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  • 151.
    Palmberg, Robin C. O.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, System Analysis and Economics.
    Enriching Automated Travel Diaries Using Biometric Information2019Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The methods for collecting travel data about travellers today incorporate either fully manual or semi-automatic elements, which makes the methods susceptible to errors. The travellers might respond subjectively rather than objectively or even wholly incorrect, albeit with or without purpose. For certain types of studies, these are still valid methods for collecting data. However, for specific target groups, it might be hard to respond using these methods, either because of physical or psychological limitations.

    One of these target groups that is increasing rapidly is elderly in general, and dementia patients in particular, who suffer from fluctuating cognitive skills and memory. These conditions affect the recipient’s ability to answer truthfully and correctly. However, in the strive to form more accessible urban environments, the information regarding the need and behaviour of the said target group is crucial, meaning that new methods for collecting travel data need to be created.

    The three papers included in this licentiate thesis present the development and trial of a new method for fully automated data collection using biometric data as a dimension. The method attempts to determine how the recipient is affected by the elements presented to them while they travel, such as the built environment, based on the variations in the biometric data dimension.

    With the rapid advancements in information and communication technology, many new artefacts which open for new possible methods of data collection has been launched and are widely available. The methods and artefacts are not capable of meeting the requirements for the type of data collection method that would be needed to cater to the target group by themselves. However, by combing several types of currently available artefacts and methods, it is theoretically possible to cover the gaps of each artefact and method to create versatile methods for data collection (Paper I).

    Such methods require tools for physical operationalisation. An exploratory development process has led to the creation of a software tool which could be used with several types of consumer hardware, which means that it would theoretically be possible to conduct extensive surveys fast with low costs where participants utilise their own hardware (Paper II).

    In order to uncover the usefulness of the tool, an analysis was conducted on a limited dataset which had been collected as a result of a trial of the tool. In an attempt to prove the hypothesis “it is possible to understand how much the dimensions of data collected in specific locations affect the stress of travellers using heart rate as the dependent variable”, data-driven methods of data analysis were explored and utilised. Simple clustering methods, which disregarded any weighting on the dimensions, uncovered if there was any valuable information in the dataset at all. A model had to be created in order to understand better how the different dimensions of the collected data affected the participant (Paper III).

    This set of papers should indicate whether this type of method is feasible to pursue with the current means of widely available technology and what sort of significance the collected data might hold when analysed with appropriate analysis methods.

  • 152.
    Palmberg, Robin C. O.
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, System Analysis and Economics.
    Schwertner, Emilia
    Karolinska Institutet, Department of Neurobiology, Division of Clinical Geriatrics, Center for Alzheimer Research, Care Sciences and Society.
    Gidofalvi, Gyözö
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Geoinformatics.
    Religa, Dorota
    Karolinska Institutet, Department of Neurobiology, Division of Clinical Geriatrics, Center for Alzheimer Research, Care Sciences and Society.
    Susilo, Yusak O.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, System Analysis and Economics.
    Using Smart Technologies to Understand Travellers Who have Dementia: Potentials and ChallengesManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Age-related cognitive diseases are becoming a growing problem in Sweden. With the fast ageing population and lowered mortality rate comes the spread of cognitive diseases related to dementia. In order to accommodate this growing target group in transport and the built environment, it is crucial to understand the mobility and travel behaviour of patients suffering from these diseases.

    However, the adopted techniques to uncover travel behaviour of today do not allow for errors caused by cognitive impairment, since they require retrospective validation. Such design choices make it hard to understand how to improve the environment to accommodate the target group.  Recently, technologies have emerged that allow for new design methods which can be beneficial for the said target group. This paper aims to address the issue of how to collect and analyse data regarding the mobility of the target group, and roles of the built environment in affecting their behaviour. A literature review has been conducted to 1) uncover the state of the art of the technologies and design methods that relate to automated data collection about the travel behaviour, 2) understand the limits of the user related to software interaction and, in turn, data collection and 3) find possibilities for new solutions to collect travel data from patients who have dementia.

  • 153.
    Palmberg, Robin C. O.
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, System Analysis and Economics.
    Susilo, Yusak O.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, System Analysis and Economics.
    Gidofalvi, Gyözö
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Geoinformatics.
    Developing and Trialling an Implicit Interaction Platform to Monitor Elderly TravellersManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    As the population grows older, age-induced illnesses related to cognitive impairments arise. Little is known regarding what and how the built environment affects that target group. It is theorized that external factors in the built environment might play a part in elderlies getting lost because of conditions related to illnesses such as dementia. To accommodate the target group in a future society, it is crucial to understand any possible correlation between locations and psychophysiological conditions.

    Technological advancements of wearable devices allow for the creation of software that collects data relevant to location as well as biometric data automatically, without affecting the user. By utilising consumer-grade hardware, it is possible to scale up the studies that the software allows for indefinitely.

    This paper covers the development of such a tool, by detailing what has become possible because of previous advancements in research regarding automatic travel diaries and the recognition of psychophysiological conditions through biometric data collection. Initial testing shows, that while data can be collected as proposed, there are drawbacks in terms of run time due to the battery capacity of wearable devices. More data is required to indicate whether the data collected can be used for correlation and causality analysis.

  • 154.
    Palmberg, Robin C. O.
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, System Analysis and Economics.
    Susilo, Yusak O.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, System Analysis and Economics.
    Gidofalvi, Gyözö
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Geoinformatics.
    Naqavi, Fatemeh
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, System Analysis and Economics.
    Built Environment Characteristics, Daily Travel, and Biometric Readings: Creation of an Experimental Tool based on a Smartwatch PlatformManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The utilisation of travel surveys can uncover layers of information regarding travel behaviour, travel needs, and more. The collected information is utilised to make strategic planning choices when reorganising or planning new built environments. Over the years, the methods for conducting travel surveys have changed from manual interviews and paper forms to automated travel diaries which are monitoring the trips made by the survey participants. With the fast progression of technological advancements, new possibilities for operationalising said types of automated travel diaries can be changed from utilising mobile devices to wearable devices. Wearable devices are often equipped with sensors which can collect continuous biometric data from sources which are not reachable from standard mobile devices such as smartphones. The biometric data that can be collected through wearable devices ranging from heart rate and blood pressure to temperature and perspiration, given the proper sensors. This advancement opens for new possible layers of information in the collection of travel data. Such biometric data can be used to derive psychophysiological conditions related to cognitive load, which can uncover more in-depth knowledge regarding stress and emotions, given the right variables and sample rate. This paper aims to explore the possibilities in terms of data analysis on a data set collected through a software combining traditional travel survey data, such as position and time, with biometric data, in this case; heartrate, to gain knowledge of the implications of such collected data. The knowledge about the implications of spatial configurations can be used in the planning phase of new areas, in order to create more accessible environments, as the information could be used to make neutral, or even encouraging, environments for travellers.

  • 155.
    Palmberg, Robin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, System Analysis and Economics.
    Gidofalvi, Gyözö
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Geoinformatics.
    Susilo, Yusak
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Transport Studies, CTS. KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Traffic Research, CTR. KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, System Analysis and Economics.
    Enabling Technologies to Serve the Ageing Urban Society Better (ENTRUST)2018Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The life span of the inhabitants of Sweden is increasing and with this comes age related cognitive diseases such as those related to dementia. Our society is not prepared to accommodate for the needs of the people who are affected by this.

    The diseases related to dementia often affect the person’s ability to localize themselves and to remember previous and upcoming events. A common issue that occurs is a state called “elopement”.

  • 156.
    Palmberg, Robin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, System Analysis and Economics.
    Susilo, Yusak
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Transport Studies, CTS. KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Traffic Research, CTR. KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, System Analysis and Economics.
    Gidofalvi, Gyözö
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Geoinformatics.
    Developing and trialling an implicit interaction platform to monitor and aiding dementia travellers2019Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Age related cognitive diseases are becoming a growing problem in Sweden. With the fast ageing population and lowered mortality rate comes the spread of cognitive diseases related to dementia. In order to accommodate this growing target group in transport and the built environment, it is important to understand the mobility and travel behaviour of patients suffering from these diseases. One subset of this target group is travellers suffering from age induced illnesses related with dementia, which most often have fluctuating symptoms that are affecting the cognitive skills of the traveller. This makes it hard to use standardized forms and survey-based information that would require the traveller to actively respond retroactively, either in oral or written form, since the traveller might have forgotten or mixed up their past experiences, among other things, it becomes very hard to gain confidence in the results as it might be hard to tell in which condition the patient is during the collection.

    We propose an automated collection of biometric data such as heart rate in combination with position. Since the validity of the information collected in this manner is directly related to the quality of the sensors used it means that the precision and accuracy of the results could be virtually endlessly improved by upgrading the hardware and optimizing the software. To take a first step towards a solution like this we have started developing a smart watch application which is utilizing PPG technology to collect heart rate and combine it with positions collected through GPS technology.

    Early testing has shown the possibility to correlate the heart rate of a traveller to their specific location. The implications of this must be validated through data labelling as we wish to utilize machine learning algorithms to analyse the data collected.

  • 157.
    Palmberg, Robin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, System Analysis and Economics.
    Susilo, Yusak
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, System Analysis and Economics. KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Transport Studies, CTS. KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Traffic Research, CTR.
    Gidofalvi, Gyözö
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Geoinformatics.
    Uncovering Effects of Spatial and Transportation Elements on Travellers Using Biometric Data2019In: TOWARDS HUMAN SCALE CITIES - OPEN AND HAPPY / [ed] Tuuli Toivonen, Karst Geurs, Elias Willberg, Helsinki: Department of Geosciences and Geography, University of Helsinki , 2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Travel surveys has been used for decades to observe the patterns, locations, and choices, which travellers chose and do during the given observed period. This information can be utilized as background for informed planning decisions. Despite the progress in the travel survey technologies, the applications mostly focus on more traditional travel parameters. With programmable smart watches now, we can also collect real time data that is not solely pertaining to position and travel mode choices, but also to users’ biometric data. Such an application would open another level of possibilities in dynamically integrating land use and transport planning with public health research.

    Utilising a smart watch platform, we are aiming to develop a tool that will collect biometric data, in combination with spatial context, such as position, spatial features and objects in the built environment, and by utilizing machine learning algorithms, try to detect how travellers are affected by their choice of transport mode, the built environment in general as well as how the public transport is operated.

    Early testing reveals the possibility to find correlations between heart rate and position, which in turn could reveal the effect of spatial and transportation elements on the traveller. By targeting widely available hardware, the scalability for this tool is virtually endless, making it possible to collect large amounts of data and utilizing machine learning algorithms to analyse it.

  • 158.
    Palmér, Matthias
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media technology and interaction design, MID.
    Learning Applications based on Semantic Web Technologies2012Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The interplay between learning and technology is a growing field that is often referred to as Technology Enhanced Learning (TEL). Within this context, learning applications are software components that are useful for learning purposes, such as textbook replacements, information gathering tools, communication and collaboration tools, knowledge modeling tools, rich lab environments that allows experiments etc. When developing learning applications, the choice of technology depends on many factors. For instance, who and how many the intended end-users are, if there are requirements to support in-application collaboration, platform restrictions, the expertise of the developers, requirements to inter-operate with other systems or applications etc.

    This thesis provides guidance on a how to develop learning applications based on Semantic Web technology. The focus on Semantic Web technology is due to its basic design that allows expression of knowledge at the web scale. It also allows keeping track of who said what, providing subjective expressions in parallel with more authoritative knowledge sources. The intended readers of this thesis include practitioners such as software architects and developers as well as researchers in TEL and other related fields.

    The empirical part of the this thesis is the experience from the design and development of two learning applications and two supporting frameworks. The first learning application is the web application Confolio/EntryScape which allows users to collect files and online material into personal and shared portfolios. The second learning application is the desktop application Conzilla, which provides a way to create and navigate a landscape of interconnected concepts. Based upon the experience of design and development as well as on more theoretical considerations outlined in this thesis, three major obstacles have been identified:

    The first obstacle is: lack of non-expert and user friendly solutions for presenting and editing Semantic Web data that is not hard-coded to use a specific vocabulary. The thesis presents five categories of tools that support editing and presentation of RDF. The thesis also discusses a concrete software solution together with a list of the most important features that have crystallized during six major iterations of development.

    The second obstacle is: lack of solutions that can handle both private and collaborative management of resources together with related Semantic Web data. The thesis presents five requirements for a reusable read/write RDF framework and a concrete software solution that fulfills these requirements. A list of features that have appeared during four major iterations of development is also presented.

    The third obstacle is: lack of recommendations for how to build learning applications based on Semantic Web technology. The thesis presents seven recommendations in terms of architectures, technologies, frameworks, and type of application to focus on.

    In addition, as part of the preparatory work to overcome the three obstacles, the thesis also presents a categorization of applications and a derivation of the relations between standards, technologies and application types.

  • 159.
    Paloranta, Jimmie
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Lundström, Anders
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Elblaus, Ludvig
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Bresin, Roberto
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Frid, Emma
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Interaction with a large sized augmented string instrument intended for a public setting2016In: Sound and Music Computing 2016 / [ed] Großmann, Rolf and Hajdu, Georg, Hamburg: Zentrum für Mikrotonale Musik und Multimediale Komposition (ZM4) , 2016, p. 388-395Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we present a study of the interaction with a large sized string instrument intended for a large installation in a museum, with focus on encouraging creativity,learning, and providing engaging user experiences. In the study, nine participants were video recorded while interacting with the string on their own, followed by an interview focusing on their experiences, creativity, and the functionality of the string. In line with previous research, our results highlight the importance of designing for different levels of engagement (exploration, experimentation, challenge). However, results additionally show that these levels need to consider the users age and musical background as these profoundly affect the way the user plays with and experiences the string.

  • 160.
    Panariello, Claudio
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Sköld, Sköld
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. KMH Royal College of Music.
    Frid, Emma
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Bresin, Roberto
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    From vocal sketching to sound models by means of a sound-based musical transcription system2019In: Proceedings of the 16th Sound and Music Computing Conference, Malaga, Spain, 2019, p. 1-7, article id S2.5Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper explores how notation developed for the representation of sound-based musical structures could be used for the transcription of vocal sketches representing expressive robot movements. A mime actor initially produced expressive movements which were translated to a humanoid robot. The same actor was then asked to illustrate these movements using vocal sketching. The vocal sketches were transcribed by two composers using sound-based notation. The same composers later synthesized new sonic sketches from the annotated data. Different transcriptions and synthesized versions of these were compared in order to investigate how the audible outcome changes for different transcriptions and synthesis routines. This method provides a palette of sound models suitable for the sonification of expressive body movements.

  • 161.
    Pang, Xiaodan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Communication Systems, CoS, Optical Network Laboratory (ON Lab).
    Van Kerrebrouck, J.
    Belgium.
    Ozolins, O.
    Sweden.
    Lin, Rui
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Communication Systems, CoS, Optical Network Laboratory (ON Lab).
    Udalcovs, A.
    Sweden.
    Zhang, Lu
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Communication Systems, CoS, Optical Network Laboratory (ON Lab).
    Spiga, S.
    Germany.
    Amann, M. C.
    Germany.
    Van Steenberge, G.
    Belgium.
    Gan, L.
    China.
    Tang, M.
    China.
    Fu, S.
    China.
    Schatz, Richard
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Photonics.
    Jacobsen, G.
    Sweden.
    Popov, Sergei
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Photonics.
    Liu, D.
    China.
    Tong, W.
    China.
    Torfs, G.
    Belgium.
    Bauwelinck, J.
    Belgium.
    Yin, X.
    Belgium.
    Chen, Jiajia
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Communication Systems, CoS, Optical Network Laboratory (ON Lab).
    High-speed SDM interconnects with directly-modulated 1.5-μm VCSEL enabled by low-complexity signal processing techniques2018In: Optics InfoBase Conference Papers, OSA - The Optical Society , 2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We report on our recent work in supporting up to 100 Gbps/λ/core transmissions with a directly modulated 1.5-μm single mode VCSEL and multicore fiber, enabled by low-compleixty pre- and post- digital equalizations.

  • 162.
    Pauletto, Sandra
    Department of Theatre, Film and Television, University of York, United Kingdom.
    Film and theatre-based approaches for sonic interaction design2014In: Digital Creativity, ISSN 1462-6268, E-ISSN 1744-3806, Vol. 25, no 1, p. 15-26Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sonic interaction design studies how digital sound can be used in interactive contexts to convey information, meaning, aesthetic and emotional qualities. This area of research is positioned at the intersection of sound and music computing, auditory displays and interaction design. The key issue the designer is asked to tackle is to create meaningful sound for objects and interactions that are often new. To date, there are no set design methodologies, but a variety of approaches available to the designer. Knowledge and understandingofhow humans listen and interpret sound is the first step toward being able to create such sounds.This article discusses two original approaches that borrow techniques from film sound and theatre. Cinematic sound highlights how our interpretation of sounddependson listening modes and context, while theatre settings allow us to explore sonic interactions from the different perspectives of the interacting subject, the observer and the designer.

  • 163. Pauletto, Sandra
    et al.
    Cambridge, HowardSusini, Patrick
    Data sonification and sound design in interactive systems2015Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 164.
    Pauletto, Sandra
    et al.
    The University of Huddersfield, Queensgate; The University of York, Heslington, York.
    Hunt, Andy
    Interacting with sonifications: An evaluation2007In: Proceedings of the 13th International Conference on Auditory Display, Montréal, Canada, June 26-29, 2007, 2007Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 165.
    Pauletto, Sandra
    et al.
    Department of Theatre, Film and Television, The University of York, Heslington, York, YO10 5DQ, United Kingdom.
    Hunt, Andy
    Interactive sonification of complex data2009In: International journal of human-computer studies, ISSN 1071-5819, E-ISSN 1095-9300, Vol. 67, no 11, p. 923-933Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we present two experiments on implementing interaction in sonification displays: the first focuses on recorded data (interactive navigation) and the second on data gathered in real time (auditory feedback). Complex synthesised data are explored in the first experiment to evaluate how well the known characteristics present in the data are distinguished using different interaction methods, while real medical data (from physiotherapy) are used for the second. The addition of interaction to the exploration of sonified recorded data improves the system usability (efficiency, effectiveness and user satisfaction), and the real-time sonification of complex physiotherapy data can produce sounds with timbral characteristics that audibly change when important characteristics present in the data vary.

  • 166.
    Pauletto, Sandra
    et al.
    University of Huddersfield, Queensgate, Huddersfield, HD1 3DH, UK.
    Hunt, Andy
    The sonification of EMG data2006In: Proceedings of the 12th International Conference on Auditory Display, London, UK, June 20-23, 2006, 2006Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 167.
    Pauletto, Sandra
    et al.
    The University of York, UK.
    Walus, Bartlomiej Piotr
    Reflecting on the Role of Sound in an Immersive Multimedia Intervention for Health Communication2018Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 168. Pedersen, Jonas Frich
    et al.
    Juul Sondergaard, Marie Louise
    Department of Aesthetics and Communication, Aarhus University, Denmark.
    CityMockUp Co-Creating the Urban Space2015In: Proceedings of the 33rd Annual ACM Conference Extended Abstracts on Human Factors in Computing Systems, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2015, p. 43-48Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents CityMockUp, our contribution to the CHI'15 student design competition. CityMockUp emphasizes and proposes a solution to the problem of involving citizens in the actual process of furnishing or shaping the urban environment that they inhabit. The design consists of digitally interconnected and tangible wooden modules that enable the citizens to construct their own desired urban architecture proposals. The product is rooted within and contributes to the emerging field of Urban Interaction Design (UIxD).

  • 169.
    Pernestål Brenden, Anna
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Product and Service Design. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC, Green Leap. KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Centres, Integrated Transport Research Lab, ITRL.
    Hesselgren, Mia
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Product and Service Design. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC, Green Leap.
    Possibilities and barriers in ride-sharing in work commuting – a case study in Sweden2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To understand possibilities and barriers for ride-sharing in work commuting, 451 persons living in the same suburban area and working at the same site were invited to join a ride-sharing program and use a mobile application. Two quantitative web surveys and 16 in-depth interviews have been performed. The results have been analysed using social practice theories as an analytical lens. The participants understood the benefits with the ride-sharing practice, but out of the 451 invited participants, only 8 downloaded the required mobile application for the ride-sharing program. Different to previous results in the literature, trust and security were not seen as issues in this case. Instead the expected loss of flexibility was seen as the main barrier. The participants found a meaning in “being a green commuter” and understood that ride-sharing could contribute to decrease challenges of congestion, environmental impact, and overfull parking places. However, they rated their own current flexibility and convenience in commuting higher than the expected benefits from ride-sharing.

  • 170.
    Persson, Hans
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. Institute for Humane Technology (IHT), Sweden.
    Åhman, Henrik
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Yngling, Alexander Arvei
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Gulliksen, Jan
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Universal design, inclusive design, accessible design, design for all: different concepts—one goal? On the concept of accessibility—historical, methodological and philosophical aspects2015In: Universal Access in the Information Society, ISSN 1615-5289, E-ISSN 1615-5297, Vol. 14, no 4, p. 505-526Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Accessibility and equal opportunities for all in the digital age have become increasingly important over the last decade. In one form or another, the concept of accessibility is being considered to a greater or smaller extent in most projects that develop interactive systems. However, the concept varies among different professions, cultures and interest groups. Design for all, universal access and inclusive design are all different names of approaches that largely focus on increasing the accessibility of the interactive system for the widest possible range of use. But, in what way do all these concepts differ and what is the underlying philosophy in all of these concepts? This paper aims at investigating the various concepts used for accessibility, its methodological and historical development and some philosophical aspects of the concept. It can be concluded that there is little or no consensus regarding the definition and use of the concept, and consequently, there is a risk of bringing less accessibility to the target audience. Particularly in international standardization the lack of consensus is striking. Based on this discussion, the authors argue for a much more thorough definition of the concept and discuss what effects it may have on measurability, conformance with standards and the overall usability for the widest possible range of target users.

  • 171. Puiggròs, Montserrat
    et al.
    Gómez, Emilia
    Ramírez, Rafael
    Serra, Xavier
    Bresin, Roberto
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Music Acoustics.
    Automatic characterization of ornamentation from bassoon recordings for expressive synthesis2006In: 9th International Conference on Music Perception & Cognition / [ed] Baroni, M.; Addessi, A. R.; Caterina, R.; Costa, M., Bologna: Bonomia University Press , 2006, p. 1533-1538Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Expressive performance characterization is traditionally based on the analysis of the main differences between performances, players, playing styles and emotional intentions. This work addresses the characterization of expressive bassoon ornaments by analyzing audio recordings played by a professional bassoonist. This characterization is then used to generate expressive ornaments from symbolic representations by means of Machine Learning

  • 172.
    Raghothama, Jayanth
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Health Informatics and Logistics.
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Health Informatics and Logistics.
    Rigor in Gaming for Design: Conditions for Transfer Between Game and Reality2018In: Journal Simulation & Gaming, ISSN 1046-8781, E-ISSN 1552-826X, Vol. 49, no 3, p. 246-262Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background. The increasing cognizance of complexity in systems has brought into focus important questions about the methods and tools we use to address them. Games for design, where games and computer simulations are used together to create concrete and tangible designs in a pluralistic way, with multiple stakeholders within the game is a new area for simulation gaming. Aim. In this article about gaming for design, embedded in the design science approach towards game science, we raise important philosophical questions about this new area, as well as attempt to address practical questions at the application level. We attempt to bridge the analytical science and design science approaches to games, and analyze them through meta-constructs of games such as fidelity, abstraction and resolution. Results. Results from two applications, through analysis of game play and debriefing of game sessions from two applications, COMPLEX and ProtoWorld are gathered and analyzed to understand the respresentational requirements for simulations and games. Conclusion. Results point to the need for rigor in gaming, particularly when modeling reference systems and rigor in assessing effects, both during game play and while debriefing. Results also point to expanded definitions of meta-constructs of games, as well as to their linked nature.

  • 173.
    Rauh, Sebastian Felix
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. Heilbronn University.
    Exploring the Potential of Head Worn Displays for Manual Work Tasks in Industrial Environments2017Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In this thesis I explore the potential of modern Head-Worn Displays for aiding manual work tasks in the manufacturing industries. In such settings, workers are already supported by using mobile hand-held devices that show instructions and enable the worker to document work tasks. However, the most important disadvantage of hand-held devices is that users need to put them aside when performing tasks that require both of their hands. The current generation of Head-Worn Displays promises hands-free usage with little added complexity and also enables the augmentation of workers’ vision,

    thereby supporting the work task in a more effective and efficient way.

    For assessing the potential of Head-Worn Displays on factory floors, a series of studies has been conducted. The studies have been carried out directly on the production line of a German car manufacturer together with workers or in-lab, depending on the study goals. Together with workers and managers in the industrial settings we identified two work tasks whereby support for Head-Worn Displays showed good potential for increasing productivity, quality and worker comfort. The Head-Worn Display support was improved in an iterative manner within a Human-Centred Design approach.

    The thesis contributes with experiences on introducing Head-Worn Displays in real world settings and for long time periods. The recorded productivity increases attributed to the Head-Worn Displays are discussed, along with worker and manager feedback. For long-term use on a factory floor, extending battery operating time was found to be of central importance. CPU and Camera were identified as the most energy consuming devices and an approach to address that is presented. A benchmark suite is introduced to enable designers, developers, and project managers to make informed decisions when selecting Head-Worn Displays. Finally, a theoretical discussion of Head-Worn Displays is presented by situating them in a sense-based Augmented Reality taxonomy, I proposed.

  • 174.
    Rigo, Riccardo
    et al.
    KTH.
    Kortbeek, Charlotte
    KTH.
    Grama, Cristian
    KTH.
    Laure, Denis
    KTH.
    Tommy Blocks: A modern redesign of the classical children's building blocks2016In: TEI 2016 - Proceedings of the 10th Anniversary Conference on Tangible Embedded and Embodied Interaction, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2016, p. 738-742Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we present Tommy Blocks, a low-poly (polygon mesh) magnetic construction set. We set out to redesign the classic building blocks, some of the most used (and loved) toys by children of all ages. Tommy Blocks is composed of various types of blocks of different shapes and sizes that can be joined together thanks to magnets on the inside. The blocks have irregular low-poly shapes. This is the main difference between Tommy Blocks and other regular and well-known building blocks sets. Triangular faces invite the player to build completely different constructions than the traditional squares. We also explored how technology can contribute to the creative development of children and added some electronics to the main component of the set to make the game more challenging. Moreover, a small story-telling component is included, giving personality to the actual toy. In this paper we describe the design process and present the latest prototype of Tommy Blocks.

  • 175.
    Roa Rodríguez, Rodrigo
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC).
    Lundin, Robert
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC).
    Heatmap Visualization of Neural Frequency Data2016Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Complex spatial relationships and patterns in multivariate data are relatively simple to identify visually but di cult to detect computation- ally. For this reason, Anivis, an interactive tool for visual exploration of multivariate quantitative pure serial periodic data was developed. The data has four dimensions depth, laterality, frequency and time. The data was visualized as an animated heatmap, by mapping depth and laterality to coordinates in a pixel grid and frequency to color. Transfer functions were devised to map a single variable to color through parametric curves. Anivis implemented heatmap generation through both weighted sum and deconvolution for comparison reasons. Deconvolution exhibited a to have better theoretical and practical performance. In addition to the heatmap visualization a scatter-plot was added in order to visualize the causal relationships between data points and high value areas in the heatmap visualization. Performance and applicability of the tool were tested and verified on experimental data from the Karolinksa Institute’s Department of Neuroscience. 

  • 176. Rocchesso, Davide
    et al.
    Avanzini, Federico
    Rath, Matthias
    Bresin, Roberto
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Speech, Music and Hearing.
    Serafin, Stefania
    Contact sounds for continuous feedback2004In: Proceedings of International Workshop on Interactive Sonification: (Human Interaction with Auditory Displays) / [ed] Hunt, A.; Hermann, T., 2004Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The role of continuous auditory feedback in multimodal embodied interfaces is advocated. Examples of physics based cartoon sound models (rolling and friction) are usedto display deviation from equilibrium and exerted effort inmanipulative interfaces.

  • 177.
    Roungas, Bill
    et al.
    Delft Univ Technol, Dept Multi Actor Syst, Jaffalaan 5, NL-2628 BX Delft, Netherlands..
    Verbraeck, Alexander
    Delft Univ Technol, Dept Multi Actor Syst, Jaffalaan 5, NL-2628 BX Delft, Netherlands..
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Health Informatics and Logistics.
    The future of contextual knowledge in gaming simulations: A research agenda2018In: 2018 Winter Simulation Conference (WSC), Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE), 2018, p. 2435-2446Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Gaming simulations (games) are increasingly becoming the tool of choice for modeling and understanding the complexity of today's systems. This increased popularity has consequently revealed the weaknesses of games in several areas. These limitations range from inconsistencies on the game design to the unexploited explicit and tacit knowledge that games invoke. This paper focuses on games that do not aim at generalizing the produced knowledge but, instead, at understanding how a system works within a specific context. The first step of the analysis is identifying these limitations based on an extensive literature review. Based on this, different directions that could mitigate or even fully address these limitations are proposed. The paper concludes with a focused research agenda.

  • 178.
    Saxena, Vidhu Vaibhav
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. Indian Institute of Technology Delhi (IITD).
    Explorative Design of an Indoor Positioning based Mobile Application for Workplaces: To ease workflow management while investigating any privacy concerns in sharing one’s location data indoors2015Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis elaborates on the design process of a mobile phone based application for indoor positioning at workplaces. The aim of the application is to ease workflow management and help increase the work efficiency of individuals and teams by reducing the amount of time spent in looking and waiting for each other. In doing so, the research takes a closer look on the user’s perspective on sharing one’s location data. An attempt is made to explore users’ behavior, investigating if any privacy concerns arise out of sharing one’s indoor location data and how it effects the adoption of the service within the context of a workspace. This exploratory approach employed a number of qualitative tools in order to gather data and analyze it.

    In order to understand the complex context of a work environment where activities (or actions) are defined by a number of factors, actors, mediators, communication channels, etc., the research followed an activity centred approach. The resulting solution is in the form of a service that provides layers of contextual information, responding to the overall activity being performed and the smaller actions that constitute it. A prototype of this application is then taken for user testing. The test results show that the users were hesitant in sharing their location data; citing a number of speculated scenarios where this information may be used in ways that induced a sense of being spied upon. However, in the overall acceptance and adoption of the system, the context of use (the workspace) was found to play a very crucial role.

  • 179.
    Saxena, Vidhu Vaibhav
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. Indian Institute of Technology Delhi (IITD).
    Explorative Design of an Indoor Positioning based Mobile Application for Workplaces: To ease workflow management while investigating any privacy concerns in sharing one’s location data indoors2016Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis elaborates on the design process of a mobile phone based application for indoor positioning at workplaces. The aim of the application is to ease workflow management and help increase the work efficiency of individuals and teams by reducing the amount of time spent in looking and waiting for each other. In doing so, the research takes a closer look on the user’s perspective on sharing one’s location data. An attempt is made to explore users’ behavior, investigating if any privacy concerns arise out of sharing one’s indoor location data and how it effects the adoption of the service within the context of a workspace. This exploratory approach employed a number of qualitative tools in order to gather data and analyze it.

    In order to understand the complex context of a work environment where activities (or actions) are defined by a number of factors, actors, mediators, communication channels, etc., the research followed an activity centred approach. The resulting solution is in the form of a service that provides layers of contextual information, responding to the overall activity being performed and the smaller actions that constitute it. A prototype of this application is then taken for user testing. The test results show that the users were hesitant in sharing their location data; citing a number of speculated scenarios where this information may be used in ways that induced a sense of being spied upon. However, in the overall acceptance and adoption of the system, the context of use (the workspace) was found to play a very crucial role.

  • 180.
    Schäfer, Philip
    et al.
    Heilbronn University.
    Koller, Marius
    Heilbronn University.
    Diemer, Julia
    University of Regensburg.
    Meixner, Gerrit
    Heilbronn University.
    Development and Evaluation of a Virtual Reality-System with integrated Tracking of Extremities under the Aspect of Acrophobia2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    With the help of a Virtual Reality-System (VRsystem) an exposure therapy can be done comfortably within the usual treatment room of the psychologist. The presented Acrophobia Therapy with Virtual Reality (AcTiVity-System) is constructed to be such a treatment instrument. Due to the integration of an avatar and the use of the Oculus Rift it positively differs from common VR system. In an evaluation with42 subjects the effect of the integrated avatar on the individual’s presence was explored. Therefore two groups were formed with 21 persons each. In the first group the subjects were lead througha virtual height scenario with the avatar, while the second group experienced the same scenario without this feature. Further, the suitability of the AcTiVity-System as a treatment system was investigated. T-Tests showed that the avatar’s influence on thebehavior of the participants was significant. To control the systemthe subject was given an input device but participants in the group with the avatar enabled tried subconsciously to control the system through physical interaction with their bodies. Furthermore the comparison with other VR systems showed that participants inour study with the AcTiVity-System scored significantly.

