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  • 151.
    Angelis, Jannis
    et al.
    Warwick Business School, University of Warwick.
    Macintyre, Mairi
    Dahliwal, John
    Parry, Glenn
    Siraliova, Jelena
    Customer centred value creation2011In: Issues of Business and Law, ISSN 2029-1094, Vol. 3, p. 11-19Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study explores approaches to management of value creation in complex systems and provides a basic method of determining to what extent a system is complex. In doing so it reviews approaches to value creation, the change from goods to services and implications for a business model and associated operational models. The study also examines the elements of value at the point of engagement. The concluding discussion highlights the importance of customer-centered rather than output-centered approaches to operational design and the implications which they have for both product and service offerings.

  • 152.
    Angelis, Jannis
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Macintyre, Mairi
    Parry, Glenn
    Discretion and complexity in customer focused environments2012In: European Management Journal, ISSN 0263-2373, E-ISSN 1873-5681, Vol. 30, no 5, p. 466-472Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Operations have traditionally focused on reductive analysis; transactional processes open to mass-customisation and standardisation. This study proposes that service complexity created by extensive ‘reasonable’ customer demand limits the ability to standardise and manage systems through mass-customisation. Beyond mass-customisation we propose management is by discretion. Discretion is difficult, if not impossible to codify, so operations are ‘managed’ via framework principles that also are difficult to replicate and provide a source of sustainable competitive advantage. The study furthers the servitisation discussion through a public sector services case.

  • 153.
    Angelis, Jannis
    et al.
    Warwick Business School.
    Parry, Glenn
    Macintyre, Mairi
    Discretion and complexity in customer focused environments2011In: Proceedings of the Service Alliance Complex Service Systems Conference, 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 154.
    Angelis, Jannis
    et al.
    Warwick Business School.
    Pinheiro de Lima, Edson
    Shifting from production to service to experienced-based operations2011In: Service Design and Delivery: Research and Innovations in the Service Economy / [ed] Perry, G., Macintyre, M. and Angelis, J., London: Springer London, 2011, p. 83-94Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter covers the shift in focus of value added business operations from ­production to services, and in turn, to experience-based operations where customer involvement itself becomes part of the offering. The shift has significant implications for how businesses are managed. The greater service focus affects the firm’s unique value proposition, which necessitates considerations on strategy, supplier relations, post-sale offerings and so on. Meanwhile, the inclusion of customer ­experiences affect the way operations are designed and employed so that these are structurally systematically captured and capitalised.

  • 155.
    Angelis, Jannis
    et al.
    Warwick Business School.
    Pinheiro de Lima, Edson
    Siraliova, Jelena
    Servitised experiences: Business and management implications2010In: Issues of Business and Law, ISSN 2029-1094, Vol. 2, p. 1-11Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study explores business and management implications of the increased emphasis placed on experiences in a servitised context. Customer experience becomes an integral part of the offering, which necessitates greater end-user access to the value chain and emphasises their involvement in the offering. The two research questions on such a servitisation trend and management implications are investigated conceptually, supported by industry examples. The results indicate that operations need to be designed with customer perception and experience in mind, with corresponding performance measures and management. The split between front- and back office becomes less distinct, with greater customer involvement throughout the supply chain and life cycles stages. Relevant components that impact the experiences must be incorporated deliberately and from the outset, and controlling for error through reduced discretion becomes a priority.

  • 156.
    Angelis, Jannis
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Management.
    Ribeiro da silva, Elias
    Blockchain adoption: a value driver perspective2019In: Business Horizons, ISSN 0007-6813, E-ISSN 1873-6068, Vol. 62, no 3, p. 307-314Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The ongoing discussion regarding blockchain technologies is focused primarily on cryptocurrencies, but blockchain features and functionalities have developed beyond financial instruments. As the technologies provide new functionalities, the associated value proposition changes as well. This study explores the relationship between blockchain technologies and their underlying value drivers. Four identified distinct blockchain stages of increased maturity are analyzed and discussed. This covers the evolutionary technology types focused on transactions, smart contracts, decentralized applications, and the introduction of artificial intelligence supporting decentralized decision making. In addition, we address management issues around appropriate blockchain adoption using a blockchain value driver-focused framework that gives decision makers actionable questions and recommendations. We provide practitioners with a method for assessing suitable blockchain adoption that addresses the specific value creation associated with a given organizational strategy. For academics, we critically identify and assess the characteristics of the blockchain stages and their strategy implications and provide a structured approach conceptualizing blockchain technology evolution.

  • 157.
    Angelis, Jannis
    et al.
    Warwick Business School.
    Thompson, Mark
    Product and service complexity and high performance work practices in the aerospace industry2007In: Journal of Industrial Relations, ISSN 0022-1856, E-ISSN 1472-9296, Vol. 49, no 5, p. 775-781Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Offering products or services with high specification and complexity is often used as a competitive business strategy for organizations that cannot compete on cost. Theories on high performance work practices suggest that the combination of high employee involvement and aligned human resources and industrial relations allows firms to achieve higher performance. This study explores the adoption of such work practices in the UK aerospace industry. The results are based on responses from 225 firms across the value chain, ranging from service providers and systems integrators to component and material suppliers. The study identifies relevant work practices at each level of product and service complexity and discusses the varying needs firms have depending on their product offerings, and the implications on their work practices.

