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  • 151. Andersson, J.
    et al.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Ageing of Flexographic Printed Model Cellulose Surfaces and Determination of the Mechanisms Behind Ageing2009In: Pulp & paper Canada, ISSN 0316-4004, Vol. 110, no 6, p. 34-38Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The influence of storage conditions on the ink detachment efficiency of water-based flexographic ink printed onto model cellulose surfaces and handsheets was investigated. It was shown that UV light, elevated temperatures, longer storage time, increasing surface roughness, and increasing surface hydrophobicity all had a negative effect on ink detachment. It was also shown that the ink's chemical and structural characteristics changed when stored at elevated temperatures. No chemical or structural changes could be observed for the ink when stored under UV light.

  • 152.
    Andersson, Joel
    et al.
    GKN Aerosp Engine Syst, SE-46181 Trollhattan, Sweden.;Univ West, Dept Engn Sci, SE-46186 Trollhattan, Sweden.;Chalmers, Dept Mat & Mfg Technol, SE-41296 Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Raza, Shahzad
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering.
    Eliasson, Anders
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering.
    Surreddi, Kumar Babu
    Chalmers, Dept Mat & Mfg Technol, SE-41296 Gothenburg, Sweden..
    SOLIDIFICATION OF ALLOY 718, ATI 718PLUS (R) AND WASPALOY2014In: 8TH INTERNATIONAL SYMPOSIUM ON SUPERALLOY 718 AND DERIVATIVES / [ed] Ott, E Banik, A Andersson, J Dempster, I Gabb, T Groh, J Heck, K Helmink, R Liu, X WusatowskaSarnek, A, JOHN WILEY & SONS INC , 2014, p. 181-192Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Alloy 718, ATI 718Plus (R) and Waspaloy have been investigated in terms of what their respective solidification process reveals. Differential thermal analysis was used to approach the task together with secondary electron and back scattered electron detectors equipped with an energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy detector. These experimental methods were used to construct pseudo binary phase diagrams that could aid in explaining solidification as well as liquation mechanisms in processes such as welding and casting. Furthermore, it was seen that Waspaloy has the smallest solidification range, followed by Alloy 718, and finally ATI 718Plus (R) possessing the largest solidification interval in comparison.

  • 153. Andersson, L.
    et al.
    Larsson, Per Tomas
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Bergström, Lennart
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry, Stockholm University.
    Evaluating pore space in macroporous ceramics with water-based porosimetry2013In: Journal of The American Ceramic Society, ISSN 0002-7820, E-ISSN 1551-2916, Vol. 96, no 6, p. 1916-1922Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We show that water-based porosimetry (WBP), a facile, simple, and nondestructive porosimetry technique, accurately evaluates both the pore size distribution and throat size distribution of sacrificially templated macroporous alumina. The pore size distribution and throat size distribution derived from the WBP evaluation in uptake (imbibition) and release (drainage) mode, respectively, were corroborated by mercury porosimetry and X-ray micro-computed tomography (μ-CT). In contrast with mercury porosimetry, the WBP also provided information on the presence of "dead-end pores" in the macroporous alumina.

  • 154.
    Andersson, Margareta
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering, Applied Process Metallurgy.
    Appelberg, Jesper
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering, Applied Process Metallurgy.
    Tilliander, Anders
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering, Applied Material Physics.
    Nakajima, Keiji
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering, Applied Process Metallurgy.
    Shibata, Hiroyuki
    Tohoku University, Institute of Multidisciplinary Research for Advanced Materials.
    Kitamura, Shinya
    Tohoku University, Institute of Multidisciplinary Research for Advanced Materials.
    Jonsson, Lage
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering, Applied Process Metallurgy.
    Jönsson, Pär
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering, Applied Process Metallurgy.
    Some Aspects on Grain Refining Additions with Focus on Clogging during Casting2006In: ISIJ International, ISSN 0915-1559, E-ISSN 1347-5460, Vol. 46, no 6, p. 814-823Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Some ideas of how to study optimum conditions for implementation of grain refining in liquid steel processing with focus on how to avoid clogging are discussed. It is assumed that the inclusions most beneficial for grain refining are known from studies by physical metallurgists. The challenge for a process metallurgist is how to provide a homogeneous distribution of grain refiners at the onset of solidification. Four different ways of providing information to succeed with this are discussed. Thermodynamic modeling can be used to predict what additions to make to create potential grain refiners, if relevant thermodynamic data is available. Mathematical fluid-flow modeling can be used to study where to add potential grain refiners. It is discussed that the tundish is the most appropriate reactor to add grain refiners, since enough time is given to a complete mixing of the grain refiner into the steel before the steel enters the mold. By using the scanning laser microscopy technique it is possible to study which potential grain refiners has the lowest attraction forces between each other. This is important in order to minimise growth of inclusions when they collide during transport in the tundish, which can lead to the formation of larger inclusions that do not serve as useful grain refiners. Finally, it is suggested that laboratory experiments are carried out in order to study the tendency for nozzle clogging, before the use of grain refiners is tested in industrial scale.

  • 155.
    Andersson, Margareta A.T.
    et al.
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Materials Science and Engineering.
    Hallberg, Malin
    Jonsson, Lage
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering, Applied Process Metallurgy.
    Jönsson, Pär
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering, Applied Process Metallurgy.
    Slag-metal reactions during ladle treatment with focus on desulphurisation2002In: Ironmaking & steelmaking, ISSN 0301-9233, E-ISSN 1743-2812, Vol. 29, no 3, p. 224-232Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Within several cooperative projects, KTH (Royal Institute of Technology), Ovako Steel AB, and MEFOS have investigated the desulphurisation of bearing steel during vacuum degassing. The work includes thermodynamic calculations of the slag-metal equilibrium, CFD modelling of slag-metal reactions, and plant trials. Results from the various studies are presented and discussed in this paper. Models for predicting slag properties (sulphide capacity, viscosity, and oxide activities) in liquid slags as functions of slag composition and temperature have been used for the calculation of data which have been employed in static and dynamic modelling of sulphur refining. The results from static modelling show that the method allows fast and easy evaluation of the theoretical desulphurisation conditions during degassing at Ovako Steel AB, as well as theoretical determination of the parameters that have the greatest influence on the equilibrium sulphur distribution. The conclusion from dynamic modelling is that the vacuum degassing operation can be described dynamically with the present knowledge of sulphide capacity, sulphur distribution, viscosity, and oxide activities of ladle slags if this knowledge is combined with fluid flow modelling to derive the overall kinetics. The presented model approaches have been found useful in understanding the sulphur refining process at Ovako Steel AB. The dynamic modelling concept is also believed to have potential for dynamic descriptions of other slag-metal reactions in steelmaking.

  • 156.
    Andersson, Margareta
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering, Applied Process Metallurgy.
    Hallberg, Malin
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering, Applied Process Metallurgy.
    Jonsson, Lage
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Applied Process Metallurgy.
    Jönsson, Pär
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Applied Process Metallurgy.
    Slag/metal reactionsduring ladle treatment with focus on desulphurisation2000In: 6thInternational Conference on Molten Slags, Fluxes and Salts, 2000Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 157.
    Andersson, Nils
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering, Applied Process Metallurgy.
    Tilliander, Anders
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering, Applied Process Metallurgy.
    Jonsson, Lage
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering, Applied Process Metallurgy.
    Jönsson, Pär
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering, Applied Process Metallurgy.
    Fundamental decarburisation model of AOD process2013In: Ironmaking & steelmaking, ISSN 0301-9233, E-ISSN 1743-2812, Vol. 40, no 5, p. 390-397Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A mathematical fluid flow model of gas injection in an argon–oxygen decarburisation (AOD) converter process has been coupled with a high temperature thermodynamic model. The current model is a further enhancement of an earlier developed three-dimensional, three-phase model, to also include some thermodynamics of the process. The model is based on fundamental transport equations and includes separate solutions for the steel, slag and the gas phases and their coupling by friction. The AOD model has been used to predict the first injection stage of decarburisation in an AOD converter. The predictions have been found to agree well with the corresponding results from an industrial process control model. One of the important observations from the simulations was that large concentration gradients of carbon exist in the AOD at an early stage and as the first injection step approaching its end the carbon gradients diminish. Also, the results show, in accordance with theory, that the local decarburisation rate is decreased at elevated pressures.

