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  • 151.
    Frykholm, Oscar
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Nilsson, Marcus
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Groth, Kristina
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Yngling, Alexander
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Interaction design in a complex context: medical multi-disciplinary team meetings2012In: The 7th Nordic Conference on Human-Computer Interaction: Making Sense Through Design, New York, NY, USA, 2012, p. 341-350Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In order to improve collaboration on, and visualisation of, patient information in medical multi-disciplinary team meetings, we have developed a system that presents information from different medical systems to be used as a support for the decision process. Based on field studies, we have implemented a high-fidelity prototype on tablet-sized displays, and tested it in a realistic setting. Our evaluation proved that more patient information can efficiently be displayed to all meeting participants, compared to the current situation. Interaction with the information, on the other hand, proved to be a complicated activity that needs careful design considerations; it should ultimately be based on what roles the meeting participants have, and what tasks they should complete. Medical decision-making is a complex area, and conducting interaction design in this area proved complex too. We foresee a great opportunity to improve medical work, by introducing collaborative tools and visualisation of medical data, but it requires that interaction design becomes a natural part of medical work.

  • 152.
    Geratz, Elke
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Virtual Activity Becomes Visible - ICT Users in Public Places2013Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Whether utilizing our smartphones for navigation or skyping our friend on our way, the use of ICTs affects the way that we walk through and stay in public places. "Dancing" mobile phone users are only one example of this. Their virtual activity becomes visible in public places. This master thesis is about contemporary demands on public space imposed by the new ICT generation, and aims to explore ethe behaviour of ICT users in public places. Therefore, it investigates the question of how the use of ICTs affects the way that people use public places and whar that means for urban planning. To this end, the thesis combines a literature review with an empirical study on the Münsterplatz in Bonn, Germany. The interviews and observations from this case study identified examples of characteristics of ICT users that are described in the literature; however, they also revealed new insights. Therefore, the thesis contributes to a greater understanding of the behaviour and demands of ICT users in public places and identifies ICT users as one user group, out-of-many, with specific demands on public space.

  • 153. Giuffrida, G.
    et al.
    Rinaldi Mazzeo, Francesco
    KTH.
    Zarba, C.
    Big data and news online: The possibilities and limits for social research2016In: Sociologia e Ricerca Sociale, ISSN 1121-1148, no 109, p. 159-173Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The main aim of this article is to improve knowledge on applicability of Big Data (BD) techniques in social research, by exploring the validity of using BD as an approach in emerging news contexts. In particular, we constructed and examined a large database of historical data of public online comments on a recent constitutional bill review. We using BD technology in order to analyze people's opinions to this particular reform.

  • 154. Gomez, J.
    et al.
    Jaccheri, L.
    Hauge, Jannicke
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM).
    Entertainment Computing - A Key for Improving Inclusion and Reducing Gender Gap?2018In: 17th IFIP TC 14 International Conference on Entertainment Computing, ICEC 2018 Held at the 24th IFIP World Computer Congress, WCC 2018, Springer, 2018, p. 388-391Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Entertainment Computing application areas are increasing day after day. The same way serious games become part of the teaching materials as schools, they can be useful tools to improve inclusion of people with special needs and reduce the gender gap. With this workshop we want to set a discussion space for researchers, designers and practitioners on Entertainment Computing interesting in its application to solve social issues, such as reducing the gender gap, preventing social exclusion of people in risk and promoting the inclusion of people with special needs. .

  • 155.
    Grancharov, Volodya
    et al.
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Signals, Sensors and Systems.
    Samuelsson, Jonas
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Signals, Sensors and Systems.
    Bastiaan Kleijn, W.
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Signals, Sensors and Systems.
    Distortion measures for vector quantization of noisy spectrum2005In: Eur. Conf. Speech Commun. Technol., 2005, p. 3173-3176Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we address the problem of vector quantization of speech in a noisy environment. We show that the performance of a vector quantization system can be improved by adapting the distortion measure to the changing environmental conditions. The proposed method emphasizes the distortion in spectral regions where the speech signal dominates. The method functions well even when conventional pre-processor methods fail because the noise statistics cannot be estimated reliably from speech pauses (as, e.g., in tandeming operations). Objective tests confirm that the use of environmentally adaptive measures significantly improves estimation accuracy in noisy speech, while preserving the quality in the case of clean input.

  • 156.
    Granström, Björn
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, Centre for Speech Technology, CTT.
    Speech technology for language training and e-inclusion2005Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Efficient language learning is one of the keys to social inclusion. In this paper we present some work aiming at creating a virtual language tutor. The ambition is to create a tutor that can be engaged in many aspects of language learning from detailed pronunciation training to conversational practice. Some of the crucial components of such a system are described. An initial implementation of a stress/quantity training tutor for Swedish will be presented.

  • 157.
    Groth, Kristina
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Numerical Analysis and Computer Science, NADA.
    A technological framework supporting knowledge exchange in organizations2004In: ACM Int. Conf. Proc. Ser., 2004, p. 381-384Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper focuses on presenting a technological framework for supporting knowledge sharing in organizations through computer support. The framework is based on the results from three studies of organizational knowledge in three kinds of settings and focuses on communication between people, awareness information about people's activities and availability, and information management. The third study also included an evaluation of a number of prototypes developed based on the three areas focused on in the framework. The results from the evaluation indicate that the framework is suitable for the purpose of supporting knowledge exchange.

  • 158.
    Groth, Kristina
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Human - Computer Interaction, MDI.
    Bogdan, Cristian
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Human - Computer Interaction, MDI.
    Lindquist, Sinna
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Human - Computer Interaction, MDI.
    Räsänen, Minna
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Human - Computer Interaction, MDI.
    Sandor, Ovidiu-Silviu
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Human - Computer Interaction, MDI.
    Lidskog, Tobias
    Metamatrix Development & Consulting AB.
    Creating a space for increased community feeling among geographically distributed teachers2005In: Proceedings of the 4th decennial conference on Critical computing: between sense and sensibility : August 20-24, 2005 Aarhus, Denmark, New York, USA: ACM , 2005, p. 145-148Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present the initial stages of a project in which we focuson participatory design methods to build information andcommunication technology support that stimulate knowledgesharing in a group of geographically distributedteachers. Teachers in general spend most of their time in aclassroom leaving few opportunities for social encountersand chats with their colleagues. The prototype we aredeveloping focuses on informality and playfulness, thatwould increase the social communication and thereby thecommunity feeling. In turn, this would ultimately increaselearning among the setting members.

