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  • 151.
    Langfeldt, Liv
    et al.
    Nordic Institute for Studies in Innovation, Research and Education (NIFU), PO Box 2815, Tøyen, 0608 Oslo, Norway.
    Nedeva, Maria
    Alliance Manchester Business School, University of Manchester, Oxford Rd, Manchester M13 9PL, UK.
    Sörlin, Sverker
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History, History of Science, Technology and Environment. Nordic Institute for Studies in Innovation, Research and Education (NIFU), PO Box 2815, Tøyen, 0608 Oslo, Norway.
    Thomas, Duncan A.
    Nordic Institute for Studies in Innovation, Research and Education (NIFU), PO Box 2815, Tøyen, 0608 Oslo, Norway.
    Co-existing Notions of Research Quality: A framework to study context-specific understandings of good research2020In: Minerva, ISSN 0026-4695, E-ISSN 1573-1871, Vol. 58, no 1, p. 115-137Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Notions of research quality are contextual in many respects: they varybetween fields of research, between review contexts and between policy contexts.Yet, the role of these co-existing notions in research, and in research policy, ispoorly understood. In this paper we offer a novel framework to study and understandresearch quality across three key dimensions. First, we distinguish betweenquality notions that originate in research fields (Field-type) and in research policyspaces (Space-type). Second, drawing on existing studies, we identify three attributes(often) considered important for ‘good research’: its originality/novelty, plausibility/reliability, and value or usefulness. Third, we identify five different sites wherenotions of research quality emerge, are contested and institutionalised: researchersthemselves, knowledge communities, research organisations, funding agencies andnational policy arenas. We argue that the framework helps us understand processesand mechanisms through which ‘good research’ is recognised as well as tensionsarising from the co-existence of (potentially) conflicting quality notions.

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  • 152.
    Larsen, Katarina
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Nilsson, Susanne
    Back to basics – revisiting rhetoric of competitive research funding allocation and impact agenda in Sweden2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Science policy studies have traditionally been concerned with analysis of research programs, national science policy and their motivation for investments in science and in basic research in particular. As Keith Pavitt (1991) pointed out, the “market failure” line of argument has been in the limelight with less attention paid to other questions such as the following: “How does science contribute to technology?” In the Swedish context, this is a relevant question given that it is a nation with high share of investments in science and historically high level of industry investments in R&D. The aim of the current study is to analyse the rhetoric of science policy about how investments in scientific excellence contributes to industrially relevant output. We examine this by taking a closer look at different strands of arguments and assessment criteria used to support competitive funding allocation to university-based research. Particular attention is paid to examining centres of excellence (CoE) as a form of science policy of promoting both scientific excellence and interaction between academia and industry. Moreover the study examines consequences of interim evaluations and the policy advice given  in assessments of centre activities. One conclusion is that the research funding agency assessment criteria have a strong influence on the direction on future centre activities but also that the range of present and future activities are determined by areas where the centre have internationally high quality research and the impact agenda defined by the centre in interaction with industry partners of ongoing research projects. 

  • 153.
    Larsson, Tore J
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Centres, Centre for Health and Building, CHB.
    Normark, M
    AFA Insurances Sweden.
    Oldertz, Cecilia
    AFA Insurances Sweden.
    Tezic, K
    AFA Insurances Sweden.
    Allvarliga arbetsskador och långvarig sjukfrånvaro 2011: Severe work-related injury and long-term absence from work in 2011 (In Swedish)2011Report (Other academic)
  • 154.
    Lazpita, Eneko
    et al.
    Univ Politecn Madrid, Sch Aerosp Engn, E-28040 Madrid, Spain..
    Martinez-Sanchez, Alvaro
    Univ Politecn Valencia, Inst Matemat Pura & Aplicada, Camino Vera, Valencia 46024, Spain..
    Corrochano, Adrian
    Univ Politecn Madrid, Sch Aerosp Engn, E-28040 Madrid, Spain..
    Hoyas, Sergio
    Univ Politecn Valencia, Inst Matemat Pura & Aplicada, Camino Vera, Valencia 46024, Spain..
    Le Clainche, Soledad
    Univ Politecn Madrid, Sch Aerosp Engn, E-28040 Madrid, Spain..
    Vinuesa, Ricardo
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Engineering Mechanics, Fluid Mechanics and Engineering Acoustics.
    On the generation and destruction mechanisms of arch vortices in urban fluid flows2022In: Physics of fluids, ISSN 1070-6631, E-ISSN 1089-7666, Vol. 34, no 5, p. 051702-, article id 051702Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study uses higher-order dynamic mode decomposition to analyze a high-fidelity database of the turbulent flow in an urban environment consisting of two buildings separated by a certain distance. We recognize the characteristics of the well-known arch vortex forming on the leeward side of the first building and document this vortex's generation and destruction mechanisms based on the resulting temporal modes. We show that the arch vortex plays a prominent role in the dispersion of pollutants in urban environments, where its generation leads to an increase in their concentration; therefore, the reported mechanisms are of extreme importance for urban sustainability.& nbsp;Published under an exclusive license by AIP Publishing