  • 158.
    Andersson, Nils
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering, Applied Process Metallurgy.
    Tilliander, Anders
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering, Applied Process Metallurgy.
    Jonsson, Lage
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering, Applied Process Metallurgy.
    Jönsson, Pär
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering, Applied Process Metallurgy.
    Investigating the effectof slag on decarburization in an AOD converter using a fundamental model2013In: Steel Research International, ISSN 1611-3683, E-ISSN 1869-344X, Vol. 84, no 2, p. 169-177Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A high-temperature thermodynamics model has been coupled with a fundamental mathematical model describing the fluid flow, where boundary conditions were chosen based on data for an industrial AOD converter. Using this model, the effect of both slag phases (a liquid part and a solid part) on the decarburization was studied. More specifically, the separation of chromium oxide to liquid slag as well as the effect of the amount of rigid top slag (solid)on the decarburization was investigated. The liquid slag was considered with respect to the uptake of chromium oxide, while the rigid top slag was only considered with respect to the increase of the metallostatic pressure in the steel melt. The results suggest that separation of chromium oxide to liquid slag results in a decreased decarburization rate. The same conclusion can be drawn with respect to the amount of solid top slag.

  • 159.
    Andersson, Nils
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering, Applied Process Metallurgy.
    Tilliander, Anders
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering, Applied Process Metallurgy.
    Jonsson, Lage
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering, Applied Process Metallurgy.
    Jönsson, Pär
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering, Applied Process Metallurgy.
    Preliminary investigation of influence of temperature on decarburisation using fundamental AOD model2013In: Ironmaking & steelmaking, ISSN 0301-9233, E-ISSN 1743-2812, Vol. 40, no 7, p. 551-558Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A high temperature thermodynamics model was earlier coupled with a fundamental mathematical model describing the fluid flow in an argon–oxygen decarburisation (AOD) converter and was initially validated for an idealised temperature description. More specifically, a linear average temperature relation was used such that the temperature would be isolated from other effects such as reactions and mixing. Thereafter, the effect of the starting temperature on the decarburisation was studied. The purpose is to provide some initial knowledge about how temperature affects the decarburisation in an AOD converter. The results suggest that the thermodynamic limit for carbon concentration after reaching the carbon removal efficiency (CRE) maxima is vertically translated downwards at higher temperatures. Furthermore, when plotting the mass ratio between CO and CO2, there is an indication of a point that may relate to a CRE maximum.

  • 160.
    Andersson, Nils Å. I.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering, Applied Process Metallurgy.
    Coupling of a fundamental mathematical fluid flow model with computational thermodynamics model to study the decarburisation2012Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
  • 161.
    Andersson, Nils Å. I.
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering, Applied Process Metallurgy.
    Tilliander, Anders
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering, Applied Process Metallurgy.
    Jonsson, Lage T. I.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering, Applied Process Metallurgy.
    Jönsson, Pär G.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering, Applied Process Metallurgy.
    A fundamental decarburization model of the AOD processIn: Ironmaking & steelmaking, ISSN 0301-9233, E-ISSN 1743-2812Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 162.
    Andersson, Nils Å. I.
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering, Applied Process Metallurgy.
    Tilliander, Anders
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering, Applied Process Metallurgy.
    Jonsson, Lage T. I.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering, Applied Process Metallurgy.
    Jönsson, Pär G.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering, Applied Process Metallurgy.
    An in-Depth Model-Based Analysis of Decarburization in the AOD Process2012In: Steel Research International, ISSN 1611-3683, E-ISSN 1869-344X, Vol. 83, no 11, p. 1039-1052Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A previously reported flow and reaction model for an argon-oxygen decarburization converter was extended to also include a thermodynamic description. An in-depth study of the model results has been conducted to answer how concentrations of elements and species in the converter at different locations change with time. This may contribute to the understanding of the mechanisms of the refining procedure in the argon-oxygen decarburization process. The refining procedure includes several step-wise changes of an injected gas composition to higher and higher inert gas ratio, called step changes. A step change leads to a decreased partial pressure of carbon monoxide and maintains the decarburization at a higher efficiency. The results shows early and late concentration profiles for the first injection step and suggests a way to determine when a step change should be made. Moreover, the step change could be determined by calculating the carbon concentration profiles and deciding when the carbon concentration gradients start to diminish.

  • 163.
    Andersson, Nils Å. I.
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering, Applied Process Metallurgy.
    Tilliander, Anders
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering, Applied Process Metallurgy.
    Jonsson, Lage T. I.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering, Applied Process Metallurgy.
    Jönsson, Pär G.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering, Applied Process Metallurgy.
    Investigating the effect of slag on decarburization in an AOD coverter using a fundamental modelIn: Steel Research International, ISSN 1611-3683, E-ISSN 1869-344XArticle in journal (Other academic)
  • 164.
    Andersson, Nils Å. I.
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering, Applied Process Metallurgy.
    Tilliander, Anders
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering, Applied Process Metallurgy.
    Jonsson, Lage T. I.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering, Applied Process Metallurgy.
    Jönsson, Pär G.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering, Applied Process Metallurgy.
    Preliminary investigation of temperatur dependencies on decarburization in a fundamental AOD modelIn: Ironmaking & steelmaking, ISSN 0301-9233, E-ISSN 1743-2812Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 165.
    Andersson, Oscar
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering. KTH, Centres, XPRES, Excellence in production research.
    Budak, Nesrin
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Solid Mechanics (Dept.).
    Melander, Arne
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering. KTH, Centres, XPRES, Excellence in production research.
    Palmquist, Niclas
    Experimental measurements and numerical simulations of distortions of overlap laser-welded thin sheet steel beam structures2017In: Welding in the World, ISSN 0043-2288, E-ISSN 1878-6669, Vol. 61, no 5, p. 927-934Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Distortions of mild steel structures caused by laser welding were analyzed. One thousand-millimeter U-beam structures were welded as overlap joints with different process parameters and thickness configurations. Final vertical and transverse distortions after cooling were measured along the U-beam. Significant factors, which affect distortions, were identified. Heat input per unit length, weld length, and sheet thickness showed a significant effect on welding distortions. Furthermore, the welding distortions were modeled using FE simulations. A simplified and computationally efficient simulation method was used. It describes the effect of shrinkage of the weld zone during cooling. The simulations show reasonable computation times and good agreement with experiments.

  • 166.
    Andersson, Patrik
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering.
    Arvhult, Carl-Magnus
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering.
    Metallic residues after hydriding of zirconium2012Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    As a part of the production of nitride nuclear fuel for use in fast nuclear reactors, zirconium is hydrided followed by nitriding and mixing with uranium nitride. This work concludes a study of unwanted metallic particles present in a powder that is supposed to be a zirconium hydride. Sponge zirconium was hydrided at different temperatures and different time intervals, and the resulting hydride was milled into a powder. The powders were analyzed using SEM and XRD after which the powders were pressed into pellets for light optical microscopic study. The primary goals were determination of the structure of the particles and thereafter elimination of them. It was seen that hydriding at 500 C results in less metal particles but more experiments need to be conducted to confirm this.

