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  • 151.
    Pennacchietti, Francesca
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Biophysics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Alvelid, Jonatan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Biophysics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Morales, Rodrigo A.
    Division of Immunology and Allergy, Department of Medicine Solna, Karolinska Institutet and University Hospital, Stockholm, 17176, Sweden; Center for Molecular Medicine (CMM), Stockholm, 17176, Sweden.
    Damenti, Martina
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Biophysics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Ollech, Dirk
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Biophysics.
    Oliinyk, Olena S.
    Medicum, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, 00290, Finland.
    Shcherbakova, Daria M.
    Department of Genetics, and Gruss-Lipper Biophotonics Center, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY, 10461, USA.
    Villablanca, Eduardo J.
    Division of Immunology and Allergy, Department of Medicine Solna, Karolinska Institutet and University Hospital, Stockholm, 17176, Sweden; Center for Molecular Medicine (CMM), Stockholm, 17176, Sweden.
    Verkhusha, Vladislav V.
    Medicum, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, 00290, Finland; Department of Genetics, and Gruss-Lipper Biophotonics Center, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY, 10461, USA.
    Testa, Ilaria
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Biophysics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Blue-shift photoconversion of near-infrared fluorescent proteins for labeling and tracking in living cells and organisms2023In: Nature Communications, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 14, no 1, article id 8402Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Photolabeling of intracellular molecules is an invaluable approach to studying various dynamic processes in living cells with high spatiotemporal precision. Among fluorescent proteins, photoconvertible mechanisms and their products are in the visible spectrum (400–650 nm), limiting their in vivo and multiplexed applications. Here we report the phenomenon of near-infrared to far-red photoconversion in the miRFP family of near infrared fluorescent proteins engineered from bacterial phytochromes. This photoconversion is induced by near-infrared light through a non-linear process, further allowing optical sectioning. Photoconverted miRFP species emit fluorescence at 650 nm enabling photolabeling entirely performed in the near-infrared range. We use miRFPs as photoconvertible fluorescent probes to track organelles in live cells and in vivo, both with conventional and super-resolution microscopy. The spectral properties of miRFPs complement those of GFP-like photoconvertible proteins, allowing strategies for photoconversion and spectral multiplexed applications.

  • 152.
    Perakis, Fivos
    et al.
    Stockholm Univ, AlbaNova Univ Ctr, Dept Phys, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden.;SLAC Natl Accelerator Lab, 2575 Sand Hill Rd, Menlo Pk, CA 94025 USA..
    Camisasca, Gaia
    Stockholm Univ, AlbaNova Univ Ctr, Dept Phys, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Lane, Thomas J.
    SLAC Natl Accelerator Lab, 2575 Sand Hill Rd, Menlo Pk, CA 94025 USA..
    Spah, Alexander
    Stockholm Univ, AlbaNova Univ Ctr, Dept Phys, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Wikfeldt, Kjartan Thor
    Stockholm Univ, AlbaNova Univ Ctr, Dept Phys, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Sellberg, Jonas A.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Biomedical and X-ray Physics.
    Lehmkuehler, Felix
    Deutsch Elektronen Synchrotron DESY, Notkestr 85, D-22607 Hamburg, Germany.;Hamburg Ctr Ultrafast Imaging, Luruper Chaussee 149, D-22761 Hamburg, Germany..
    Pathak, Harshad
    Stockholm Univ, AlbaNova Univ Ctr, Dept Phys, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Kim, Kyung Hwan
    Stockholm Univ, AlbaNova Univ Ctr, Dept Phys, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Amann-Winkel, Katrin
    Stockholm Univ, AlbaNova Univ Ctr, Dept Phys, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Schreck, Simon
    Stockholm Univ, AlbaNova Univ Ctr, Dept Phys, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Song, Sanghoon
    SLAC Natl Accelerator Lab, 2575 Sand Hill Rd, Menlo Pk, CA 94025 USA..
    Sato, Takahiro
    SLAC Natl Accelerator Lab, 2575 Sand Hill Rd, Menlo Pk, CA 94025 USA..
    Sikorski, Marcin
    SLAC Natl Accelerator Lab, 2575 Sand Hill Rd, Menlo Pk, CA 94025 USA.;European XFEL, Holzkoppel 4, D-22869 Schenefeld, Germany..
    Eilert, Andre
    SLAC Natl Accelerator Lab, 2575 Sand Hill Rd, Menlo Pk, CA 94025 USA..
    McQueen, Trevor
    SLAC Natl Accelerator Lab, 2575 Sand Hill Rd, Menlo Pk, CA 94025 USA..
    Ogasawara, Hirohito
    SLAC Natl Accelerator Lab, 2575 Sand Hill Rd, Menlo Pk, CA 94025 USA..
    Nordlund, Dennis
    SLAC Natl Accelerator Lab, 2575 Sand Hill Rd, Menlo Pk, CA 94025 USA..
    Roseker, Wojciech
    Deutsch Elektronen Synchrotron DESY, Notkestr 85, D-22607 Hamburg, Germany..
    Koralek, Jake
    SLAC Natl Accelerator Lab, 2575 Sand Hill Rd, Menlo Pk, CA 94025 USA..
    Nelson, Silke
    SLAC Natl Accelerator Lab, 2575 Sand Hill Rd, Menlo Pk, CA 94025 USA..
    Hart, Philip
    SLAC Natl Accelerator Lab, 2575 Sand Hill Rd, Menlo Pk, CA 94025 USA..
    Alonso-Mori, Roberto
    SLAC Natl Accelerator Lab, 2575 Sand Hill Rd, Menlo Pk, CA 94025 USA..
    Feng, Yiping
    SLAC Natl Accelerator Lab, 2575 Sand Hill Rd, Menlo Pk, CA 94025 USA..
    Zhu, Diling
    SLAC Natl Accelerator Lab, 2575 Sand Hill Rd, Menlo Pk, CA 94025 USA..
    Robert, Aymeric
    SLAC Natl Accelerator Lab, 2575 Sand Hill Rd, Menlo Pk, CA 94025 USA..
    Gruebel, Gerhard
    Deutsch Elektronen Synchrotron DESY, Notkestr 85, D-22607 Hamburg, Germany.;Hamburg Ctr Ultrafast Imaging, Luruper Chaussee 149, D-22761 Hamburg, Germany..
    Pettersson, Lars G. M.
    Stockholm Univ, AlbaNova Univ Ctr, Dept Phys, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Nilsson, Anders
    Stockholm Univ, AlbaNova Univ Ctr, Dept Phys, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Coherent X-rays reveal the influence of cage effects on ultrafast water dynamics2018In: Nature Communications, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 9, article id 1917Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The dynamics of liquid water feature a variety of time scales, ranging from extremely fast ballistic-like thermal motion, to slower molecular diffusion and hydrogen-bond rearrangements. Here, we utilize coherent X-ray pulses to investigate the sub-100 fs equilibrium dynamics of water from ambient conditions down to supercooled temperatures. This novel approach utilizes the inherent capability of X-ray speckle visibility spectroscopy to measure equilibrium intermolecular dynamics with lengthscale selectivity, by measuring oxygen motion in momentum space. The observed decay of the speckle contrast at the first diffraction peak, which reflects tetrahedral coordination, is attributed to motion on a molecular scale within the first 120 fs. Through comparison with molecular dynamics simulations, we conclude that the slowing down upon cooling from 328 K down to 253 K is not due to simple thermal ballistic-like motion, but that cage effects play an important role even on timescales over 25 fs due to hydrogen-bonding.

  • 153.
    Petersen, Julian
    et al.
    Department of Orthodontics, University Leipzig Medical Center, Leipzig, Germany.
    Akkuratov, Evgeny E.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Biophysics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. University of Oxford, MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Radcliffe Department of Medicine, Oxford, OX3 9DS, UK.
    Adameyko, Igor
    Department of Neuroimmunology, Center for Brain Research, Medical University Vienna, Vienna, Austria; Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    et al.,
    A previously uncharacterized Factor Associated with Metabolism and Energy (FAME/C14orf105/CCDC198/1700011H14Rik) is related to evolutionary adaptation, energy balance, and kidney physiology2023In: Nature Communications, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 14, no 1, article id 3092Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study we use comparative genomics to uncover a gene with uncharacterized function (1700011H14Rik/C14orf105/CCDC198), which we hereby name FAME (Factor Associated with Metabolism and Energy). We observe that FAME shows an unusually high evolutionary divergence in birds and mammals. Through the comparison of single nucleotide polymorphisms, we identify gene flow of FAME from Neandertals into modern humans. We conduct knockout experiments on animals and observe altered body weight and decreased energy expenditure in Fame knockout animals, corresponding to genome-wide association studies linking FAME with higher body mass index in humans. Gene expression and subcellular localization analyses reveal that FAME is a membrane-bound protein enriched in the kidneys. Although the gene knockout results in structurally normal kidneys, we detect higher albumin in urine and lowered ferritin in the blood. Through experimental validation, we confirm interactions between FAME and ferritin and show co-localization in vesicular and plasma membranes.

  • 154. Petersen, Julian
    et al.
    Wright, Shane C.
    Rodriguez, David
    Matricon, Pierre
    Lahav, Noa
    Vromen, Aviv
    Friedler, Assaf
    Strömqvist, Johan
    Wennmalm, Stefan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Experimental Biomolecular Physics.
    Carlsson, Jens
    Schulte, Gunnar
    Agonist-induced dimer dissociation as a macromolecular step in G protein-coupled receptor signaling2017In: Nature Communications, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 8, no 1, article id 226Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) constitute the largest family of cell surface receptors. They can exist and act as dimers, but the requirement of dimers for agonist-induced signal initiation and structural dynamics remains largely unknown. Frizzled 6 (FZD6) is a member of Class F GPCRs, which bind WNT proteins to initiate signaling. Here, we show that FZD6 dimerizes and that the dimer interface of FZD6 is formed by the transmembrane a-helices four and five. Most importantly, we present the agonist-induced dissociation/re-association of a GPCR dimer through the use of live cell imaging techniques. Further analysis of a dimerization-impaired FZD6 mutant indicates that dimer dissociation is an integral part of FZD6 signaling to extracellular signal-regulated kinases1/2. The discovery of agonistdependent dynamics of dimers as an intrinsic process of receptor activation extends our understanding of Class F and other dimerizing GPCRs, offering novel targets for dimerinterfering small molecules.

  • 155.
    Platz, Daniel
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Nanostructure Physics.
    Forchheimer, Daniel
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Nanostructure Physics.
    Tholén, Erik A.
    Haviland, David B.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Nanostructure Physics.
    Interaction imaging with amplitude-dependence force spectroscopy2013In: Nature Communications, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 4, p. 1360-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Knowledge of surface forces is the key to understanding a large number of processes in fields ranging from physics to material science and biology. The most common method to study surfaces is dynamic atomic force microscopy (AFM). Dynamic AFM has been enormously successful in imaging surface topography, even to atomic resolution, but the force between the AFM tip and the surface remains unknown during imaging. Here we present a new approach that combines high-accuracy force measurements and high-resolution scanning. The method, called amplitude-dependence force spectroscopy (ADFS), is based on the amplitude dependence of the cantilever's response near resonance and allows for separate determination of both conservative and dissipative tip-surface interactions. We use ADFS to quantitatively study and map the nano-mechanical interaction between the AFM tip and heterogeneous polymer surfaces. ADFS is compatible with commercial atomic force microscopes and we anticipate its widespread use in taking AFM toward quantitative microscopy.