  • 155.
    Lee, Linda
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial marketing.
    Advice from creative consumers: a study of online hotel reviews2014In: International Journal of Technology Marketing, ISSN 1741-878X, E-ISSN 1741-8798, Vol. 9, no 1, p. 53-71Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This studyexplores what creative consumers are compelled to say about hotels throughonline reviews.  Online reviews arehighly influential, with consumers preferring the advice of other consumersover industry experts or information provided by the marketer.  Over 7,000 online hotel reviews posted onTripAdvisor were examined, using Leximancer, a content analysis tool.  This study provides insights on the factorscontributing to guest satisfaction and dissatisfaction in luxury hotels andmoderate hotels.  It also demonstrates theimportance of the information provided by creative consumers, both in terms ofmarket research and as part of an overall marketing communicationsinitiative. 

  • 156.
    Lee, Linda W.
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    McCarthy, I. P.
    Ellis, D.
    Customer Cohort Climate:: A Conceptual Model for Group Service Encounters: An Abstract2018In: Back to the Future:: Using Marketing Basics to Provide Customer Value / [ed] Nina Krey, Patricia Rossi, Springer Nature , 2018, p. 497-Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Group service encounters, when multiple customers are intentionally batched and involved in the delivery and consumption of a service, are common in tourism and hospitality, recreation, and education. In such service settings, customers will accept, expect, and sometimes even desire to share and consume the service experience “with” other customers. Thus, in group service encounters, customer-to-customer interactions are often integral to the service being provided. While previous research has largely examined services that take place between a single customer and a service employee or where customers consume “in the presence of” other customers, the topic of consuming “with” other customers has not been fully explored. This theory development paper focuses on understanding how the characteristics of the group itself impacts how group service encounters should be designed and delivered. This paper introduces the concept of customer cohort climates (CCCs) and explores how CCCs vary and the implications for the design of group service encounters. To understand how CCCs vary, we focus on two fundamental dimensions: why consumers participate in a group service encounter and how they interact with each other. More specifically, we develop a typology that shows how CCCs vary according to whether the service employee or the customer is the protagonist that initiates customer-to-customer interactions and customers’ hedonic or utilitarian motivation. 

  • 157.
    Legeby, Ann
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture.
    Feng, Chen
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture.
    Towards Just Cities: An architectural approach to mapping unequal living conditions2022In: Proceedings 13th International Space Syntax Symposium, SSS 2022, Western Norway University of Applied Sciences (HVL) , 2022, article id 458Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Unequal living conditions is a core challenge in contemporary societies and addressed in the Sustainability Development Goals. It is argued that unequal living conditions create and reproduce urban segregation. Having good access to different resources is especially critical for disadvantaged groups. One way of increasing the understanding of urban segregation and the role of architecture, urban design and planning that reach beyond housing segregation is to define living conditions created by the distribution of, and the accessibility to, various resources and opportunities in an urban environment. We argue that analysis of living conditions needs to acknowledge urban form since such descriptions highlight accessibility through public space and are closer to what people may perceive and experience in their everyday life. This paper presents a comprehensive approach that uncover urban inequalities, using the city of Uppsala in Sweden as a case study. Configurative analysis identifies spatial segregation and foregrounds the spaces that have a high network centrality. Accessibility to local resources and amenities is measured with a high spatial resolution based on both metric distance and topological distance. Analyses that measure the socioeconomic diversity within the catchment areas of schools reveal the potential diversity among pupils. Further, the study explores methods for comparison between neighbourhoods. Superimposing socio-economic layers of the population illustrates how analyses may inform decisions of future urban design strategies with the aim to counteract segregation and realize the just city. The results reveal an urban landscape characterised by unequal living conditions. However, the situation in many of the neighbourhoods may be improved through urban design interventions and investments.