  • 158.
    Angelis, Jannis
    et al.
    University of Oxford.
    Thompson, Mark
    Product and service complexity and high performing aerospace organizations2005In: Proceedings of the 16th Annual Production and Operations Management Society Conference, 2005Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Offering products or services with high specification and complexity is often used as a competitive business strategy for organizations that cannot compete on cost. Theories on high performance work practices suggest that the combination of high employee involvement and aligned human resources and industrial relations allows firms to achieve higher performance. This study explores the adoption of such work practices in the UK aerospace industry. The results are based on responses from 225 firms across the value chain, ranging from service providers and systems integrators to component and material suppliers. The study identifies relevant work practices at each level of product and service complexity and discusses the varying needs firms have depending on their product offerings, and the implications on their work practices.

  • 159.
    Angelis, Jannis
    et al.
    University of Oxford.
    Thompson, Mark
    Taking the high road: Product specificity and high performance work organizations2005In: Proceedings of the Annual British Academy of Management Conference 2005, 2005Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 160.
    Angelis, Jannis
    et al.
    Warwick Business School.
    Watt, Cameron
    Macintyre, Mairi
    Customer value and lean operations in self care2008In: Proceedings of the 19th Annual Production and Operations Management Society Conference, 2008Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 161.
    Angelis, Jannis
    et al.
    Warwick Business School.
    Watt, Cameron
    Macintyre, Mairi
    Customer value and lean operations in self care2008In: Proceedings of the 15th Annual European Operations Management Association Conference, 2008Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 162.
    Angelis, Jannis
    et al.
    Warwick Business School.
    Watt, Cameron
    Macintyre, Mairi
    Customer value and lean operations in self care2008In: Proceedings of the 3rd World Conference on Production and Operations Management, 2008Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 163.
    Angelis, Jannis
    et al.
    Warwick Business School.
    Watt, Cameron
    Macintyre, Mairi
    Information systems and the pursuit of patient value in the care chain2009In: Integrating Healthcare with Information and Communication Technology / [ed] Finnegan, D. and Currie, W., Oxford: Radcliffe Publishing, 2009, p. 255-266Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 164.
    Angelis, Jannis
    et al.
    Warwick Business School.
    Watt, Cameron
    Macintyre, Mairi
    Tis a Far Place2008In: Proceedings of the 15th Annual European Operations Management Association Conference, 2008Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 165.
    ANGIUS, ROBERTO
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Management.
    STJERNUDDE, ANDREAS
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Management.
    Handling disruptions in large organizations: A study on asymmetricwarfare2015Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The question of how to handle a disruption in a large organization is largely dependent on what kind of organization that is subject to a disruption, in addition it is also a question that has many areas to consider. The victim of a disruption will most likely not have the initiative due to the nature of disruptions. However, changes in the environment that could indicate a transformation can be observed. But to successfully look into the future and foresee what is going to happen, is almost impossible. This means that an organization that faces a disruption will have to be reactive in such a situation. To handle a disruption efficiently the organization must be prepared in such a way that it can retake the initiative and disrupt the disruptor. The areas that have been given focus are the general strategic understanding and how to increase the organizations innovative capacity.

    When facing a high degree of uncertainty and duress, there is a tendency among people to revert to their core competencies. This can be utilized by the disruptor, which leads to that continued use of the core competence can lead to a trap, where the perceived use of the organizations strong point might in fact turn out to be the competitor’s strong suit. The functional fixation also lead to a stovepipe mentality, which in turn leads to inefficient intra unit communication and thus hinders the creation of synergy effects.

    External pressure can have negative, as well as positive effects on the organization as a catalyst for change. If the organization is too rigid, i.e. hierarchical structures, poor information flow and experience based leadership, then the organization will tend to focus inwards when confronted by change. On the other hand if the organization is flat and has a leadership that is instead based on intellectual capabilities, then the pressure might lead to a higher capacity for innovation.

    However, a flat and ad hoc organization can have problems with coping under too much pressure.

  • 166.
    Aniander, Magnus
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Blomgren, Henrik
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial marketing. KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Business Development and Entrepreneurship.
    On the Production Concept1997Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 167.
    Aniander, Magnus
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Blomgren, Henrik
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial marketing. KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Business Development and Entrepreneurship.
    Engwall, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Gessler, Fredrik
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Gramenius, Jakob
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Karlson, Bok
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Lagergren, Fredrik
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Storm, Pär
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Westin, Paul
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Industriell Ekonomi: Faktabok1998Book (Other academic)
  • 168.
    Annadotter, Kerstin
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Real Estate and Construction Management, Building and Real Estate Economics.
    Vilka är orsakerna till ett ökat behov av bostäder till Helsingborgs bostadssociala program och hur ska bostadsbehovet lösas?: En förstudie.2016Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Sammanfattning

     

    Helsingborgshems formulering av problemet som denna rapport adresserar är att man önskar få besked av socialtjänsten, i detta fall Arbetsmarknadsförvaltningen och Socialförvaltningen, hur behovet av en utökning av det bostadssociala programmet ser ut. Hur många lägenheter per år är behovet och vilka klienter eller klientgrupper hos förvaltningarna är det som har behovet?

     

    Inom Helsingborg stad är det Arbetsmarknadsförvaltningen, Socialförvaltningen, Vård- och Omsorgsförvaltningen och Fastighetsförvaltningen som samarbetar inom ramen för det bostadssociala programmet. Fastighetsförvaltningen fungerar som spindeln i nätet, administrerar och fördelar remisser från förvaltningarna på de lägenheter som ställs till socialtjänstens förfogande av Helsingborgshem och privata fastighetsägare.

     

    Från den 1 januari 2015 har socialnämnden och dess förvaltning samordningsansvaret för det bostadssociala programmet.