  • 156. Poulakis, K.
    et al.
    Pereira, J. B.
    Muehlboeck, J. -S
    Wahlund, L. -O
    Smedby, Örjan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Medical Imaging.
    Volpe, G.
    Masters, C. L.
    Ames, D.
    Niimi, Y.
    Iwatsubo, T.
    Ferreira, D.
    Westman, E.
    Multi-cohort and longitudinal Bayesian clustering study of stage and subtype in Alzheimer’s disease2022In: Nature Communications, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 13, no 1, article id 4566Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Understanding Alzheimer’s disease (AD) heterogeneity is important for understanding the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms of AD. However, AD atrophy subtypes may reflect different disease stages or biologically distinct subtypes. Here we use longitudinal magnetic resonance imaging data (891 participants with AD dementia, 305 healthy control participants) from four international cohorts, and longitudinal clustering to estimate differential atrophy trajectories from the age of clinical disease onset. Our findings (in amyloid-β positive AD patients) show five distinct longitudinal patterns of atrophy with different demographical and cognitive characteristics. Some previously reported atrophy subtypes may reflect disease stages rather than distinct subtypes. The heterogeneity in atrophy rates and cognitive decline within the five longitudinal atrophy patterns, potentially expresses a complex combination of protective/risk factors and concomitant non-AD pathologies. By alternating between the cross-sectional and longitudinal understanding of AD subtypes these analyses may allow better understanding of disease heterogeneity.

  • 157.
    Pronk, Sander
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Theoretical Physics, Theoretical & Computational Biophysics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Lindahl, Erik
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Theoretical Physics, Theoretical & Computational Biophysics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Kasson, Peter M.
    Dynamic heterogeneity controls diffusion and viscosity near biological interfaces2014In: Nature Communications, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 5, p. 3034-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    At a nanometre scale, the behaviour of biological fluids is largely governed by interfacial physical chemistry. This may manifest as slowed or anomalous diffusion. Here we describe how measures developed for studying glassy systems allow quantitative measurement of interfacial effects on water dynamics, showing that correlated motions of particles near a surface result in a viscosity greater than anticipated from individual particle motions. This effect arises as a fundamental consequence of spatial heterogeneity on nanometre length scales and applies to any fluid near any surface. Increased interfacial viscosity also causes the classic finding that large solutes such as proteins diffuse much more slowly than predicted in bulk water. This has previously been treated via an empirical correction to the solute size: the hydrodynamic radius. Using measurements of quantities from theories of glass dynamics, we can now calculate diffusion constants from molecular details alone, eliminating the empirical correction factor.

  • 158.
    Quellmalz, Arne
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Intelligent systems, Micro and Nanosystems.
    Wang, Xiaojing
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Intelligent systems, Micro and Nanosystems.
    Sawallich, Simon
    Protemics GmbH, Aachen, Germany.;Rhein Westfal TH Aachen, Fac Elect Engn & Informat Technol, Chair Elect Devices, Aachen, Germany..
    Uzlu, Burkay
    Rhein Westfal TH Aachen, Fac Elect Engn & Informat Technol, Chair Elect Devices, Aachen, Germany.;AMO GmbH, Adv Microelect Ctr Aachen AMICA, Aachen, Germany..
    Otto, Martin
    AMO GmbH, Adv Microelect Ctr Aachen AMICA, Aachen, Germany..
    Wagner, Stefan
    AMO GmbH, Adv Microelect Ctr Aachen AMICA, Aachen, Germany..
    Wang, Zhenxing
    AMO GmbH, Adv Microelect Ctr Aachen AMICA, Aachen, Germany..
    Prechtl, Maximilian
    Univ Bundeswehr Munchen, Fac Elect Engn & Informat Technol, Inst Phys, EIT 2, Neubiberg, Germany..
    Hartwig, Oliver
    Univ Bundeswehr Munchen, Fac Elect Engn & Informat Technol, Inst Phys, EIT 2, Neubiberg, Germany..
    Luo, Siwei
    Univ Bundeswehr Munchen, Fac Elect Engn & Informat Technol, Inst Phys, EIT 2, Neubiberg, Germany..
    Duesberg, Georg S.
    Univ Bundeswehr Munchen, Fac Elect Engn & Informat Technol, Inst Phys, EIT 2, Neubiberg, Germany..
    Lemme, Max C.
    Rhein Westfal TH Aachen, Fac Elect Engn & Informat Technol, Chair Elect Devices, Aachen, Germany.;AMO GmbH, Adv Microelect Ctr Aachen AMICA, Aachen, Germany..
    Gylfason, Kristinn
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Intelligent systems, Micro and Nanosystems.
    Roxhed, Niclas
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Intelligent systems, Micro and Nanosystems.
    Stemme, Göran
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Intelligent systems, Micro and Nanosystems.
    Niklaus, Frank
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Intelligent systems, Micro and Nanosystems.
    Large-area integration of two-dimensional materials and their heterostructures by wafer bonding2021In: Nature Communications, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 12, no 1, article id 917Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Integrating two-dimensional (2D) materials into semiconductor manufacturing lines is essential to exploit their material properties in a wide range of application areas. However, current approaches are not compatible with high-volume manufacturing on wafer level. Here, we report a generic methodology for large-area integration of 2D materials by adhesive wafer bonding. Our approach avoids manual handling and uses equipment, processes, and materials that are readily available in large-scale semiconductor manufacturing lines. We demonstrate the transfer of CVD graphene from copper foils (100-mm diameter) and molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) from SiO2/Si chips (centimeter-sized) to silicon wafers (100-mm diameter). Furthermore, we stack graphene with CVD hexagonal boron nitride and MoS2 layers to heterostructures, and fabricate encapsulated field-effect graphene devices, with high carrier mobilities of up to 4520 cm2V-1s-1. Thus, our approach is suited for backend of the line integration of 2D materials on top of integrated circuits, with potential to accelerate progress in electronics, photonics, and sensing. The existing integration approaches for 2D materials often degrade material properties and are not compatible with industrial processing. Here, the authors devise an adhesive wafer bonding strategy to transfer and stack monolayers, suitable for back end of the line integration of 2D materials.

  • 159.
    Quellmalz, Arne
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Intelligent systems, Micro and Nanosystems.
    Wang, Xiaojing
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Intelligent systems, Micro and Nanosystems.
    Sawallich, Simon
    Protemics GmbH; Chair of Electronic Devices, Faculty of Electrical Engineering and Information Technology, RWTH Aachen University.
    Uzlu, Burkay
    Otto, Martin
    Wagner, Stefan
    AMO GmbH, Advanced Microelectronic Center Aachen (AMICA).
    Wang, Zhenxing
    Prechtl, Maximilian
    Institute of physics, EIT 2, Faculty of Electrical Engineering and Information Technology, Universität der Bundeswehr München.
    Hartwig, Oliver
    Institute of physics, EIT 2, Faculty of Electrical Engineering and Information Technology, Universität der Bundeswehr München.
    Luo, Siwei
    Institute of physics, EIT 2, Faculty of Electrical Engineering and Information Technology, Universität der Bundeswehr München.
    Duesberg, Georg S.
    Institute of physics, EIT 2, Faculty of Electrical Engineering and Information Technology, Universität der Bundeswehr München.
    Lemme, Max
    AMO GmbH, Advanced Microelectronic Center Aachen (AMICA); Chair of Electronic Devices, Faculty of Electrical Engineering and Information Technology, RWTH Aachen University.
    Gylfason, Kristinn
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Intelligent systems, Micro and Nanosystems.
    Roxhed, Niclas
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Intelligent systems, Micro and Nanosystems.
    Stemme, Göran
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Intelligent systems, Micro and Nanosystems.
    Niklaus, Frank
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Intelligent systems, Micro and Nanosystems.
    Large-Area Integration of Two-Dimensional Materials and Their Heterostructures Using Wafer Bonding2021In: Nature Communications, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 12, p. 917-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Integrating two-dimensional (2D) materials into semiconductor manufacturing lines is essential to exploit their material properties in a wide range of application areas. However, current approaches are not compatible with high-volume manufacturing on wafer level. Here, we report a generic methodology for large-area integration of 2D materials by adhesive wafer bonding. Our approach avoids manual handling and uses equipment, processes, and materials that are readily available in large-scale semiconductor manufacturing lines. We demonstrate the transfer of CVD graphene from copper foils (100-mm diameter) and molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) from SiO2/Si chips (centimeter-sized) to silicon wafers (100-mm diameter). Furthermore, we stack graphene with CVD hexagonal boron nitride and MoS2 layers to heterostructures, and fabricate encapsulated field-effect graphene devices, with high carrier mobilities of up to 4520cm2V−1s−14520cm2V−1s−1. Thus, our approach is suited for backend of the line integration of 2D materials on top of integrated circuits, with potential to accelerate progress in electronics, photonics, and sensing.

  • 160.
    Rana, Sunil
    et al.
    University of Bristol.
    Mouro, João
    University of Bristol.
    Bleiker, Simon J.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Intelligent systems, Micro and Nanosystems.
    Reynolds, Jamie D.
    University of Southampton.
    Chong, Harold M. H.
    University of Southampton.
    Niklaus, Frank
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Intelligent systems, Micro and Nanosystems.
    Pamunuwa, Dinesh
    University of Bristol.
    Nanoelectromechanical relay without pull-in instability for high-temperature non-volatile memory2020In: Nature Communications, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 11, no 1, article id 1181Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Emerging applications such as the Internet-of-Things and more-electric aircraft require electronics with integrated data storage that can operate in extreme temperatures with high energy efficiency. As transistor leakage current increases with temperature, nanoelectromechanical relays have emerged as a promising alternative. However, a reliable and scalable non-volatile relay that retains its state when powered off has not been demonstrated. Part of the challenge is electromechanical pull-in instability, causing the beam to snap in after traversing a section of the airgap. Here we demonstrate an electrostatically actuated nanoelectromechanical relay that eliminates electromechanical pull-in instability without restricting the dynamic range of motion. It has several advantages over conventional electrostatic relays, including low actuation voltages without extreme reduction in critical dimensions and near constant actuation airgap while the device moves, for improved electrostatic control. With this nanoelectromechanical relay we demonstrate the first high-temperature non-volatile relay operation, with over 40 non-volatile cycles at 200 °C.

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    fulltext
  • 161.
    Raptis, Savvas
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Electrical Engineering, Space and Plasma Physics.
    Karlsson, Tomas
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Electrical Engineering, Space and Plasma Physics.
    Vaivads, Andris
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Electrical Engineering, Space and Plasma Physics.
    Pollock, Craig
    Plaschke, Ferdinand
    Johlander, Andreas
    Trollvik, Henriette
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Electrical Engineering, Space and Plasma Physics.
    Lindqvist, Per-Arne
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Electrical Engineering, Space and Plasma Physics.
    Downstream high-speed plasma jet generation as a direct consequence of shock reformation2022In: Nature Communications, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 13, no 1, article id 598Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Shocks are one of nature’s most powerful particle accelerators and have been connected to relativistic electron acceleration and cosmic rays. Upstream shock observations include wave generation, wave-particle interactions and magnetic compressive structures, while at the shock and downstream, particle acceleration, magnetic reconnection and plasma jets can be observed. Here, using Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) we show in-situ evidence of high-speed downstream flows (jets) generated at the Earth’s bow shock as a direct consequence of shock reformation. Jets are observed downstream due to a combined effect of upstream plasma wave evolution and an ongoing reformation cycle of the bow shock. This generation process can also be applicable to planetary and astrophysical plasmas where collisionless shocks are commonly found.