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  • 158.
    Lindblad, Jenny
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Contextual temporalities: plans, planners and power in Bordeaux, France2020Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Urban planning in France is undergoing a shift. It is a shift in scale from plan-making in smaller municipalities towards larger metropoles, and a shift towards more flexibility to ensure that development plans are adjustable to unpredictable near-futures. When the city of Bordeaux revised its land-use plan towards the background of this shift, they sought to prepare a ‘contextualized’ plan. In this paper, I engage with the implications of this claim based on fieldwork among planners, bureaucrats, local politicians and planning documents in Bordeaux. In discussions among planning practitioners and theorists, context is a notion often sympathetically associated with bottom-up approaches and sensitivity to local communities. Rather than resonating with such assumptions, I show how the idea of a contextualized plan in Bordeaux was charged with manipulations of bureaucratic, legal and political temporalities in struggles over authority and democratic legitimacy. Local politicians seeing their decision power reduced following the shift of scales made use of the increased flexibility to influence in other stages of planning procedures, particularly reviewing of building permits. The call for a ‘contextualized’ plan was riddled with adverse relations between planners’ further-looking perspectives and local politicians’ strive for assuring authority over planning decisions in an unfolding presence, suggesting an importance to attend to diverse and conflicting temporalities embedded in calls for ‘context’. 

  • 159.
    Lindblad, Jenny
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Contextualizing anticipation: planning for futures and the present in Bordeaux2021In: STS-CH Conference by the Swiss Association for the Studies of Science, Technology & Society, 15-17 February 2021, 2021Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    When the city of Bordeaux initiated a revision of its land use plan, essentially an anticipatory activity drawing on pasts, contemporary concerns and aspirations for the future, the planning department and politicians assured that it was to become ‘contextualized’. Inspired by Asdal and Moser’s (2012) proposition to elaborate on “contexting,” as a move that recognizes the overlapping presence of multiple contexts shaped through practices, I carry out a contextualization of what a ‘contextualized plan’ came to mean in Bordeaux. I do this based on fieldwork among planners, permit reviewers, local politicians and planning documents. The plan revision unfolded to the background of two interrelated shifts in France: the scaling of land use planning from municipalities towards larger metropoles, and reforms enhancing the flexibility of plans to ensure their adjustability towards unpredictable futures and unruly environments. By tracing the intentions that had been invested in the plan and how it operated in the realm of building permit reviewing, I show how the intersection of legal, technical and political temporalities was strategically made use of by different actors. Among these were local politicians’ uses of the increased flexibility to insure an authority over land use decisions in spite of the plan. The anticipatory activity of plan making, I argue, was as much about the future that it laid out, as it was a political struggle over capacity to act on planning decisions in an unfolding present.

  • 160.
    Lindblad, Jenny
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    From ecosystem services to ecosystem carers: reorienting urban planning policy through soil practices2023Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Urban planning is undergoing an ecological turn in attempts to address climate and biodiversity crises. Ecosystem service (ES) assessments has gained influence in this turn, as a means to address environmental issues. The critique on ES stresses that these evaluations of nature’s value in terms of how well an ecological phenomena serves human well-being rely on anthropocentrism and fail to acknowledge for multi-species interdependencies. In this paper, we seek to resituate the human in ES by visiting urban gardeners’ work with soils. Soils, a bioinfrastructure invisible in ES assessments and approached in urban planning as an extractive resource, have proven generative for social sciences and humanities to rethink human-environment relations. Joining this line of work, we draw on our own and others’ ethnographic engagements with soil practitioners. Urban soil growers define themselves and their practices in terms of servicing (rather than merely receiving) and caring for local ecosystems. These care practices are informed by a concern for the environmental challenges that we are facing on different scales and unequal terms. To learn from and find ways to recognize these practices, we try out a reconceptualization of ES from a receiving position of services towards an ecosystem caring. This implies grappling with the notion of care as accommodating ambivalent human-environment relations beyond technoscientific management of bioinfrastructures.