     

    I intervjuerna har framkommit att gruppen av försörjningsstödstagare som saknar övrig social eller ekonomisk problematik inte är ny för Socialförvaltningen utan har funnits länge, att man inte vet om gruppen har ökat eller inte samt att man har svårt att bedöma hur många personer som utgör behovet av en utökning av det bostadssociala programmet. Socialförvaltningen uppger ändå att det kan röra sig om ca 50 personer eller fler. Man betonar att siffran är en grov uppskattning och att man vill återkomma om antalet. Fastighetsförvaltningen bedömer sitt behov till ca 40-50 personer. Dessa personer har enligt förvaltningarna ingen så kallad bostadsproblematik, innebärande att personerna inte har någon belastning som gör att de inte kan uppfylla hyreslagens krav på en hyresgäst. Dessa personer skulle enligt nuvarande regler vara kvalificerade för ett förstahandskontrakt med hyresgaranti inom det bostadssociala programmet. Arbetsmarknadsförvaltningen uppger att de inte har något utökat behov av lägenheter med hyresgarantier inom det bostadsociala programmet.

     

    Ett urval reflektioner, slutsatser och rekommendationer är:

     

    • Hemlösheten i Sverige idag kan till stor del förklaras av en mängd dysfunktionaliteter på strukturell och institutionell nivå i samhället, se avsnitt 3 och Appendix 2. En kompletterande förklaring av den pågående snabba ökningen av hemlösheten är den internationella flyktingkrisen och antalet asylsökande som kommer till Sverige.
    • Helsingborgs stad har ett upparbetat och välfungerande system för det bostadssociala programmet som berörda förvaltningar nu ser över med syftet att åstadkomma ett ännu bättre system för det bostadssociala programmet. Enligt uppgift (feb 2016) finns ett förslag från arbetsgruppen som innebär smärre justeringar av programmet eftersom man i stort är nöjda med gällande ordning.
    • Helsingborgs stad behöver kommunicera med, informera och engagera fler privata fastighetsägare i staden att delta i det bostadssociala programmet och att bidra med lägenheter motsvarande sin marknadsandel av hyresmarknaden i Helsingborg. Det bedöms här som nödvändigt för att uppnå stadens mål: att minska segregation och utanförskap. Vid behov kan staden använda verktygen markanvisningar och exploateringsavtal för att få även nyproducerade lägenheter till det bostadssociala programmet.
    • Relevant och korrekt statistik behöver föras av och kommuniceras mellan alla parter i det bostadssociala programmet, det vill säga förvaltningarna och fastighetsägarna.
    • Den kommunala hyresnormen behöver höjas för att möjliggöra lägenheter med hyresgaranti i fler bostadsområden.
    • Socialförvaltningen i Helsingborg har svårt att bedöma behovet av fler hyreslägenheter med hyresgaranti. De problem som orsakar svårigheter av en behovsbedömning behöver identifieras, kommuniceras och lösas.
    • Bygg fler hållbara bostäder, även till låginkomsttagare. Öka konkurrens och innovation i nyproduktion och på bostadsmarknaden.
    • Ingen av förvaltningarna har identifierat vilka klientgrupper som står för det ökade behovet av hyreslägenheter med hyresgaranti.
  • 169.
    Annadotter, Kerstin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Real Estate and Construction Management, Building and Real Estate Economics.
    Blomé, Gunnar
    Malmö Högskola/ Malmö University.
    Uthyrningspolicy-jämförelse och diskussion av uthyrningsregler i nio bostadsföretag med fördjupning för Landskrona Stad2014Report (Other academic)
  • 170.
    Annadotter, Kerstin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Real Estate and Construction Management, Building and Real Estate Economics.
    Werner, Inga Britt
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Grannskapseffekter på områdesnivå- en fördjupad studie av bostadsrättsombildning i allmännyttan: Arbetsrapport 3: Ekonomiska investeringar i Dalen och Östberga2014Report (Other academic)
  • 171.
    Annadotter, Kerstin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Real Estate and Construction Management.
    Werner, Inga Britt
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment.
    Hungria Gunnelin, Rosane
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Real Estate and Construction Management.
    Bostadsrättsprisernas nivå och utveckling i Dalen och Östberga, åren 2005 - 2012: Arbetsrapport nr 2 i projekt Grannskapseffekter på områdesnivå - en fördjupad studie av bostadsrättsombildning i allmännyttan2014Report (Other academic)
  • 172.
    Annadotter, Kerstin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Real Estate and Construction Management, Building and Real Estate Economics.
    Werner, IngaBritt
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Bostadsrättsombildning i allmännyttan: Delproejkt 4 Socialt Kapital: Delrapport. Redovisning av undersökningsfas 12009Report (Other academic)
  • 173. Annosi, M. C.
    et al.
    Giustiniano, L.
    Brunetta, F.
    Magnusson, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.). LUISS School of Business and Management, Italy.
    The emergence of new organization designs. Evidences from self-managed team-based organizations2017In: Learning and Innovation in Hybrid Organizations: Strategic and Organizational Insights, Springer International Publishing , 2017, p. 255-268Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    New organization designs emerge continuously in highly dynamic innovation context to improve readiness to change. The adoption of self-managing teams operating cross-functionally on a bulk of products, together with the reduction of vertical layers in the organization, seems to be a common strategy for many organizations aiming to achieve higher level of efficacy and shorter lead times. Authors explore the extent to which new micro-and meso-level organizational forms contribute to the achievement of organizational efficiency, and produce secondary effects on long-term innovation goals.