  • 167.
    Andersson-Östling, Henrik C.M.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering. KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering, Materials Technology.
    Mechanical Properties of Welds at Creep Activation Temperatures2010Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Welds in materials intended for service at temperatures above the creep activation temperature often develop damage before the base metal. The weld is a discontinuity in the material and stresses and strains often accumulate in the weld. Knowledge of the properties of the weld is essential to the safe operation of the component containing the weld. The work in this thesis has been aimed at the study of welds in service at high temperatures: The work is divided into two main chapters. The first chapter deals with welds in stainlesssteels and dissimilar metal welds and includes three papers, and the second chapter dealswith welds in copper intended for nuclear waste disposal, also including three papers. Common to both parts is that the temperature is high enough for most of the damage in the welds to result from creep.

    In the first part the role of the weld microstructure on the creep crack propagation properties has been studied. Experiments using compact tension specimens have been performed on service exposed, low alloyed heat resistant steels. The results show good correlation with the crack tip parameter, C*, during steady state creep crack growth. The test methodology has also been reviewed and sensitive test parameters have been identified. The results from the creep crack propagation tests on service exposed material has been modeled using uniaxial creep data on both new and ex-service material. The development of the weld microstructure in a dissimilar metal weld between two heat resistant steels has also been investigated. A weld was made between one ferritic and one martensitic steel and the development of the microstructure during welding and post-weldheat treatments has been studied. The results show that the carbon depleted zone that develops near the weld metal in the lower alloyed steel depends on the formation and dissolution of the M23C6-carbide. Variations of the weld parameters and the post-weld heat treatment affect the size and shape of this zone. The process has been successfully modeled by computer simulation.

    The second part focuses on oxygen free copper intended for nuclear waste disposal containers. The containers are made with an inner core of cast nodular iron and an outer core of copper for corrosion protection. The copper shell has to be welded and two weld methods has been tested, electron beam welding and friction stir welding. Creep specimens taken from both weld types have been tested as have base metal specimens. The technical specifications of the waste canisters demand that the creep ductility of both the copper shell and the welds has to be as high as possible. The creep test results show that base material doped with at least 30 ppm phosphorus has high creep ductility, and friction stir welds made from this material has almost as high creep strength and creep ductility. Copper without phosphorus does not exhibit the same ductility. The creep properties evaluated from testing has been modeled and extrapolated for the intended purpose

  • 168. Andre, A.
    et al.
    Norrby, Monica
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Lightweight Structures.
    Åkermo, Malin
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Lightweight Structures.
    Nilsson, S.
    Nyman, Teresia
    KTH.
    An experimental and numerical study of the effect of some manufacturing defects2013In: ICCM International Conferences on Composite Materials, International Committee on Composite Materials , 2013, p. 4105-4112Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    During the manufacturing process of composite structural parts, layer of fabrics or unidirectional prepreg may have to be cut in order to fulfil production requirements. From a general mechanical point of view, cutting fibres in a composite part has a large negative impact on the mechanical properties. However, such interventions are necessary in particular cases, for example due to draping of complex geometries. A rather extensive test program was launched to investigate the effects of defects that typically could arise during manufacturing. The overall purpose of the test program was to determine knock-down factors on strength for typical manufacturing defects that occasionally arise and sometimes are hard to avoid in production: cuts/gaps and fibre angle deviations. Four types of specimens were tested, reference, intersection of cuts in adjacent layers combined with a bolt hole, cut in a zero degree ply combined with a bolt hole and specimens with misaligned fibres. The specimens with misaligned fibres were tested with three different fibre angles. In addition to the experimental procedure, FE-analyses utilising cohesive elements were conducted, and after mechanical tests, Non Destructive Investigation (NDI) and fractographic investigations were performed. An excellent correlation between analyses and experiments were obtained. 

  • 169. Andrew, P
    et al.
    Coad, J P
    Corre, Yann
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics, Atomic and Molecular Physics.
    Eich, T
    Herrmann, A
    Matthews, G F
    Paley, J I
    Pickworth, L
    Pitts, R A
    Stamp, M F
    Outer divertor target deposited layers during reversed magnetic field operation in JET2005In: Journal of Nuclear Materials, ISSN 0022-3115, E-ISSN 1873-4820, Vol. 337, no 1-3, p. 99-103Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Divertor surface temperatures are significantly affected by the presence of deposited surface layers. This phenomenon can be used to monitor deposited layer evolution on a shot-by-shot basis. It was found that during an experimental campaign where the B x del B direction was reversed that the outer target, normally an erosion zone, became a deposition zone.

  • 170. André, Alain
    et al.
    Norrby, Monica
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Lightweight Structures.
    Åkermo, Malin
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Lightweight Structures.
    Nilsson, Sören
    Nyman, Tonny
    An Experimental And Numerical Study Of The Effect Of Some Manufacturing Defects2013In: Proceedings of the 19th International conference on composite materials, ICCM-19, 2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Data provided are for informational purposes only. Although carefully collected, accuracy cannot be guaranteed. The impact factor represents a rough estimation of the journal's impact factor and does not reflect the actual current impact factor. Publisher conditions are provided by RoMEO. Differing provisions from the publisher's actual policy or licence agreement may be applicable.

  • 171.
    Andrén, Peter
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering.
    Development and results of the Swedish road deflection tester2006Licentiate thesis, monograph (Other scientific)
    Abstract [en]

    A project to construct a high-speed road deflection tester was initiated in the 1991. A mid-sized truck was used as a carrier for the first prototype. The results were promising and it was decided to build a full-size truck system. The new vehicle, based on a Scania R143 ML, was completed in 1997.

    The Road Deflection Tester (RDT) is equipped with two arrays of twenty noncontact laser sensors that collects transversal surface profiles at normal traffic speeds. One profile, placed between the wheel axles, constitutes an unloaded case. The other profile, just behind the rear axle of the vehicle, constitutes the loaded case. By subtracting the front cross profile from the corresponding rear one, the "deflection profile" is assessed. The deflection is assumed to vary with the stiffness of the road.

    In order to produce a large load on the rear wheels the engine was mounted in the back of the vehicle, slightly behind the rear axle. In testing mode the rear axle force is approximately 112 kN, and the front axle force is about 30 kN. An incremental wheel pulse transducer, two force transducers and two accelerometers, an optical speedometer and a gyroscope are also mounted on the RDT.

    The first test programme was carried out in 1998. Due to the careful choice of test sections, data from these sections still produce the best results. A smaller test programme was carried out in 2001, and a larger one in 2002 when the RDT was taken to England and France for demonstration. Promising results, both on an aggregated scale and for individual test sections, have been obtained. The RDT compares favourably with the Falling Weight Deflectometer.

    Short histories of road construction and road research give some historical and cultural background to the more recent developments. A more comprehensive history of rolling deflectographs presents all devices found in the literature from the start in the mid-fifties when the California Traveling Deflectograph and Lacroix Deflectograph were constructed, to the latest laser based High-Speed Deflectograph. Many references are given for further reading.

    The data acquisition hardware on the RDT system consist of sensors, signal converters, signal processing cards, an industrial computer for data communication, and an ordinary PC for operating the equipment and data storage. The software used to evaluate the data is written entirely in Matlab. Many levels of pre-processing make evaluation relatively fast, and the modularised design makes it easy to implement new evaluation algorithms in a clean and efficient way.