  • 161.
    Lindblad, Jenny
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Life Among Urban Planners: Practice, Professionalism, and Expertise in the Making of the City2022In: The Anthropology Book Forum, Vol. 8, no 1Article, book review (Other academic)
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  • 162.
    Lindblad, Jenny
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Planning context: Flexible plans and mayoral authority in French urban planning2023In: Environment & Planning. D, Society and Space, ISSN 0263-7758, E-ISSN 1472-3433Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article, I consider the relationship between urban planning and context by investigating the planning practices associated with a land-use plan in Bordeaux described as “adapted to context.” Invested with flexible rules, the plan description followed a tendency in French urban planning concerned with being strategic, prospective, and participatory. It was also the result of metropolitan planning. Through an ethnographic account, I show how local politicians’ references to context related to concerns with mayoral authority in times of planning powers transferred to the metropole. Using permit reviewers’ skills, mayors mobilized flexible rules to manipulate building permit decisions prepared in compliance with the metropolitan plan. It is widely acknowledged that urban planning is affected by as well as affecting different contexts. I outline a complementing approach by drawing on engagements with context in anthropology and STS-scholarship, to propose that the practices associated with the same notion in Bordeaux are telling of how urban planning contributes to making contexts. Since calls for context direct attention and shape which issues and local communities are prioritized, these insights on the relationship between planning and context urge attention to how appeals to context, as never value-neutral or ready-made, gain importance across different urban planning issues and settings.

  • 163.
    Lindblad, Jenny
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Shifting planning rationalities: investments of hope in the land-use plan of Bordeaux, France2018In: 15th European Association of Social Anthropologists (EASA) Biennial Conference, 2018, 2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper explores the work invested in the production of a land-use plan in Bordeaux, France. Itinquires how, besides manifesting desired routes for future developments, the plan provokes emotionsamong politicians, civil servants and planners, and hosts hope for shifting planning rationalities.

  • 164.
    Lindblad, Jenny
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Tomorrow’s cities in the making: an ethnographic approach2016In: Proceedings of the IV World Planning Schools Congress, 2016, p. 752-754Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 165.
    Lindblad, Jenny
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Anand, Nikhil
    University of Pennsylvania, USA.
    Cities after planning2023In: Environment & Planning. D, Society and Space, ISSN 0263-7758, E-ISSN 1472-3433Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 166.
    Lindborg, PerMagnus
    Nanyang Technological University, Singapore.
    Singapore Voices: An interactive installation about languages to (re)(dis)cover the intergenerational distance2011In: IM Interactive Media, E-ISSN 1833-0533, no 6Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Singapore Voices is an interactive installation, integrating sound and image in aseries of touch-sensitive displays. Each display shows the portrait of an elderly person,standing with the hand turned outwards, as if saying: “I built this nation”. Two displayscan be seen in Figure 1 below. When the visitor touches the hand or shoulder, they heara recording of the speaker’s voice. Chances are that the visitor will not be able tounderstand the language spoken, but she or he will indeed grasp much of all that is, in amanner of speaking, “outside” of the words - elements of prosody such as phrasing andspeech rhythm, but also voice colour that may hint at the emotional state of the person.Then there is coughing, laughing, a hand clap and so forth. Such paralingual elements ofvocal communication are extremely important and furthermore, their meaning is quite universal.

  • 167.
    Lindhult, Erik
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Scientific excellence in participatory and action research: Part II. rethinking objectivity and reliability2019In: Technology Innovation Management Review, E-ISSN 1927-0321, Vol. 9, no 5, p. 22-33Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this article is to deal with the following question: Can the concepts of reliability and objectivity be reconceptualized and reappropriated to enable understanding of scientific excellence in participatory and action research? The article shows that it is fruitful to consider the “subjective” and active role of researchers as vital in enabling scientific objectivity and reliability. As an expansion from a replication logic, reliability can be conceptualized as adaptive, goal-seeking, dynamically regulated processes enabled by effective organization of interactive and participatory learning processes where all participants can contribute to learning and correction in inquiry. Instead of erasing subjectivity, objectivity can be enabled by critical subjectivity, intersubjectivity, practical wisdom, impartial norms of inquiry, and open democratic dialogue. Reliability and objectivity in this understanding can be enabled by participatory and action research through skilful performance of research practices such as reflective conversations between parties, dialogue conferences, experimentation, and experiential learning as part of action-research cycles, etc., which are common in participatory and action research initiatives and projects. By rethinking validity, reliability, and objectivity, recognizing the substantially more active and participatory stances enables scientific excellence, it can expand the repertoire of strategies for promoting research quality, and it helps to mainstream this type of approach in the scientific community. 