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    fulltext
  • 162.
    Redjai Sani, Sohrab
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Materials- and Nano Physics, Material Physics, MF.
    Persson, J.
    Mohseni, Seyed Majid
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Materials- and Nano Physics, Material Physics, MF.
    Pogoryelov, Ye
    Muduli, P. K.
    Eklund, Anders
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Integrated Devices and Circuits.
    Malm, Gunnar
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Integrated Devices and Circuits.
    Dmitriev, A.
    Käll, M.
    Åkerman, Johan
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Materials- and Nano Physics, Material Physics, MF.
    Mutually synchronized bottom-up multi-nanocontact spin-torque oscillators2013In: Nature Communications, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 4, p. 2731-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Spin-torque oscillators offer a unique combination of nanosize, ultrafast modulation rates and ultrawide band signal generation from 100 MHz to close to 100 GHz. However, their low output power and large phase noise still limit their applicability to fundamental studies of spin-transfer torque and magnetodynamic phenomena. A possible solution to both problems is the spin-wave-mediated mutual synchronization of multiple spin-torque oscillators through a shared excited ferromagnetic layer. To date, synchronization of high-frequency spin-torque oscillators has only been achieved for two nanocontacts. As fabrication using expensive top-down lithography processes is not readily available to many groups, attempts to synchronize a large number of nanocontacts have been all but abandoned. Here we present an alternative, simple and cost-effective bottom-up method to realize large ensembles of synchronized nanocontact spin-torque oscillators. We demonstrate mutual synchronization of three high-frequency nanocontact spin-torque oscillators and pairwise synchronization in devices with four and five nanocontacts.

  • 163.
    Roxhed, Niclas
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Intelligent systems, Micro and Nanosystems.
    Bendes, Annika
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Affinity Proteomics.
    Dale, Matilda
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Affinity Proteomics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Mattsson, Cecilia
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Affinity Proteomics.
    Hanke, Leo
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Microbiol Tumor & Cell Biol, Solna, Sweden..
    Dodig-Crnkovic, Tea
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Affinity Proteomics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Christian, Murray
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Microbiol Tumor & Cell Biol, Solna, Sweden..
    Meineke, Birthe
    Karolinska Inst, Sci Life Lab, Dept Med Biochem & Biophys, Div Genome Biol, Solna, Sweden.;Karolinska Inst, Ming Wai Lau Ctr Reparat Med, Stockholm Node, Solna, Sweden..
    Elsasser, Simon
    Karolinska Inst, Sci Life Lab, Dept Med Biochem & Biophys, Div Genome Biol, Solna, Sweden.;Karolinska Inst, Ming Wai Lau Ctr Reparat Med, Stockholm Node, Solna, Sweden..
    Andrell, Juni
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Biochem & Biophys, Sci Life Lab, Solna, Sweden..
    Havervall, Sebastian
    Danderyd Hosp, Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Sci, Div Internal Med, Danderyd, Sweden..
    Thalin, Charlotte
    Danderyd Hosp, Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Sci, Div Internal Med, Danderyd, Sweden..
    Eklund, Carina
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Karolinska Univ Lab, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Dillner, Joakim
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Karolinska Univ Lab, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Beck, Olof
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Neurosci, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Thomas, Cecilia E.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Affinity Proteomics.
    McInerney, Gerald
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Microbiol Tumor & Cell Biol, Solna, Sweden..
    Hong, Mun-Gwan
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Murrell, Ben
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Microbiol Tumor & Cell Biol, Solna, Sweden..
    Fredolini, Claudia
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Affinity Proteomics.
    Schwenk, Jochen M.
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Affinity Proteomics.
    Multianalyte serology in home-sampled blood enables an unbiased assessment of the immune response against SARS-CoV-22021In: Nature Communications, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 12, no 1, article id 3695Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Serological testing is essential to curb the consequences of the COVID-19 pandemic. However, most assays are still limited to single analytes and samples collected within healthcare. Thus, we establish a multianalyte and multiplexed approach to reliably profile IgG and IgM levels against several versions of SARS-CoV-2 proteins (S, RBD, N) in home-sampled dried blood spots (DBS). We analyse DBS collected during spring of 2020 from 878 random and undiagnosed individuals from the population in Stockholm, Sweden, and use classification approaches to estimate an accumulated seroprevalence of 12.5% (95% CI: 10.3%-14.7%). This includes 5.4% of the samples being IgG(+)IgM(+) against several SARS-CoV-2 proteins, as well as 2.1% being IgG(-)IgM(+) and 5.0% being IgG(+)IgM(-) for the virus' S protein. Subjects classified as IgG(+) for several SARS-CoV-2 proteins report influenza-like symptoms more frequently than those being IgG(+) for only the S protein (OR=6.1; p<0.001). Among all seropositive cases, 30% are asymptomatic. Our strategy enables an accurate individual-level and multiplexed assessment of antibodies in home-sampled blood, assisting our understanding about the undiagnosed seroprevalence and diversity of the immune response against the coronavirus. Here, Roxhed et al. develop a multiplexed approach to screen IgG and IgM levels against several SARS-CoV-2 proteins in home-sampled dried blood spots and estimate seroprevalence of 12.5% in Stockholm in spring of 2020.

  • 164. Rudberg, Ann-Sofie
    et al.
    Havervall, Sebastian
    Månberg, Anna
    Jernbom Falk, August
    Aguilera, Katherina
    Ng, Henry
    Gabrielsson, Lena
    Salomonsson, Ann-Christin
    Hanke, Leo
    Murrell, Ben
    McInerney, Gerald
    Olofsson, Jennie
    Andersson, Eni
    Hellström, Cecilia
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Affinity Proteomics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Bayati, Shaghayegh
    Bergström, Sofia
    Pin, Elisa
    Sjöberg, Ronald
    Tegel, Hanna
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science.
    Hedhammar, My
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Centres, Centre for Bioprocess Technology, CBioPT. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Protein Technology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Phillipson, Mia
    Nilsson, Peter
    Hober, Sophia
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Protein Technology.
    Thålin, Charlotte
    SARS-CoV-2 exposure, symptoms and seroprevalence in healthcare workers in Sweden.2020In: Nature Communications, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 11, no 1, article id 5064Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    SARS-CoV-2 may pose an occupational health risk to healthcare workers. Here, we report the seroprevalence of SARS-CoV-2 antibodies, self-reported symptoms and occupational exposure to SARS-CoV-2 among healthcare workers at a large acute care hospital in Sweden. The seroprevalence of IgG antibodies against SARS-CoV-2 was 19.1% among the 2149 healthcare workers recruited between April 14th and May 8th 2020, which was higher than the reported regional seroprevalence during the same time period. Symptoms associated with seroprevalence were anosmia (odds ratio (OR) 28.4, 95% CI 20.6-39.5) and ageusia (OR 19.2, 95% CI 14.3-26.1). Seroprevalence was also associated with patient contact (OR 2.9, 95% CI 1.9-4.5) and covid-19 patient contact (OR 3.3, 95% CI 2.2-5.3). These findings imply an occupational risk for SARS-CoV-2 infection among healthcare workers. Continued measures are warranted to assure healthcare workers safety and reduce transmission from healthcare workers to patients and to the community.

  • 165.
    Sandoz, Patrick
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Biophysics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Kuhnigk, Kyra
    Department of Medicine Huddinge, Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Szabo, Edina K.
    Precision Immunotherapy Alliance, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway; Department of Cancer Immunology, Institute for Cancer Research, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway.
    Thunberg, Sara
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Erikson, Elina
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Biophysics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Sandström, Niklas
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Biophysics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Verron, Quentin
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Biophysics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Brech, Andreas
    Cancell, Centre for Cancer Cell Reprogramming, Department for Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway; Department of Biosciences, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway; Department of Molecular Cell Biology, Institute for Cancer Research, Oslo University, Oslo, Norway.
    Watzl, Carsten
    Department for Immunology, Leibniz Research Centre for Working Environment and Human Factors, TU Dortmund, Dortmund, Germany.
    Wagner, Arnika K.
    Department of Medicine Huddinge, Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Alici, Evren
    Department of Medicine Huddinge, Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Malmberg, Karl Johan
    Department of Medicine Huddinge, Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden; Precision Immunotherapy Alliance, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway; Department of Cancer Immunology, Institute for Cancer Research, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway.
    Uhlin, Michael
    CLINTEC, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Önfelt, Björn
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Biophysics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Department of Medicine Huddinge, Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Microbiology, Tumour and Cell Biology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    et al.,
    Modulation of lytic molecules restrain serial killing in γδ T lymphocytes2023In: Nature Communications, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 14, no 1, article id 6035Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    γδ T cells play a pivotal role in protection against various types of infections and tumours, from early childhood on and throughout life. They consist of several subsets characterised by adaptive and innate-like functions, with Vγ9Vδ2 being the largest subset in human peripheral blood. Although these cells show signs of cytotoxicity, their modus operandi remains poorly understood. Here we explore, using live single-cell imaging, the cytotoxic functions of γδ T cells upon interactions with tumour target cells with high temporal and spatial resolution. While γδ T cell killing is dominated by degranulation, the availability of lytic molecules appears tightly regulated in time and space. In particular, the limited co-occurrence of granzyme B and perforin restrains serial killing of tumour cells by γδ T cells. Thus, our data provide new insights into the cytotoxic arsenal and functions of γδ T cells, which may guide the development of more efficient γδ T cell based adoptive immunotherapies.

  • 166.
    Sarén, Tina
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Dept Immunology, Genetics, Pathology, Science for Life Laboratory, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Saronio, Giulia
    Uppsala University, Dept Immunology, Genetics, Pathology, Science for Life Laboratory, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Marti Torrell, Paula
    Uppsala University, Dept Immunology, Genetics, Pathology, Science for Life Laboratory, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Zhu, Xu
    Uppsala University, Dept Immunology, Genetics, Pathology, Science for Life Laboratory, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Thelander, Josefin
    Uppsala University, Dept Immunology, Genetics, Pathology, Science for Life Laboratory, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Andersson, Yasmin
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Drug Discovery and Development. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Hofström, Camilla
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Drug Discovery and Development. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Nestor, Marika
    Uppsala University, Dept Immunology, Genetics, Pathology, Science for Life Laboratory, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Dimberg, Anna
    Uppsala University, Dept Immunology, Genetics, Pathology, Science for Life Laboratory, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Persson, Helena
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Drug Discovery and Development. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Ramachandran, Mohanraj
    Uppsala University, Dept Immunology, Genetics, Pathology, Science for Life Laboratory, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Yu, Di
    Uppsala University, Dept Immunology, Genetics, Pathology, Science for Life Laboratory, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Essand, Magnus
    Uppsala University, Dept Immunology, Genetics, Pathology, Science for Life Laboratory, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Complementarity-determining region clustering may cause CAR-T cell dysfunction2023In: Nature Communications, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 14, no 1, p. 4732-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-T cell therapy is rapidly advancing as cancer treatment, however, designing an optimal CAR remains challenging. A single-chain variable fragment (scFv) is generally used as CAR targeting moiety, wherein the complementarity-determining regions (CDRs) define its specificity. We report here that the CDR loops can cause CAR clustering, leading to antigen-independent tonic signalling and subsequent CAR-T cell dysfunction. We show via CARs incorporating scFvs with identical framework and varying CDR sequences that CARs may cluster on the T cell surface, which leads to antigen-independent CAR-T cell activation, characterized by increased cell size and interferon (IFN)-γ secretion. This results in CAR-T cell exhaustion, activation-induced cell death and reduced responsiveness to target-antigen-expressing tumour cells. CDR mutagenesis confirms that the CAR-clustering is mediated by CDR-loops. In summary, antigen-independent tonic signalling can be induced by CDR-mediated CAR clustering, which could not be predicted from the scFv sequences, but could be tested for by evaluating the activity of unstimulated CAR-T cells.

  • 167.
    Schenk, Frederik
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW. Stockholm Univ, Bolin Ctr Climate Res, Svante Arrhenius Vag 8, SE-10691 Stockholm, Sweden.;Stockholm Univ, Dept Geol Sci, Svante Arrhenius Vag 8, SE-10691 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Valiranta, Minna
    Univ Helsinki, Ecosyst & Environm Res Programme, Fac Biol & Environm Sci, ECRU, POB 65, FIN-00014 Helsinki, Finland.;Univ Helsinki, Helsinki Inst Sustainabil Sci HELSUS, POB 65, FIN-00014 Helsinki, Finland..
    Muschitiello, Francesco
    Stockholm Univ, Bolin Ctr Climate Res, Svante Arrhenius Vag 8, SE-10691 Stockholm, Sweden.;Stockholm Univ, Dept Geol Sci, Svante Arrhenius Vag 8, SE-10691 Stockholm, Sweden.;Univ Cambridge, Dept Geog, Cambridge CB2 3EN, England.;Columbia Univ, Lamont Doherty Earth Observ, 61 Route 9 W, New York, NY 10964 USA..
    Tarasov, Lev
    Mem Univ Newfoundland, Dept Phys & Phys Oceanog, St John, NF A1B 3X7, Canada..
    Heikkila, Maija
    Univ Helsinki, Ecosyst & Environm Res Programme, Fac Biol & Environm Sci, ECRU, POB 65, FIN-00014 Helsinki, Finland.;Univ Helsinki, Helsinki Inst Sustainabil Sci HELSUS, POB 65, FIN-00014 Helsinki, Finland..
    Björck, Svante
    Stockholm Univ, Bolin Ctr Climate Res, Svante Arrhenius Vag 8, SE-10691 Stockholm, Sweden.;Stockholm Univ, Dept Geol Sci, Svante Arrhenius Vag 8, SE-10691 Stockholm, Sweden.;Lund Univ, Dept Geol, Quaternary Sci, Box 117, SE-22100 Lund, Sweden..
    Brandefelt, Jenny
    Swedish Nucl Fuel & Waste Management Co SKB, Box 250, SE-10124 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Johansson, Arne V.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics.
    Näslund, Jens-Ove
    Swedish Nucl Fuel & Waste Management Co SKB, Box 250, SE-10124 Stockholm, Sweden.;Stockholm Univ, Dept Phys Geog & Quaternary Geol, Svante Arrhenius Vag 8, SE-10691 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Wohlfarth, Barbara
    Stockholm Univ, Bolin Ctr Climate Res, Svante Arrhenius Vag 8, SE-10691 Stockholm, Sweden.;Stockholm Univ, Dept Geol Sci, Svante Arrhenius Vag 8, SE-10691 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Warm summers during the Younger Dryas cold reversal2018In: Nature Communications, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 9, article id 1634Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Younger Dryas (YD) cold reversal interrupts the warming climate of the deglaciation with global climatic impacts. The sudden cooling is typically linked to an abrupt slowdown of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) in response to meltwater discharges from ice sheets. However, inconsistencies regarding the YD-response of European summer temperatures have cast doubt whether the concept provides a sufficient explanation. Here we present results from a high-resolution global climate simulation together with a new July temperature compilation based on plant indicator species and show that European summers remain warm during the YD. Our climate simulation provides robust physical evidence that atmospheric blocking of cold westerly winds over Fennoscandia is a key mechanism counteracting the cooling impact of an AMOC-slowdown during summer. Despite the persistence of short warm summers, the YD is dominated by a shift to a continental climate with extreme winter to spring cooling and short growing seasons.

  • 168.
    Schäbitz, A.
    et al.
    Division of Dermatology and Venereology, Department of Medicine Solna, and Center for Molecular Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hillig, C.
    Institute of Computational Biology, Helmholtz Zentrum München—German Research Centre for Environmental Health, Ingolstädter Landstrasse 1, 85764, Neuherberg, Germany, Ingolstädter Landstrasse 1.
    Mubarak, M.
    Center for Allergy and Environment (ZAUM), Technical University and Helmholtz Center Munich, Biedersteinerstrasse 29, 80802, Munich, Germany, Biedersteinerstrasse 29.
    Jargosch, M.
    Center for Allergy and Environment (ZAUM), Technical University and Helmholtz Center Munich, Biedersteinerstrasse 29, 80802, Munich, Germany, Biedersteinerstrasse 29; Department of Dermatology and Allergy, Technical University of Munich, Biedersteinerstrasse 29, 80802, Munich, Germany, Biedersteinerstrasse 29.
    Farnoud, A.
    Institute of Computational Biology, Helmholtz Zentrum München—German Research Centre for Environmental Health, Ingolstädter Landstrasse 1, 85764, Neuherberg, Germany, Ingolstädter Landstrasse 1.
    Scala, E.
    Division of Dermatology and Venereology, Department of Medicine Solna, and Center for Molecular Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Dermatology and Venerology, Medical Center—University of Freiburg, Faculty of Medicine, University of Freiburg, Freiburg, Germany.
    Kurzen, N.
    Center for Allergy and Environment (ZAUM), Technical University and Helmholtz Center Munich, Biedersteinerstrasse 29, 80802, Munich, Germany, Biedersteinerstrasse 29.
    Pilz, A. C.
    Department of Dermatology and Allergy, Technical University of Munich, Biedersteinerstrasse 29, 80802, Munich, Germany, Biedersteinerstrasse 29; Department of Dermatology and Venerology, Medical Center—University of Freiburg, Faculty of Medicine, University of Freiburg, Freiburg, Germany.
    Bhalla, Nayanika
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Gene Technology.
    Thomas, J.
    Center for Allergy and Environment (ZAUM), Technical University and Helmholtz Center Munich, Biedersteinerstrasse 29, 80802, Munich, Germany, Biedersteinerstrasse 29.
    Stahle, M.
    Division of Dermatology and Venereology, Department of Medicine Solna, and Center for Molecular Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Biedermann, T.
    Department of Dermatology and Allergy, Technical University of Munich, Biedersteinerstrasse 29, 80802, Munich, Germany, Biedersteinerstrasse 29.
    Schmidt-Weber, C. B.
    Center for Allergy and Environment (ZAUM), Technical University and Helmholtz Center Munich, Biedersteinerstrasse 29, 80802, Munich, Germany, Biedersteinerstrasse 29.
    Theis, F.
    Institute of Computational Biology, Helmholtz Zentrum München—German Research Centre for Environmental Health, Ingolstädter Landstrasse 1, 85764, Neuherberg, Germany, Ingolstädter Landstrasse 1.
    Garzorz-Stark, N.
    Division of Dermatology and Venereology, Department of Medicine Solna, and Center for Molecular Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Dermatology and Allergy, Technical University of Munich, Biedersteinerstrasse 29, 80802, Munich, Germany, Biedersteinerstrasse 29.
    Eyerich, K.
    Division of Dermatology and Venereology, Department of Medicine Solna, and Center for Molecular Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Dermatology and Venerology, Medical Center—University of Freiburg, Faculty of Medicine, University of Freiburg, Freiburg, Germany; Department of Dermatology and Venereology, Unit of Dermatology, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Menden, M. P.
    Institute of Computational Biology, Helmholtz Zentrum München—German Research Centre for Environmental Health, Ingolstädter Landstrasse 1, 85764, Neuherberg, Germany, Ingolstädter Landstrasse 1; Department of Biology, Ludwig-Maximilians University, Goßhadernerstrasse 2, Martinsried, 82152, Germany, Goßhadernerstrasse 2; German Center for Diabetes Research (DZD e.V.), Ingolstädter Landstrasse 1, 85764, Neuherberg, Germany, Ingolstädter Landstrasse 1.
    Eyerich, S.
    Center for Allergy and Environment (ZAUM), Technical University and Helmholtz Center Munich, Biedersteinerstrasse 29, 80802, Munich, Germany, Biedersteinerstrasse 29.
    Spatial transcriptomics landscape of lesions from non-communicable inflammatory skin diseases2022In: Nature Communications, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 13, no 1, article id 7729Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Abundant heterogeneous immune cells infiltrate lesions in chronic inflammatory diseases and characterization of these cells is needed to distinguish disease-promoting from bystander immune cells. Here, we investigate the landscape of non-communicable inflammatory skin diseases (ncISD) by spatial transcriptomics resulting in a large repository of 62,000 spatially defined human cutaneous transcriptomes from 31 patients. Despite the expected immune cell infiltration, we observe rather low numbers of pathogenic disease promoting cytokine transcripts (IFNG, IL13 and IL17A), i.e. >125 times less compared to the mean expression of all other genes over lesional skin sections. Nevertheless, cytokine expression is limited to lesional skin and presented in a disease-specific pattern. Leveraging a density-based spatial clustering method, we identify specific responder gene signatures in direct proximity of cytokines, and confirm that detected cytokine transcripts initiate amplification cascades of up to thousands of specific responder transcripts forming localized epidermal clusters. Thus, within the abundant and heterogeneous infiltrates of ncISD, only a low number of cytokine transcripts and their translated proteins promote disease by initiating an inflammatory amplification cascade in their local microenvironment.

  • 169. Seiboth, Frank
    et al.
    Schropp, Andreas
    Scholz, Maria
    Wittwer, Felix
    Rödel, Christian
    Wünsche, Martin
    Ullsperger, Tobias
    Nolte, Stefan
    Rahomäki, Jussi
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Biomedical and X-ray Physics.
    Parfeniukas, Karolis
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Biomedical and X-ray Physics.
    Giakoumidis, Stylianos
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Biomedical and X-ray Physics.
    Vogt, Ulrich
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Biomedical and X-ray Physics.
    Wagner, Ulrich
    Rau, Christoph
    Boesenberg, Ulrike
    Garrevoet, Jan
    Falkenberg, Gerald
    Galtier, Eric C.
    Ja Lee, Hae
    Nagler, Bob
    Schroer, Christian G.
    Perfect X-ray focusing via fitting corrective glasses to aberrated optics2017In: Nature Communications, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 8Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Due to their short wavelength, X-rays can in principle be focused down to a few nanometres and below. At the same time, it is this short wavelength that puts stringent requirements on X-ray optics and their metrology. Both are limited by today’s technology. In this work, we present accurate at wavelength measurements of residual aberrations of a refractive X-ray lens using ptychography to manufacture a corrective phase plate. Together with the fitted phase plate the optics shows diffraction-limited performance, generating a nearly Gaussian beam profile with a Strehl ratio above 0.8. This scheme can be applied to any other focusing optics, thus solving the X-ray optical problem at synchrotron radiation sources and X-ray free-electron lasers.

  • 170. Sessi, Paolo
    et al.
    Biswas, Rudro R.
    Bathon, Thomas
    Storz, Oliver
    Wilfert, Stefan
    Barla, Alessandro
    Kokh, Konstantin A.
    Tereshchenko, Oleg E.
    Fauth, Kai
    Bode, Matthias
    Balatsky, Alexander V.
    KTH, Centres, Nordic Institute for Theoretical Physics NORDITA.
    Dual nature of magnetic dopants and competing trends in topological insulators2016In: Nature Communications, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 7, article id 12027Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Topological insulators interacting with magnetic impurities have been reported to host several unconventional effects. These phenomena are described within the framework of gapping Dirac quasiparticles due to broken time-reversal symmetry. However, the overwhelming majority of studies demonstrate the presence of a finite density of states near the Dirac point even once topological insulators become magnetic. Here, we map the response of topological states to magnetic impurities at the atomic scale. We demonstrate that magnetic order and gapless states can coexist. We show how this is the result of the delicate balance between two opposite trends, that is, gap opening and emergence of a Dirac node impurity band, both induced by the magnetic dopants. Our results evidence a more intricate and rich scenario with respect to the once generally assumed, showing how different electronic and magnetic states may be generated and controlled in this fascinating class of materials.

  • 171.
    Shipulin, Ilya
    et al.
    Institute for Metallic Materials, Leibniz-IFW Dresden, D-01069, Dresden, Germany; Institute for Solid State and Materials Physics, Technische Universität Dresden, D-01069, Dresden, Germany.
    Stegani, Nadia
    University of Genoa, Via Dodecaneso 33, 16146, Genoa, Italy; Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche (CNR)-SPIN, Corso Perrone 24, 16152, Genova, Italy.
    Maccari, Ilaria
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics, Condensed Matter Theory. Laboratory for Theoretical and Computational Physics, Paul Scherrer Institute, 5232, Villigen PSI, Switzerlanderland.
    Kihou, Kunihiro
    National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Tsukuba, Ibaraki, 305-8568, Japan.
    Lee, Chul Ho
    National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Tsukuba, Ibaraki, 305-8568, Japan.
    Hu, Quanxin
    Tsung-Dao Lee Institute, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai, 201210, China.
    Zheng, Yu
    Tsung-Dao Lee Institute, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai, 201210, China.
    Yang, Fazhi
    Tsung-Dao Lee Institute, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai, 201210, China.
    Li, Yongwei
    Tsung-Dao Lee Institute, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai, 201210, China.
    Yim, Chi Ming
    Tsung-Dao Lee Institute, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai, 201210, China; School of Physics and Astronomy, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai, 200240, China.
    Hühne, Ruben
    Institute for Metallic Materials, Leibniz-IFW Dresden, D-01069, Dresden, Germany.
    Klauss, Hans Henning
    Institute for Solid State and Materials Physics, Technische Universität Dresden, D-01069, Dresden, Germany.
    Putti, Marina
    University of Genoa, Via Dodecaneso 33, 16146, Genoa, Italy; Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche (CNR)-SPIN, Corso Perrone 24, 16152, Genova, Italy.
    Caglieris, Federico
    University of Genoa, Via Dodecaneso 33, 16146, Genoa, Italy; Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche (CNR)-SPIN, Corso Perrone 24, 16152, Genova, Italy; Institute for Solid State Research, Leibniz-IFW Dresden, D-01069, Dresden, Germany.
    Babaev, Egor
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics, Condensed Matter Theory.
    Grinenko, Vadim
    Tsung-Dao Lee Institute, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai, 201210, China; School of Physics and Astronomy, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai, 200240, China.
    Calorimetric evidence for two phase transitions in Calorimetric evidence for two phase transitions in Ba1−xKxFe2As2 with fermion pairing and quadrupling states2023In: Nature Communications, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 14, no 1, article id 6734Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Materials that break multiple symmetries allow the formation of four-fermion condensates above the superconducting critical temperature (T c). Such states can be stabilized by phase fluctuations. Recently, a fermionic quadrupling condensate that breaks the Z 2 time-reversal symmetry was reported in Ba1−xKxFe2As2. A phase transition to the new state of matter should be accompanied by a specific heat anomaly at the critical temperature where Z 2 time-reversal symmetry is broken (TcZ2>Tc). Here, we report on detecting two anomalies in the specific heat of Ba1−xKxFe2As2 at zero magnetic field. The anomaly at the higher temperature is accompanied by the appearance of a spontaneous Nernst effect, indicating the breakdown of Z 2 symmetry. The second anomaly at the lower temperature coincides with the transition to a zero-resistance state, indicating the onset of superconductivity. Our data provide the first example of the appearance of a specific heat anomaly above the superconducting phase transition associated with the broken time-reversal symmetry due to the formation of the novel fermion order.

  • 172.
    Singh, Rahul K.
    et al.
    Complex Fluids and Flows Unit, Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University, Okinawa, Japan.
    Perlekar, Prasad
    TIFR Centre for Interdisciplinary Sciences, Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Gopanpally, Hyderabad, India, Gopanpally.
    Mitra, Dhrubaditya
    KTH, Centres, Nordic Institute for Theoretical Physics NORDITA. Nordita Stockholm University, Hannes Alfvéns väg 12, Stockholm, Sweden, Hannes Alfvéns väg 12.
    Rosti, Marco E.
    Complex Fluids and Flows Unit, Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University, Okinawa, Japan.
    Intermittency in the not-so-smooth elastic turbulence2024In: Nature Communications, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 15, no 1, article id 4070Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Elastic turbulence is the chaotic fluid motion resulting from elastic instabilities due to the addition of polymers in small concentrations at very small Reynolds (Re) numbers. Our direct numerical simulations show that elastic turbulence, though a low Re phenomenon, has more in common with classical, Newtonian turbulence than previously thought. In particular, we find power-law spectra for kinetic energy E(k) ~ k−4 and polymeric energy Ep(k) ~ k−3/2, independent of the Deborah (De) number. This is further supported by calculation of scale-by-scale energy budget which shows a balance between the viscous term and the polymeric term in the momentum equation. In real space, as expected, the velocity field is smooth, i.e., the velocity difference across a length scale r, δu ~ r but, crucially, with a non-trivial sub-leading contribution r3/2 which we extract by using the second difference of velocity. The structure functions of second difference of velocity up to order 6 show clear evidence of intermittency/multifractality. We provide additional evidence in support of this intermittent nature by calculating moments of rate of dissipation of kinetic energy averaged over a ball of radius r, εr, from which we compute the multifractal spectrum.

  • 173.
    Smit, S.
    et al.
    Van der Waals - Zeeman Institute, Institute of Physics, University of Amsterdam, Sciencepark 904, 1098 XH, Amsterdam, The Netherlands, Sciencepark 904.
    Mauri, E.
    Institute for Theoretical Physics and Center for Extreme Matter and Emergent Phenomena, Utrecht University, Utrecht, The Netherlands.
    Bawden, L.
    Van der Waals - Zeeman Institute, Institute of Physics, University of Amsterdam, Sciencepark 904, 1098 XH, Amsterdam, The Netherlands, Sciencepark 904.
    Heringa, F.
    Van der Waals - Zeeman Institute, Institute of Physics, University of Amsterdam, Sciencepark 904, 1098 XH, Amsterdam, The Netherlands, Sciencepark 904.
    Gerritsen, F.
    Van der Waals - Zeeman Institute, Institute of Physics, University of Amsterdam, Sciencepark 904, 1098 XH, Amsterdam, The Netherlands, Sciencepark 904.
    van Heumen, E.
    Van der Waals - Zeeman Institute, Institute of Physics, University of Amsterdam, Sciencepark 904, 1098 XH, Amsterdam, The Netherlands, Sciencepark 904.
    Huang, Y. K.
    Van der Waals - Zeeman Institute, Institute of Physics, University of Amsterdam, Sciencepark 904, 1098 XH, Amsterdam, The Netherlands, Sciencepark 904.
    Kondo, T.
    Institute for Solid State Physics, University of Tokyo, 277-8581, Kashiwa, Chiba, Japan, Chiba.
    Takeuchi, T.
    Energy Materials Laboratory, Toyota Technological Institute 2-12-1 Hisakata Tempaku-ku, 468-8511, Nagoya, Japan.
    Hussey, N. E.
    High Field Magnet Laboratory (HFML-EMFL) and Institute for Molecules and Materials, Radboud University, Toernooiveld 7, 6525 ED, Nijmegen, The Netherlands, Toernooiveld 7; H. H. Wills Physics Laboratory, University of Bristol, Tyndall Avenue, BS8 1TL, Bristol, UK, Tyndall Avenue.
    Allan, M.
    Leiden Institute of Physics, Leiden University, Leiden, The Netherlands.
    Kim, T. K.
    Diamond Light Source, Harwell Campus, OX11 0DE, Didcot, UK, Harwell Campus.
    Cacho, C.
    Diamond Light Source, Harwell Campus, OX11 0DE, Didcot, UK, Harwell Campus.
    Krikun, Alexander
    KTH, Centres, Nordic Institute for Theoretical Physics NORDITA. NORDITA, Stockholm University, Hannes Alfvéns väg 12, 106 91, Stockholm, Sweden, Hannes Alfvéns väg 12.
    Schalm, K.
    Institute-Lorentz for Theoretical Physics, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9506, Leiden, The Netherlands.
    Stoof, H. T.C.
    Institute for Theoretical Physics and Center for Extreme Matter and Emergent Phenomena, Utrecht University, Utrecht, The Netherlands.
    Golden, M. S.
    Van der Waals - Zeeman Institute, Institute of Physics, University of Amsterdam, Sciencepark 904, 1098 XH, Amsterdam, The Netherlands, Sciencepark 904; Dutch Institute for Emergent Phenomena (DIEP), Sciencepark 904, 1098 XH, Amsterdam, The Netherlands, Sciencepark 904.
    Momentum-dependent scaling exponents of nodal self-energies measured in strange metal cuprates and modelled using semi-holography2024In: Nature Communications, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 15, no 1, article id 4581Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The anomalous strange metal phase found in high-Tc cuprates does not follow the conventional condensed-matter principles enshrined in the Fermi liquid and presents a great challenge for theory. Highly precise experimental determination of the electronic self-energy can provide a test bed for theoretical models of strange metals, and angle-resolved photoemission can provide this as a function of frequency, momentum, temperature and doping. Here we show that constant energy cuts through the nodal spectral function in (Pb,Bi)2Sr2−xLaxCuO6+δ have a non-Lorentzian lineshape, consistent with a self-energy that is k dependent. This provides a new test for aspiring theories. Here we show that the experimental data are captured remarkably well by a power law with a k-dependent scaling exponent smoothly evolving with doping, a description that emerges naturally from anti-de Sitter/conformal-field-theory based semi-holography. This puts a spotlight on holographic methods for the quantitative modelling of strongly interacting quantum materials like the cuprate strange metals.

  • 174.
    Solera-Rico, Alberto
    et al.
    Aerospace Engineering Research Group, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, Leganés, Spain; Subdirectorate General of Terrestrial Systems, Spanish National Institute for Aerospace Technology (INTA), San Martín de la Vega, Spain.
    Sanmiguel Vila, Carlos
    Aerospace Engineering Research Group, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, Leganés, Spain; Subdirectorate General of Terrestrial Systems, Spanish National Institute for Aerospace Technology (INTA), San Martín de la Vega, Spain.
    Gómez-López, Miguel
    Subdirectorate General of Terrestrial Systems, Spanish National Institute for Aerospace Technology (INTA), San Martín de la Vega, Spain.
    Wang, Yuning
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Engineering Mechanics, Fluid Mechanics and Engineering Acoustics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Almashjary, Abdulrahman
    Mechanical, Materials, and Aerospace Engineering Department, Illinois Institute of Technology, 60616, Chicago, IL, USA.
    Dawson, Scott T.M.
    Mechanical, Materials, and Aerospace Engineering Department, Illinois Institute of Technology, 60616, Chicago, IL, USA.
    Vinuesa, Ricardo
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Engineering Mechanics, Fluid Mechanics and Engineering Acoustics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    β-Variational autoencoders and transformers for reduced-order modelling of fluid flows2024In: Nature Communications, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 15, no 1, article id 1361Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Variational autoencoder architectures have the potential to develop reduced-order models for chaotic fluid flows. We propose a method for learning compact and near-orthogonal reduced-order models using a combination of a β-variational autoencoder and a transformer, tested on numerical data from a two-dimensional viscous flow in both periodic and chaotic regimes. The β-variational autoencoder is trained to learn a compact latent representation of the flow velocity, and the transformer is trained to predict the temporal dynamics in latent-space. Using the β-variational autoencoder to learn disentangled representations in latent-space, we obtain a more interpretable flow model with features that resemble those observed in the proper orthogonal decomposition, but with a more efficient representation. Using Poincaré maps, the results show that our method can capture the underlying dynamics of the flow outperforming other prediction models. The proposed method has potential applications in other fields such as weather forecasting, structural dynamics or biomedical engineering.

  • 175.
    Song, S.
    et al.
    Norwegian Univ Sci & Technol, Dept Phys, N-7491 Trondheim, Norway.;Norwegian Univ Sci & Technol, PoreLab, N-7491 Trondheim, Norway..
    Lonsethagen, K.
    Norwegian Univ Sci & Technol, Dept Phys, N-7491 Trondheim, Norway.;Norwegian Univ Sci & Technol, PoreLab, N-7491 Trondheim, Norway..
    Laurell, Fredrik
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics.
    Hawkins, T. W.
    Clemson Univ, Dept Mat Sci & Engn, Clemson, SC 29634 USA..
    Ballato, J.
    Clemson Univ, Dept Mat Sci & Engn, Clemson, SC 29634 USA..
    Fokine, Michael
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics.
    Gibson, Ursula J.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics.
    Laser restructuring and photoluminescence of glass-clad GaSb/Si-core optical fibres2019In: Nature Communications, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 10, article id 1790Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Semiconductor-core optical fibres have potential applications in photonics and optoelectronics due to large nonlinear optical coefficients and an extended transparency window. Laser processing can impose large temperature gradients, an ability that has been used to improve the uniformity of unary fibre cores, and to inscribe compositional variations in alloy systems. Interest in an integrated light-emitting element suggests a move from Group IV to III-V materials, or a core that contains both. This paper describes the fabrication of GaSb/Si core fibres, and a subsequent CO2 laser treatment that aggregates large regions of GaSb without suppressing room temperature photoluminescence. The ability to isolate a large III-V crystalline region within the Si core is an important step towards embedding semiconductor light sources within infrared light-transmitting silicon optical fibre.

  • 176.
    Song, Seunghan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Laser Physics. Norwegian Univ Sci & Technol, PoreLab, N-7491 Trondheim, Norway.;Norwegian Univ Sci & Technol, Dept Phys, N-7491 Trondheim, Norway..
    Laurell, Fredrik
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Laser Physics.
    Meehan, Bailey
    Clemson Univ, Dept Mat Sci & Engn, Clemson, SC 29634 USA..
    Hawkins, Thomas W.
    Clemson Univ, Dept Mat Sci & Engn, Clemson, SC 29634 USA..
    Ballato, John
    Clemson Univ, Dept Mat Sci & Engn, Clemson, SC 29634 USA..
    Gibson, Ursula J.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Laser Physics. Norwegian Univ Sci & Technol, PoreLab, N-7491 Trondheim, Norway.;Norwegian Univ Sci & Technol, Dept Phys, N-7491 Trondheim, Norway.;Clemson Univ, Dept Mat Sci & Engn, Clemson, SC 29634 USA..
    Localised structuring of metal-semiconductor cores in silica clad fibres using laser-driven thermal gradients2022In: Nature Communications, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 13, no 1, article id 2680Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The authors show that micron size fibers comprised of semiconductor and metallic materials can be purified or doped, recrystallized or have the constituents rearranged into a variety of structures with device prospects. The molten core drawing method allows scalable fabrication of novel core fibres with kilometre lengths. With metal and semiconducting components combined in a glass-clad fibre, CO2 laser irradiation was used to write localised structures in the core materials. Thermal gradients in axial and transverse directions allowed the controlled introduction, segregation and chemical reaction of metal components within an initially pure silicon core, and restructuring of heterogeneous material. Gold and tin longitudinal electrode fabrication, segregation of GaSb and Si into parallel layers, and Al doping of a GaSb core were demonstrated. Gold was introduced into Si fibres to purify the core or weld an exposed fibre core to a Si wafer. Ga and Sb introduced from opposite ends of a silicon fibre reacted to form III-V GaSb within the Group IV Si host, as confirmed by structural and chemical analysis and room temperature photoluminescence.

  • 177.
    Sounart, Hailey
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Gene Technology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Voronin, Denis
    Systems Genomics Section, Laboratory of Parasitic Diseases, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, USA.
    Masarapu, Yuvarani
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Gene Technology.
    Chung, Matthew
    Systems Genomics Section, Laboratory of Parasitic Diseases, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, USA.
    Saarenpää, Sami
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Gene Technology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Ghedin, Elodie
    Systems Genomics Section, Laboratory of Parasitic Diseases, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, USA.
    Giacomello, Stefania
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Gene Technology.
    Miniature spatial transcriptomics for studying parasite-endosymbiont relationships at the micro scale2023In: Nature Communications, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 14, no 1, article id 6500Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Several important human infectious diseases are caused by microscale-sized parasitic nematodes like filarial worms. Filarial worms have their own spatial tissue organization; to uncover this tissue structure, we need methods that can spatially resolve these miniature specimens. Most filarial worms evolved a mutualistic association with endosymbiotic bacteria Wolbachia. However, the mechanisms underlying the dependency of filarial worms on the fitness of these bacteria remain unknown. As Wolbachia is essential for the development, reproduction, and survival of filarial worms, we spatially explored how Wolbachia interacts with the worm’s reproductive system by performing a spatial characterization using Spatial Transcriptomics (ST) across a posterior region containing reproductive tissue and developing embryos of adult female Brugia malayi worms. We provide a proof-of-concept for miniature-ST to explore spatial gene expression patterns in small sample types, demonstrating the method’s ability to uncover nuanced tissue region expression patterns, observe the spatial localization of key B. malayi - Wolbachia pathway genes, and co-localize the B. malayi spatial transcriptome in Wolbachia tissue regions, also under antibiotic treatment. We envision our approach will open up new avenues for the study of infectious diseases caused by micro-scale parasitic worms.

  • 178.
    Sridharan, Vignesh
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems Analysis.
    Broad, Oliver
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems Analysis.
    Shivakumar, Abhishek
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems Analysis.
    Howells, Mark I.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems Analysis.
    Boehlert, B.
    Groves, D. G.
    Rogner, Hans-Holger
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems Analysis.
    Taliotis, C.
    Neumann, J. E.
    Strzepek, K. M.
    Lempert, R.
    Joyce, B.
    Huber-Lee, A.
    Cervigni, R.
    Resilience of the Eastern African electricity sector to climate driven changes in hydropower generation2019In: Nature Communications, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 10, no 1, article id 302Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Notwithstanding current heavy dependence on gas-fired electricity generation in the Eastern African Power Pool (EAPP), hydropower is expected to play an essential role in improving electricity access in the region. Expansion planning of electricity infrastructure is critical to support investment and maintaining balanced consumer electricity prices. Variations in water availability due to a changing climate could leave hydro infrastructure stranded or result in underutilization of available resources. In this study, we develop a framework consisting of long-term models for electricity supply and water systems management, to assess the vulnerability of potential expansion plans to the effects of climate change. We find that the most resilient EAPP rollout strategy corresponds to a plan optimised for a slightly wetter climate compared to historical trends. This study demonstrates that failing to climate-proof infrastructure investments can result in significant electricity price fluctuations in selected countries (Uganda & Tanzania) while others, such as Egypt, are less vulnerable.

  • 179. Stödberg, T
    et al.
    Lundeberg, Joakim
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Gene Technology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Kurian, Manju A.
    et al.,
    Mutations in SLC12A5 in epilepsy of infancy with migrating focal seizures2015In: Nature Communications, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 6, article id 8038Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The potassium-chloride co-transporter KCC2, encoded by SLC12A5, plays a fundamental role in fast synaptic inhibition by maintaining a hyperpolarizing gradient for chloride ions. KCC2 dysfunction has been implicated in human epilepsy, but to date, no monogenic KCC2-related epilepsy disorders have been described. Here we show recessive loss-of-function SLC12A5 mutations in patients with a severe infantile-onset pharmacoresistant epilepsy syndrome, epilepsy of infancy with migrating focal seizures (EIMFS). Decreased KCC2 surface expression, reduced protein glycosylation and impaired chloride extrusion contribute to loss of KCC2 activity, thereby impairing normal synaptic inhibition and promoting neuronal excitability in this early-onset epileptic encephalopathy.

  • 180.
    Subbotina, Elena
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Wood Chemistry and Pulp Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Ram, Farsa
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites.
    Dvinskikh, Sergey
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Applied Physical Chemistry.
    Berglund, Lars
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Olsen, Peter
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites.
    Aqueous synthesis of highly functional, hydrophobic, and chemically recyclable cellulose nanomaterials through oxime ligation2022In: Nature Communications, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 13, no 1, article id 6924Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cellulose nanofibril (CNF) materials are candidates for the sustainable development of high mechanical performance nanomaterials. Due to inherent hydrophilicity and limited functionality range, most applications require chemical modification of CNF. However, targeted transformations directly on CNF are cumbersome due to the propensity of CNF to aggregate in non-aqueous solvents at high concentrations, complicating the choice of suitable reagents and requiring tedious separations of the final product. This work addresses this challenge by developing a general, entirely water-based, and experimentally simple methodology for functionalizing CNF, providing aliphatic, allylic, propargylic, azobenzylic, and substituted benzylic functional groups. The first step is NaIO4 oxidation to dialdehyde-CNF in the wet cake state, followed by oxime ligation with O-substituted hydroxylamines. The increased hydrolytic stability of oximes removes the need for reductive stabilization as often required for the analogous imines where aldehyde groups react with amines in water. Overall, the process provides a tailored degree of nanofibril functionalization (2-4.5 mmol/g) with the possible reversible detachment of the functionality under mildly acidic conditions, resulting in the reformation of dialdehyde CNF. The modified CNF materials were assessed for potential applications in green electronics and triboelectric nanogenerators. Water is a standing challenge in the chemical modification of cellulose nanofibrils. Here, authors employ oxime-ligation to solve this by direct covalent chemistry on dialdehyde-CNF in water and assess the material for potential applications in green electronics and triboelectric nanogenerators.