  • 181.
    Shafqat, Omar
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Electric Power and Energy Systems.
    Rosberg, Erik
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Bogdan, Cristi
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Lundström, Anders
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology.
    Per-appliance energy feedback as a moving target2019In: Proceedings of the 6th International Conference on ICT for Sustainability, CEUR-WS , 2019, Vol. 2382Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Energy feedback through interactive technologies is often proposed as a major approach to reduce household energy consumption and carbon footprint. However, this vision is challenged by critics. This paper seeks to inform this debate through a case study of an advanced energy feedback device providing runtime and de-aggregated per-appliance feedback through a smartphone app. This study, based on 15 contextual interviews, aims to investigate how users understand and act on the various levels of feedback received from the device and the resulting impact on user behaviour. We found that appliance detection can be a “moving target” that hampers the intended aims of energy feedback, as it reduces user understanding of the technology. The lack of understanding was further deepened by unrelated supplementary functionality added in the package, in the form of smart plugs. Despite gaining a better understanding of their energy consumption, the users felt limited in terms of their ability to change their behaviour considerably.

  • 182.
    Sidenmark, Ludvig
    et al.
    Lancaster University, Lancaster, United Kingdom.
    Lundström, Anders
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Gaze Behaviour on Interacted Objects during Hand Interaction in Virtual Reality for Eye Tracking Re-calibration2019In: Eye Tracking Research and Applications Symposium (ETRA), Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2019, article id a6Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we investigate the probability and timing of attaining gaze fxations on interacted objects during hand interaction in virtual reality, with the main purpose for implicit and continuous eye tracking re-calibration. We conducted an evaluation with 15 participants in which their gaze was recorded while interacting with virtual objects. The data was analysed to fnd factors infuenc-ing the probability of fxations at diferent phases of interaction for diferent object types. The results indicate that 1) interacting with stationary objects may be favourable in attaining fxations to moving objects, 2) prolonged and precision-demanding interactions positively infuences the probability to attain fxations, 3) performing multiple interactions simultaneously can negatively impact the probability of fxations, and 4) feedback can initiate and end fxations on objects.

  • 183.
    Simbelis, Vygandas
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Lundström, Anders
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Synesthetic Experience in STRATIC2018In: TEI 2018 - Proceedings of the 12th International Conference on Tangible, Embedded, and Embodied Interaction, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2018, p. 574-580Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    How do we humanize digital interactive technology? One way is through our experience with technology. With S T R A T I C we present several post-digital concepts to discuss the relationship of the digital in regard to our human lives. We emphasize the synesthetic experience along with other aesthetic experiences and materiality issues with manifestations of the digital in the physical world, tangible approaches to sonic performances, or exposure of internal logics of technological processes. In this paper, we propose both exhibiting our work as an art installation and via a live performance. We regard it as being highly relevant to the topic of the TEI Arts Track exhibition: post-digital materiality at the intersection of the analog and the digital, and to its tangible aspects.

  • 184.
    Sundblad, Yngve
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Human - Computer Interaction, MDI.
    From Utopia 1981 to Utopia 20082009In: (Re)searching the Digital Bauhaus / [ed] Binder, T., Löwgren, J. & Malmborg, L., London: Springer Publishing Company, 2009, p. 13-41Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Studies and design of Information Technology support for workplaces, especially workshop floors and office floors, have a strong tradition in Scandinavia, involving workplace users and their trade unions and other stakeholders.

    The projects emphasized the active co-operation between researchers and workers of the organization to help improve their work situation. While researchers got their results, the people that they worked with were equally entitled to get something out of the projects.

    Since then the obvious idea to involve the users as early as possible in systems and interface design, using low and high tech prototypes, has become a standard to which most developers pay at least lip service. That it is not necessarily followed in practice is usually because of time constraints and lack of insight rather than reluctance, but there are also inherent difficulties.This tradition is put into perspective, starting with the roots in Norway in the early 1970s, highlighting the seminal UTOPIA project, led by Pelle Ehn 1981–86, and its off-springs all the way up to UsersAward, KLIV and other Scandinavian workplace projects of today.

    We analyse changes in design and use context, from social and technical aspects, over three decades.

    In the early 1970s computer technology and use in Scandinavia was dominated by mainframes in “computer centres”, guarded by technicians in white frocks, with text input and output, and rudimentary communication between the installations. Few were aware of the future, broad and powerful use of computers that was being formed in laboratories, especially in California.

    Today computer use and interaction possibilities are changing quickly, while usecontexts and application types are radically broadening. Technology no longerconsists of static tools belonging only to the workplace, but permeates work on the move, in homes and everyday lives.

    Pervasive technologies, augmented reality, small interfaces, tangible interfaces, etc. are dramatically changing the nature of HCI (human-computer interaction) and its possibilities for workplace settings. We witness the creation of ad-hoc configurations of large and small user interfaces. The new interfaces are moveable and used in changing locations and contexts; different tasks are done through a combination of specialized technologies. A wider repertoire of physical devices is available than just the keyboard, the screen and the mouse.

    The Scandinavian tradition of user involvement in development is facing up with the challenges of new contexts. Here we will concentrate on work contexts.

  • 185.
    Sundblad, Yngve
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Human - Computer Interaction, MDI (closed 20111231).
    UTOPIA - Participatory Design from Scandinavia to the World2010In: History of Nordic Computing 3 / [ed] John Impagliazzo, Per Lundin, Benkt Wangler, Berlin, London: Springer Publishing Company, 2010, p. 176-186Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Studies and design of Information Technology support for workplaces, especially workshop floors, office floors and hospital floors, have a strong tradition in Scandinavia, involving workplace users and their trade unions and other stakeholders. The projects emphasize the active co-operation between researchers and workers in the organizations to help improve their work situation. This tradition is here put into and analysed in its historic perspective, starting with the roots in Norway in the early 1970s and highlighting the seminal UTOPIA project from the early 1980s. Today computer use and interaction possibilities are changing quickly, with use contexts and application types radically broadening. Technology no longer consists of static tools belonging only to the workplace, but permeates work on the move, homes and everyday lives. The Scandinavian tradition of user involvement in development is facing up with the challenges of new contexts. The influence on past and current practices for ICT system design internationally in described and analysed.

  • 186.
    Sundblad, Yngve
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Human - Computer Interaction, MDI (closed 20111231).
    Westerlund, Bo
    Industridesign, Konstfack.
    Design as a Democratic Process - and Implications for Innovation2016In: Action Research for Democracy: New Ideas and Perspectives from Scandinavia / [ed] Ewa Gunnarsson, Hans Peter Hansen, Birger Steen Nielsen, Nadarajah Sriskandarajah, New York & Abington: Routledge, 2016, p. 39-61Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We discuss Participatory Design (PD) as a democratic process and its implications for innovation. We see strong similarities between PD and Action Research (AR), as both seek to create some kind of change based on the aquisition of knowledge. The knowledge aquired in PD and AR is intended to guide a sequence of necessary activities that lead to a desired change, yet there are also some fundamental differences between them.