  • 168.
    Lindström, Kati
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History, History of Science, Technology and Environment. University of Tartu.
    Constructing agricultural and industrial heritage in Hida region, Japan2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The presentation analyses the tension between the construction of agricultural and industrial heritage in Japan. The nostalgic image of historical landscapes is increasingly penetrating into protection policies as a model of sustainability, focusing primarily on rice production landscapes. Yet Japan is an old industrial country. In a prevalent discourse of unique national harmony with nature, industrial heritage sites need to appeal to a different sense of uniqueness and value.

    This paper traces two UNESCO World Heritage sites, Tomioka Silk Mill (inscribed in 2014) and Historic Villages of Shirakawa-go and Gokayama (inscribed in 1995), and their reception and representation in relation to changing ideas on value, heritage and Japaneseness. Both of the sites are tightly related to silk industry, but while Tomioka is recognized as the cradle of industrial Japan, Hida region is increasingly interpreted as an isolated rural settlement and linked with traditional agricultural activities, including rice cultivation, which, however, is extremely recent for the area. In addition, both of the areas are tightly interconnected in 20th century Japanese literature and film through stories of serious exploitation of adolescent girls in early Japanese silk industry.

  • 169.
    Lindström, Kati
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Fuji. Fuji? Fuji! The community and the “universal value“ of the world heritage.2015Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 170.
    Lindström, Kati
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Internal and external perception in conceptualizing home landscapes: Japanese examples2014In: Geografiska Annaler. Series B, Human Geography, ISSN 0435-3684, E-ISSN 1468-0467, Vol. 96, no 1, p. 51-65Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Employing the conceptual pair external-internal, the present article traces how meanings and ideals are generated in landscapes. It analyses the dialectics between the firsthand landscape experiences acquired in the course of everyday life activities and externally created models of value and meaning that have been adopted by the locals, replacing or dominating over the former ones. With rice and reed fields at the banks of Lake Biwa in Central Japan as a backdrop, this phenomenon is described at personal, community and cultural level.

  • 171.
    Lindström, Kati
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Whose identity should World Heritage support2016Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 172.
    Lindström, Kati
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Uchiyama, Junzo
    Mt Fuji World Heritage Research Centre.
    Fuji as a European Mountain? Universal heritage value, local identities and changing landscapes at a new world heritage site.2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mt. Fuji is a mountain that is visible from the whole world – as a symbol of the Japanese state or the great Orient, its images are featured in virtually every Japan-related brochure and merchandize well beyond  the geographical constraints of the Archipelago.

    The present paper asks several provocative questions: to what extent are the Western perceptions of Mt. Fuji  embedded into the constructed „universal heritage value“ in its UNESCO World Heritage nomination process; how does the defined universal value relate to the local identity value of Mt Fuji cultural landscape; and how does the contemporary perception of both universal and local value of the place relate to the evidence of its long-term  history of land use? To what extent can we claim that its nomination as a „sacred place and source of artistic inspiration“ casts the mountain in terms of European values and perception of the place, and how well does it accommodate different identities and uses on local level? And on the other hand, to what  extent are the present local identities related to historical land use before the rapid modernization?

    To answer these and related questions, we will use a variety of sources from interviews with people involved in world heritage nomination process, nomination materials, media sources, but also historical evidence of past landscape use, such as maps, historical documents and archaeological data. While the people involved in the construction of „universal value“ lament the excessive pressure by the Western experts, the local inhabitants express bewilderment about the nomination as a site of worship and art. How and by whom was the mountain used is a key question in addressing these claims. An additional theoretical issue involved in the discussion is how much should the present local identities and evaluations be included in the construction of heritage value in case of a massive landscape change that completely changes millenia-long practices? 

