1747-7778, E-ISSN 1747-7786Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Gaming simulations (games) for policy and decision making have been the neglected “sibling” of educational and training games. The latter have experienced a widespread usage by practitioners and researchers, while the former have had limited, yet slowly increasing, adoption by organisations. As a result, various issues developing and using these games remain unaddressed. This includes the design of games, their validation, the actual game sessions, and applying the resulting knowledge from games in organisations. In this paper, solutions for issues identified in these four areas of gaming simulations are proposed. Solutions vary from purely analytical to purely social, stressing the interdisciplinary approach required to tackle the issues associated with them. The result consists of several theoretical and practical contributions as well as philosophical considerations regarding games for policy and decision making.

  • 144.
    Roungas, Bill
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Health Informatics and Logistics.
    Dahlberg, Hans
    Broman, Emanuel
    Lundström, Fredrik
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Health Informatics and Logistics.
    An Auction Game for Railway Capacity Allocation2021Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The deregulation of railway systems across western countries have brought the subject of pricing railway slots to the surface. The majority of the infrastructure remains under the ownership and supervision of governments, which in turn further complicates the pricing of slots, since profit does not become the sole aim. This paper proposes an auction model for pricing railway slots aimed at been applied in the Swedish railways. Moreover, in this paper, a game built on top of the auction model is presented as an interface that would enable testing the auction model with railway operators.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 145.
    Roungas, Bill
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Health Informatics and Logistics.
    Herrero Álvarez, Lucía
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Health Informatics and Logistics.
    A Participatory Simulation Framework for Agent-Based Model Validation in Air Traffic Management2021Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The European Air Traffic Management (ATM) system is responsible for the safe and timely transportation of more than a billion passengers annually. It is a system that depends heavily on technology and is expected to stay on top of the technological advancements and be an early adopter of technologies. Nevertheless, technological change in ATM has historically developed at a slow pace. As a result, an agent-based model (ABM) of the ATM technology deployment cycle has been developed. This ABM is part of a larger project, which intends to recommend new policy measures for overcoming any barriers associated with technology adoption in ATM. In this paper, a participatory simulation framework validating this ABM is proposed. The aim of the framework is to be able to provide evidences with regards to validation both in an agent as well as in a system level.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 146.
    Roungas, Bill
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Health Informatics and Logistics.
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Health Informatics and Logistics.
    Towards the Management and Dissemination of Knowledge from Gaming Simulations2020In: JCSG 2020: Serious Games, Springer Science and Business Media Deutschland GmbH , 2020, p. 276-288Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Nowadays, gaming simulations (games) are used for various different purposes and generate a wealth of knowledge. Yet, there is still lack of research on whether, and if so how, these games can be used by researchers and practitioners to build evidences on systems’ behavior within a larger scheme and/or manage and exploit the knowledge produced by and in these games. This article proposes a knowledge management framework, which aims at enabling the development of a knowledge management system that can store, index, and disseminate the knowledge produced by and in games in an appropriate way. The proposed framework is built on the basis of several factors, like the type of knowledge and the prospective users, and is then validated with three case studies from the Dutch railway sector. Through the case studies, the proposed framework appears to be able to help the management and dissemination of knowledge derived from games. The framework is a proof of concept on the feasibility of developing a knowledge management system module for games.

  • 147.
    Roungas, Bill
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Health Informatics and Logistics.
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Health Informatics and Logistics.
    Verbraeck, A.
    The Tacit Knowledge in Games: From Validation to Debriefing2021In: Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics), Springer Nature , 2021, p. 74-83Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Game sessions consist of three phases: briefing, gameplay, and debriefing, with the latter being considered the most important feature of games. Nevertheless, given that games are considered by many to be more of an artistic form rather than a scientific artifact, a question that rises is: Can game sessions in general and debriefing in particular be analyzed and performed in a rigorous scientific way? In other words, can they be consistently structured, given the different characteristics of games, and can clear criteria on what would constitute a successful game session and debriefing be defined? The answer to these questions is yes. Yet, it remains a challenge to extract the knowledge of experts, which resides to a large extent in the tacit knowledge spectrum. Hence, the aim of this paper is to shed some light in this tacit knowledge possessed by experts and to gain understanding on why certain practices are more prone to success than others as well as bring into the surface other practices that have remained well hidden. In order to accomplish this goal, three rounds of interviews were conducted.

  • 148.
    Roungas, Bill
    et al.
    Department of Multi Actor Systems, Delft University of Technology, Jaffalaan 5, Delft, Netherlands.
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Health Informatics and Logistics.
    Verbraeck, Alexander
    Department of Multi Actor Systems, Delft University of Technology, Jaffalaan 5, Delft, Netherlands.
    Harnessingweb 3.0 and r to mitigate simulation validation restrictions2018In: SIMULTECH 2018 - Proceedings of 8th International Conference on Simulation and Modeling Methodologies, Technologies and Applications, SciTePress , 2018, p. 44-54Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The complexity of modern systems has made the use of simulations paramount, in order to test different scenarios in an affordable, ethical, and risk-free way. As such, simulations need to be validated, ensuring that the obtained results are meaningful. But validation apart from the computational difficulties, bears several other problems. The constant need for validation due to updates on the simulation software, the dependence on the validation experts to be always available for the new iterations and for presenting any new insights are just some of these problems. This paper proposes a framework, and applies it to two case studies, which is based on Web 3.0 technologies and the R statistical language as a mean to mitigate such problems.

  • 149.
    Roungas, Bill
    et al.
    Delft Univ Technol, Dept Multi Actor Syst, Jaffalaan 5, NL-2628 BX Delft, Netherlands..
    Verbraeck, Alexander
    Delft Univ Technol, Dept Multi Actor Syst, Jaffalaan 5, NL-2628 BX Delft, Netherlands..
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Health Informatics and Logistics.
    The future of contextual knowledge in gaming simulations: A research agenda2018In: 2018 Winter Simulation Conference (WSC), Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE), 2018, p. 2435-2446Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Gaming simulations (games) are increasingly becoming the tool of choice for modeling and understanding the complexity of today's systems. This increased popularity has consequently revealed the weaknesses of games in several areas. These limitations range from inconsistencies on the game design to the unexploited explicit and tacit knowledge that games invoke. This paper focuses on games that do not aim at generalizing the produced knowledge but, instead, at understanding how a system works within a specific context. The first step of the analysis is identifying these limitations based on an extensive literature review. Based on this, different directions that could mitigate or even fully address these limitations are proposed. The paper concludes with a focused research agenda.

  • 150.
    Roungas, Bill
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Health Informatics and Logistics.
    Álvarez, L.H.
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Health Informatics and Logistics.
    Participatory Simulation Framework for Agent-Based Model Validation in Air Traffic Management2022In: ISAGA 2021: Gaming, Simulation and Innovations: Challenges and Opportunities, Springer Science and Business Media Deutschland GmbH , 2022, p. 288-296Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The EU Air Traffic Management (ATM) system is responsible for the safe and timely transportation of more than a billion passengers annually. It is a system that depends heavily on technology and is expected to stay on top of the technological advancements and be an early adopter of technologies. Technological change in ATM has historically developed at a slow pace. An agent-based model (ABM) of the ATM technology deployment cycle has been developed. This ABM is part of a larger project, which intends to recommend new policy measures for overcoming any barriers associated with technology adoption in ATM. In this paper, a participatory simulation framework validating this ABM is proposed. The aim of the framework is to be able to provide evidence for validation both in an agent level as well as in a system level.

1234 101 - 150 of 191
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf