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  • 151.
    Tahvilzadeh, Nazem
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Att göra kaos: Om förortspolitiken som urban styrregim och demokratiskt spel2018In: ARKIV. Tidskrift för samhällsanalys, ISSN 2000-6225, E-ISSN 2000-6217, no 9, p. 103-128Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    I Nazem Tahvilzadeh och Lisa Kings artikel diskuteras orsakerna till den uppståndelse, eller ”kaos” för att använda aktivisternas egna ord, som organisationen Megafonen skapade inom ramen för stadsutvecklingsprojektet Järvalyftet i Husby. Med inspiration från teorier om hur samtycke till ojämlikhet grundläggs på fabriksgolvet utvecklas två begrepp för att synliggöra den politiska ordningen i förorten och dess konkreta aktiviteter: urbana styrregimer och demokratiska spel. Studien visar hur Megafonens avhopp och sedermera kritik av Järvalyftet och förortspolitiken bröt mot den etablerade politiska ordningen i relationerna mellan stat och civilsamhälle i den urbana periferin. Aktivisternas handlingar kom därför att betraktas som ”skandalösa” av delar av det politiska etablissemanget. Megafonen vägrade att spela enligt spelets regler och synliggjorde således ojämlikheterna i förortspolitikens demokratiska spel med medborgarna. Underlaget för studien baseras på processpårande och etnografisk metod som empiriskt återskapar den förortspolitiska satsningen Järvalyftet och dess logiker samt Megafonens roll 2006–2013.

  • 152.
    Tahvilzadeh, Nazem
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies. KTH, department of urban planning and the environ.
    Folkbildning i marginaliserade stadsdelar.: Förankrad, invävd och trevande.2019 (ed. 1)Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    numera återfinns mer än hälften av studieförbundens och folkhögskolornas deltagare i eller i anslutning till landets storstäder och större städer. Städernas utmaningar har på så sätt allt mer blivit folkbildningens angelägenhet. I studien Folkbildning i marginaliserade stadsdelar analyseras folkbildningens, framför allt studieförbundens, arbete i landets marginaliserade stadsdelar.

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  • 153.
    Tahvilzadeh, Nazem
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Dahlstedt, Magnus
    Kings, Lisa
    Orten och stadens demokratisering2018In: Manifest: För ett socialt arbete i tiden / [ed] Magnus Dahlstedt, Philip Lalander, Studentlitteratur AB, 2018Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 154.
    Torre, Ilaria
    et al.
    University of Plymouth.
    White, Laurence
    University of Plymouth.
    Goslin, Jeremy
    University of Plymouth.
    Behavioural mediation of prosodic cues to implicit judgements of trustworthiness2016In: Proceedings of the eighth International Conference on Speech Prosody 2016, ISCA , 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
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  • 155.
    Uchiyama, Junzo
    et al.
    Mt Fuji World Heritage Research Centre.
    Lindström, Kati
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment. University of Tartu.
    Idealised Landscapes and Heritage: Past and Future Sustainability in Hida2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The designation of historical heritage occurs on the basis of modern values and ideologies that are supposedly embodied in the cultural landscapes of the nominated area, without considering the actual historical contexts supporting them. This paper discusses the meaning of historical heritage in the modern socio-cultural contexts by presenting results of the GIS analysis of a historical database in the Hida Province (present Gifu Prefecture), as an example, focusing on the observed historical changes from a landscape perspective.

                          While located in deep mountains, Hida villages are often marketed as secluded places, cut off from the Modern world ("the last unexplored area of Japan" according to the UNESCO world heritage nomination documents), with a high level of auto-sufficiency and harmonious relationship with the environment. However, the analyses show that Hida has never been isolated; rather, the inter-regional trading network was the pre-requisite for the formation of this regional landscape throughout history, since it was dependent on gunpowder and silk industry. Originally nominated for its architectural qualities, the Hida villages are increasingly perceived through the prism of ecologically sustainable traditional rice farming. Contrasting historical data with modern discourse analysis, we question the concept of sustainability in imagined past and protected present landscapes.

  • 156.
    von Oelreich, Jacob
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
    Milestad, Rebecka
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
    Transformations towards resilience within the food system: scaling up two organic food value chains in Sweden2015In: Proceedings of the XXVI Congress. Places of Possibility? Rural Societies in a Neoliberal World / [ed] Sutherland, L.-A. et al., Aberdeen: James Hutton Institute , 2015, p. 201-202Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    One way to build resilience of the food system may be to scale up organic food initiatives. This paper discusses two organic food initiatives in Sweden, exploring challenges and opportunities for a double scaling up of volumes and values. Two different approaches, "reformist" and "progressive", are explored. The paper concludes that the two approaches demand sustaining and building resilience in different ways and at multiple scales.

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  • 157.
    Werner, Inga Britt
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Boendeattityder till miljö- och kretsloppsanpassning: Drivkrafter och motkrafter i olika upplåtelseformer2004Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Swedish political goals on environmental issues are set at a high standard and fulfilling them will affect the everyday life of all residents. Voluntary self-restraint from benefits in housing services is hard to implement. This is an empirical study on actual habits and on stated willingness for pro-environmental practices, related to different forms of tenure.

    Incentives and perceived control are important for predicting actions. Administrative and physical structures are more significant though, as are the households’ resources. Well–off homeowners have many incentives to conserve energy and water. They also have the highest frequency of pro-environmental behaviour. Still they cause the heaviest environmental impact, due to large dwellings and abundant car use. Households in multifamily housing have fewer incentives and lower frequencies of pro-environmental habits, but cause less environmental impact due to generally lower consumption.

    The results are of interest to planning authorities, housing managers and researchers, working with the implementation of pro-environmental behaviour in housing.

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  • 158.
    Werner, Inga Britt
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    How does the planning goal 'urban density' correspond to people's residential choices and everyday life?: A pilot study2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 159.
    Werner, Inga Britt
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    How does the planning goal ’urban density’ correspond to people’s residential choices and everyday life?: Affordances in differing urban densities2008Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The paper presents the basis of a project recently funded by FORMAS, Swedish Research Council for Environment, Agricultural Sciences and Spatial Planning. Although there is consensus among planners and politicians that dense and compact cities are better for the environment than sprawling urban landscapes, much of what is currently being built is characterised by low urban density, ‘sprawl’. Generally researchers agree that ‘sprawl’ in industrialised countries is driven by rising average income and decreasing transport costs. Urban households can afford to demand larger dwelling units as well as daily travel long dis-tances. Individual decisions are aggregated into a force that governs the development towards ’sprawl’. The aim of the project is to analyse how urban environments can offer desired qualities, by studying households’ actual use and valuation of opportunities for work, service, leisure ac-tivities, culture and education within areas of different urban density. The contribution of the study will be a deeper understanding of what urban density means in the daily life of house-holds. The study will employ theories and concepts from planning research and environmental psy-chology. Urban density is a key concept. Range and variety of urban functions are then impor-tant additions to measurement of physical densities. Another key concept is ‘affordance‘. ’Affordance’ is here a quality or asset within a specific environment, which can be perceived and used by an individual for carrying out a certain activity. The main study is a survey covering around 2000 households within the Stockholm area. Four areas will be chosen, and around 500 households in each, admitting control for socio-economic subgroups. Study areas will be selected to illustrate different urban densities and structure, from inner city to garden suburb. The survey will cover blocks of questions con-cerning the most important affordances inherent in the actual environment of the household, such as place of work, shops, schools and social networks. The questions will be constructed to grade perceived, potential, shaped and utilised affordances in their environment. The concept of ’affordance’ will be tested as a tool for structured comparisons between urban areas regarding different aspects of density. The availability of affordances in different urban structures will be described and relationships between density, in all its aspects, and life styles can be tested.

  • 160.
    Werner, Inga Britt
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Kvalitetsutveckling i boendet-Värdeskapande processer, Rapport från tre fallstudier : Rissne i Sundbyberg, Berga i Linköping och Gottsunda i Uppsala2007Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The research on housing quality is comprehensive and broad. Residents’ evaluation of quality is studied within a variety of disciplines. There is a fairly good knowledge on a general level regarding people’s values of housing quality. Safety and security, social relations to neigh-bours, the area’s reputation as well as the design of local environment and dwelling units have been shown to be important aspects of housing quality.