  • 173.
    Lindström, Kati
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Uchiyama, Junzo
    Mt Fuji World Heritage Research Centre.
    Idealised landscapes and heritage: sustainability in mountain Japan2016Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 174.
    Ljunggren, Maria
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment.
    Collaborations effect on undergraduate education: a study of two policyprograms.2010Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    A shift has occurred in the traditional type of centralised government control to a more multilevel type of governing referred to as governance. The change from government to governance can be illustrated with an emphasis on networks and social capital enhancement. In higher education this is enveloped through a larger emphasis on institutionalisation of collaboration between the higher education institutions (HEI) and the surrounding environment. In lieu of large block grants come financial incentives through semi-governmental agencies embracing collaboration projects between industry and HEI as well as municipalities.`

    This licentiate thesis objective is to study the collaboration task’s practical implication on undergraduate education in terms of social capital enhancement and research and teaching links. This is reported in two articles that elaborate on social capital establishment through a policy program and whether policy programs focusing on research collaborations also have an effect on undergraduate education by improving research and teaching links. In general, the findings of this thesis indicate that semi-governmental policy programs have a positive effect on establishing new social capital between regional HEI, industry and municipalities, and that semi-governmentally financed research profiles also have a positive effect on undergraduate education by introducing a link to research outside and within the HEI.

     

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  • 175.
    Ljunggren, Maria
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    No Researcher Is an Island: Collaboration in Higher Education Institutions2013Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The developing knowledge economy affects organizations within the innovation system where higher education institutions (HEI) are regarded as a significant part. There is a large amount of research that focus on different aspects of collaboration such as the outcome, the process and its infrastructure. To emphasize HEIs role in the national and regional innovation systems concepts such as Mode 2 and Triple helix, and the Knowledge triangle, have developed. These concepts have also heavily influenced Swedish innovation policy.

     

    This thesis is set to analyze collaboration work between Swedish HEIs and the public and private sectors, and to understand how collaboration: i) occurs in practice in research and undergraduate education; ii) is influenced by policy efforts, and; iii) influence HEI’s internal and external social capital building. Firstly, research and teaching links is analyzed to highlight the integration of collaboration, research and education within specific research profiles. This is because previous research has neglected collaboration and its effect on undergraduate education. Secondly, social capital theory is used as a framework for the analysis. Social capital theory is used to obtain a thorough understanding of individual researchers’ attitude to collaboration and participation in collaboration activities.

     

    The results indicate that short term projects had long-term effects since it established new education programs and projects. Collaboration also effects undergraduate education through research profiles with their integration of research and education in groups within as well as outside the HEI. The results also show that social capital building through top steered initiatives is complex. In the HEIs there was no relation between researchers expressing a positive attitude towards different forms of collaboration and a high participation level in collaboration activities. This suggests that building of external social capital within HEIs is not related to the nature of the internal social capital. There was interfaculty differences in both the researchers’ attitude to collaboration activities and participation in collaboration activities. As expected, professors had more opportunities and ability for collaboration. They also indicated a resistance to use a central infrastructure for collaboration to build external social capital. The opposite was demonstrated for professors from the humanities who had little experience of collaboration. They still did not to use the infrastructure to a large extent. Suggestively policy makers should encourage a more efficient external social capital building through earmarked funding for collaboration on a department level rather than on the HEIs’ central level.

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  • 176.
    López, Elisa Maria
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Critical Studies in Architecture.
    The Liquid City: On the Production/Destruction of Space in Kiruna, Sweden2024Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 177.
    Mack, Jennifer
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture.
    A Swedish Concrete Paradise: Flying People Meet Flying Panels2019In: Flying Panels / [ed] Pedro Ignacio Alonso and Hugo Palmarola, Berlin: DOM Publishers , 2019, p. 78-90Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 178.
    Mack, Jennifer
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE).
    An awkward technocracy: Mosques, churches, and urban planners in neoliberal Sweden2019In: American Ethnologist, ISSN 0094-0496, E-ISSN 1548-1425, Vol. 46, no 1, p. 89-104Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In Sweden, an ostensibly secular-majority society, urban planners facilitate the construction of new churches and mosques for minority religious groups. In this work, they typically perceive themselves as neutral professionals relying on a technical education. But since the 1980s, Swedish civil servants, including planners, have transformed from experts to managers, and their interactions with clients for mosques and churches often reveal their opinions and preferences, including for modernism and secularism. These awkward encounters challenge the planners' technocratic understanding of their work, forcing them into a new kind of productive labor: as uncomfortable arbiters of difference and its public presence. This is a result of neoliberal governance, which has ambiguously expanded the types of European civil servants asked to manage minority groups, as well as the professional roles they must play. [urban planning, neoliberalism, secularism, mosques, churches, immigration, Sweden]