  • 181.
    Sunadome, Kazunori
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Physiol & Pharmacol, S-17177 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Erickson, Alek G. G.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Physiol & Pharmacol, S-17177 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Kah, Delf
    Univ Erlangen Nurnberg, Dept Phys, D-91052 Erlangen, Germany..
    Fabry, Ben
    Univ Erlangen Nurnberg, Dept Phys, D-91052 Erlangen, Germany..
    Adori, Csaba
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Neurosci, S-17177 Stockholm, Sweden.;Stockholm Univ, Wenner Gren Inst, Dept Mol Biosci, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Kameneva, Polina
    Med Univ Vienna, Ctr Brain Res, Dept Neuroimmunol, A-1090 Vienna, Austria..
    Faure, Louis
    Med Univ Vienna, Ctr Brain Res, Dept Neuroimmunol, A-1090 Vienna, Austria..
    Kanatani, Shigeaki
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Biochem & Biophys, Div Mol Neurobiol, S-17177 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Kaucka, Marketa
    Max Planck Inst Evolutionary Biol, August Thienemann Str 2, D-24306 Plon, Germany..
    Ellstroem, Ivar Dehnisch
    Spinalis Fdn, S-16970 Solna, Sweden..
    Tesarova, Marketa
    Brno Univ Technol, Cent European Inst Technol, Brno, Czech Republic..
    Zikmund, Tomas
    Brno Univ Technol, Cent European Inst Technol, Brno, Czech Republic..
    Kaiser, Jozef
    Brno Univ Technol, Cent European Inst Technol, Brno, Czech Republic..
    Edwards, Steven
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Biophysics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Maki, Koichiro
    Kyoto Univ, Inst Life & Med Sci, Lab Biomech, Kyoto 6068507, Japan..
    Adachi, Taiji
    Kyoto Univ, Inst Life & Med Sci, Lab Biomech, Kyoto 6068507, Japan..
    Yamamoto, Takuya
    Kyoto Univ, Inst Adv Study Human Biol ASHBi, Kyoto 6068501, Japan.;Kyoto Univ, Ctr iPS Cell Res & Applicat CiRA, Kyoto 6068507, Japan..
    Fried, Kaj
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Neurosci, S-17177 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Adameyko, Igor
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Physiol & Pharmacol, S-17177 Stockholm, Sweden.;Med Univ Vienna, Ctr Brain Res, Dept Neuroimmunol, A-1090 Vienna, Austria..
    Directionality of developing skeletal muscles is set by mechanical forces2023In: Nature Communications, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 14, no 1, article id 3060Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The mechanisms that drive myocyte orientation and fusion to control muscle directionality are not well understood. Here authors show that the developing skeleton produces mechanical tension that instructs the directional outgrowth of skeletal muscles. Formation of oriented myofibrils is a key event in musculoskeletal development. However, the mechanisms that drive myocyte orientation and fusion to control muscle directionality in adults remain enigmatic. Here, we demonstrate that the developing skeleton instructs the directional outgrowth of skeletal muscle and other soft tissues during limb and facial morphogenesis in zebrafish and mouse. Time-lapse live imaging reveals that during early craniofacial development, myoblasts condense into round clusters corresponding to future muscle groups. These clusters undergo oriented stretch and alignment during embryonic growth. Genetic perturbation of cartilage patterning or size disrupts the directionality and number of myofibrils in vivo. Laser ablation of musculoskeletal attachment points reveals tension imposed by cartilage expansion on the forming myofibers. Application of continuous tension using artificial attachment points, or stretchable membrane substrates, is sufficient to drive polarization of myocyte populations in vitro. Overall, this work outlines a biomechanical guidance mechanism that is potentially useful for engineering functional skeletal muscle.

  • 182.
    Tan, Tien-Chye
    et al.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Industrial Biotechnology.
    Kracher, Daniel
    Gandini, Rosaria
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Industrial Biotechnology.
    Sygmund, Christoph
    Kittl, Roman
    Haltrich, Dietmar
    Hallberg, B Martin
    Ludwig, Roland
    Divne, Christina
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Industrial Biotechnology.
    Structural basis for cellobiose dehydrogenase action during oxidative cellulose degradation2015In: Nature Communications, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 6, p. 7542-7542Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A new paradigm for cellulose depolymerization by fungi focuses on an oxidative mechanism involving cellobiose dehydrogenases (CDH) and copper-dependent lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases (LPMO); however, mechanistic studies have been hampered by the lack of structural information regarding CDH. CDH contains a haem-binding cytochrome (CYT) connected via a flexible linker to a flavin-dependent dehydrogenase (DH). Electrons are generated from cellobiose oxidation catalysed by DH and shuttled via CYT to LPMO. Here we present structural analyses that provide a comprehensive picture of CDH conformers, which govern the electron transfer between redox centres. Using structure-based site-directed mutagenesis, rapid kinetics analysis and molecular docking, we demonstrate that flavin-to-haem interdomain electron transfer (IET) is enabled by a haem propionate group and that rapid IET requires a closed CDH state in which the propionate is tightly enfolded by DH. Following haem reduction, CYT reduces LPMO to initiate oxygen activation at the copper centre and subsequent cellulose depolymerization.

  • 183.
    Tang, Jianwei
    et al.
    Zhejiang Univ, Ctr Opt & Electromagnet Res, State Key Lab Modern Opt Instrumentat, Natl Engn Res Ctr Opt Instrumentat,JORCEP,Coll Op, Hangzhou 310058, Zhejiang, Peoples R China..
    Xia, Juan
    Zhejiang Univ, Ctr Opt & Electromagnet Res, State Key Lab Modern Opt Instrumentat, Natl Engn Res Ctr Opt Instrumentat,JORCEP,Coll Op, Hangzhou 310058, Zhejiang, Peoples R China..
    Fang, Maodong
    South China Normal Univ, South China Acad Adv Optoelect, Ctr Opt & Electromagnet Res, ZJU SCNU Joint Ctr Photon, Guangzhou 510006, Guangdong, Peoples R China..
    Bao, Fanglin
    South China Normal Univ, South China Acad Adv Optoelect, Ctr Opt & Electromagnet Res, ZJU SCNU Joint Ctr Photon, Guangzhou 510006, Guangdong, Peoples R China..
    Cao, Guanjun
    South China Normal Univ, South China Acad Adv Optoelect, Ctr Opt & Electromagnet Res, ZJU SCNU Joint Ctr Photon, Guangzhou 510006, Guangdong, Peoples R China..
    Shen, Jianqi
    Zhejiang Univ, Ctr Opt & Electromagnet Res, State Key Lab Modern Opt Instrumentat, Natl Engn Res Ctr Opt Instrumentat,JORCEP,Coll Op, Hangzhou 310058, Zhejiang, Peoples R China..
    Evans, Julian
    Zhejiang Univ, Ctr Opt & Electromagnet Res, State Key Lab Modern Opt Instrumentat, Natl Engn Res Ctr Opt Instrumentat,JORCEP,Coll Op, Hangzhou 310058, Zhejiang, Peoples R China..
    He, Sailing
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Electrical Engineering, Electromagnetic Engineering. Zhejiang Univ, Ctr Opt & Electromagnet Res, State Key Lab Modern Opt Instrumentat, Natl Engn Res Ctr Opt Instrumentat,JORCEP,Coll Op, Hangzhou 310058, Zhejiang, Peoples R China.;South China Normal Univ, South China Acad Adv Optoelect, Ctr Opt & Electromagnet Res, ZJU SCNU Joint Ctr Photon, Guangzhou 510006, Guangdong, Peoples R China..
    Selective far-field addressing of coupled quantum dots in a plasmonic nanocavity2018In: Nature Communications, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 9, article id 1705Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Plasmon-emitter hybrid nanocavity systems exhibit strong plasmon-exciton interactions at the single-emitter level, showing great potential as testbeds and building blocks for quantum optics and informatics. However, reported experiments involve only one addressable emitting site, which limits their relevance for many fundamental questions and devices involving interactions among emitters. Here we open up this critical degree of freedom by demonstrating selective far-field excitation and detection of two coupled quantum dot emitters in a U-shaped gold nanostructure. The gold nanostructure functions as a nanocavity to enhance emitter interactions and a nanoantenna to make the emitters selectively excitable and detectable. When we selectively excite or detect either emitter, we observe photon emission predominantly from the target emitter with up to 132-fold Purcell-enhanced emission rate, indicating individual addressability and strong plasmon-exciton interactions. Our work represents a step towards a broad class of plasmonic devices that will enable faster, more compact optics, communication and computation.

  • 184.
    The, Matthew
    et al.
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Käll, Lukas
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Gene Technology.
    Focus on the spectra that matter by clustering of quantification data in shotgun proteomics2020In: Nature Communications, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 11, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In shotgun proteomics, the analysis of label-free quantification experiments is typically limited by the identification rate and the noise level in the quantitative data. This generally causes a low sensitivity in differential expression analysis. Here, we propose a quantification-first approach for peptides that reverses the classical identification-first workflow, thereby preventing valuable information from being discarded in the identification stage. Specifically, we introduce a method, Quandenser, that applies unsupervised clustering on both MS1 and MS2 level to summarize all analytes of interest without assigning identities. This reduces search time due to the data reduction. We can now employ open modification and de novo searches to identify analytes of interest that would have gone unnoticed in traditional pipelines. Quandenser+Triqler outperforms the state-of-the-art method MaxQuant+Perseus, consistently reporting more differentially abundant proteins for all tested datasets. Software is available for all major operating systems at https://github.com/statisticalbiotechnology/quandenser, under Apache 2.0 license. Matching mass spectra to peptide sequences is the usual first step in proteomics data analysis, often followed by peptide quantification. Here, the authors show that clustering and quantifying mass spectral features prior to peptide identification can increase the sensitivity of label-free quantitative proteomics.

  • 185.
    Thorén, Per-Anders
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Nanostructure Physics.
    de Wijn, Astrid S.
    Borgani, Riccardo
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Nanostructure Physics.
    Forchheimer, Daniel
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Nanostructure Physics.
    Haviland, David B.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Nanostructure Physics.
    Imaging high-speed friction at the nanometer scale2016In: Nature Communications, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 7, article id 13836Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Friction is a complicated phenomenon involving nonlinear dynamics at different length and time scales. Understanding its microscopic origin requires methods for measuring force on nanometer-scale asperities sliding at velocities reaching centimetres per second. Despite enormous advances in experimental technique, this combination of small length scale and high velocity remain elusive. We present a technique for rapidly measuring the frictional forces on a single asperity over a velocity range from zero to several centimetres per second. At each image pixel we obtain the velocity dependence of both conservative and dissipative forces, revealing the transition from stick-slip to smooth sliding friction. We explain measurements on graphite using a modified Prandtl-Tomlinson model, including the damped elastic deformation of the asperity. With its improved force sensitivity and small sliding amplitude, our method enables rapid and detailed surface mapping of the velocity dependence of frictional forces with less than 10 nm spatial resolution.

  • 186.
    Tian, Jingyi
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Laser Physics. State Key Laboratory of Modern Optical Instrumentation, College of Optical Science and Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, 310027, China.
    Luo, Hao
    Zhejiang Univ, Coll Opt Sci & Engn, State Key Lab Modern Opt Instrumentat, Hangzhou 310027, Zhejiang, Peoples R China..
    Yang, Yuanqing
    Univ Southern Denmark, SDU Nano Opt, Campusvej 55, DK-5230 Odense, Denmark..
    Ding, Fei
    Univ Southern Denmark, SDU Nano Opt, Campusvej 55, DK-5230 Odense, Denmark..
    Qu, Yurui
    Zhejiang Univ, Coll Opt Sci & Engn, State Key Lab Modern Opt Instrumentat, Hangzhou 310027, Zhejiang, Peoples R China.;MIT, Dept Phys, Cambridge, MA 02139 USA..
    Zhao, Ding
    Tech Univ Denmark, DTU Danchip Cen, DK-2800 Lyngby, Denmark..
    Qiu, Min
    Zhejiang Univ, Coll Opt Sci & Engn, State Key Lab Modern Opt Instrumentat, Hangzhou 310027, Zhejiang, Peoples R China.;Westlake Univ, Sch Engn, 18 Shilongshan Rd, Hangzhou 310024, Zhejiang, Peoples R China.;Westlake Inst Adv Study, Inst Adv Technol, 18 Shilongshan Rd, Hangzhou 310024, Zhejiang, Peoples R China..
    Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I.
    Univ Southern Denmark, SDU Nano Opt, Campusvej 55, DK-5230 Odense, Denmark..
    Active control of anapole states by structuring the phase-change alloy Ge2Sb2Te52019In: Nature Communications, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 10, article id 396Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    High-index dielectric nanoparticles supporting a distinct series of Mie resonances have enabled a new class of optical antennas with unprecedented functionalities. The great wealth of multipolar responses has not only brought in new physical insight but also spurred practical applications. However, how to make such a colorful resonance palette actively tunable is still elusive. Here, we demonstrate that the structured phase-change alloy Ge2Sb2Te5 (GST) can support a diverse set of multipolar Mie resonances with active tunability. By harnessing the dramatic optical contrast of GST, we realize broadband (del lambda/lambda similar to 15%) mode shifting between an electric dipole resonance and an anapole state. Active control of higher-order anapoles and multimodal tuning are also investigated, which make the structured GST serve as a multispectral optical switch with high extinction contrasts (>6 dB). With all these findings, our study provides a new direction for realizing active nanophotonic devices.