    A literature survey on the deformations of solids under static and moving load is presented in Appendix A. The static case started with Boussinesq in 1885, was much developed in the sixties, but since the eighties only a very limited amount of new results have been published. The moving load case, on the other hand, is still an field of active research and development.

  • 172.
    Anghel, Clara
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering.
    Modified oxygen and hydrogen transport in Zr-based oxides2006Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other scientific)
    Abstract [en]

    Most metals and alloys in the presence of oxygen and moisture will instantaneously react and form a thin (2-5 nm) surface oxide layer. For further reaction to occur, oxygen ions and/or metal cations often diffuse through the already formed oxide layer. The corrosion resistance of a metal in aggressive environments at high temperatures depends on the properties of the surface oxide scale.

    Zirconium-based alloys represent the main structural materials used in water-cooled nuclear reactors. For these materials, the formation of a thin, adherent oxide scale with long-term stability in high temperature water/steam under irradiation conditions, is crucial. In this thesis, the transport of oxygen and hydrogen through Zr-based oxide scales at relevant temperatures for the nuclear industry is investigated using isotopic gas mixtures and isotope-monitoring techniques such as Gas Phase Analysis and Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry.

    Porosity development in the oxide scales generates easy diffusion pathways for molecules across the oxide layer during oxidation. A considerable contribution of molecular oxygen to total oxygen transport in zirconia has been observed at temperatures up to 800°C. A novel method for evaluation of the gas diffusion, gas concentration and effective pore size of oxide scales is presented in this thesis. Effective pore sizes in the nanometer range were found for pretransition oxides on Zircaloy-2. A mechanism for densification of oxide scales by obtaining a better balance between inward oxygen and outward metal transport is suggested. Outward Zr transport can be influenced by the presence of hydrogen in the oxide and/or metal substrate. Inward oxygen transport can be promoted by oxygen dissociating elements such as Fe-containing second phase particles. The results suggest furthermore that a proper choice of the second-phase particles composition and size distribution can lead to the formation of dense oxides, which are characterized by low oxygen and hydrogen uptake rates during oxidation.

    Hydrogen uptake in Zr-based materials during oxidation in high temperature water/steam can generate degradation due to the formation of brittle hydrides in the metal substrate. A promising method for the suppression of hydrogen uptake has been developed and is presented in this thesis.

  • 173.
    Anghel, Clara
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Materials Science and Engineering.
    Studies of transport in oxides on Zr-based materials2004Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other scientific)
    Abstract [en]

    Zr-based materials have found their main application in the nuclear field having high corrosion resistance and low neutron absorption cross-section. The oxide layer that is formed on the surface of these alloys is meant to be the barrier between the metal and the corrosive environment. The deterioration of this protective layer limits the lifetime of these alloys. A better understanding of the transport phenomena, which take place in the oxide layer during oxidation, could be beneficial for the development of more resistant alloys.

    In the present study, oxygen and hydrogen transport through the zirconia layer during oxidation of Zr-based materials at temperatures around 400C have been investigated using the isotope-monitoring techniques Gas Phase Analysis and Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry. The processes, which take place at oxide/gas and oxide/metal interface, in the bulk oxide and metal, have to be considered in the investigation of the mechanism of hydration and oxidation. Inward transport of oxygen and hydrogen species can be influenced by modification of the surface properties. We found that CO molecules adsorbed on Zr surface can block the surface reaction centers for H2 dissociation, and as a result, hydrogen uptake in Zr is reduced. On the other hand, coating the Zr surface with Pt, resulted in increased oxygen dissociation rate at the oxide/gas interface. This generated enhanced oxygen transport towards the oxide/metal interface and formation of thicker oxides. Our results show that at temperatures relevant for the nuclear industry, oxygen dissociation efficiency decreases in the order: Pt > Zr2Fe > Zr2Ni > ZrCr2 ≥ Zircaloy-2.

    Porosity development in the oxide scales generates easy diffusion pathways for molecules across the oxide layer during oxidation. A novel method for evaluation of the gas diffusion, gas concentration and effective pore size of oxide scales is presented in this study. Effective pore sizes in the nanometer range were found for pretransition oxides on Zircaloy-2.

    A mechanism for densification of oxide scales by obtaining a better balance between inward oxygen and outward metal transport is suggested. Outward Zr transport can be influenced by the presence of hydrogen in the oxide/metal substrate. Inward oxygen transport can be promoted by oxygen dissociating elements such as Fe-containing second phase particles. The results suggest furthermore that a proper choice of the second-phase particle composition and size distribution can lead to the formation of dense oxides, which are characterized by low oxygen and hydrogen uptake rates during oxidation.

  • 174.
    Anghel, Clara
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering.
    Hultquist, Gunnar
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Limbäck, Magnus
    Influence of Pt, Fe/Ni/Cr–containing intermetallics and deuterium on the oxidation of Zr-based materials2005In: Journal of Nuclear Materials, ISSN 0022-3115, E-ISSN 1873-4820, Vol. 340, no 2-3, p. 271-283Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An in situ gas phase analysis technique and the 18O-SIMS technique are used to evaluate the transport of oxygen and hydrogen in oxidation of Zr-based materials. At 400 °C, it is found that oxygen dissociation efficiency decreases in the order: Pt > Zr2Fe > Zr2Ni > ZrCr2 Zircaloy-2. Two Zr-plates partly coated with 200 Å porous Pt, with and respectively without D in the substrate, were oxidized in two stages at 400 °C. SIMS depth profiles in the Pt area show that an enhanced oxidation takes place mainly by inward oxygen transport. A minimum in the oxide thickness was found near the Pt area on both Zr plates. Two Ar-filled Zircaloy-2 tubes with ZrSn liner were exposed at 370 °C to 22 mbar water, filled in from one side. Our experimental results suggest that a proper choice of the SPP composition and size distribution can lead to reduced hydrogen uptake during oxidation of Zr-based materials in water.

  • 175.
    Ankerfors, Caroline
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Polyelectrolyte complexes: Preparation, characterization, and use for control of wet and dry adhesion between surfaces2012Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis examines polyelectrolyte complex (PEC) preparation, adsorption behaviour, and potential use for control of wet and dry adhesion between surfaces.

    PEC formation was studied using a jet-mixing method not previously used for mixing polyelectrolytes. The PECs were formed using various mixing times, and the results were compared with those for PECs formed using the conventional polyelectrolyte titration method. The results indicated that using the jet mixer allowed the size of the formed PECs to be controlled, which was not the case with the polyelectrolyte titration method, and a two-step mechanism for PEC formation was suggested.

    Adsorption experiments comparing two types of PECs, both produced from PAA and PAH, but with different molecular weights, demonstrated that surface-induced aggregation occurred in the high-molecular-weight PECs, whereas the adsorption stopped at a low level in the low-molecular-weight PECs. It was suggested that the latter PECs consisted of two fractions of complexes and that the fraction with lower polymer density exerted a site-blocking effect, hindering further adsorption.

    It was also demonstrated that particle-PECs (PPECs), in which one polyion was replaced with a silica nanoparticle, could be prepared. The purpose of preparing PPECs was to create a PEC structure that could create a joint with a special failure pattern referred to as disentanglement behaviour. Using the colloidal probe AFM technique, the expected disentanglement could be detected in PPECs, though the joint strength was low. Adhesion experiments demonstrated significantly higher pull-off values with polymer–polymer complexes than with PPECs. However, there was large spread in the data, possibly due to the surface inhomogeneity.

    Experiments using low-molecular-weight PECs as a paper strength agent demonstrated that PECs can indeed increase paper strength. Comparing the PEC results with those for polyelectrolyte multilayers (PEMs) prepared from the same polyelectrolytes indicated that, since the PEM strategy enables higher adsorption levels than does the PEC strategy, greater absolute strength improvements could be achieved using PEMs. However, PEC treatment resulted in the greatest effect per adsorbed amount of polymer.