  • 159.
    Gullberg, Anders
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment. School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Stockholm, århundradets trafikhuvudstad?2014In: Samhällsbyggaren, ISSN 2000-2408, no 2, p. 12-13Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    De många snabbt växande städerna världen över utkämpar en ojämn kamp mot stegrade trafikvolymer, svårartad trängsel och allvarliga miljöproblem. . Det har visat sig omöjligt att hålla jämna steg med efterfrågan och att uppfylla uppställda miljömål. Långt över en miljard människor drabbas dagligen. Försöken att påverka efterfrågan har hittills bara haft marginella effekter. Med hjälp av ett integrerat informations- och betalsystem och dynamisk prissättning i realtid skulle stora framsteg kunna göras. Stockholmsregionen som redan infört trängselskatt har goda möjligheter att ta täten i försöken att skapa en hållbar stadstrafik.

  • 160.
    Gulliksen, Jan
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Institutionalizing human-computer interaction for global health2017In: Global Health Action, ISSN 1654-9716, E-ISSN 1654-9880, Vol. 10, article id 1344003Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Digitalization is the societal change process in which new ICT-based solutions bring forward completely new ways of doing things, new businesses and new movements in the society. Digitalization also provides completely new ways of addressing issues related to global health. This paper provides an overview of the field of human-computer interaction (HCI) and in what way the field has contributed to international development in different regions of the world. Additionally, it outlines the United Nations' new sustainability goals from December 2015 and what these could contribute to the development of global health and its relationship to digitalization. Finally, it argues why and how HCI could be adopted and adapted to fit the contextual needs, the need for localization and for the development of new digital innovations. The research methodology is mostly qualitative following an action research paradigm in which the actual change process that the digitalization is evoking is equally important as the scientific conclusions that can be drawn. In conclusion, the paper argues that digitalization is fundamentally changing the society through the development and use of digital technologies and may have a profound effect on the digital development of every country in the world. But it needs to be developed based on local practices, it needs international support and to not be limited by any technological constraints. Particularly digitalization to support global health requires a profound understanding of the users and their context, arguing for user-centred systems design methodologies as particularly suitable.

  • 161.
    Gullström, Charlie
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture.
    Jonsson, Alex (Contributor)
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC).
    Nyström, Jimmy (Contributor)
    Luleå Technical UNiversity.
    Handberg, Leif (Contributor)
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Nefs, Harold (Contributor)
    Delft University of Technology.
    Immersive Spaces 1.0: WP4 Mediated Presence Components2016Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    COMPEIT creates a web-based system for highly interactive, personalised, shared media experiences. The new technologies will improve the feeling of being together in a shared mediated space and support interaction and collaboration between people who are separated in time or space.

    Immersive spaces 1.0 is a software component for the COMPEIT presence system with a feature set that allows users to interact and perform shared actions in virtual spaces, simply using their web browser. The main features are called SharedSpace, a virtual 3D environment which users can redesign and populate by scaling and rearranging their avatar-like live videostream representations; and PixelPresence which is an overlay technique that offers a pixelated view of a livestream, hereby adding an ambient and discrete presence filter, which indicates movement and subtly prompts users to enter a mediated interaction. 

    The COMPEIT presence system supports individuals and distributed groups who want to stay close with one another on a regular basis, ready to spontaneously interact in mediated and virtual space. Feedback from users and user requirements in WP2 showed that people want to be subtly aware of what others are doing, and if they are at a particular place at a given time – which, of course, is quite different to keeping a videolink open 24/7. Whether the context is professional or social, ambient forms of presence are thus called for, in order to support gradation and, perhaps more importantly, to prompt users to join a shared virtual space. 

  • 162.
    Gullström, Charlie
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture.
    Presence Design: Mediated Spaces Extending Architecture2010Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis is a contribution to design-led research and addresses a readership in the fields of architecture as well as in media and communications. In juxtaposing the tools of the designer (e.g. drafting, prototyping, visual/textual/spatial forms of montage) with those of architectural theory, this thesis seeks to extend the disciplinary boundaries of architecture by observing its assimilation of other media practices. Its primary contribution is to architectural design and theory, and its aims are twofold:

    Firstly, this thesis applies the concepts of virtual and mediated space to architecture, proposing an extended architectural practice that assimilates the concept of remote presence. Through realized design examples as well as through the history and theory of related concepts, the thesis explores what designing mediated spaces and designing for presence entails for the practicing architect.

    As a fusion of architecture and media technology, video-mediated spaces facilitate collaborative practices across spatial extensions while simultaneously fostering novel and environmentally sustainable modes of communication. The impact of presence design on workplace design is examined. As an extended practice also calls for an extended discourse, a preliminary conceptual toolbox is proposed. Concepts are adapted from related visual practices and tested on design prototypes, which arise from the author’s extensive experience in designing work and learning spaces.

    Secondly, this thesis outlines presence design as a transdisciplinary aesthetic practice and discusses the potential contribution of architects to a currently heterogeneous research field, which spans media space research, cognitive science, (tele)presence research, interaction design, ubiquitous computing, second-order cybernetics, and computer-supported collaborative work. In spite of such diversity, design and artistic practices are insufficiently represented in the field. This thesis argues that presence research and its discourse is characterised by sharp disciplinary boundaries and thereby identifies a conceptual gap: presence research typically fails to integrate aesthetic concepts that can be drawn from architecture and related visual practices. It is an important purpose of this thesis to synthesize such concepts into a coherent discourse.

    Finally, the thesis argues that remote presence through the proposed synthesis of architectural and technical design creates a significantly expanded potential for knowledge sharing across time and space, with potential to expand the practice and theory of architecture itself. The author’s design-led research shows that mediated spaces can provide sufficient audiovisual information about the remote space(s) and other person(s), allowing the subtleties of nonverbal communication to inform the interaction. Further, in designing for presence, certain spatial features have an effect on the user’s ability to experience a mediated spatial extension, which in turn, facilitates mediated presence. These spatial features play an important role in the process through which trust is negotiated, and hence has an impact on knowledge sharing. Mediated presence cannot be ensured by design, but by acknowledging the role of spatial design in mediated spaces, the presence designer can monitor and, in effect, seek to reduce the ‘friction’ that otherwise may inhibit the experience of mediated presence. The notion of ‘friction’ is borrowed from a context of knowledge sharing in collaborative work practices. My expanded use of the term ‘design friction’ is used to identify spatial design features which, unaddressed, may be said to impose friction and thus inhibit and impact negatively on the experience of presence. A conceptual tool-box for presence design is proposed, consisting of the following design concepts: mediated gaze, spatial montage, active spectatorship, mutual gaze, shared mediated space, offscreen space, lateral and peripheral awareness, framing and transparency. With their origins in related visual practices these emerge from the evolution of the concept of presence across a range of visual cultures, illuminating the centrality of presence design in design practice, be it in the construction of virtual pictorial space in Renaissance art or the generative design experiments of prototypical presence designers, such as Cedric Price, Gordon Pask and numerous researchers at MIT Media Lab, Stanford Institute and Xerox PARC.