  • 174. Annosi, Maria Carmela
    et al.
    Foss, Nicolai
    Brunetta, Federica
    Magnusson, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    The Interaction of Control Systems and Stakeholder Networks in Shaping the Identities of Self-Managed Teams2017In: Organization Studies, ISSN 0170-8406, E-ISSN 1741-3044, Vol. 38, no 5, p. 619-645Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Team identity has received little research attention even though an increasing number of firms are moving to team-based organizations and there is evidence that teams form identities. We explore the extent to which team identity can be institutionalized as a central organizing principle of team-based firms. We argue that managerial and stakeholder interventions shape the self-construction of team identity as well as the team's commitment to specific work objectives. We also suggest that team identity becomes isomorphic to organizational identity because of pressures related to: (1) the presence of a dense network of managers and stakeholders, which orients teams towards a focus on certain aspects of the higher-order identity; (2) the use of team routines and regular feedback loops, which force alignment with the organizational identity; and (3) the use of coordinating roles aimed at promoting, ratifying and reinforcing the convergence of identity within the team. We analyse multiple cases from a major multinational corporation in the telecommunications industry, which we examine through the lens of a multi-level model of controls involving the micro, meso and macro organizational levels. We expand and refine the model in the process.

  • 175.
    Anop, Sviatlana
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Real Estate and Construction Management.
    Apartment price determinants: A comparison between Sweden and Germany2015Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Similar development of economic fundamentals in Germany over the last two decades did not lead to the same dramatic house price increases as it is in Sweden. What can explain this house price stability over a long period? This thesis attempts to find the answer this question.

    The first paper in this thesis contains an extended literature review on the studies focused on the factors affecting house prices in the short and in the long run. Existing literature adopts a broad variation of approaches and reaches different conclusions attempting to answer the question about what are the key drivers of house prices. Conclusions often depend on the model specifications and econometric methods applied. Though there is a considerable agreement in real estate economics theory regarding the main factors that affect house prices (or so called “fundamental determinants”), it is hard to find a consistent definition regarding what factors can be considered as “fundamentals” and what factors belong to “non-fundamentals”. The dominating factors that are presented in the majority of the studies are income, population, interest rate, housing stock and unemployment. Studies done after the recent financial crisis put more attention on such factors as the behavior of the market participants, financing conditions and regulations. The characteristics of the bank lending and valuation policies as well as regulations on the rental market have received attention in the research literature, but the impact of these factors on house price dynamics is not measured and not well described. Therefore the other two papers in this thesis aim to provide a better insight in to the factors that create fluctuations in housing markets.

    The second paper investigates the effects of macroeconomic indicators such as population, income housing stock, mortgage interest rate on house prices. Estimation is done by applying panel data methodology on regional data for major cities in Germany and Sweden and by using yearly observations from 1995 to 2010. Results suggest that the long-run development of apartment prices in Sweden can be explained by changes in such factors as population, disposable income per capita, mortgage interest rate, housing stock, and prices per square meter in the previous period. The price for the previous period has the highest impact in comparison with other factors in Sweden. At the same time for Germany this is the only factor that is valid for long-term house price development. Estimates for fundamental factors such as population, disposable income, mortgage interest rate and housing stock appeared as not significant in house price development in the long run in Germany. A closer analysis has shown that the fundamental factors developed in a similar way in both countries during the analyzed period, though the house prices dynamic is very different. The conclusion is that fundamental factors cannot provide an explanation for the differences in house price developments in two countries and further analysis of institutional differences in the housing markets is done in the third paper.

    Third paper applies a comparative analysis approach and hypothetico-deductive method in order to examine the differences in the banking policies on mortgage financing and approaches to valuation of mortgage properties in Germany and Sweden.  The results suggest that the extreme rise in Swedish house prices above the long-term trend was created by expanding bank lending policies that was supported by the general macroeconomic factors and regulation environment on the housing market. The main difference between countries in approaches to valuation for mortgage purposes is that in Germany that mortgage is based not on the market value as it is in Sweden, but on the long-run sustainable value, so called “fundamental” value. Mortgage lending value is determined in such a way that is also develops in the same tempo as fundamentals in the long-run and is not that procyclical as market value. Using a long-term sustainable value has a restrictive effect on the housing prices and in such a way stabilizes the market.  One more factor that gives stability to the housing market in Germany is the well-functioning rental market. Third paper contributes to a better understanding of necessary conditions for the house prices to rise in the long run above the fundamentals level and suggests policy solutions that can reduce the risks of housing bubbles and increase financial stability.

  • 176.
    Anop, Sviatlana
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Real Estate and Construction Management, Building and Real Estate Economics.
    Comparison of valuation and lending policies in Germany and SwedenManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 177.
    Anop, Sviatlana
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Real Estate and Construction Management.
    Determinants of foreign direct investments in real estate in European countries - panel data analysis2010In: 17th ERES conference proceedings, Milan, Italy, 2010Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Foreign direct investments (FDI) have been one of the core features of globalization and the world economy over the past two decades. Statistical data shows that the level of FDI was continuously increasing during 2003-2007, but the directions and amount of such inflows differs significantly between the countries. Investments in Real Estate are just one of these inflows and European countries proved to be successful in this process. The objective of this study is to highlight theoretical and empirical findings about determinants of foreign direct investment in Real Estate in developed European countries. This paper first present and analyze existing scientific theories in this area with special attention to Real Estate investments, then focuses on assessing the relative significance of the factors that may attract FDI in Real Estate via a panel data regression analysis for a representative sample consisting of 15 OECD countries for 1996-2007. Results of the study suggest that certain variables such as size and growth of GDP, human capital and road infrastructure appear to be robust under different specifications. Significance of these factors estimates are also observed, confirming the relevant theoretical propositions. However certain differential variables that expected to have positive effect proved to be insignificant within the estimated data sample.