  • 176.
    Ankerfors, Caroline
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Polyelectrolyte complexes: their preparation, adsorption behaviour and effect on paper properties2008Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other scientific)
    Abstract [en]

    In this work, the formation of polyelectrolyte complexes (PECs) has been studied using a jet mixing method not previously used for mixing polyelectrolytes. The PECs were formed from two weak polyelectrolytes, i.e., polyacrylic acid (PAA) and polyallylamine hydrochloride (PAH), with different mixing times, and the results were compared with those for PECs formed using the conventional polyelectrolyte titration method.

     

    The adsorption behaviour of the formed PECs on silicon oxide substrates and pulp fibres was analysed, and the results were compared with those for polyelectrolyte multilayers (PEMs) prepared from the same two polyelectrolytes.

     

    The results indicated that by using the jet mixer, the size of the formed PECs could be controlled, which was not the case with the polyelectrolyte titration method. The PECs produced by jet mixing were also found to be smaller than those produced by polyelectrolyte titration. From these results, a two-step mechanism for the formation of PECs was suggested: initial precomplex formation, which is a fast and diffusion-controlled process, followed by a reconformation process, during which the vigorous mixing in the jet mixer can partially limit secondary aggregation.

     

    When the complexes were adsorbed to silicon oxide or pulp fibre surfaces, adsorption studies indicated that it was impossible to reach the same adsorption levels for PECs as for PEMs. This was explained in terms of free energy, entropical, reasons rather than to any geometric limitation of the surface. Despite the smaller amount of polyelectrolyte adsorbed from the PEC treatment than from the PEM treatment of pulp fibres, the PEC treatment had the greatest effect on paper strength per adsorbed amount of polymer. This was thought to be because the three-dimensional structure of the PECs, versus the smoother structure of PEMs, allows for the formation of multiple contact points between the macroscopically rough fibres and increased molecular contact area.

     

    In the adsorption experiments, it was also found that net cationic complexes can adsorb to both anionic and cationic substrates. This phenomenon was explained by the occurrence of anionic patches on the surface of the net cationic PECs and the ability of the PECs, formed from weak polyelectrolytes, to partially change charge upon exposure to a surface of the same charge as the complex itself, due to a change of the degree of dissociation of the polyelectrolytes constituting the complex.

  • 177.
    Ankerfors, Caroline
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Lingström, Rikard
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Ödberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    A comparison of polyelectrolyte complexes and multilayers: Their adsorption behaviour and use for enhancing tensile strength of paper2009In: Nordic Pulp & Paper Research Journal, ISSN 0283-2631, E-ISSN 2000-0669, Vol. 24, no 1, p. 77-86Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper compares the adsorption behaviour and paper-strength-enhancing properties of polyelectrolyte complexes (PECs) and polyelectrolyte multilayers (PEMs) of polyallylamine hydrochloride and polyacrylic acid. Model adsorption experiments using SPAR (stagnation point adsorption reflectometry) and QCM-D (quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation) showed that the amount of complexes adsorbed was lower than the amount adsorbed when forming a multilayer using the same polymer system. From these experiments, in combination with AFM and ESEM imaging, it was concluded that the PEC adsorption stopped before full surface coverage was reached. Tensile testing of handsheets treated with PECs and PEM showed a significant increase in both tensile index and strain-at-break using both systems. The largest strength improvement was achieved with the fibres treated with the largest number of PEMs, but the largest effect per adsorbed amount of polymer was achieved by PEC treatment.

  • 178.
    Ankerfors, Caroline
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Ondaral, Sedat
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Ödberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Applying jet mixing to the preparation of polyelectrolyte complexes: complex properties and their interaction with silicon oxide surfacesManuscript (Other academic)
  • 179. Ankerfors, M.
    et al.
    Lindström, T.
    Söderberg, Daniel
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics.
    The use of microfibrillated cellulose in high filler fine papers2013In: Pap. Conf. Trade Show, PaperCon, 2013, p. 1129-1132Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The field of communication, printing and writing papers has become an increasingly competitive field during the latest years as the market demand of printing and writing papers and newsprint has finally started to decline in the developed economies. One obvious approach to stay competitive is to increase the filler content of such papers. High filler paper is not a new idea and numerous approaches have been tested over the years to produce such papers. In order to reach industrial implementation, pilot-scale research and development under industrial conditions is necessary as a step after laboratory studies. Therefore an environment has been developed in order to perform projects targeting existing technologies for high filler applications as well as the new possibilities incurred by e.g. microfibrillated cellulose.

  • 180.
    Ankerfors, Mikael
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Microfibrillated cellulose: Energy-efficient preparation techniques and applications in paper2015Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This work describes three alternative processes for producing microfibrillated cellulose (MFC; also referred to as cellulose nanofibrils, CNF) in which bleached pulp fibres are first pretreated and then homogenized using a high-pressure homogenizer. In one process, fibre cell wall delamination was facilitated by a combined enzymatic and mechanical pretreatment. In the two other processes, cell wall delamination was facilitated by pretreatments that introduced anionically charged groups into the fibre wall, by means of either a carboxymethylation reaction or irreversibly attaching carboxymethylcellulose (CMC) to the fibres. All three processes are industrially feasible and enable energy-efficient production of MFC. Using these processes, MFC can be produced with an energy consumption of 500–2300 kWh/tonne. These materials have been characterized in various ways and it has been demonstrated that the produced MFCs are approximately 5–30 nm wide and up to several microns long.

    The MFCs were also evaluated in a number of applications in paper. The carboxymethylated MFC was used to prepare strong free-standing barrier films and to coat wood-containing papers to improve the surface strength and reduce the linting propensity of the papers. MFC, produced with an enzymatic pretreatment, was also produced at pilot scale and was studied in a pilot-scale paper making trial as a strength agent added at the wet-end for highly filled papers.

  • 181.
    Ankerfors, Mikael
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Microfibrillated cellulose: Energy-efficient preparation techniques and key properties2012Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This work describes three alternative processes for producing microfibrillated cellulose (MFC) in which pulp fibres are first pre-treated and then homogenized using a high-pressure homogenizer. In one process, fibre cell wall delamination was facilitated with a combined enzymatic and mechanical pre-treatment. In the two other processes, cell wall delamination was facilitated by pre-treatments that introduced anionically charged groups into the fibre wall, by means of either a carboxymethylation reaction or irreversibly attaching carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) onto the fibres. All three processes are industrially feasible and enable production with low energy consumption. Using these methods, MFC can be produced with an energy consumption of 500–2300 kWh/tonne, which corresponds to a 91–98% reduction in energy consumption from that presented in earlier studies. These materials have been characterized in various ways and it has been demonstrated that the produced MFCs are approximately 5–30 nm wide and up to several microns long.

  • 182.
    Ankerfors, Mikael
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Lindström, Tom
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Method for providing a nanocellulose involving modifying cellulose fibers2009Patent (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    The present invention provides a method for the manufacturing of nanocellulose. The method includes a first modification of the cellulose material, where the cellulose fibres are treated with an aqueous electrolyte-containing solution of an amphoteric cellulose derivative. The modification is followed by a mechanical treatment. By using this method for manufacturing nanocellulose, clogging of the mechanical apparatus is avoided. Also disclosed is nanocellulose manufactured in accordance with said method and uses of said cellulose.

  • 183.
    Ansari, Farhan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Berglund, Lars A.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Tensile Properties of Wood Cellulose Nanopaper and Nanocomposite Films2016In: Multifunctional Polymeric Nanocomposites Based on Cellulosic Reinforcements, Elsevier Inc. , 2016, p. 115-130Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The nanocellulose fibril is the major load-bearing component in the wood cell wall. It is readily disintegrated from wood pulp, and of great interest as a component in new materials. It can be used to form 100% cellulose nanofiber (CNF) nanopaper films or polymer matrix nanocomposite films of high cellulose content, where the CNF network controls most physical properties. Here, the uniaxial tensile properties of CNF nanopaper and composite films are discussed, together with the deformation mechanisms. The CNF network and most types of nanocomposite films are prepared by a scalable filtration process akin to paper-making. The effects of intrinsic CNF properties, degree of CNF dispersion, CNF-CNF adhesion, CNF-polymer matrix interaction, CNF orientation, and humidity are also discussed.

  • 184.
    Ansari, Farhan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation.
    Berglund, Lars
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering.
    Medina, Lilian
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites.
    Epoxies can solve moisture problems in nanocellulose materials2017In: International Conference on Nanotechnology for Renewable Materials 2017, TAPPI Press , 2017, p. 1220-1227Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 185.
    Ansari, Farhan
    et al.
    Stanford Univ, Dept Mat Sci & Engn, Stanford, CA 94305 USA..
    Ding, Yichuan
    Stanford Univ, Dept Mat Sci & Engn, Stanford, CA 94305 USA..
    Berglund, Lars
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Dauskardt, Reinhold H.
    Stanford Univ, Dept Mat Sci & Engn, Stanford, CA 94305 USA..
    Toward Sustainable Multifunctional Coatings Containing Nanocellulose in a Hybrid Glass Matrix2018In: ACS Nano, ISSN 1936-0851, E-ISSN 1936-086X, Vol. 12, no 6, p. 5495-5503Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We report on a sustainable route to protective nanocomposite coatings, where one of the components, nanocellulose fibrils, is derived from trees and the glass matrix is an inexpensive sol-gel organic-inorganic hybrid of zirconium alkoxide and an epoxy-functionalized silane. The hydrophilic nature of the colloidal nanocellulose fibrils is exploited to obtain a homogeneous one-pot suspension of the nanocellulose in the aqueous sol-gel matrix precursors solution. The mixture is then sprayed to form nano composite coatings of a well-dispersed, random in-plane nano cellulose fibril network in a continuous organic inorganic glass matrix phase. The nanocellulose incorporation in the sol-gel matrix resulted in nanostructured composites with marked effects on salient coating properties including optical transmittance, hardness, fracture energy, and water contact angle. The particular role of the nanocellulose fibrils on coating fracture properties, important for coating reliability, was analyzed and discussed in terms of fibril morphology, molecular matrix, and nanocellulose/matrix interactions.

  • 186.
    Ansari, Farhan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Erik, Lindh
    Furo, Istvan
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Applied Physical Chemistry.
    Mats, Johansson
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Lars, Berglund
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Interface tailoring through covalent hydroxyl-epoxy bonds improves  hygromechanical stability in nanocellulose materialsManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Wide-spread use of cellulose nanofibril (CNF) biocomposites and nanomaterials is limited by CNF moisture sensitivity due to surface hydration. We report on a versatile and scalable interface tailoring route for CNF to address this, based on technically important epoxide chemistry. Bulk impregnation of epoxide-amine containing liquids is used to show that CNF hydroxyls can react with epoxides at high rates and high degree of conversion to form covalent bonds. Reactions take place inside nanostructured CNF networks under benign conditions, and are verified by solid state NMR. Epoxide modified CNF nanopaper shows significantly improved mechanical properties under moist and wet conditions. High resolution microscopy is used in fractography studies to relate the property differences to structural change. The cellulose-epoxide interface tailoring concept is versatile in that the functionality of molecules with epoxide end-groups can be varied over a wide range. Furthermore, epoxide reactions with nanocellulose can be readily implemented for processing of moisture-stable, tailored interface biocomposites in the form of coatings, adhesives and molded composites.

  • 187.
    Ansari, Farhan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites.
    Galland, Sylvain
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites.
    Johansson, Mats
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    Berglund, Lars
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites.
    Cellulose nanofiber network of high specific surface area provides altered curing reacion and moisture stability in ductile epoxy biocompositesManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 188.
    Ansari, Farhan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Galland, Sylvain
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Johansson, Mats K. G.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Plummer, Christopher J. G.
    Berglund, Lars A.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Cellulose nanofiber network for moisture stable, strong and ductile biocomposites and increased epoxy curing rate2014In: Composites. Part A, Applied science and manufacturing, ISSN 1359-835X, E-ISSN 1878-5840, Vol. 63, p. 35-44Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Nanocomposites with high volume fractions (15-50 vol%) of nanofibrillated cellulose (NFC) were prepared by impregnation of a wet porous NFC network with acetone/epoxy/amine solution. Infrared spectroscopy studies revealed a significant increase in curing rate of epoxy (EP) in the presence of NFC. The NFC provided extremely efficient reinforcement (at 15 vol%: 3-fold increase in stiffness and strength to 5.9 GPa and 109 MPa, respectively), and ductility was preserved. Besides, the glass transition temperature increased with increasing NFC content (from 68 degrees C in neat epoxy to 86 degrees C in 50 vol% composite). Most interestingly, the moisture sorption values were low and even comparable to neat epoxy for the 15 vol% NFC/EP. This material did not change mechanical properties at increased relative humidity (90% RH). Thus, NFC/EP provides a unique combination of high strength, modulus, ductility, and moisture stability for a cellulose-based biocomposite. Effects from nanostructural and interfacial tailoring are discussed.

  • 189.
    Ansari, Farhan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites.
    Granda, L. A.
    Joffe, R.
    Berglund, Lars
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Vilaseca, Fabiola
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Experimental evaluation of anisotropy in injection molded polypropylene/wood fiber biocomposites2017In: Composites. Part A, Applied science and manufacturing, ISSN 1359-835X, E-ISSN 1878-5840, Vol. 96, p. 147-154Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although the anisotropy of wood fibers is reasonably well established, the anisotropy of injection molded wood fiber composites is not well understood. This work focuses on chemo-thermomechanical pulp (CTMP) reinforced polypropylene (PP) composites. A kinetic mixer (Gelimat) is used for compounding CTMP/PP composites, followed by injection molding. Effects from processing induced orientation on mechanical properties are investigated. For this purpose, a film gate mold was designed to inject composites in the shape of plates so that specimens in different directions to the flow could be evaluated. Observations from tensile tests were complemented by performing flexural tests (in different directions) on discs cut from the injected plates. SEM was used to qualitatively observe the fiber orientation in the composites. At high fiber content, both modulus and tensile strength could differ by as much as 40% along the flow and transverse to the flow. The fiber orientation was strongly increased at the highest fiber content, as concluded from theoretical analysis.

  • 190.
    Ansari, Farhan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites.
    Lindh, Erik L.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Applied Physical Chemistry. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. Innventia AB, Sweden.
    Furo, Istvan
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Applied Physical Chemistry.
    Johansson, Mats K.G.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    Berglund, Lars A.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Interface tailoring through covalent hydroxyl-epoxy bonds improves hygromechanical stability in nanocellulose materials2016In: Composites Science And Technology, ISSN 0266-3538, E-ISSN 1879-1050, Vol. 134, p. 175-183Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Wide-spread use of cellulose nanofibril (CNF) biocomposites and nanomaterials is limited by CNF moisture sensitivity due to surface hydration. We report on a versatile and scalable interface tailoring route for CNF to address this, based on technically important epoxide chemistry. Bulk impregnation of epoxide-amine containing liquids is used to show that CNF hydroxyls can react with epoxides at high rates and high degree of conversion to form covalent bonds. Reactions take place inside nanostructured CNF networks under benign conditions, and are verified by solid state NMR. Epoxide modified CNF nanopaper shows significantly improved mechanical properties under moist and wet conditions. High resolution microscopy is used in fractography studies to relate the property differences to structural change. The cellulose-epoxide interface tailoring concept is versatile in that the functionality of molecules with epoxide end-groups can be varied over a wide range. Furthermore, epoxide reactions with nanocellulose can be readily implemented for processing of moisture-stable, tailored interface biocomposites in the form of coatings, adhesives and molded composites.