  • 179.
    Mack, Jennifer
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE).
    Big Faith: Planning Immigrant Spaces in Sweden2013Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 180.
    Mack, Jennifer
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture.
    Breaking the Rules, Making the Ruler: Syriac Single-Family Homes and the Limits of Welfare State Planning2020In: Life Among Urban Planners: Practice, Professionalism, and Expertise in the Making of the City / [ed] Jennifer Mack and Michael Herzfeld, Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press , 2020, p. 137-159Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Swedish town of Södertälje is arguably the capital of the diasporic Syriac Christians, who have arrived from across the Middle East for decades. While Syriacs have usually resided in standardized apartments in high rises, this paper examines the controversial, Syriac-dominated neighborhoods of custom-designed, single-family houses now under construction, drawing on ethnographic research among both planners and residents. While Swedish planners have long imagined immigrants to have a valuable “voice” during renovations of older neighborhoods, Syriac participation in new areas has radically exceeded such expectations, blurring the boundary between resident and planner. Here, both residents and planners navigate the limits of the plan, where not only neighborhood aesthetics, but also questions of nationalism, class, and professionalism are at stake.

  • 181. Mack, Jennifer
    Centrum on the Periphery: Sweden’s Welfare State, Public Space, and Immigration in the 1970s2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 182.
    Mack, Jennifer
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE).
    Children of the New World: Migration, Welfare, and Design in Sweden, 1970 to 19952021Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    How did discourses about design, children, and migration in Sweden evolve, intersect, and dissemble from 1970 to 1995, a period when non-European migration to Sweden increased dramatically? Late welfare state ideals for children’s spaces were represented in the reports commissioned by the Swedish national government and released in the series known as the State’s Public Invesigations (Statens Offentliga Utredningar), covering topics from social services to laundry rooms. Research about spaces for children (such as playgrounds, youth clubs, and schools) represented a frequent topic of inquiry in these efforts, with the seminal report “Children’s Outdoor Space” (Barns utemiljö), published in 1970, comprising a key document. Intriguingly, however, designs for and discourses about the architecture and landscape architecture of children’s spaces were initially separated from simultaneous discussions about migrant children.

    In the mid-20th century, “problem youth” – children of the working class said to loiter unproductively on street corners – were to be disciplined through membership in condoned, municipal clubs offering “appropriate” activities (ungdomsgårdar). During the 1970s, however, when labor migration increased, and in the 1980s, Sweden’s “decade of the migrant” according to its Migration Board, these designs and discourses began to evolve to include children not born in Sweden. Newspaper articles and government research about “migrant youth” then became pervasive, reflecting the new forms of anxiety about children as espoused by civil servants and politicians. Even if government reports posited spaces for play and education, among others, as the design of spaces to produce particular, desired futures, children arriving to this new Swedish world brought new needs, including help with their traumas of the past from war and other catastrophes, and often had uncertain futures (owing to migration status). Their “welfare landscapes” took on new dimensions.