  • 187.
    Svanberg, Christoffer
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC). KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE).
    Westman, Anton
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC). KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE).
    Interaction Design - by the protocol : Combining user-centered design methods for finding user needs in a time-­‐constrained environment2015Independent thesis Basic level (professional degree), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    ABSTRACT

    Today there are lots of different health care computer systems in use. However, according to recent studies many of them lack necessary usability. Within Nordic pediatric cancer care, analogue treatment protocols on paper are currently used, as a complement to the digital medical records and prescription systems. In these protocols, doctors and nurses note information regarding the patient’s treatment. Comments and changes are noted in the margin, which sometimes leads to making the protocol messy and difficult to grasp. Since several people are involved in the handling of the treatment protocols it occasionally happens that the protocol disappears for periods of time. We had two aims with this project. The first was to examine and map requirements for a usable interactive treatment plan for acute lymphoblastic leukemia, ALL. The second was to investigate if our suggested

    combination of methods would be sufficient to acquire these requirements in a setting where the users, i.e. physicians, were time-­‐constrained.

     

    Based on large variety of theories and methods from educational science and research in human computer interaction, we have conducted a qualitative study, iterating a combination of user-­‐centered design methods, with a revision of the requirements as well as the design following each iteration. The requirements analysis was performed in close collaboration with the doctors at the Astrid Lindgren Children's Hospital, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.

     

    Our results indicate that by using a combination of methods from usability engineering and participatory design, a well-­‐defined list of requirements from the doctors could be identified which might be sufficient to develop an interactive prototype for a digital treatment protocol. In addition we found that our method enabled an exchange of knowledge between the designers and the users.

    In conclusion, these combined methods were suitable for enhancing the software designer’s understanding of the user needs in this time-­‐constrained environment.

  • 188.
    Søndergaard, Marie Louise Juul
    et al.
    Department of Digital Design and Information Studies, Aarhus University, Denmark.
    Hansen, Lone Koefoed
    Intimate Futures: Staying with the Trouble of Digital Personal Assistants Through Design Fiction2018In: Proceedings of the 2018 Designing Interactive Systems Conference, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2018, p. 869-880Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    While digital personal assistants (DPAs) are moving into our homes, managing our everyday lives and providing help in the household, we have barely begun to understand them. Design fiction can be a method for contextualizing the social and cultural implications for adoption of future technologies like DPAs. In this paper, we present an analytical perspective on gender issues arising when a DPA moves into our home. Through a critical and feminist design methodology, the design fiction project "Intimate Futures" focuses on how a DPA's character and functions are often gendered and what it means for the design and adoption of a DPA. We argue that the gender issues of DPAs are interwoven with our collective imaginings of DPAs, and that design fiction is a method to explore and "trouble" our collective imaginings of DPAs. The paper contributes with an analysis of gender issues of DPAs, and a methodological way of "staying with the trouble" of future technologies through design fiction.

  • 189.
    Tobiasson, Helena
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Human - Computer Interaction, MDI.
    Fun and Joy of movement: powerful ingredient in rehabilitation2011In: ACE 2011 Digital Proceedings, ACM Digital Library, 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this position paper we discuss and problematize theexperience of conducting a participative design projectaiming at supporting people with dementia living in aspecial housing with fun and physically engagingrehabilitation activities.

  • 190.
    Tobiasson, Helena
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC).
    Physical action gaming and fun as a tool within elderly care: Game over or play it again and again…2009In: Proceedings of the IEA 2009 conference. Beijing; 2009, 2009Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    How can we support elderly living in special housing to be active and on the move?Around Europe and US there is a rapidly growing interest for use of computer games encouragingphysical motion, such as the Nintendo Wii, within healthcare and rehabilitation. We report a studywhere we introduced and used this game at a special housing for old people with severe dementia inOckelbo in Sweden. It was supposed to be a pilot-study during one month but the growing interestamong all involved, especially the players, led to an over six month long study. An example is 91-yearold Elsa saying “the motivation to win is still present”, “It is really exciting and fun – we have a matchevery day”. Examples of comments from the caregivers are “The ones I thought would never do thishas been the ones that liked it the most and has played a lot”, “This is not something especially for oldpeople, everyone does it”, “we need to change the repertoire of activities we propose for our elderly –me myself would get crazy if I when old were to be put in a room using potato-printing techniques ontable clothes”.Bridging the gap between differences in physical abilities to be able to play, compete or meet on anequal arena is tricky within elderly care. A conclusion is that Wii managed to bridge part of that gap,another that many of the elderly like to be more physically active, when the opportunities and thetechnologies are accessible for them.

  • 191.
    Tobiasson, Helena
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Hedman, Anders
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Yngve, Sundblad
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Still at the Office: Designing for Physical Movement-Inclusion During Office Work2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we describe, analyse and reflect onexperiences and knowledge generated from designing forphysical movement integration during office work. Work intraditional modern office settings provides few physicallydemanding tasks. Evidence from research indicates thatsedentary life styles are increasing our risk for developing ahost of diseases and other medical complications.Together with students and through user-centered design,concepts for inviting the body “back to work” weredeveloped. The concepts inspired the design of threephysical movement probes that were explored by officeworkers. The participants were encouraging to the attemptto transform the sedentary nature of office work into morephysically sustainable work. They described their workenvironments as filled with stuff for enhancing physicalactivity but these were seldom used. Integrating physicalmovements in the design of future office work tools mayhave considerable positive effects on public health.

  • 192. Trouvain, Jürgen
    et al.
    Malisz, Zofia
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Speech Communication and Technology.
    Inter-speech clicks in an Interspeech keynote2016In: Proceedings of INTERSPEECH 2016, San Francisco, CA: International Speech Communication Association, 2016, p. 1397-1401Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Clicks are usually described as phoneme realisations in some African languages or as paralinguistic vocalisations, e.g. to signal disapproval or as sound imitation. A more recent discovery is that clicks are, presumably unintentionally, used as discourse markers indexing a new sequence in a conversation or before a word search. In this single-case study, we investigated more than 300 apical clicks of an experienced speaker during a keynote address at an Interspeech conference. The produced clicks occurred only in inter-speech intervals and were often combined with either hesitation particles like "uhm" or audible inhalation. Our observations suggest a link between click production and ingressive airflow as well as indicate that clicks are used as hesitation markers. The rather high frequency of clicks in the analysed sections from the 1- hour-talk shows that in larger discourse, the time between articulatory phases consists of more than silence, audible inhalation and typical hesitation particles. The rather large variation in the intensity and duration and particularly the number of bursts of the observed clicks indicates that this prosodic discourse marker seems to be a rather acoustically inconsistent phonetic category. 