  • 178.
    Anop, Sviatlana
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Real Estate and Construction Management.
    Hotel valuation and management: Experience from Sweden2012In: 2nd International scientific-practical conference proceedings ”Perspectives of valuation activity development” Belarusian State Technological University, Minsk, Belarus, Belarusian State Technological University, Minsk, Belarus , 2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 179.
    Anop, Sviatlana
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Real Estate and Construction Management, Building and Real Estate Economics.
    House price determinants: A comparison between major cities in Germany and SwedenManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 180.
    Anop, Sviatlana
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Real Estate and Construction Management.
    House price determinants in Germany and Sweden: panel data analysis2011In: 18th ERES conference proceedings, Eindhoven, Netherlands, 2011Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Article has an aim to investigate the effects of macroeconomic indicators such as population, income levels, GDP, housing stock, interest rate and rent levels on house prices. Analysis is done by applying panel data methodology on regional data for major cities in Germany and Sweden and by using yearly observations from 1995 to 2009. Results confirm that population, GDP, income, housing stock, interest rate and price levels for other market segments have effects on housing prices. However, these effects can be different for certain indicators depending on market segment and model used.

  • 181.
    Anop, Sviatlana
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Real Estate and Construction Management, Building and Real Estate Economics.
    House price dynamics: A literature reviewManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 182.
    Anop, Sviatlana
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Real Estate and Construction Management.
    Practical issues in real estate valuation in Belarus2010In: 3rd International scientific-practical conference proceedings “Economy, valuation and management of real estate and nature resources” Belarusian State Technological University, Minsk, Belarus, 2010Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 183.
    Anop, Sviatlana
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Real Estate and Construction Management.
    Valuation and management of hotel property: Swedish experience2012In: 2nd International scientific-practical conference proceedings ”Perspectives of valuation activity development” Belarusian State Technological University, Minsk, Belarus / [ed] Belarusian State Technological University, Minsk, Belarus, 2012Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 184.
    Anop, Sviatlana
    Polotsk State University, Novopolotsk, Belarus.
    Анализ хозяйственной деятельности: Учеб.-метод. комплекс для студ. спец. 25 01 07, 25 01 04 Полоцкий Государственный Университет, Новополоцк, Республика Беларусь /Analysis of the economic activity: Study manual for students with specialization 25 01 07, 25 01 04. 2nd ed. Polotsk State University, Novopolotsk, Belarus2005Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [ru]

    Приведены темы изучаемого курса, изложены теоретические и практические основы анализа хозяйственной деятельности промышленных предприятий и в основных отраслях экономики. Представлены задания для практических занятий, рекомендации по организации рейтингового контроля изучения дисциплины, вопросы к экзамену, тест для проведения зачета, контрольные работы по курсу, тематика курсовых работ.

  • 185.
    Anop, Sviatlana
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Real Estate and Construction Management.
    Aldaghi, Shaghayegh
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Applied Mechanical Engineering (KTH Södertälje).
    MANAGEMENT OF COMMUNICATION RISKS: EVIDENCEFROM INTERNATIONAL PROJECTS CASE STUDY2010In: International conference proceedings PM-05 -  Advancing project management for the 21st century “Concepts, tools & techniques for managing successful projects”,  Heraklion, Crete, Greece., 2010Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The realization of project requires collaboration between many different participants.  The majority of interactions happen on the project management team level. The general believe is that teams/groups can achieve more efficiency if they use effective instruments of risk management in their communication process. The aim of this study is to investigate how the level of communication risks varies between different project group development stages and how project manager can help project group to reach the maximum effectiveness of communication. The study analyzes different communication barriers that project group meets while working at project. The investigation was performed by using qualitative analysis method in four different projects of an engineering and consulting company involved with mining industries in South Africa. Interpersonal relationships were measured by FIRO model and communication risks were evaluated by a typical risk analysis method. Results of investigations show that communication risks are directly affected by the stage of group development and different factors of group development tend to synchronize with each other. The total amount of risks tends to decrease as group moves from one stage to another on the FIRO model. For improving communication process in project groups the dynamic nature of FIRO model should be considered. The risks will not be settled down unless the group stands in “Openness” stage and the group development stage is vulnerable to any changes; the environmental effects should be carefully followed for preventive action.

  • 186.
    Anop, Sviatlana
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Real Estate and Construction Management.
    Siniak, Nikolaj
    Belarussian State Technological University (BSTU).
    Creation of  housing price  indices: international experience2012In: 2nd International scientific-practical conference proceedings ”Perspectives of valuation activity development” Belarusian State Technological University, Minsk, Belarus / [ed] Belarusian State Technological University, Minsk, Belarus, 2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 187.
    Apanasevic, Tatjana
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Communication Systems, CoS, Radio Systems Laboratory (RS Lab). KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Centres, Center for Wireless Systems, Wireless@kth.
    Barriers to further commercialization of NFC pilots in Western Europe2013In: The Second International Cashless Society Roundtable (ICSR) / [ed] Fergal Carton and Jonas Hedman, 2013, p. 39-41Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A mobile payment can be performed in various ways. For example, the Near Field Technology (NFC) integrated with mobile devices provides an opportunity of a contactless mobile payment. However, it is not only payment. The NFC can further expand functionality of mobile phones and enrich consumer experience. Indeed, added value services created by the NFC include mobile ticketing, loyalty applications, smart advertisement, informational service, physical and logical access, and other functionalities.