  • 163.
    Guttenkunst, Ia
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE).
    Hållbarhetsarbete och kommunikation: En studie av AB Bollnäs Bostäders verksamhet2017Independent thesis Advanced level (professional degree), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The objective has been to visualize sustainability work of AB Bollnäs Bostäder, based on 18 sustainability categories developed in the study, divided on the sustainable aspects ecological, social and economical. The ecological and social aspect of the sustainability categories is part

    of the ISO26000, a standard describing company’s social responsibility, and the economic aspect is developed based on research and document discussing sustainable development in the property business. Furthermore, the aim has also been to study the communication of the sustainability work at the company, and see the result of it. It was accomplished by a didactic analysis, based on the didactical questions for who, why, what and how. The last object of the study has been to learn the visions of the future sustainability work of AB Bollnäs Bostäder, from different groups perspectives, based on the 18 sustainability categories. To collect relevant empirical data, personal interviews, questionnaires and document studies has been carried out.

    The results show that active work towards a sustainable development is performed in AB Bollnäs Bostäder, from all three aspects of sustainable development

    – ecology, social and economy. Out of the 18 sustainability categories, the work of 14 of them was assessed to be satisfying. Well invested resources would help the company to develop their work, and fulfil all the sustainability categories. The communication of the sustainability categories showed a consideration towards an economical content, both internally and externally, but with different aims for the targeted groups property service, economic and administrations, customer centre, park division, technical, CEO, inhabitants, entrepreneurs, municipal council and the board. The outcome of the communication on the other hand, showed that the economical, social and ecological sustainability categories, in the stated order, is interpreted different by the targeted groups. Finally, the results showed that all three sustainability aspects were important for AB Bollnäs Bostäder in the future, but the economical sustainability categories were considered to have a higher priority.

  • 164.
    Gürdür, Didem
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Machine Design (Div.).
    Sopjani, Liridona
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Machine Design (Div.).
    Visual Analytics to Support the Service Design for Sustainable Mobility2018In: 2018 IEEE CONFERENCE ON TECHNOLOGIES FOR SUSTAINABILITY (SUSTECH), IEEE , 2018, p. 84-89Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Intelligent transport system is a general term for the combined application of communication technologies, control and information processing for transport systems. Intelligent transport system covers all modes of transportation-including public transport-and all elements of the transportation system, such as the vehicle, infrastructure, and the driver. Integrated transport system allows a series of new unconventional solutions to improve the safety of the traffic and to satisfy transport requirements using new technologies. The service design of these systems, however, brings along different challenges. The process of service design requires the designers to engage with user behavior and understand the usage patterns related to the intelligent transport systems. Today, there are no well-developed methods to support this engagement. This paper suggests a data oriented visual analytics approach to support designers in their decision-making processes, the implementation of successful services for sustainable, shared mobility service systems, and data oriented approaches. Moreover, this paper discusses visual analytics as a tool to aid service designers by enabling real-time data analytics support. To this end, this paper summarizes the current literature on system innovation, challenges related to the design of these systems for sustainability and presents a shared and connected mobility service case study to illustrate the benefits of having visual analytics platforms for sustainable and intelligent transport systems. The study concludes that intuitive, data-oriented, interactive visual analytics approach has the potential to support service designers to create a coherent picture of the user in the service design process.

  • 165.
    Haking, Julia
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Digital Nomad Lifestyle: A field study in Bali2018Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The digital age has unleashed limitless opportunities and transformed how we work, play and live. As a result, more people embrace the digital nomad lifestyle to fulfill both personal and professional goals. This research assesses the advantages and disadvantages that are associated with this lifestyle. In addition, I examine the digital nomad characteristics in Bali and how the digital nomad community in Bali supports professional development. Data were collected during a two-month field study in Bali, which is one of the world’s most popular digital nomad hubs. The findings suggest that digital nomads are predominantly millennials from advanced economies who have different academic backgrounds. Freedom is the primary advantage, while overall job satisfaction and productivity dramatically differ. Overall, members of Bali’s digital nomad community feel supported in their professional development.

    “Spend your days on a nine to five You waste your time on a central line What do you love? Work two jobs tryin' stay alive You spend your money on a Friday night Tell me, what do you love?”

    – Jacob Banks 

  • 166.
    Hamrin, Göran
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Library.
    Hamrin@Praha2017: Invited talks at National Library of Technology Prague, November 20-27 20172017Other (Other academic)
  • 167.
    Hamrin, Göran
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Library, Library Services and Learning Support.
    Informationskompetens för ingenjörer2015In: Bortom förlägenheten: bibliotekariens pedagogiska roll i utveckling / [ed] Androls, Hilda, Lucassi, Elin och Wallén, Christine, Stockholm: Kungl. biblioteket , 2015, p. 133-151Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 168.
    Hamrin, Göran
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Library, Library Services and Learning Support.
    LIFTING INFORMATION LITERACY IN ERGONOMICS: A case study of integrated information literacy teaching at the KTH Royal institute of technology, Stockholm, Sweden.2017In: Proceedings of the 38th IATUL conference at the Free University of Bozen-Bolzano - University Library, Italy from 18 to 22 June 2017, 2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 169.
    Hamrin, Göran
    et al.
    KTH, Superseded Departments, KTH Library.
    Hedell, Kia
    Uppsala university.
    Biblioteks-och informationsvetenskap–en positionsbestämning: Svenska avhandlingar och uppsatser i en interpretativ innehållsanalys2013Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study is to gauge the current state of Swedish library and information science research. LIS is generally defined as a cross- or multidisciplinary subject, according to some coupled with heterogenity or dichotomy within the subject. In light of Jack Meadows’s description of the scientific community growth and scientific communication, the following two research questions are formulated as basis for the study: 1. What are the current themes, what range of theories and methods are used in our research material? 2. What are the relationships between our research material with respect to choice of themes, theories and methods used, compared with the image given in earlier studies of LIS research? Our research material consists of all Swedish licentiate and doctoral theses in LIS defended at Swedish universities 1993-2011 and all master’s theses published at three different Swedish LIS departments (Borås, Lund and Uppsala) during the years 2008-2009. The theses have been collected and processed using an interpretative content analysis, which includes categorisation of themes, theories and methods, as well as statistical analysis. A compilation of the results suggests the dominance of certain categories of themes, theories and methods. The dominating themes are focused on different aspects of the Library as an entity. The dominating theories are sociological or philosophical (used alone or in combination), and the prominent methods used are interviews and text analysis. The results overall agree with earlier studies from the 21st century. However, studies from the 1990s show a different distribution of theme categories in older research publications in LIS. This difference may be attributed to different research trends over time, but also to the specific versions of content analysis applied.

  • 170.
    Hamrin, Göran
    et al.
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Library, Library Services and Learning Support.
    Lönneborg, Rosa
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Library, Library Services and Learning Support.
    Unger, Maria
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Library, Library Services and Learning Support.
    Teaching information literacy for engineering students in a rapidly changing information landscape2016In: Nordic Journal of Information Literacy in Higher Education. Creating Knowledge VIII - Special Issue, 2016, Vol. 8Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The KTH Library has a long tradition of teaching information searching to technology students. Over the last years teaching information searching has become teaching information literacy, including more evaluation and source criticism. Traditionally, there have been three forms of teaching: independent credit-giving courses, integrated shorter modules in subject-specific courses and support via individual face-to-face supervision.

    Although evaluation and source criticism are now important parts of our teaching, much focus is still on search methodology. During this spring we, and our teaching colleagues at the KTH library, will revise and develop the content and pedagogical methodology for the courses and integrated modules in information literacy. In doing so, we need to address important questions on how to face the changing information landscape.

    Should the teaching be adapted to the search behaviour observed in our students or should we keep trying to change that behaviour? Do we put our effort into directing students to traditional scientific subject databases or should we put more emphasis on the importance of critically evaluating the search results, regardless of their source? How do we find the balance between these alternatives?

    Recently published studies have already covered these questions to some extent. The findings from a systematic literature search, together with insights collected from our development work during Spring 2016, will be used in an analysis of these questions in the context of teaching information literacy for engineering students.

  • 171. Hamrin, Göran
    et al.
    Voß, Viola
    Universitäts- und Landesbibliothek Münster.
    Quadcopters or Linguistic Corpora: Establishing RDM Services for Small-Scale Data Producers at Big Universities.2018In: Proceedings of the 39th IATUL conference, Oslo Metropolitan University - University Library, Norway, 17 to 21 June 2018., 2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    During the IATUL Conference 2017, the authors had many productive exchanges about similari-ties and differences in Swedish and German higher-education libraries. Since research data management (RDM) is an emerging topicon both sides of the Baltic Sea, we find it valuable to compare strategies, services, and workflows to learn from each other’s practices. Aim: In this talk, we aim to compare the practices and needs of small-scale data producers in engineering and the humanities. In particular, we try to answer the following research questions: What kind of data do the small-scale data producers produce? What do these producers need in terms of RDM support? What then can we librarians help them with? Hypothesis: Our research hypothesis is that small-scale data producers have similar needs in engineering and the humanities. This hypothesis is based on the many similarities in demands from funding agencies on open data and on the assumption that research in different subjects often creates empirical results which are different in content but similar in structure. Method: We study the current strategies, practices, and services of our respective universities (KTH Royal Institute of Technology Stockholm and Westfälische Wilhelms-Universität Münster). We also study the work and initiatives done on a more advanced level by universities, libraries, and other organisations in Sweden and Germany (e.g. Stockholm University, Swedish National Data Service (SND), Cologne Center for eHumanities at the University of Cologne). Results: The talk will give an overview of how we did the groundwork for the initial services pro-vided by our libraries. We focus on what we are doing and in particular why we are doing it. We find that we are following in the leading footsteps of other university libraries. The experiences shared by colleagues help us to adapt their best practices to our local demands, making them better practices for KTH and WWU researchers.

  • 172.
    Hartung, Ronald
    et al.
    Franklin University, Department of Computer Sciences & Mathematics, Columbus, Ohio.
    Håkansson, Anne
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Communication: Services and Infrastucture (Closed 20120101), Software and Computer Systems, SCS (Closed 20120101).
    A Knowledge Based Interactive Agent Assistant for Leadership2006In: Proceedings of the European Conference on IS Management, Leadership and Governance: ECMLG 2006: ECMLG 2006 / [ed] Academic Conferences Limited, 2006Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 173.
    Hartung, Ronald
    et al.
    Franklin University, Department of Computer Sciences & Mathematics, Columbus, Ohio.
    Håkansson, Anne
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Automated Testing for Knowledge Based Systems2007In: Knowledge-Based Intelligent Information and Engineering Systems, Berlin Heidelberg: Springer Berlin/Heidelberg, 2007, p. 270-278Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Building and modifying knowledge-based systems requires testing of the knowledge for quality assurance, such as verification and validation. This is especially important when reverse engineering is applied to a system that needs to be remodeled or renewed. However, the modification of a knowledge-based system is a difficult process. Commonly, the documentation is poor, and the original domain expertise is lacking. Therefore, testing must be applied on existing knowledge to be able to verify the changed knowledge. To this objective we apply an automated test generation system to verify the operation of the modified system.

  • 174.
    Hartung, Ronald
    et al.
    Franklin University, Department of Computer Sciences & Mathematics, Columbus, Ohio.
    Håkansson, Anne
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Knowledge Representation for Knowledge Based Leadership System2006In: Knowledge-Based Intelligent Information and Engineering Systems: KES-2006 / [ed] Bogdan Gabrys, Robert J. Howlett, Lakhmi C. Jain, Berlin Heidelberg: Springer Berlin/Heidelberg, 2006, p. 352-359Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Leaders make decisions in different and sometimes difficult situations. These decisions are often converted into valuableknowledge needed by other people in decision positions. For example, students becoming leaders need knowledge about leadershipto make good judgments. When the situation is sensitive, perhaps concerning personal changes or an unfamiliar business strategy,leaders need opinions and not just those from people involved in the company. An artificial system allows us to replicatea system of opinions and observations from outside advisors, which is why we base our research on this kind of system. Inthis paper we present a knowledge representation for a knowledge-based leadership system used in the experimental system weare developing.

  • 175. Hartung, Ronald
    et al.
    Håkansson, Anne
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Knowledge representation for leadership stories2007In: Cybernetics and systems, ISSN 0196-9722, E-ISSN 1087-6553, Vol. 38, no 5-6, p. 587-610Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Leadership requires making decisions and implementing the results by influencing those being lead. The Personal Access to Leadership project, PAL, is constructing tools to assist leaders in creative ways and assisting the development of leaders. The tools are knowledge-based systems employing shallow understanding of the domain. The approaches used provide guidance, but do not generate solutions. One aspect that continues under exploration in PAL is the use of stories for training and guiding leaders. In order to make such support systems work, a representation is needed to enable locating useful stories related to the task of a leader. This article defines a model for story representation for the PAL tools, called the PAL tool IdeaLab. The IdeaLab is the tool to which stories are being added, as a help system to support and extend the user's thinking.