  • 193.
    Tsaknaki, Vasiliki
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Balaam, Madeline
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS).
    Ståhl, Anna
    Sanches, Pedro
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS).
    Windlin, Charles
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS).
    Karpashevich, Pavel
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS).
    Höök, Kristina
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS).
    Teaching Soma Design2019In: In Proceedings of the 2019 Conference on Designing Interactive Systems (DIS '19), ACM Digital Library, San Diego, CA, USA: ACM , 2019, p. 1237-1249Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 194.
    Tsaknaki, Vasiliki
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Cohn, Marisa
    Boer, Laurens
    Fernaeus, Ylva
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Vallgarda, Anna
    Things Fall Apart: Unpacking the Temporalities of Impermanence for HCI2016In: PROCEEDINGS OF THE NORDICHI '16: THE 9TH NORDIC CONFERENCE ON HUMAN-COMPUTER INTERACTION - GAME CHANGING DESIGN, Association for Computing Machinery , 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Hardware decays, software obsolesces, infrastructures sediment, devices patinate. While recent scholarship has examined longevity and sustainability, we have little empirical understanding of how things age, decay, and obsolesce and how we might approach impermanence as a resource for practice and reflection. This one-day NordiCHI'16 workshop will bring together researchers from the fields of design, HCI, and anthropology, in order to unpack the temporalities of these forms of impermanence from both theoretical and practical perspectives. The workshop aims to build a rich lexicon for the material and temporal qualities of aging, decay, degradation, and obsolescence by drawing together participants from a broad range of domains working to develop, maintain, or study systems as they age. Drawing together these different perspectives we will consider the various ways that impermanence might serve as a resource for design, use, and maintenance of long-lived technological artifacts.

  • 195.
    Tsaknaki, Vasilki
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Fernaeus, Ylva
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Jonsson, Martin
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. SÖDERTÖRN UNIVERSITY, Sweden.
    Precious Materials of Interaction: Exploring Interactive Accessories as Jewellery Items2015In: Nordes, ISSN 1604-9705, no 6Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we present a series of design explorations on the theme of wearable and mobile technology through the lens of jewellery design. This is done by looking at properties of traditional fine jewellery in terms of material considerations and crafting processes, as well as considerations related to patterns of wear and interaction. By using jewellery as a point of departure, both theoretically and practically, we discuss four topics: a) the gestalt of electronic artefacts versus jewellery design, b) material preciousness, c) interactive properties of physical materials, and d) jewellery usage as an inspiration for new interactive designs.

  • 196. Vallgårda, A.
    et al.
    Boer, L.
    Tsaknaki, Vasiliki
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Svanæs, D.
    Material programming: A new interaction design practice2016In: DIS 2016 Companion - Proceedings of the 2016 ACM Conference on Designing Interactive Systems: Fuse, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2016, p. 149-152Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We propose the notion of material programming as a new practice for designing future interactive artifacts. Material programming would be a way for the interaction designer to better explore the dynamics of the materials at hand and through that familiarity be able to compose more sophisticated and complex temporal forms in their designs. As such it would blur the boundaries between programming and crafting these new smart and computational materials. We envision a material programming practice developed around physical tools (e.g. Fig 1) that draw on bodily skills and experiences (Fig 2) while enabling actions performed directly on the material with immediate effects (no program vs. execution mode). Finally, the tools would enable one layer of abstraction and as such encompass the potential of the computational materials but not that of possibly adjacent computers, which could run more complex algorithms.

  • 197. Vallgårda, Anna
    et al.
    Boer, Laurens
    Tsaknaki, Vasiliki
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Svanæs, Dag
    Material programming: A design practice for computational composites2016In: Proceedings of the 9th Nordic Conference on Human-Computer Interaction, 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we propose the notion of material programming as a future design practice for computational composites. Material programming would be a way for the interaction designer to better explore the dynamic potential of computational materials at hand and through that familiarity be able to compose more sophisticated and complex temporal forms in their designs. The contribution of the paper is an analysis of qualities that we find a material programming practice would and should support: designs grounded in material properties and experiences, embodied programming practice, real-time on-site explorations, and finally a reasonable level of complexity in couplings between input and output. We propose material programming knowing that the technology and materials are not entirely ready to support this practice yet, however, we are certain they will be and that the interaction design community will need to find new ways of relating to such computational materials.

  • 198.
    van Almkerk, Marc
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS).
    Li, Rui
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS).
    Marcon, Nicola
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS).
    Embodiment of Machine Olfaction: The Braitenberg Nose2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is an increasing attention towards machine olfaction and many studies show useful application through this type of technology, both for industry as well as for our lives. To further research in this area, from an interaction point of view, this paper presents the Braitenberg Nose, an artifact that explores how olfactory devices can be implemented in our lives through a tangible form. Users can present various smells to the nose that, based on the chemical composition and smell intensity, will show different movements through its nostrils and the sides of the nasal bridge.

  • 199. van den Hoogen, J.
    et al.
    Lo, J.
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Health Care Logistics.
    Debriefing Research Games: Context, Substance and Method2016In: Journal Simulation & Gaming, ISSN 1046-8781, E-ISSN 1552-826X, Vol. 47, no 3, p. 368-388Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background. Debriefing is an intrinsic part of games for learning and proper debriefing can also be beneficial to research games. However, the literature on how to debrief research games is sparse and only provides the professional with an abstract topic guide. Aim. The purpose of this study was to design a framework for the debriefing of research games that are used in ongoing innovation processes. Method. We used the literature on debriefing and experimental research and our experience as game designers to build a framework that tackles the context, substance and method of debriefing research games. Results. Our framework provides three contributions. First, it shows how the context in which a research game is applied sometimes impacts the functionality of the game in negative ways. This can be helped by designing both the game and the debriefing together. Second, we operationalize validity to a greater extent, as this is the core of a good research game. Third, we provide a methodology for debriefing professionals that opens up the black box of the gaming simulation session. Conclusion. The debriefing framework provides a method to collectively assess the validity, reliability and robustness of the causal claims associated with the research conducted.

  • 200. Van Den Hoogen, J.
    et al.
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH).
    Lessons on the design of gaming simulations for convergence and divergence in volatile innovation environments2016In: Proceedings - Winter Simulation Conference, IEEE conference proceedings, 2016, p. 1044-1055Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Gaming simulation allows innovation stakeholders to experiment with innovations in a shielded environment. The main contribution to innovation processes is not solely the provision of knowledge to stakeholders but also the manipulation of process volatility. Volatility is the speed and magnitude by which innovations, stakeholders and institutions change during the process, creating unpredictability and uncontrollability. This paper posits that a more even distribution of volatility over time is beneficial and that gaming simulation is able to contribute to this. The use of games allows innovation managers to front-load volatility beforehand or diminish it when it occurs. Crucial is that both effects demand from games qualitatively different design choices. This paper distills, from a multitude of gaming experiments in the U.K. And Dutch railroad sector, a set of design choices to consider. This enables game designers and innovation managers to improve the impact of gaming simulation on innovation processes.

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