    The overall picture of how to strike the balance between certain levels of quality against input of resources from the housing management is not studied to the same extent. Different actors within housing management may have differing and even conflicting views of quality and efficiency. Short-term economical judgements can increase the risk of sub-optimisations.

    Substantial evidence shows that social capital is critical for increasing security and wellbeing in residential areas. The hypothesis is that the creation of social capital within a housing neighbourhood will raise housing quality and facilitate management.

    The purpose of this study was to analyse the creation of social capital in a housing neighbourhood context, to make the concept applicable in housing management. A complementary aim was to develop indicators for social capital in housing areas, useful for evaluating the effects of different measures. To find out new methods for the development of housing quality, the study applied case studies of housing management, for evaluation of quality efforts. A multi-disciplinary framework was adopted. Theories of social capital and models for value creation processes are the key concept in the project.

    The core of value creation processes is to produce more value at a given input of resources. The basic idea is that value can be created through the supply of goods or services in new ways or in a new form. The customer / consumer is part of the process and will, through this participation, experience a higher quality (Cars, Healey, Madanipour, Magalhães, 2002).

    Several theorists in sociology, for example Bourdieu and Coleman, have interpreted social capital. The starting point for this project is primarily the concept as coined by Robert Putnam: ”Social capital here refers to features of social organization, such as trust, norms, and networks, that can improve the efficiency of society by facilitating coordinated actions.” (Putnam, 1993, p. 167). Social capital is seen a common utility, a form of capital that is not owned by individuals, but is created and growing in interpersonal relations, for example among neighbours in a residential area. Putnam (2000) and Lin (2001) discuss the epithets 'bonding' and 'bridging' in connection with SC. Bonding SC tends to exclude other individuals or groups, while the group that possesses the bonding capital benefits from it. Bridging SC will increase trust in other groups and structures in society and contribute to the identification and mutual cooperation with others. In residential areas SC can be a great asset, but the balance between bonding and bridging SC is critical.

    The study objects were management projects in a number of public housing companies. The criteria for selection of projects for the study were that their purpose should be to improve housing quality and / or trust and norms between companies and residents. There should be enough of accessible information on the measures taken and the projects should be fairly recent so that staff and residents of the company had clear memories of what happened before, during and after the process. The study covered four case studies, from different medium sized Swedish cities. Data were collected through interviews with key actors and residents, questionnaires to residents and document studies.

    The projects were compared regarding how they were designed to achieve their goals, and to what degree they managed to attain those goals. The intention was to find out more about the successes or failures in terms of management measures, regarding the enhancement of participation, security and social capital in the residential areas.

    The four case studies focused on very different types of measures. One project aimed at increasing perceived security in a residential area by introducing a special watchman who would offer protection, assistance and social control. Next project held youth activities for primary school children, to prevent youth delinquency. Sports clubs gave free instruction, the municipality offered venues for free and the school administered the activities in cooperation with the housing company. The third project was the renovation of outdoor environment and common areas like laundry rooms and entrances, in a residential area with social problems, to make the area more attractive. The fourth project was a campaign among tenants to counteract the perception of water as a free resource and in particular reduce the consumption of hot water.

    The results showed that the projects did not fully meet their stated objectives; to the extent it was possible to make such assessments. The companies had not ensured that there was data to verify the compliance to goals before they started their actions. Rather, the projects may be seen as building up experience in the housing management practice.

    The companies themselves have not mentioned the concept of social capital during the planning of the various projects. In practice though, the addressed management problems could be defined as stemming from deficits in social capital. Where the residents did not trust their neighbours there was a lack of bonding capital. If residents saw themselves as victims of circumstances, unable to influence their own situation, the bridging capital was missing.

    Social capital can be built from personal relationships between residents and housing companies and between the residents. With time bonding social capital is built up. This in turn contributes to the fostering of bridging social capital. When the residents see that commitment and work for the common good pays off in different ways, trust in the housing company will grow and in a longer perspective also trust in the surrounding society. To participate in the housing management and take on responsibilities can provide new life opportunities, such as an entrance ticket to the job market.

    The case studies showed that housing quality is a complex concept. It is a 'fresh product' that must be constantly maintained and developed. Various conditions can affect what is perceived as housing quality, and quality must be kept up all the time. To achieve the best quality as perceived by residents, it is a prerequisite that residents are involved to a high degree.