  • 176.
    Hartung, Ronald
    et al.
    Franklin University, Department of Computer Sciences & Mathematics, Columbus, Ohio.
    Håkansson, Anne
    Department of Information Science, Computer Science, Uppsala University.
    Using Meta-agents to Reason with Multiple Ontologies2008In: AGENT AND MULTI-AGENT SYSTEMS: TECHNOLOGIES AND APPLICATIONS, PROCEEDINGS / [ed] Ngoc Thanh Nguyen, GeunSik Jo, Robert J. Howlett, Lakhmi C. Jain, Springer Berlin/Heidelberg, 2008, p. 261-270Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The semantic web uses ontologies to improve searching since ontologies provide a richer semantic model of content by expressing terms and relationships. However, a problem with the web is the large number of ontologies, which complicates searching. To maximize the capability of the search, the ontologies need to be combined to obtain complex answers. Usually, the ontologies are created without following any guidelines and, therefore, combining them is not a simple task, especially when ensuring a consistent result. We propose using meta-agents on top of software agents in a multi-agent system to resolve the use and the combination of multiple ontologies and to enable searching and reasoning. The software agents search for parts in the ontologies corresponding to the user-request and meta-agents combine the results from the agents. The meta-agents also partition the ontologies into consistent sets and then combine multiple ontologies into meaningful and logically consistent structures. For this purpose, we extend an existing mapping and alignment algorithm used for communication between agents. The use of multi-agents gives advantages since they provide a parallel approach and, thereby, efficiently handle large numbers of ontologies in order to accomplishtasks separately.

  • 177.
    Hemphälä, Jens
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    The Influence of Internal Channels of Communication on Incremental and Radical Innovation in Swedish PharmaciesIn: Creativity and Innovation Management, ISSN 0963-1690, E-ISSN 1467-8691Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 178. Henelius, Andreas
    et al.
    Puolamaki, Kai
    Boström, Henrik
    Stockholms universitet, Institutionen för data- och systemvetenskap.
    Asker, Lars
    Stockholms universitet, Institutionen för data- och systemvetenskap.
    Papapetrou, Panagiotis
    Stockholms universitet, Institutionen för data- och systemvetenskap.
    A peek into the black box: exploring classifiers by randomization2014In: Data mining and knowledge discovery, ISSN 1384-5810, E-ISSN 1573-756X, Vol. 28, no 5-6, p. 1503-1529Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Classifiers are often opaque and cannot easily be inspected to gain understanding of which factors are of importance. We propose an efficient iterative algorithm to find the attributes and dependencies used by any classifier when making predictions. The performance and utility of the algorithm is demonstrated on two synthetic and 26 real-world datasets, using 15 commonly used learning algorithms to generate the classifiers. The empirical investigation shows that the novel algorithm is indeed able to find groupings of interacting attributes exploited by the different classifiers. These groupings allow for finding similarities among classifiers for a single dataset as well as for determining the extent to which different classifiers exploit such interactions in general.

  • 179. Henkel, Martin
    et al.
    Perjons, Erik
    Sneiders, Eriks
    Karlgren, Jussi
    Boye, Johan
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Speech Communication and Technology.
    Thelemyr, Anders
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Speech Communication and Technology.
    Language technology for eGovernment - business cases2014In: New Perspectives in Information Systems and Technologies, Volume 1, Springer, 2014, no VOLUME 1, p. 83-95Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Language technologies and tools, such as text mining, information extraction, and question and answering systems, have been developed during many years. These technologies are becoming mature and should be ready for deployment in private and public organizations. However, little focus has been paid to how these technologies can be applied to tackle real-world problems within organizations. In this paper, we present a set of business cases where language technologies can have a significant impact on public organizations, including their business processes and services. We describe how each business case can influence the service quality, as seen from a consumer perspective, and the business processes efficiency, as seen from a public organizational perspective. The business cases are based on, and exemplified with, cases from large Swedish public organizations.

  • 180.
    Henriksson, Greger
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms). KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Kupersmidt, Judith
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms). KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Räsänen, Minna
    Södertörn University / School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies.
    A Day at the School of Opera: Less Travel throug Distance Education2013In: Nachhaltigkeit in der Wirtschaftskommunikation / [ed] Martin Nielsen, Iris Rittenhofer, Marianne Grove Ditlevsen, Sophie Esmann Andersen, Irene Pollach, Wiesbaden: Springer VS, Springer Fachmedien , 2013, p. 191-214Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    .

  • 181.
    Henriksson, Greger
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies (moved 20130630). KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Räsänen, Minna
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Human - Computer Interaction, MDI (closed 20111231). KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC. Södertörn University, Sweden .
    Workplace location and ICTs substituting travel2009In: Organizational communication and sustainable development: ICTs for mobility / [ed] Anette Hallin, Tina Karrbom Gustavsson, IGI Global, 2009, p. 205-225Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter is based on the assumption that keeping the number and length of business and commuting trips at reasonable levels could contribute to reaching targets of environmental sustainability. The authors highlight a couple of options for reducing or avoiding business trips and commuting through workplace location or improved use of communications. They present case studies concerning travel and communications, carried out by using diaries and interviews. They also present relevant literature on social practices and sustainability goals in relation to use of ICT. The aim is to shed light on variation in the use of travel and communications on an individual level in work life. The case studies illustrate that such variation is mainly due to the concrete practices involved in execution of professional duties and roles. Duties that involve a clearly defined end result or product being delivered regularly by the member of staff are correlated to clearly defined needs for communications. Less clearly defined end results of the work duties seem to make it harder for the individual to plan and perform communication and travel in a more energy saving way. The difference in professional duties can thus be expressed in terms of clarity and maturity. Another factor that affect who can replace travel with ICTs is relations of power, e.g., when a purchaser dictates the terms for a subcontractor concerning how and where to "deliver" his working time, service or product. The importance of clarity, maturity and power aspects means that professional practices need to be studied at a detailed level to find out who could substitute ICTs for travel and how this could be done.

  • 182.
    Hermelin, Sebastian
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    Stangesjö, Daniel
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Management.
    The importance of communicating vision, goal and strategy in a consultancy firm: A case study2013Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This study explores the case of company, Kompany, and the event, where one of Kompany’s commissions with one of their clients ended, due to problems arising in the areas of accounting practices-, organisational communication, organisational culture and the power distribution within the company. Hence, the study aims to create an understanding of why the commission ended and if the factors associated to this event are also inherent in the organisation as a whole.

     

    This study investigates the use of accounting practice as a language to describe communication problems that can arise due to cross-professional barriers between engineers and economists. Furthermore, communication is evaluated through the lens of organisational culture and power distribution as to see how these affect each other, and if there is any distinction between them.