    However, despite NFC potential to create added value we cannot witness its wide penetration and global spread unless some successful solutions are implemented on a national level. The research aims to define the barriers preventing NFC pilots from entering commercialization stage in Western Europe. Commercialization of NFC mobile solutions needs to overcome a range of barriers and obstacles predefined by macro- and micro-environmental conditions, and individual factors related to consumers, which are analized in this research.

  • 188.
    Apanasevic, Tatjana
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Communication Systems, CoS, Radio Systems Laboratory (RS Lab). KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Centres, Center for Wireless Systems, Wireless@kth.
    Challenges Related to the Introduction of Innovative Services in the Market: Mobile Payment Services in the Swedish Retail Industry2015Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Mobile payment services are expected to be the next step of the electronic payment evolution. However, the level of penetration in European countries is lower than expected. The focus of most academic research has been in two main areas: (i) mobile payment adoption by consumers and (ii) technical aspects of the service. Consequently, a number of themes remain under-researched. In order to expand knowledge on reasons that affect the wider penetration of mobile payments, challenges related to the introduction of mobile payment services in the market have been explored in this thesis.

    More specifically, this research has addressed two problem areas: (i) why mobile payments have not been widely adopted by merchants; and (ii) what effects that the introduction of mobile payments has had on the business networks of the involved actors. As an example, we use the mobile payment services applied in the Swedish retail industry. The study is focused on the main groups of stakeholders – the mobile payment providers, the retailers, and the consumers.

    First, this study has helped to identify what different stakeholders expect of mobile payments and how these services correspond to their needs. In order to analyse the expectations of stakeholders, we have developed an analysis framework based on the theory of diffusion of innovations, the Technology Acceptance Model (TAM), and the theory of network externalities. The analysis highlights the expectations of stakeholders and helps to understand what kind of mobile payment service merchants expect and are willing to adopt. One key finding is that existing mobile payment services for retailing could be further improved in order to ensure an enhanced purchasing process for consumers.

    Second, the research has explored the impact of mobile payment services on the business networks. In order to analyse the relationships and cooperation between business actors, and changes in business strategy and network structure, we used the approach proposed by the Industrial Marketing and Purchasing (IMP) Group. The performed analysis illustrates the following changes in the structure of business networks for the traditional payment solutions (bank cards): (i) emergence of new business actors (i.e. independent mobile payment providers); (ii) new roles and activities of business actors; and (iii) exclusion of traditional business actors (i.e. banks) from the mobile payment systems.

    All these changes lead to increased complexity of relationships and increased level of interdependence between business actors within the networks. The following changes in the strategies of involved actors have been identified: (i) mobile payment providers seek to achieve a control over the business network; (ii) the retailers affect strategies of the mobile payment providers; (iii) the marketing strategies of business actors include cross-marketing in different sectors. All these changes result in additional value and enhanced quality of service for consumers.

    In order to analyse a complex and multidisciplinary area such as mobile payments, it is beneficial to use more than one analysis approach. A combination of different complementing methods helps to explore different aspects of the phenomenon and provides a more comprehensive overview of several research aspects.

    This work contributes to the academic research of mobile payment service adoption by merchants through proposing a theoretical analysis framework. More specifically, the research addresses a new area – expectations of retailers when new solutions are introduced. The framework consists of the following criteria and aspects: technological feasibility, economic benefits, lower service costs, added value of services, network externalities and the problem of critical mass, and finally, ease of use. This framework helps to identify what merchants can expect of mobile payment services.

    Another area of contribution is the analysis of the effect that mobile payments make on the actors and business networks of traditional payment services. The introduction of new services results in emergence of new business actors, a need to establish new relationships, and increased complexity of a business network. Moreover, in order to succeed, cooperation between all network actors is needed. As a result, business actors have to adjust their services and strategies according to needs of others.

  • 189.
    Apanasevic, Tatjana
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Communication Systems, CoS, Radio Systems Laboratory (RS Lab). KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Centres, Center for Wireless Systems, Wireless@kth.
    Factors Influencing the Slow Rate of Penetration of NFC Mobile Payment in Western Europe2013In: the 12th International Conference on Mobile Business (ICMB2013), Berlin, Germany, June 2013, 2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The NFC technology implemented on the base of contemporary mobile handsets can provide considerable benefits to end-users. However, despite high level of diffusion of mobile phones in Western Europe, the level of penetration of the NFC based mobile payment is low. A considerable number of trials have been initiated, however, large scale deployment of commercial NFC services cannot be seen. This paper identifies and analyzes different factors that influence the slow rate of penetration of NFC based mobile payment in Western Europe.

    This paper presents a qualitative study based on experience of six NFC pilots implemented in Finland, France, Italy, the Netherlands, Norway, and the UK. The research findings confirm that a number of demand and supply barriers negatively affect the rate of the penetration of the NFC payment. The network externalities and the lack of consumer awareness about NFC services were identified as the most important demand side barriers. The most significant supply side barriers are the lack of uniform technological standards, the lack of NFC enabled mobile phones, and the coopetition issue. In addition, the interrelation between mentioned obstacles was identified. This fact means that a delay in the NFC payment’s diffusion is affected not by a single factor, but rather by a set of interrelated factors. The sources of these obstacles are related to the consumer acceptance, the specifics of business environment, and the technology.

  • 190.
    Apanasevic, Tatjana
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Communication Systems, CoS, Radio Systems Laboratory (RS Lab). KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Centres, Center for Wireless Systems, Wireless@kth.
    Mobile Payments: Main Trends in the Retail Industry2014In: 25th European Regional Conference of the International Telecommunications Society (ITS), Brussels, Belgium, June 22 - 25, 2014, 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The main objective of the ongoing study is to investigate obstacles ans driving forces affecting organization adoption of innovation. In order to that an example of the mobile payments applied in the Swedish retail industry has been used. The main analyzed factors are: adopter characteristics, supplier marketing activity, perceived innovation dcharacteristics, social network, and environmental influences.