    Reasoning based upon literature and the empirical results suggests that important indicators of social capital in housing areas are related to trust, norms of reciprocity, social control, social networks and civic participation. With regard to if they are manifest on micro, meso or macro level, the indicators will take on different forms, discussed in a forthcoming article.

    The results have been presented at seminars with the housing companies, in teaching undergraduate students at KTH, in a report in Swedish, and in conference papers.

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  • 161.
    Werner, Inga Britt
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Architecture.
    Residents’ Environmentally Friendly Attitudes and Practices: – Motivation and Barriers in Different Forms Types of Tenure2004Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Thise paper presents an empirical study of actual households’ daily habits  and of their stated willingness for to adopt pro-environmental practices, relative to differ-ent forms of tenure. Economic incentives, linked to home-ownership, are shown to be significant in determining actions, as is perceived control. Well–-off homeowners have the highest frequency of pro-environmental behaviour, as measured in the study. Still, they cause the heaviest environmental impact, due to their larger dwellings and abundant car use. Households in multifamily housing have fewer incentives for and lower frequencies of pro-environmental habits, but cause less environmental impact due to their generally lower consumption. The results imply that the selection of target groups and the development of environmental policies need to be discussed assessed in relation to different life  styles and patterns of consumption.

  • 162.
    Werner, Inga Britt
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Residents’ Environmentally Friendly Attitudes and Practices: Motivation and Barriers in Different Types of Tenure2005In: Romanian Journal of Applied Psychology, ISSN 1454-8062, Vol. 6, no 3-4, p. 136-146Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 163.
    Werner, Inga Britt
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Social Capital in Housing Management: The Concept as a Tool for Analysing Problems and Formulating Goals for Action2007Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is no formal social housing sector in Sweden, but municipally owned housing companies have aresponsibility to take on all kinds of tenants. That means that they are often in charge of housing areaswhere many low-income households live, with ensuing social problems. This paper is based upon a studyof management practices in such housing companies. ‘Social Capital’, a concept widely used in thediscussion on how to fight crime and deterioration in socially burdened housing areas, is employed in thetheoretical framework. Here the concept is used as well as describing local social networks as, in particular,‘bridging’ towards the surrounding society.The applied method is case study of the attempts of three housing companies to remedy problems such ashigh crime rate, bad reputation and low demand for housing units in certain areas.The results of the case studies showed that the companies’ different ways of addressing complex problemsinherent in the housing areas were not based upon any definition on how means were related to goals.They were more or less examples of trial and error. Only one of the companies did discuss intentionallyhow they should better the reputation of a certain housing area, by doing a selective physical upgrading ofcommunal spaces and the out-door environment. They were concerned to engage the residents in theprocess.The analysis employed a ‘what if’ - approach regarding the use of ‘Social Capital’ as a tool for thecompanies when analysing and addressing their problems. The discussion concludes in a review of theconcept ‘Social capital’ and some suggestions on how to make it operational in the practice of housingmanagement.

  • 164.
    Werner, Inga Britt
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    The Liveability of the City: A study of living with children in different urban designs2005Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This is a study of what quality of life the city is offering families with children. A substantial part of the Swedish population, of fertile age groups, lives in cities, where a dwelling could be very expensive. Families' residential conditions are supposed to strongly affect their quality of life, and, in the end, the rate of fertility. A sample of blocks of different of urban design in Stockholm will be studied, regarding what qualities the design of dwellings and urban areas can offer in the daily life of households with children. The study will be carried out partly by a survey, to gather background data to be analysed by statistical methods, partly by qualitative methods such as interviews, mind-maps and self-administered photo documentation of the neighbourhood. The project has a gender perspective as the internal decision processes of households, and thereby gender differences in how the near environment is valued, are objects of study. The results will be an overview of the actual dwelling situation of families with children on a tough housing market, as well as a series of examples of more or less suitable environments for their daily life. Based on these results, the complicated relationships between people's experiences, actions and the design of the built environment will be discussed. Conclusions will facilitate the evaluation of outcomes of different planning measures, for example regarding making problem areas more attractive.

  • 165.
    Werner, Inga Britt
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Urban Density: measuring spatial dispersion of activities and affordances2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is a consensus among planners and politicians that dense cities are better for the environment than sprawling urban landscapes. The aim of the project is to analyse how urban density affects people’s actions and choices of residential location.