     

    This study concludes that an organisation’s culture and its vision, goal and strategy greatly depends on each other. Having no communicated vision, goal or strategy affects the organisational culture in a negative way, and vice versa, ultimately affecting the way a company conducts its business’ and the overall success of the company. In the case of Kompany, this is their current situation, no formal vision, goal or strategy is formulated, hence not communicated within the organisation. As such, this might be the factor that, in the event, led to the situation where Kompany’s commission with one of their biggest clients, ended. These findings can also be used to gain an insight into similar problems, experiences by other companies in the IT-consultancy sector. 

  • 183.
    Heyman, Susanna
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Banking and Finance, Cefin. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Artman, Henrik
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    A Call for Financially Literate DesignersManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Contemporary Internet banks and other systems for money management are typically designed and evaluated on their usability; a system that is easy to use is considered a good system. However, insights from behavioral finance show many ways in which users of Internet banks are likely to be misled by e.g. certain ways of displaying data, and make the wrong decisions. This paper is a call for researchers and designers of money management systems to learn principles of finance before designing systems that will influence their users’ decisions.

  • 184. Hill, C.
    et al.
    Creswell, C.
    Vigerland, S.
    Nauta, M. H.
    March, S.
    Donovan, C.
    Wolters, L.
    Spence, S. H.
    Martin, J. L.
    Wozney, L.
    McLellan, L.
    Kreuze, L.
    Gould, K.
    Jolstedt, M.
    Nord, M.
    Hudson, J. L.
    Utens, E.
    Ruwaard, J.
    Albers, C.
    Khanna, M.
    Albano, A. M.
    Serlachius, E.
    Hrastinski, Stefan
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Learning.
    Kendall, P. C.
    Navigating the development and dissemination of internet cognitive behavioral therapy (iCBT) for anxiety disorders in children and young people: A consensus statement with recommendations from the #iCBTLorentz Workshop Group2018In: Internet Interventions, ISSN 2214-7829, Vol. 12, p. 1-10Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Initial internet-based cognitive behavioral therapy (iCBT) programs for anxiety disorders in children and young people (CYP) have been developed and evaluated, however these have not yet been widely adopted in routine practice. The lack of guidance and formalized approaches to the development and dissemination of iCBT has arguably contributed to the difficulty in developing iCBT that is scalable and sustainable beyond academic evaluation and that can ultimately be adopted by healthcare providers. This paper presents a consensus statement and recommendations from a workshop of international experts in CYP anxiety and iCBT (#iCBTLorentz Workshop Group) on the development, evaluation, engagement and dissemination of iCBT for anxiety in CYP.

  • 185.
    Hischier, Roland
    et al.
    Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, St. Gallen, Switzerland.
    Coroama, Vlad C.
    Measure-IT Research, Bucharest, Romania.
    Schien, Daniel
    Department of Computer Science, University of Bristol, UK.
    Ahmadi Achachlouei, Mohammad
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC. KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Grey Energy and Environmental Impacts of ICT Hardware2015In: ICT Innovations for Sustainability / [ed] Lorenz M. Hilty, Bernard Aebischer, Switzerland: Springer, 2015, p. 171-189Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Direct energy consumption of ICT hardware is only “half the story.” In order to get the “whole story,” energy consumption during the entire life cycle has to be taken into account. This chapter is a first step toward a more comprehensive picture, showing the “grey energy” (i.e., the overall energy requirements) as well as the releases (into air, water, and soil) during the entire life cycle of exemplary ICT hardware devices by applying the life cycle assessment method. The examples calculated show that a focus on direct energy consumption alone fails to take account of relevant parts of the total energy consumption of ICT hardware as well as the relevance of the production phase. As a general tendency, the production phase is more and more important the smaller (and the more energy-efficient) the devices are. When in use, a tablet computer is much more energy-efficient than a desktop computer system with its various components, so its production phase has a much greater relative importance. Accordingly, the impacts due to data transfer when using Internet services are also increasingly relevant the smaller the end-user device is, reaching up to more than 90 % of the overall impact when using a tablet computer.

  • 186.
    Hjalmarsson, Anna
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Speech Communication and Technology.
    Human interaction as a model for spoken dialogue system behaviour2010Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis is a step towards the long-term and high-reaching objec-tive of building dialogue systems whose behaviour is similar to a human dialogue partner. The aim is not to build a machine with the same conversational skills as a human being, but rather to build a machine that is human enough to encourage users to interact with it accordingly. The behaviours in focus are cue phrases, hesitations and turn-taking cues. These behaviours serve several important communicative functions such as providing feedback and managing turn-taking. Thus, if dialogue systems could use interactional cues similar to those of humans, these systems could be more intuitive to talk to. A major part of this work has been to collect, identify and analyze the target behaviours in human-human interaction in order to gain a better understanding of these phenomena. Another part has been to reproduce these behaviours in a dialogue system context and explore listeners’ perceptions of these phenomena in empirical experiments.

    The thesis is divided into two parts. The first part serves as an overall background. The issues and motivations of humanlike dialogue systems are discussed. This part also includes an overview of research on human language production and spoken language generation in dialogue systems.

    The next part presents the data collections, data analyses and empirical experiments that this thesis is concerned with. The first study presented is a listening test that explores human behaviour as a model for dialogue systems. The results show that a version based on human behaviour is rated as more humanlike, polite and intelligent than a constrained version with less variability. Next, the DEAL dia-logue system is introduced. DEAL is used as a platform for the re-search presented in this thesis. The domain of the system is a trade domain and the target audience are second language learners of Swedish who want to practice conversation. Furthermore, a data collection of human-human dialogues in the DEAL domain is presented. Analyses of cue phrases in these data are provided as well as an experimental study of turn-taking cues. The results from the turn-taking experiment indicate that turn-taking cues realized with a di-phone synthesis affect the expectations of a turn change similar to the corresponding human version.

    Finally, an experimental study that explores the use of talkspurtinitial cue phrases in an incremental version of DEAL is presented. The results show that the incremental version had shorter response times and was rated as more efficient, more polite and better at indicating when to speak than a non-incremental implementation of the same system.

  • 187.
    House, David
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Speech Communication and Technology.
    Karlsson, Anastasia
    Svantesson, Jan-Olof
    Tayanin, Damrong
    The Phrase-Final Accent in Kammu: Effects of Tone, Focus and Engagement2009In: INTERSPEECH 2009: 10TH ANNUAL CONFERENCE OF THE INTERNATIONAL SPEECH COMMUNICATION ASSOCIATION 2009, BAIXAS: ISCA-INST SPEECH COMMUNICATION ASSOC , 2009, p. 2439-2442Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The phrase-final accent can typically contain a multitude of simultaneous prosodic signals. In this study, aimed at separating the effects of lexical tone from phrase-final intonation, phrase-final accents of two dialects of Kammu were analyzed. Kammu, a Mon-Khmer language spoken primarily in northern Laos, has dialects with lexical tones and dialects with no lexical tones. Both dialects seem to engage the phrase-final accent to simultaneously convey focus, phrase finality, utterance finality, and speaker engagement. Both dialects also show clear evidence of truncation phenomena. These results have implications for our understanding of the interaction between tone, intonation and phrase-finality.