  • 191.
    Ansari, Farhan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Salajkova, Michaela
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Zhou, Qi
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Berglund, Lars
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Cellulose nanocomposites - Controlling dispersion and material properties through nanocellulose surface modification2015In: ICCM International Conferences on Composite Materials, International Committee on Composite Materials , 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The use of cellulosic nanofibers as reinforcement in polymer composites offers great advantages over their petroleum counterparts. Apart from being strong, stiff and low density; they are obtained from naturally occurring resources and as such are favorable from an environmental point of view. A major problem while studying nanomaterials is their tendency to agglomerate, thus leading to inhomogeneous distribution within the polymer matrix. This often results in stress concentrations in the matrix rich regions when the material is subjected to load and therefore, limits the potential application of these materials. A common approach to circumvent this is by surface modification, which facilitates the dispersion in non-polar matrices. An environmental friendly approach, inspired by clay chemistry, was used to functionalize the CNC surface. It was shown that the CNC could be modified in a rather convenient way to attach a variety of functional groups on the surface. Primarily, the problem of cellulose nanocrystal (CNC) distribution in a hydrophobic polymer matrix is investigated. Composites prepared from modified CNC were studied and compared with unmodified CNC. The distribution of the CNC is carefully monitored at different stages via UV-Vis spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The mechanical properties of the resulting materials were characterized by dynamic mechanical as well as uniaxial tensile tests. It was shown that a homogeneous distribution of the CNC exposes a tremendous amount of surface area to interact with the matrix. In such a case, the stress transfer is much more efficient and perhaps, the matrix behavior is modified, which leads to significant improvements in the mechanical properties.

  • 192.
    Ansari, Farhan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation.
    Sjöstedt, Anna
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Larsson, Per Tomas
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Berglund, Lars A.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Hierarchical wood cellulose fiber/epoxy biocomposites: Materials design of fiber porosity and nanostructure2015In: Composites. Part A, Applied science and manufacturing, ISSN 1359-835X, E-ISSN 1878-5840, Vol. 74, p. 60-68Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Delignified chemical wood pulp fibers can be designed to have a controlled structure of cellulose fibril aggregates to serve as porous templates in biocomposites with unique properties. The potential of these fibers as reinforcement for an epoxy matrix (EP) was investigated in this work. Networks of porous wood fibers were impregnated with monomeric epoxy and cured. Microscopy images from ultramicrotomed cross sections and tensile fractured surfaces were used to study the distribution of matrix inside and around the fibers - at two different length scales. Mechanical characterization at different relative humidity showed much improved mechanical properties of biocomposites based on epoxy-impregnated fibers and they were rather insensitive to surrounding humidity. Furthermore, the mechanical properties of cellulose-fiber biocomposites were compared with those of cellulose-nanofibril (CNF) composites; strong similarities were found between the two materials. The reasons for this, some limitations and the role of specific surface area of the fiber are discussed.

  • 193.
    Ansari, Farhan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites.
    Skrifvars, M.
    Berglund, Lars
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Nanostructured biocomposites based on unsaturated polyester resin and a cellulose nanofiber network2015In: Composites Science And Technology, ISSN 0266-3538, E-ISSN 1879-1050, Vol. 117, p. 298-306Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Biocomposites reinforced by natural plant fibers tend to be brittle, moisture sensitive and have limited strength. Wood cellulose nanofibers (CNF) were therefore used to reinforce an unsaturated polyester matrix (UP) without the need of coupling agents or CNF surface modification. The nanostructured CNF network reinforcement strongly improves modulus and strength of UP but also ductility and toughness. A template-based prepreg processing approach of industrial potential is adopted, which combines high CNF content (up to 45 vol%) with nanoscale CNF dispersion. The CNF/UP composites are subjected to moisture sorption, dynamic thermal analysis, tensile tests at different humidities, fracture toughness tests and fractography. The glass transition temperature (T-g) increases substantially with CNF content. Modulus and strength of UP increase about 3 times at 45 vol% CNF whereas ductility and apparent fracture toughness are doubled. Tensile properties at high humidity are compared with other bio-composites and interpreted based on differences in molecular interactions at the interface.

  • 194.
    Ansari, Mohd Farhan
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Nanostructured Cellulose Biocomposites: Effects from dispersion, network and interface2016Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The major load bearing component in native wood, cellulose nanofibrils, are potential candidates for use as reinforcement in polymer matrices. This study is based on nanocellulose composites and attempts to prepare and characterize biocomposites with high nanocellulose content and investigate the influence of nanostructure on macroscopic properties.

    In an initial study, effects from cellulose nanocrystal (CNC) dispersion on optical and mechanical properties of CNC composites are studied in a model system using polyvinylacetate (PVAc) as the polymer. CNC surface modification is used as an aid to improve dispersion, and nanocomposites with up to 20 wt% of modified and unmodified CNC are characterized. Strong influence of CNC as reinforcement and on polymer matrix characteristics were observed with well-dispersed CNCs, resulting in nanocomposites with significantly improved mechanical properties.

    In the subsequent parts, an impregnation-based processing strategy is used to prepare cellulose nanofibril (CNF) based thermoset (epoxy and unsaturated polyester) composites with high CNF content (15 - 50 vol%). Influence of CNF surface hydroxyls on epoxy curing is discussed. A mono-epoxy compound is used to confirm covalent epoxy/CNF reaction and the implications of this modification on mechanical properties of wet CNF network are illustrated. Mechanical properties of thermoset composites are characterized at different relative humidities to evaluate their hygromechanical stability. The role of the CNF-thermoset interface is investigated by comparing composites with epoxy and unsaturated polyester matrices. Unique effects due to the nanostructure of composites are discussed with respect to CNF dispersion, CNF network characteristics and CNF/matrix interface. Additionally, pulp fiber composites, where the fiber wall itself is impregnated with resin, are designed and differences between nanocellulose (nanoscale network) and pulp fibers (microscale diameter) as reinforcements are analyzed.

  • 195.
    Ansell, Anders
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Concrete Structures.
    Holmgren, Jonas
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Concrete Structures.
    Lagerblad, Björn
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Concrete Structures.
    Westerholm, Mikael
    Sprutbetongs egenskaper: Reologi hos färsk sprutbetong samt fibrer och krympning, litteraturstudier2006Report (Other academic)
  • 196.
    Antonsson Nilsson, Hermina
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering.
    Jarnerud, Tova
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering.
    Plasma sprayed cylinder lining coatings: Factors affecting the amount of ceramics in plasma sprayed cylinder lining coatings2015Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Scania uses powder plasma spray technology to coat their cylinder linings. The powder used contains stainless steel and ceramics. In order for the properties of the coating to reach the quality demands, it has to have a certain amount of pores and ceramics in it. Despite the process being strictly controlled the coating has proven to exhibit differences in composition.