    The study employs theories and concepts from planning research and environmental psychology. Urban density is a key concept. Range and variety of urban functions are then important additions to measurement of physical densities. Another key concept is ‘affordance‘. ’Affordance’ is a quality or asset within a specific environment, which can be perceived and used by an individual for carrying out a certain activity.

    The main method is a survey covering a stratified randomised sample of 4500 individuals in stratified within the Stockholm area. The stratified study areas were selected on criteria of physical density, mix of functions and accessibility within the region. The survey covers important ‘affordances’ inherent in the physical environment of the household, such as place of work, shops, schools and social networks. The data are analysed with statistical methods.

    The paper concentrates on perceived affordances regarding workplaces. Preliminary results show that respondents’ perceived number of alternative workplaces within 1 kilometre from home has a positive correlation to both physical density and mix of urban functions. Any further away from home than 1 km, increasing perceived affordances had a stronger correlation to accessibility.

    Preliminary conclusions are that physical density as such seems to increase the amount of perceived affordances only within a very close environment of the home. The range of affordances widens considerably with increasing accessibility. Probably accessibility outweighs physical density as a factor for influencing people’s choices of residential location.

  • 166.
    Werner, Inga Britt
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Klingborg, Kerstin
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Real Estate and Construction Management, Building and Real Estate Economics.
    En studie av ombildningsprocessen från hyresrätt till bostadsrätt 2007-20102011Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 167.
    Werner, Inga Britt
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Klingborg, Kerstin
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Real Estate and Construction Management, Building and Real Estate Economics.
    Studying Social Capital in Housing Neighborhoods: Does Tenure Matter?2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 168.
    Werner, Inga Britt
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Klingborg, Kerstin
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Real Estate and Construction Management, Building and Real Estate Economics.
    Studying Social Capital in Housing Neighborhoods: Does Tenure Matter?2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 169.
    Westlund, Hans
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies. University of Ljubljana, Slovenia .
    Adam, Frane
    Innovation in Socio-Cultural Context2013Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Innovation - the process of obtaining, understanding, applying, transforming, managing and transferring knowledge - is a result of human collaboration, but it has become an increasingly complex process, with a growing number of interacting parties involved. Lack of innovation is not necessarily caused by lack of technology or lack of will to innovate, but often by social and cultural forces that jeopardize the cognitive processes and prevent potential innovation. This book focuses on the rule of social capital in the process of innovation: the social networks and the norms; values and attitudes (such as trust) of the actors; social capital as both bonding and bridging links between actors; and social capital as a feature at all spatial levels, from the single inventor to the transnational corporation. Contributors from a wide variety of countries and disciplines explore the cultural framework of innovation through empirics, case studies and examination of conceptual and methodological dilemmas.

  • 170.
    Winberg, Fredrik
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Human - Computer Interaction, MDI.
    Contextualizing Accessibility: Interaction for Blind Computer Users2008Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other scientific)
    Abstract [en]

    Computer usage today is predominantly based on graphical interaction, where the visual presentation of information is essential both for input (hand-eye coordination when using a computer mouse), and output (seeing the information on a computer screen). This can create difficulties for blind computer users, both at an individual level when interacting with a computer, and also when collaborating with other computer users.

    The work presented in this thesis has investigated interaction for blind computer users in three stages. First investigating access to information by making studies on an interactive audio-only game, drawing conclusions about auditory direct manipulation and auditory interface design. Second studying collaboration between blind and sighted computer users in two different contexts, leading to questioning of commonly expressed design principles regarding access to collaboration. Finally studying accessibility in a working environment, finding out how technology, the assistive device used by the blind person, communication with others and professional knowledge interplayed to create an accessible work environment.

    Based on these empirical studies, the main conclusion from this work is a proposal of a research perspective, Assistive interfaces as cooperative interfaces. Here, the context where the interface is going to be used is in focus, and cooperative and social dimensions of interaction are acknowledged and highlighted. The design and analysis of assistive devices should be highly sensitive to the socio-interactional environment, and not just focusing on the single individual using an assistive device.