    The analysis of case study findings helped to estimate some common trends in the adoption of mobile payment services by retailers. As a result, the analyzed factors were categorized as obstacles or driving forces to adoption of the mobile payments.

  • 191.
    Apanasevic, Tatjana
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Communication Systems, CoS, Radio Systems Laboratory (RS Lab). KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Centres, Center for Wireless Systems, Wireless@kth.
    Obstacles to investments in mobile payments: The perspective of merchants: Work in progress2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The main objective of the ongoing research is to investigate obstacles and driving forces affecting merchants’ decision to invest in mobile payment solutions. The core aim of this paper is to present initial results of a desktop analysis revealing the current market situation, identifying main players, and estimating the structure of investment costs. In order to do that available secondary information was analyzed.

    The conducted analysis served to identify market fragmentation existing in the Swedish market due to existence of a number of competing mobile payment solutions. Another finding allows making conclusion, that retailers select to adopt already existing solutions, rather than developing own. Finally, the size of an organization and financial resources are important when making a decision to invest in a new payment solution.

  • 192.
    Apanasevic, Tatjana
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Communication Systems, CoS.
    Opportunities and challenges of mobile payment services: The perspective of service providers2018Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

     Mobile payments are transforming the payments industry. These services open up the opportunity for non-banking actors to enter the market. In order to embrace this challenge, banks, traditional payments market players, are forced to launch mobile payments. However, in Europe and most developed economies, a big number of launched services get terminated soon after their introduction in the market. Hence, the ability of different actors to act locally calls for additional research.

    The main objective of this thesis is to broaden knowledge and understanding about the ways mobile payment service providers address the opportunities and challenges of mobile payment services. In order to investigate this problem, this research (i) explores factors stimulating and hindering the introduction of mobile payments using perspectives of different types of service providers (i.e., banks, independent providers, direct operator billing providers, retailers, and public transport companies) and (ii) seeks to explain the importance of these factors for each type of provider.

    The primary data collected using interview method. More than 40 industry representatives in six countries were contacted. The Service, Technology, Organisation, and Finance (STOF) model was used as a theoretical research framework. This is a business modelling framework that specifies a set of critical design issues that have to  be considered within each model’s domain.

    Research findings highlight that the organisation domain is the key domain, which  affects all other domains and has an impact on the general viability of the business model. A comparison of the approaches used by different service providers to address each of the critical design issues helped to identify the factors that are most important within each domain. These factors stimulate or hinder development of a viable business model within each category of service providers.

    This research contributes to a better understanding of challenges and success factors associated with the design of business models for new mobile services and uses the lens of the STOF model. The contributions to the academic research on mobile payments are: (i) collection and analysis of a rich empirical data set on mobile payment services implemented in six Northern European countries, (ii) discussion of a bigger picture by connecting research findings to the context of the existing payment system, (iii) extension  of knowledge on business models for mobile ticketing, and (iv) extension of knowledge on the value of mobile ticketing services in the business-to-business (B2B) context.

  • 193.
    Apanasevic, Tatjana
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Communication Systems, CoS, Radio Systems Laboratory (RS Lab). KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Centres, Center for Wireless Systems, Wireless@kth.
    Organizational Acceptance of Mobile Payments2014In: 30th annual International Marketing and Purchasing Conference (IMP 2014), Bordeaux, France, September 4-5, 2014, 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 194.
    Apanasevic, Tatjana
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Communication Systems, CoS.
    Primary data collection: Approaches of service providers towards mobile payments2018Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Mobile payments are new services enabled by evolution of information and communication technologies. These services can be provided by different types of actors both banks and non-banks. The understanding of capabilities and limitations of different service providers to act in local markets requires further understanding. Implemented research seeks to extend knowledge in this area. I have implemented research focused on approaches used by different types of service providers including banks, independent providers, operator billing providers, retailers, and public transport companies in six Northern European countries.

    Exploratory part of the research aims to address the following research question: What factors stimulate and hinder the introduction of mobile payments? The main objective of this report is to present primary data collected during the research through interviews with contacted companies.

    The collected primary data is classified and organised using the STOF (Service, Technology, Organisation, and Finance) model. Evidence is presented in tables. This primary data is further used for explanatory study. At the same time, this data can be used by other researchers studying the same area. The collected data is reach in facts and presents the overview of different strategies. 

  • 195.
    Apanasevic, Tatjana
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Communication Systems, CoS, Radio Systems Laboratory (RS Lab). KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Centres, Center for Wireless Systems, Wireless@kth.
    The Effect of Innovation on Business Networks2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 196.
    Apanasevic, Tatjana
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Communication Systems, CoS.
    Arvidsson, Niklas
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Sustainability and Industrial Dynamics.
    Markendahl, Jan
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Communication Systems, CoS, Radio Systems Laboratory (RS Lab).
    Mobile payments: a proposal for a context-oriented approach based on socio-technical system theoryIn: Journal of Innovation Management, ISSN 2183-0606Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A recent review on mobile payment research by Dahlberg et al. (2015) concludes that there is a need to synthesise this research area by studying contexts in which innovation is done as well as to integrate different aspects of research. This article aims to provide a proposal for how to achieve such integration and context-orientation by building on previous studies as well as an additional review. Our systematic literature review of mobile payments research is focused on papers published during 2006–2016. The main objective is to examine how mobile payments research has been conducted from the methodological and theoretical perspectives. Our findings show that research on mobile payments is a multidisciplinary research. Three main themes, which are in line with previous studies, in research are: customer adoption, technological aspects, and business aspects. Moreover, research is mainly analytical based on deductive approach. To meet the challenge formulated in the previous research, we propose and apply a socio-technical system framework to achieve synthesis and context-specific consideration in future research on mobile payments.