    Process parameters for each coated lining are logged and as part of Scania’s quality control, samples of the coating are frequently tested. For the purpose of this work, three process parameters were mapped in search for correlations to the composition of the coating – electric current, voltage and power output. To investigate the homogeneity of the powder it was analyzed using Scanning Electron Microscopy.

    The main findings were that there are no correlations found between the three process parameters and the composition of the coating. Moreover, in the powder analysis it was found that the composition of the powder itself varies to an extent that elements differ as much as twice the amount in between different batches and sites in the production.

    The results imply that it is difficult to prevent irregularities by managing process parameters. The variations in powder composition need to be further investigated in order to determine its impact on the quality of the coating.

  • 197.
    Antonsson, Stefan
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Wood Chemistry and Pulp Technology.
    Strategies for improving kraftliner pulp properties2008Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other scientific)
    Abstract [en]

    A large part of the world paper manufacturing consists of production of corrugated board components, kraftliner and fluting, that are used in many different types of corrugated boxes. Because these boxes are stored and transported, they are often subjected to changes in relative humidity. These changes together with mechanical loads will increase the deformation of the boxes compared to the case where the same loads are applied in a static environment. This enlarged creep due to the changes in relative humidity is called mechano-sorptive or accelerated creep. Mechano-sorptive creep forces producers to use high safety factors when designing boxes, and therefore, this is one of the key properties of kraftliner boards.

     

    Different strategies to decrease mechano-sorptive creep, and to simultaneously gain more knowledge about the causes for this phenomenon in paper, are the aim of this work. Derivatised and underivatised black liquor lignins, a by-product produced in pulp mills in large quantities, have been used together with biomimetic methods, to modify the properties of kraftliner pulp. Furthermore, the properties of kraftliner pulp have been compared to other pulps in order to evaluate the influence of fibre morphological factors, such as fibre width and shape factor, on the mechano-sorptive creep. In addition the influence of the chemical composition of the kraftliner pulp has been evaluated both by means of treating a kraftliner pulp with chlorite and xylanase and by producing pulps with different chemical composition.

     

    By using lignin and biomimetic methods, to create radical coupling reactions, it has been shown that it is possible to increase the wet strength of kraftliner pulp sheets. This method of treating the pulp showed, however, no significant effects on the mechano-sorptive creep. The addition of an apolar suberin-like lignin derivative, which has been shown to be possible to produce from natural resources, did show a positive effect on mechano-sorptive creep properties, but at the expense of stiffness properties in constant climate. Different pulps were compared with a kraftliner pulp and it was observed that the ratio between tensile stiffness and hygroexpansion can be used to estimate the mechano-sorptive creep properties. The hardwood kraft pulps investigated had lower hygroexpansion, probably due to more slender and straighter fibres, and higher tensile stiffness, probably due to lower lignin content. As the lignin content was varied by different methods in kraft pulps, it was observed that increased lignin content gives an increased hygroexpansion and decreased tensile stiffness as well as an increased mechano-sorptive creep. There were also indications of increased mechano-sorptive creep due to higher xylan content.

     

     

  • 198.
    Antonsson, Stefan
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    The Use of Lignin Derivatives to Improve Selected Paper Properties2007Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other scientific)
    Abstract [en]

    Wood consists mainly of three types of polymers; cellulose, hemi cellulose and lignin. Lignin is formed in nature through enzymatic initiated oxidative coupling of three different kinds of phenyl propane units. These form by various carbon-carbon and carbon-oxygen bonds, an amorphous three-dimensional polymer. As chemical pulp is produced, lignin is degraded and dissolved into pulping liquors. These liquors contain the spent cooking chemicals and are generally burnt in a recovery boiler to regenerate cooking chemicals and produce steam. However, the recovery boiler is expensive. Hence, it has become the bottleneck for production in many pulp mills. Removal of some lignin from the spent cooking liquor would, for that reason, be desired and valuable products based on lignin from cooking liquors are searched for.

    One suitable area for lignin products would be as additive in unbleached pulp. A major product from unbleached pulp is kraftliner, the top and bottom layers of corrugated board. When boxes of corrugated board are stored in containers travelling overseas the relative humidity is varying. This makes the boxes collapse more easily than if they were stored at constant humidity, even a high one. This is due to the so called mechano-sorptive or accelerated creep phenomenon. By addition of wet strength additive to kraftliner or treating it with hydrophobic compounds there are indications on that the mechano-sorptive effect would decrease.

    Trying to decrease this effect, low molecular weight kraft lignin has been used. It was obtained by cross-flow filtration of black liquor and precipitation by sulphuric acid. By derivatisation of this lignin by linseed oil, a hydrophobic lignin derivative was obtained, similar in structure to units in the biopolymer suberin. As this suberin-like lignin-derivative was added to pulp the mechano-sorptive creep seemed to be lowered. Furthermore, when the low molecular weight lignin was used together with the lignin radical initiators laccase or manganese(III) in kraftliner pulp, a wet strength of about 5% of dry strength was obtained. An amination treatment of this lignin and addition to kraftliner pulp resulted in a wet strength of up to 10% of dry strength. There are indications of that the mechano-sorptive creep also decreases as these treatments, resulting in increased wet strength, are made.

  • 199.
    Antonsson, Stefan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Henriksson, Gunnar
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Lindström, Mikael E.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Adding lignin derivatives to decrease the effect of mechano-sorptive creep in linerboard2008In: Appita journal, ISSN 1038-6807, Vol. 61, no 6, p. 468-471Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    When load is applied to any type of paper while varying the relative humidity, the paper will creep more than if the same load is applied at constant humidity. This behaviour is called mechano-sorptive creep or accelerated creep, and the reasons for its occurrence in paper are still not fully understood. However, wet strength and the addition of apolar (hydrophobic) compounds to sheets have previously been suggested as factors improving the mechano-sorptive creep performance.

    This work evaluates a method for improving wet strength and tests the addition of a hydrophobic compound, with particular reference to mechano-sorptive creep stiffness. Wet strength was improved by subjecting kraft liner pulp to low-molecular-weight lignin, obtained by cross-flow filtration, and to the radical initiator manganese(III). The hydrophobic compound added was a suberin-like lignin derivative. Adding the suberin-like lignin derivative significantly increased the mechano-sorptive creep stiffness, even though the stiffness at 90% rh decreased in the tested samples. This was probably because of the decrease in hygroexpansion caused by this hydrophobic additive.

    Even though it is possible significantly to increase the wet strength of kraft liner pulp by adding manganese(III) and cross-flow-filtered lignin, doing so has no significant effect on mechano-sorptive creep stiffness.

  • 200.
    Antonsson, Stefan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Wood Chemistry and Pulp Technology.
    Henriksson, Gunnar
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Wood Chemistry and Pulp Technology.
    Lindström, Mikael E.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Wood Chemistry and Pulp Technology.
    The influence of lignin and xylan on some kraftliner pulp properties2009In: Nordic Pulp & Paper Research Journal, ISSN 0283-2631, E-ISSN 2000-0669, Vol. 24, no 4, p. 403-408Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigates the influence of lignin and hemicellulose content on the mechanical and physical properties of softwood kraft liner pulp. Tensile properties, hygroexpansion, and mechano-sorptive creep properties were measured. The lignin and hemicellulose contents were modified by chlorite delignification and xylanase treatment.

    After treatment, the chemical composition of the pulps was 3-14% Klason lignin, 69-77% cellulose, 16-21% hemicellulose, and 4-7% xylan. In the tested pulps, low lignin content tended to decrease hygroexpansion as well as increase tensile stiffness and mechano-sorptive creep stiffness. Xylan contributed less to the pulp sheet properties, but at equal lignin contents, higher xylan content tended to give increased hygroexpansion and worse mechano-sorptive creep properties.

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