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  • 171.
    Winberg, Fredrik
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Human - Computer Interaction, MDI.
    Supporting Cross-Modal Collaboration: Adding a Social Dimension to Accessibility2006In: Lecture Notes in Computer Science, ISSN 0302-9743, E-ISSN 1611-3349, Vol. 4129, p. 102-110Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents a study of cross-modal collaboration, where blind and sighted persons collaboratively solve two different tasks using a prototype that has one auditory and one graphical interface. The results shows the importance of context and the design of tasks for the accessibility of cross-modal collaborative settings, as well as the importance of supporting the participation in a working division of labour.

  • 172.
    Winberg, Fredrik
    et al.
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Numerical Analysis and Computer Science, NADA. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, Center for Useroriented IT Design, CID.
    Bowers, John
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Numerical Analysis and Computer Science, NADA. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, Center for Useroriented IT Design, CID.
    Assembling the Senses: Towards the Design of Cooperative Interfaces for Visually Impaired Users2004In: Proceedings of the 2004 ACM conference on Computer supported cooperative work (CSCW 2004), 2004, p. 332-341Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The needs of blind and visually impaired users are seriously under-investigated in CSCW. We review work on assistive interfaces especially concerning how collaboration between sighted and blind users across different modalities might be supported. To examine commonly expressed design principles, we present a study where blind and sighted persons play a game to which the former has an auditory interface, the latter a visual one. Interaction analyses are presented highlighting features of interface design, talk and gesture which are important to the participants’ abilities to collaborate. Informed by these analyses, we reconsider design principles for cooperative interfaces for the blind.

  • 173.
    Winberg, Fredrik
    et al.
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Numerical Analysis and Computer Science, NADA. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, Center for Useroriented IT Design, CID.
    Hellström, Sten-Olof
    Department of Music, City University, London.
    Qualitative Aspects of Auditory Direct Manipulation: A Case Study of the Towers of Hanoi2001In: Proceedings of the 7th International Conference on Auditory Display (ICAD 2001), 2001, p. 16-20Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents the results from a qualitative case study of an auditory version of the game Towers of Hanoi. The goal of this study was to explore qualitative aspects of auditory direct manipulation and the subjective experience from playing the game. The results show that it is important to provide a way of focusing in the auditory space. Articulatory directness was also an important issue and feedback should support the movement of the objects in the auditory space.

  • 174.
    Winberg, Fredrik
    et al.
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Numerical Analysis and Computer Science, NADA. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, Center for Useroriented IT Design, CID.
    Hellström, Sten-Olof
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Numerical Analysis and Computer Science, NADA. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, Center for Useroriented IT Design, CID.
    The quest for auditory direct manipulation: the sonified Towers of Hanoi2000In: Proceedings of the 3rd International Conference on Disability, Virtual Reality and Associated Technologies (ICDVRAT 2000) / [ed] P. Sharkey, A. Cesarani, L. Pugnetti, & A. Rizzo, 2000, p. 75-81Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents a study of an auditory version of the game Towers of Hanoi. The goal of this study was to investigate the nature of continuos presentation and what this could mean when implementing auditory direct manipulation. We also wanted to find out if it was possible to make an auditory interface that met the requirements of a direct manipulation interface. The results showed that it was indeed possible to implement auditory direct manipulation, but using Towers of Hanoi as the underlying model restricted the possibilities of scaling the auditory space. The results also showed that having a limited set of objects, the nature of continuos presentation was not as important as how to interact with the auditory space.

  • 175.
    WU, Xiangyang
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Mobile Technology as Interface to Public Space2017Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The main idea is to make a short film about mobile technologies and the changing relationships between us and the public space under the age of these technologies. Some people might blame those mobile technologies like smart phones for separating us from each other. In my view, however, we cannot ask those technologies to take all the responsibilities, because new technologies will not be put into the market unless the society needs them. These technologies do change our perceptions on the public space in some ways, but there must be some deeper reasons behind. Based on the analogy of mobile technologies to "interfaces" to the environment like our skins, bodies and clothes, we are able to rethink the role of these technologies and our relationships with them and the public space. In big cities full of stimulations and strangers, we are always looking for different types of "filters" to help us control our experiences in order not to be too overwhelmed by the endless information. Living without these "filters" is like being naked in the wild field, which means we cannot control what we see, what we hear and what we touch. In the film, there are two story lines in parallel: one is about the overwhelming stimulations and anonymous individuals using mobiles technologies in public spaces; the other is about one person walking in the wood, stripping down clothes until being naked. By asking the question in the beginning and the end "what does it mean to be naked", I wish eachaudience could rethink the interrelationships between us, mobile technologies and public spaces.