  • 188. Huang, Y.
    et al.
    Poderi, G.
    Šćepanović, S.
    Hasselqvist, Hanna
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC, Green Leap.
    Warnier, M.
    Brazier, F.
    Embedding internet-of-things in large-scale socio-technical systems: A community-oriented design in future smart grids2019In: The Internet of Things for Smart Urban Ecosystems, Springer, 2019, p. 125-150Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In traditional engineering, technologies are viewed as the core of the engineering design, in a physical world with a large number of diverse technological artefacts. The real world, however, also includes a huge number of social components—people, communities, institutions, regulations and everything that exists in the human mind—that have shaped and been shaped by the technological components. Smart urban ecosystems are examples of large-scale Socio-Technical Systems (STS) that rely on technologies, in particular on the Internet-of-Things (IoT), within a complex social context where the technologies are embedded. Designing applications that embed both social complexity and IoT in large-scale STS requires a Socio-Technical (ST) approach, which has not yet entered the mainstream of design practice. This chapter reviews the literature and presents our experience of adopting an ST approach to the design of a community-oriented smart grid application. It discusses the challenges, process and outcomes of this apporach, and provides a set of lessons learned derived from this experience that are also deemed relevant to the design of other smart urban ecosystems.

  • 189.
    Huldén, Joe
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT).
    Riktlinjer för mjukvarustartups2016Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Många innovativa mjukvaruföretag startas årligen. Flera med stor potential att konkurrera och utmana en hel industri med sina nytänkande idéer för att göra situationer enklare för en stor grupp av användare. Startups är termen som har blivit alltmer populärt och ibland så kallar man ett vanliga små och medel stora företag för startups.

    Den här uppsatsen reder ut begreppet startups genom att studiera mjukvaru startups företagets lärdomar på vägen från idé till börsintroduktion. Små mjukvaruföretag som snabbt skalas upp och kan växa från enstaka grundare till att ha flera tusen anställda med en global marknad. Studier sker genom intervjuer av grundare av några mjukvarustartup företag och litteraturläsning som beskriver startup företag från idé stadiet till börsintroduktion. Intervjuer analyseras och sker samtidigt som litteratur studer.

    Uppsatsen resulterar i en riktlinje baserad på lärdomar längs vägen av dom intervjuade mjukvaruföretag och litteratur studier av dom så kallade succé företagen som Uber, Facebook och AirBnB som har lyckats komma ut ur startups skede.

  • 190.
    Håkansson, Anne
    Uppsala universitet.
    A User Interface for the User-Centred Knowledge Model, t-UCK2008In: Knowledge-Based Intelligent Information and Engineering Systems, PT 1, Proceedings / [ed] Ignac Lovrek, Robert J. Howlett, Lakhmi C. Jain, Berlin Heidelberg: Springer Berlin/Heidelberg, 2008, p. 312-321Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents a user interface to the User-Centred Knowledge Model (t-UCK). T-UCK is a knowledge modelling tool for designing knowledge-intensive systems. The model centres round the various users, i.e., both the design users and the end users, and facilitates the use of a conceptual model for handling different types of knowledge, the reasoning strategy and other functionality. For the design users, the conceptual model is presented through a modelling view of the contents used for developing the system. For the end users, the conceptual model has a parallel consulting view used for sessions with the system. Both these views are directly modelled into the system through a graphical modelling language, the Unified Modelling Language (UML). UML is a general-purpose modelling language, which in a modified form it can be used for development of knowledge-based systems.

  • 191. Håkansson, Anne
    An Expert System for the Environmental Impact Assessment Method2004Report (Other academic)
  • 192.
    Håkansson, Anne
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Modelling from Knowledge versus Modelling from Rules using UML2005In: Knowledge-Based Intelligent Information and Engineering Systems: KES2005 / [ed] Rajiv Khosla, Robert J. Howlett, Lakhmi C. Jain, Berlin Heidelberg: Springer Berlin/Heidelberg, 2005, p. 393-402Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Modelling support for knowledge acquisition is a tool for modelling domain knowledge. However, during the implementation of the knowledge new knowledge is created. Event though this knowledge is found in the knowledge base, the model usually is not updated with the new knowledge and do, therefore, not contain all the knowledge in the system. This paper describes how different graphical models support the complex knowledge acquisition process of handling domain knowledge and how these models can be extended by modelling knowledge from rules in a knowledge base including probability. Thus, the models are designed from domain knowledge to create production rules but the models are also extended with new generated knowledge, i.e., generated rules. The paper also describes how different models can support the domain expert to grasp this new generated knowledge and to understand the uncertainty calculated from rules during consultation. To this objective, graphic representation and visualisation is used as modelling support through the use of diagrams of Unified Modelling Language (UML), which is used for modelling production rules. Presenting rules in a static model can make the contents more comprehensible and in a dynamic model can make the uncertainty more evident.

  • 193.
    Håkansson, Anne
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    The User Centred Knowledge Model - t-UCK2008In: Knowledge-Based Intelligent Information and Engineering Systems, PT 3, Proceedings / [ed] Ignac Lovrek, Robert J. Howlett, Lakhmi C. Jain, Berlin Heidelberg: Springer Berlin/Heidelberg, 2008, p. 779-787Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In knowledge engineering, modelling knowledge is the process of structuring knowledge before implementation. A crucial part of system development depends on the acquiring and structuring, since the quality of system’s contents is of decisive importance for making good decisions. Models are needed to assure that all the required knowledge is present. However, the current models tend to be large and this makes it hard to get a grip on the knowledge presented by the model. Also, many models are difficult to use and the users have to be experts on the models before using them. To avoid these problems, we introduce the User-Centred Knowledge Model (t-UCK) for modelling knowledge. The model supports different users, i.e., domain experts, knowledge engineers and end-users, to model, implement, test, consult, and educate through the use of graphic representation and visualisation.