  • 197.
    Apanasevic, Tatjana
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Communication Systems, CoS.
    Markendahl, Jan
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Communication Systems, CoS, Radio Systems Laboratory (RS Lab).
    Mobile ticketing services in the Northern Europe: Critical business model issues2018In: Internet of Things Business Models, Users, and Networks, 2017 / [ed] Morten Falch, Copenhagen, Denmark: IEEE, 2018, p. 1-8Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Started as SMS ticketing, today, mobile ticketing services become a platform for combined mobility solutions that integrate mobile ticketing, bike renting, car sharing, and parking payment services. Mobile ticketing services provide a number of benefits for public transport companies and passengers, however, in some Northern European countries, the share of mobile ticket sales does not exceed 10 percent. In this paper, we analyse business models of three types of mobile ticketing services (SMS, in-app, and “Be-In Be-Out” (BIBO)) in order to identify factors that negatively affect wider penetration of mobile ticketing. In order to do so, we use STOF (Service, Technology, Organisation, and Finance) model. The research reveals that there are a number of challenges related to service, technology, and finance domains of mobile ticketing. Due to this, with the help of price policy, many public transport companies push choices of their customers towards use of plastic travel card.

  • 198.
    Apanasevic, Tatjana
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Communication Systems, CoS, Radio Systems Laboratory (RS Lab). KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Centres, Center for Wireless Systems, Wireless@kth.
    Markendahl, Jan
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Centres, Center for Wireless Systems, Wireless@kth. KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Communication Systems, CoS, Radio Systems Laboratory (RS Lab).
    Stakeholder’s expectations: Mobile payments in retail in Sweden2014In: 13th International Conference on Mobile Business, 2014 (ICMB 2014), London, June 4-5, 2014, 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    One of the main application areas of mobile payment services in Sweden is retailing. The main stakeholders involved in this service are mobile payment service providers, banks, merchants, and consumers. The main focus of this paper is on the change of expectations of different stakeholders taking part in service provisioning. Analysis has been performed by comparison of the initial expectations before the introduction of a mobile payment service and expectations after practical experience of the service usage. Three cases of mobile payment solutions for retailing have been investigated: BART provided by Swedbank, SEQR provided by Seamless, and a service provided by Payair.

    The analysis indicates that a number of expectations of stakeholders about mobile payment services did not come true. The results for the different cases differ but the main findings are: banks were excluded from direct service provisioning; merchants see some advantaged to deploy mobile payment, but are uncertain which solution will be a dominant in the market; consumer expectations of improved purchasing experience and usefulness are not met. The performed analysis also helps to identify some of the reasons that can be seen as obstacles for a wider penetration of mobile payment services.

  • 199.
    Apanasevic, Tatjana
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Communication Systems, CoS, Radio Systems Laboratory (RS Lab). KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Centres, Center for Wireless Systems, Wireless@kth.
    Markendahl, Jan
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Centres, Center for Wireless Systems, Wireless@kth. KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Communication Systems, CoS, Radio Systems Laboratory (RS Lab).
    The mobile payment in retail: Teaching case summary2013In: The 29th Annual IMP Conference (IMP2013) proceedings: Building and Managing Relationships in a Global Network: Challenges and Necessary Capabilities / [ed] Minna Rollins and Brian Rutherford, IMP Group, 2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The case is written for master level students from business, commerce, and technical areas having some background in strategic marketing and management. The work over case implies a group work and a discussion of a strategy behind taken decision.

    THE OBJECTIVES OF THE CASE

    The main objective of the case is to gain practical skills in and better understanding of decision making in the circumstances of market uncertainty. The decision making process requires analysis of company’s core competences (Collis and Montgomery, 2008), market forces (Porter, 1996; Porter, 2008), and understanding of consumer needs. Students should apply different analysis frameworks in order to develop a strategy improving company’s competitive advantage and leveraging opportunities provided by a new technology, namely a new mobile payment solution. In addition, a consumer-centered thinking should lead to a suggestion of a bundle of attractive added values services build on top of mobile payment solution.

  • 200.
    Apanasevic, Tatjana
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Communication Systems, CoS.
    Markendahl, Jan
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Communication Systems, CoS, Radio Systems Laboratory (RS Lab).
    The value of mobile ticketing from a public transport perspective2018In: Journal of Payments Strategy & Systems, Vol. 11, no 4, p. 292-305Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Within the field of mobile payments, the market segment for mobile ticketing services is expected to grow, driven by the public transport sector. Although a large number of studies have explored the value of mobile payments to customers (ie service end users), there is a lack of research exploring the value of mobile payment and mobile ticketing for business customers (ie transport companies and retailers). This paper aims to address this gap and to explore the kinds of value that mobile ticketing services create for public transport companies. The research considers mobile ticketing services in six Northern European countries. The research findings suggest that within the business-to-business context, mobile ticketing services create multiple dimensions of value, namely enhanced technical functionality; financial value; better working environment; operational value; and reputational and customer relationship value. For passengers, meanwhile, value takes the form of convenience and service enhancement. These benefits are factors driving adoption of mobile ticketing and mobile payment services by public transport companies.

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