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  • 176.
    Xiong, Ailun
    et al.
    Chongqing Technol & Business Univ, Chongqing, Peoples R China.
    Li, Hongyi
    Westlund, Hans
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Determinants of Social Networks in Rural China: Does Transportation Have a Role to Play?2019In: Social Science Quarterly, ISSN 0038-4941, E-ISSN 1540-6237, Vol. 100, no 5, p. 1709-1725Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: In recent years, the origins and sources of social networks and social capital have been extensively studied. Previous studies have primarily focused on social demographic factors. To enrich our understanding of the determinants of social networks, this article explores the role of mobility in rural China. Methods: Drawing upon a data set from the Chinese General Social Survey, this article first uses clustered effect logit models and then adopts a propensity score matching (PSM) model for a robustness check. Results: The results demonstrate that citizens who have access to more advanced transportation modes and spend less time on traveling are more likely to establish weak ties, especially with nonagricultural citizens in prestigious job positions. The results also indicate that strong family ties are not the consequence of mobility. By disaggregating the full sample, this article further reveals that the young, rich, and female citizens reap more benefit from mobility. Conclusions: Given the great importance of automobiles for strengthening social networks, this article suggests that car sharing/pooling/lifting programs might be a viable solution to social network deficits in rural areas.

  • 177. Zerva, K.
    et al.
    Kourtit, Karima
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies. A. Mickiewicz University, Poland.
    Nijkamp, P.
    Tourism and voyeurism in Heterotopia’s: The role of perception and information in the behaviour of visitors to Amsterdam2016In: Impact Assessment in Tourism Economics, Springer, 2016, p. 247-273Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Tourists are not only regular visitors of important distinct places of interest. In making their decisions what or where to visit, they are also influenced by the (expected or realized) observed behaviour of others. A particularly interesting case of such social externalities is formed by so-called ‘voyeurism’, the phenomenon that visitors are visibly interested in-and attracted by-the preservice and spatial motives and behaviours of other visitors. Essentially, voyeurists derive their visitor utility from the observable behaviour of others, e.g. by watching them or speculating on their motives when they pass by. The present paper offers a novel empirical approach to these issues; it focuses on tourist voyeurism in the Red Light District of Amsterdam, with an emphasis on two well-known characteristic phenomena in this area, viz. prostitution and soft drugs. On the basis of existing literature that has demonstrated the importance of tours as an educative tool for tourists, we analyse if and how the perceptions of visitors have changed, through a panel study of 29 foreign students, and identify changes in their perceptions, after they have been exposed to real-world and site-specific factual information on this area, inter alia through a professionally guided field tour. Tools used in the present paper to analyse the voyeurism phenomenon-based on a before and after experiment-are multivariate analysis and regression techniques, while as a start a content cloud analysis is employed as an introductory exploratory tool. It turns out that information provision by a tour may change the site perceptions of voyeurists, but less so their value systems on the objects or people observed.

  • 178.
    Hagbert, Pernilla (Editor)
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Larsen, Henrik Gutzon (Editor)
    Lund University.
    Thörn, Håkan (Editor)
    Gothenburg University.
    Wasshede, Cathrin (Editor)
    Gothenburg University.
    Contemporary Co-housing in Europe: Towards Sustainable Cities?2020Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This book investigates co-housing as an alternative housing form in relation to sustainable urban development. Co-housing is often lauded as a more sustainable way of living. The primary aim of this book is to critically explore co-housing in the context of wider social, economic, political and environmental developments. This volume fills a gap in the literature by contextualising co-housing and related housing forms. With focus on Denmark, Sweden, Hamburg and Barcelona, the book presents general analyses of co-housing in these contexts and provides specific discussions of co-housing in relation to local government, urban activism, family life, spatial logics and socio-ecology. This book will be of interest to students and researchers in a broad range of social-scientific fields concerned with housing, urban development and sustainability, as well as to planners, decision-makers and activists.

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