  • 194.
    Håkansson, Anne
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Transferring Problem Solving Strategies from the Expert to the End Users: Supporting understanding2005In: The Seventh International Conference on Enterprise Information Systems: ICEIS-2005, SciTePress, 2005, p. 3-10Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    If knowledge sharing between people in an organisation is to be encouraged, new types of systems areneeded to transfer domain knowledge and problem-solving strategies from an expert to the end users and,thereby, make the knowledge available and applicable in a specific domain. If it is to be possible to applythe knowledge in the organisation, the systems will need a means of illustrating the reasoning strategiesinvolved in interpreting the knowledge to arrive at the conclusions drawn. One solution is to incorporatedifferent diagrams in knowledge management systems to assist the user to comprehend the reasoningstrategies and to better understand the knowledge required and gained. This paper describes the manners bywhich knowledge management systems can facilitate transfer of problem-solving strategies from a domainexpert to different kinds of end users. With this objective in mind, we suggest using visualization, graphicaldiagrams and simulation in conjunction to support the transfer of problem-solving strategies from a domainexpert to the end users. Visualization can support end users, enabling them to follow the reasoning strategyof the system more easily. The visualization discussed here includes static and dynamic presentation of therules and facts in the knowledge base that are used during execution of the system. The static presentationillustrates how different rules are related statically in a sequence diagram in the Unified Modeling Language(UML). The dynamic presentation, in contrast, visualizes rules used and facts relevant to a specificconsultation, i.e., this presentation depends on the input inserted by the users and is illustrated in acollaboration diagram in the UML. Utilising these diagrams can support the sharing and reuse of theknowledge and strategies used for handling routine tasks and problems more efficiently and profitablywhilst minimizing potential for loss of knowledge. This is important when experts are not available on thespot. These diagrams can also be used for the organisation and the disseminating of knowledge by locatingexperts in an organisation, which is important when these are to be relocated in large organisations orgeographically distributed.

  • 195. Håkansson, Anne
    Visual Conceptualisation for Knowledge Acquisition in Knowledge Based Systems2004In: Expert Update, ISSN 1465-4091, Vol. 7Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 196.
    Håkansson, Anne
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Communication: Services and Infrastucture (Closed 20120101), Software and Computer Systems, SCS (Closed 20120101).
    Hamfelt, Andreas
    Uppsala universitet.
    Compositional Relational Programming and its Visualisation2004In: Advances in the Internet Technology: Concepts and Systems / [ed] I., Vujovic, V. Milutinovic (editors), I., Vujovic, V. Milutinovic (editors) , 2004, , p. 179p. 49-72Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 197.
    Håkansson, Anne
    et al.
    Department of Information Science, Computer Science, Uppsala University.
    Hartung, Ronald
    Franklin University, Department of Computer Sciences & Mathematics, Columbus, Ohio.
    An Approach to Event-Driven Algorithm for Intelligent Agents in Multi-agent Systems2008In: AGENT AND MULTI-AGENT SYSTEMS: TECHNOLOGIES AND APPLICATIONS, PROCEEDINGS. / [ed] Ngoc Thanh Nguyen, GeunSik Jo, Robert J. Howlett, Lakhmi C. Jain, Springer Berlin/Heidelberg, 2008, p. 411-420Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Meta-level agents and intelligent agents in multi-agent systems canbe used to search for solutions in networks and graphs where the meta-agentsprovide paths between nodes based on properties of the graph elements given atthe time. A challenge with network problems is finding these search paths whileextracting information in the network within an acceptable time bound.Moreover, this is especially difficult when information is extracted andcombined from several different sources. Reducing time and making the agentswork together requires a plan or an effective algorithm. In this paper wepropose an approach to an event-driven algorithm that can search forinformation in networks using meta-agents in multi-agent systems. The metaagentsmonitor the agents using event-driven communication, acting as a searchmethod and extract the searching for information in networks.

  • 198.
    Håkansson, Anne
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Hartung, Ronald
    Franklin University, Department of Computer Sciences & Mathematics, Columbus, Ohio.
    Reengineering for Knowledge in Knowledge Based Systems2006In: Knowledge-Based Intelligent Information and Engineering Systems: KES-2006 / [ed] Bogdan Gabrys, Robert J. Howlett, Lakhmi C. Jain, Berlin Heidelberg: Springer Berlin/Heidelberg, 2006, p. 342-351Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents an approach to reengineering knowledge-based systems. Commonly, reengineering is used to modify systems that have functioned for many years, but are no longer able to accomplish the tasks required, and therefore need to be updated. Reengineering can also be used to modify and extend the knowledge contained in these systems. This is an intricate task if the systems are large, complex and poorly documented. The rules in the knowledge base must be gathered, analyzed and understood. In this paper, we apply reengineering to the knowledge and the functionality of knowledge-based systems. The outcome of the reengineering process is presented in graphic representations using Unified Modeling Language diagrams.

  • 199.
    Håkansson, Anne
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Communication: Services and Infrastucture (Closed 20120101), Software and Computer Systems, SCS (Closed 20120101).
    Hartung, Ronald
    Franklin University, Department of Computer Sciences & Mathematics, Columbus, Ohio.
    Using Meta-Agents for Multi-Agents in Networks2007In: The 2007 International Conference on Artificial Intelligence: The 2007 World Congress in Computer Science, Artificial Intelligence / [ed] H. Arabnia et al, 2007, p. 561-567Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we propose an approach usingmeta-agents for monitoring multi-agents and controllingtheir behaviour while moving between states in a network.The meta-agents are built on the agents in the system andthen used to inspect the agents’ behaviour when reachinga result as well as perceiving the reason for that result.Each meta-agent can comprise everything from one agentto dozen or more agents depending on the task assigned tothe system. The benefit of using meta-agents for a multiagentsystem is the ability to provide the fastest waybetween nodes under given circumstances and to handle avast number of nodes in graphs and networks such astravelling salesman problem (TSP).

  • 200.
    Håkansson, Anne
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet.
    Hartung, Ronald
    Using reengineering for knowledge-based systems2007In: Cybernetics and systems, ISSN 0196-9722, E-ISSN 1087-6553, Vol. 38, p. 799-824Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Reverse engineering, also called reengineering, is used to modify systems that have functioned for many years, but which can no longer accomplish their intended tasks and, therefore, need to be updated. Reverse engineering can support the modification and extension of the knowledge in an already existing system. However, this can be an intricate task for a large, complex and poorly documented knowledge-based system. The rules in the knowledge base must be gathered, analyzed and understood, but also checked for verification and validation. We introduce an approach that uses reverse engineering for the knowledge in knowledge-based systems. The knowledge is encapsulated in rules, facts and conclusions, and in the relationships between them. Reverse engineering also collects functionality and source code. The outcome of reverse engineering is a model of the knowledge base, the functionality and the source code connected to the rules. These models are presented in diagrams using a graphic representation similar to Unified Modeling Language and employing ontology. Ontology is applied on top of rules, facts and relationships. From the diagrams, test cases are generated during the reverse engineering process and adopted to verify and validate the system.

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