  • 183.
    Mack, Jennifer
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture.
    Det nya förortscentrum: Äta, be, handla2016In: Utvandrat och invandrat: Stockholms stadsmiljö i ett internationellt perspektiv, Stockholm: Historiska Media , 2016, p. 174-187Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 184.
    Mack, Jennifer
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture.
    Det nya periferin2018In: Arkitektur, ISSN 0004-2021, p. 62-67Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 185. Mack, Jennifer
    Dreaming in Syriac: The Transformation of Swedish Local Planning in ‘Hollywood2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 186. Mack, Jennifer
    Eat, Pray, Shop!: Architects, Mosques, and the New Center2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 187.
    Mack, Jennifer
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture.
    Eat, Pray, Shop!: The Mosque as the Centre of the Town2020In: Re-Centring the City: Global Urban Mutations and Post-Socialist Modernity / [ed] Jonathan Bach and Michal Murawski, London: UCL Press, 2020, p. 149-166Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 188.
    Mack, Jennifer
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE).
    Form Follows Faith: Swedish Architects, Expertise, and New Religious Spaces in the Stockholm Suburbs2018In: Expertise and Architecture in the Modern Islamic World: A Critical Anthology / [ed] Peter Christensen, Bristol: Intellect Ltd., 2018, p. 271-286Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 189.
    Mack, Jennifer
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture.
    Formen följer tron2016In: Arkitektur, ISSN 0004-2021, p. 42-45Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 190. Mack, Jennifer
    From Cellar to Megamosque: The Right to Build, Transparency, and New Sacred Spaces2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 191.
    Mack, Jennifer
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE).
    Generatively Generic: Internet Cafés in Berlin and Barcelona2008Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 192. Mack, Jennifer
    Generous Harvest: Allotment Gardens and the Politics of Urban Green Space in Sweden2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 193.
    Mack, Jennifer
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture.
    Green Affect: A "Landscape Music of the Artefacts" in the Swedish Million Programme2021In: Architectural Affects after Deleuze and Guattari / [ed] Marko Jobst and Hélène Frichot, London: Routledge , 2021, p. 81-97Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 194. Mack, Jennifer
    Greetings from "Hollywood"!: Building Syriac Homes, Rebuilding Swedish Local Planning2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 195.
    Mack, Jennifer
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE).
    Heavenly Bureaucracy: Minority Religious Spaces and Urban Planners in Neoliberal Sweden2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 196.
    Mack, Jennifer
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE).
    Impossible Nostalgia: Green Affect in the Landscapes of the Swedish Million Programme2021In: Landscape research, ISSN 0142-6397, E-ISSN 1469-9710Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The modernist neighbourhoods of the so-called Swedish Million Programme (1965–1974) were to house a new citizenry in utopian cities of the future, where nuclear families would live in optimal conditions and where ‘rational’ landscapes included playgrounds, courtyards, and traffic separation. Even so, they are ‘problem areas’ in current popular representations: places without history and thus unworthy of preservation. Radical proposals suggest their total demolition. Ethnographic research among residents, however, reveals alternative, multidimensional views instead. In parks, on bridges, and in tunnels, inhabitants have met friends, walked dogs, and sunbathed, often over decades. Their ‘green affect’ – expressed in reveries, poetry, stories, and caring suggestions for repair – challenges portrayals of the areas as disposable. Rather than suburbs without a future, residents express affection, longing, and even a seemingly impossible nostalgia for modernism’s outdoor spaces. This suggests the need for preservation and the inclusion of memories and feelings in planning processes.

  • 197.
    Mack, Jennifer
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE).
    Impossible Nostalgia: Growing Up in the ‘Concrete Suburbs’ of Sweden2018Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 198.
    Mack, Jennifer
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE).
    Infamous Environments: Intersecting Justice and Vulnerability in the Landscapes of the Swedish Million Program2018Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 199.
    Mack, Jennifer
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE).
    Inhabiting the Imaginary: "Factory Women" at Home on Batam Island, Indonesia2004In: Singapore journal of tropical geography, ISSN 0129-7619, E-ISSN 1467-9493, Vol. 25, no 2, p. 156-179Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Batam Island, Indonesia, located a short ferry ride away from Singapore, is a place where tourism and industry have been developed simultaneously and a border area where “developed” and “developing” nations meet. Government officials, investing international corporations and the “factory women” who work in the island's industrial estates arrive in Batam - native to none of them - with their own preconceptions and goals. When challenges not foreseen through master planning arise, the authorities cling ever more tightly to their physical and structural development model: the nearby city-state of Singapore. Conversely, the factory workers who travel intranationally to work in this export processing zone (EPZ) find their objectives contested in the face of the Master Plan, corporate agendas and ethnic fusions characterising this transnational capitalist space.

    Entering into the homes of three groups of women migrants living and working in Batam, the relationship between the private realm that they inhabit and the social contexts in which they participate publicly is investigated. Some of the choices that women make at and about home are identified, and their ability to “micro-resist” these external structures is explored. At home, the dynamic relationship between the Batam development project and the women's own hopes and visions of the place - sometimes parallel and sometimes incongruous - are revealed. As they experience life on Batam, their “social imaginaries” of it are shaped into various new realities, and their homes, removed from the confines of the factory floor, thus become spaces of release from these tensions.

  • 200.
    Mack, Jennifer
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture.
    Introduction: Living Life among Planners2020In: Life Among Urban Planners: Practice, Professionalism, and Expertise in the Making of the City / [ed] Jennifer Mack and Michael Herzfeld, Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2020, p. 1-15Chapter in book (Refereed)
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