  • 187.
    Tian, Weiqian
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Vahid Mohammadi, Armin
    Auburn Univ, Dept Mech & Mat Engn, Auburn, AL 36849 USA..
    Wang, Zhen
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Ouyang, Liangqi
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Beidaghi, Majid
    Auburn Univ, Dept Mech & Mat Engn, Auburn, AL 36849 USA..
    Hamedi, Mahiar M.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Layer-by-layer self-assembly of pillared two-dimensional multilayers2019In: Nature Communications, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 10, article id 2558Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We report Layer-by-Layer (LbL) self-assembly of pillared two-dimensional (2D) multilayers, from water, onto a wide range of substrates. This LbL method uses a small molecule, tris(2-aminoethyl) amine (TAEA), and a colloidal dispersion of Ti3C2Tx MXene to LbL self-assemble (MXene/TAEA)(n )multilayers, where n denotes the number of bilayers. Assembly with TAEA results in highly ordered (MXene/TAEA)(n) multilayers where the TAEA expands the interlayer spacing of MXene flakes by only similar to 1 angstrom and reinforces the interconnection between them. The TAEA-pillared MXene multilayers show the highest electronic conductivity of 7.3 x10(4) S m(-1) compared with all reported MXene multilayers fabricated by LbL technique. The (MXene/ TAEA)(n) multilayers could be used as electrodes for flexible all-solid-state supercapacitors delivering a high volumetric capacitance of 583 F cm(-3) and high energy and power densities of 3.0 Wh L-1 and 4400 W L-1, respectively. This strategy enables large-scale fabrication of highly conductive pillared MXene multilayers, and potentially fabrication of other 2D heterostructures.

  • 188. Tomas-Roca, L.
    et al.
    Qiu, Z.
    Fransén, Erik
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Gokhale, R.
    Bulovaite, E.
    Price, D. J.
    Komiyama, N. H.
    Grant, S. G. N.
    Developmental disruption and restoration of brain synaptome architecture in the murine Pax6 neurodevelopmental disease model2022In: Nature Communications, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 13, no 1, article id 6836Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Neurodevelopmental disorders of genetic origin delay the acquisition of normal abilities and cause disabling phenotypes. Nevertheless, spontaneous attenuation and even complete amelioration of symptoms in early childhood and adolescence can occur in many disorders, suggesting that brain circuits possess an intrinsic capacity to overcome the deficits arising from some germline mutations. We examined the molecular composition of almost a trillion excitatory synapses on a brain-wide scale between birth and adulthood in mice carrying a mutation in the homeobox transcription factor Pax6, a neurodevelopmental disorder model. Pax6 haploinsufficiency had no impact on total synapse number at any age. By contrast, the molecular composition of excitatory synapses, the postnatal expansion of synapse diversity and the acquisition of normal synaptome architecture were delayed in all brain regions, interfering with networks and electrophysiological simulations of cognitive functions. Specific excitatory synapse types and subtypes were affected in two key developmental age-windows. These phenotypes were reversed within 2-3 weeks of onset, restoring synapse diversity and synaptome architecture to the normal developmental trajectory. Synapse subtypes with rapid protein turnover mediated the synaptome remodeling. This brain-wide capacity for remodeling of synapse molecular composition to recover and maintain the developmental trajectory of synaptome architecture may help confer resilience to neurodevelopmental genetic disorders. 

  • 189.
    Tyrode, Eric
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Sengupta, Sanghamitra
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Sthoer, Adrien
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Identifying Eigen-like hydrated protons at negatively charged interfaces2020In: Nature Communications, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 11, no 1, article id 493Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite the importance of the hydrogen ion in a wide range of biological, chemical, and physical processes, its molecular structure in solution remains lively debated. Progress has been primarily hampered by the extreme diffuse nature of the vibrational signatures of hydrated protons in bulk solution. Using the inherently surface-specific vibrational sum frequency spectroscopy technique, we show that at selected negatively charged interfaces, a resolved spectral feature directly linked to the H3O+ core in an Eigen-like species can be readily identified in a biologically compatible pH range. Centered at ~2540 cm−1, the band is seen to shift to ~1875 cm−1 when forming D3O+ upon isotopic substitution. The results offer the possibility of tracking and understanding from a molecular perspective the behavior of hydrated protons at charged interfaces.

  • 190. Usov, Ivan
    et al.
    Nyström, Gustav
    Adamcik, Jozef
    Handschin, Stephan
    Schütze, Christina
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Fall, Andreas
    Bergstrom, Lennart
    Mezzenga, Raffaele
    Understanding nanocellulose chirality and structure-properties relationship at the single fibril level2015In: Nature Communications, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 6, article id 7564Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Nanocellulose fibrils are ubiquitous in nature and nanotechnologies but their mesoscopic structural assembly is not yet fully understood. Here we study the structural features of rod-like cellulose nanoparticles on a single particle level, by applying statistical polymer physics concepts on electron and atomic force microscopy images, and we assess their physical properties via quantitative nanomechanical mapping. We show evidence of right-handed chirality, observed on both bundles and on single fibrils. Statistical analysis of contours from microscopy images shows a non-Gaussian kink angle distribution. This is inconsistent with a structure consisting of alternating amorphous and crystalline domains along the contour and supports process-induced kink formation. The intrinsic mechanical properties of nanocellulose are extracted from nanoindentation and persistence length method for transversal and longitudinal directions, respectively. The structural analysis is pushed to the level of single cellulose polymer chains, and their smallest associated unit with a proposed 2 x 2 chain-packing arrangement.

  • 191.
    Vickovic, S.
    et al.
    Broad Inst MIT & Harvard, Klarman Cell Observ, Cambridge, MA 02142 USA.;MIT, Dept Biol, Cambridge, MA 02139 USA.;New York Genome Ctr, New York, NY 10013 USA.;Stockholm Univ, Dept Biochem & Biophys, Sci Life Lab, Solna, Sweden..
    Lötstedt, Britta
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Gene Technology. Broad Inst MIT & Harvard, Klarman Cell Observ, Cambridge, MA 02142 USA.;MIT, Dept Biol Engn, 77 Massachusetts Ave, Cambridge, MA 02139 USA..
    Klughammer, J.
    Broad Inst MIT & Harvard, Klarman Cell Observ, Cambridge, MA 02142 USA..
    Mages, S.
    Broad Inst MIT & Harvard, Klarman Cell Observ, Cambridge, MA 02142 USA..
    Segerstolpe, A.
    Broad Inst MIT & Harvard, Klarman Cell Observ, Cambridge, MA 02142 USA..
    Rozenblatt-Rosen, O.
    Broad Inst MIT & Harvard, Klarman Cell Observ, Cambridge, MA 02142 USA.;Genentech Inc, 1 DNA Way, San Francisco, CA 94080 USA..
    Regev, A.
    Broad Inst MIT & Harvard, Klarman Cell Observ, Cambridge, MA 02142 USA.;MIT, Howard Hughes Med Inst, Cambridge, MA 02139 USA.;MIT, Koch Inst Integrat Canc Res, Dept Biol, Cambridge, MA 02139 USA.;Genentech Inc, 1 DNA Way, San Francisco, CA 94080 USA..
    SM-Omics is an automated platform for high-throughput spatial multi-omics2022In: Nature Communications, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 13, no 1, article id 795Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The spatial organization of cells and molecules plays a key role in tissue function in homeostasis and disease. Spatial transcriptomics has recently emerged as a key technique to capture and positionally barcode RNAs directly in tissues. Here, we advance the application of spatial transcriptomics at scale, by presenting Spatial Multi-Omics (SM-Omics) as a fully automated, high-throughput all-sequencing based platform for combined and spatially resolved transcriptomics and antibody-based protein measurements. SM-Omics uses DNA-barcoded antibodies, immunofluorescence or a combination thereof, to scale and combine spatial transcriptomics and spatial antibody-based multiplex protein detection. SM-Omics allows processing of up to 64 in situ spatial reactions or up to 96 sequencing-ready libraries, of high complexity, in a similar to 2 days process. We demonstrate SM-Omics in the mouse brain, spleen and colorectal cancer model, showing its broad utility as a high-throughput platform for spatial multi-omics.

  • 192.
    Vickovic, Sanja
    et al.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Gene Technology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Stahl, Patrik L.
    Salmén, Fredrik
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Giatrellis, Sarantis
    Westholm, Jakub Orzechowski
    Mollbrink, Annelie
    Navarro, Jose Fernandez
    Custodio, Joaquin
    Bienko, Magda
    Sutton, Lesley-Ann
    Rosenquist, Richard
    Frisen, Jonas
    Lundeberg, Joakim
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Gene Technology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Massive and parallel expression profiling using microarrayed single-cell sequencing2016In: Nature Communications, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 7, article id 13182Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Single-cell transcriptome analysis overcomes problems inherently associated with averaging gene expression measurements in bulk analysis. However, single-cell analysis is currently challenging in terms of cost, throughput and robustness. Here, we present a method enabling massive microarray-based barcoding of expression patterns in single cells, termed MASC-seq. This technology enables both imaging and high-throughput single-cell analysis, characterizing thousands of single-cell transcriptomes per day at a low cost (0.13 USD/cell), which is two orders of magnitude less than commercially available systems. Our novel approach provides data in a rapid and simple way. Therefore, MASC-seq has the potential to accelerate the study of subtle clonal dynamics and help provide critical insights into disease development and other biological processes.

  • 193.
    Vihervaara, Anniina
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Gene Technology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, 14853, USA.
    Versluis, Philip
    Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, 14853, USA.
    Himanen, Samu V.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Gene Technology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Lis, John T.
    Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, 14853, USA.
    PRO-IP-seq tracks molecular modifications of engaged Pol II complexes at nucleotide resolution2023In: Nature Communications, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 14, no 1, article id 7039Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    RNA Polymerase II (Pol II) is a multi-subunit complex that undergoes covalent modifications as transcription proceeds through genes and enhancers. Rate-limiting steps of transcription control Pol II recruitment, site and degree of initiation, pausing duration, productive elongation, nascent transcript processing, transcription termination, and Pol II recycling. Here, we develop Precision Run-On coupled to Immuno-Precipitation sequencing (PRO-IP-seq), which double-selects nascent RNAs and transcription complexes, and track phosphorylation of Pol II C-terminal domain (CTD) at nucleotide-resolution. We uncover precise positional control of Pol II CTD phosphorylation as transcription proceeds from the initiating nucleotide (+1 nt), through early (+18 to +30 nt) and late (+31 to +60 nt) promoter-proximal pause, and into productive elongation. Pol II CTD is predominantly unphosphorylated from initiation until the early pause-region, whereas serine-2- and serine-5-phosphorylations are preferentially deposited in the later pause-region. Upon pause-release, serine-7-phosphorylation rapidly increases and dominates over the region where Pol II assembles elongation factors and accelerates to its full elongational speed. Interestingly, tracking CTD modifications upon heat-induced transcriptional reprogramming demonstrates that Pol II with phosphorylated CTD remains paused on thousands of heat-repressed genes. These results uncover dynamic Pol II regulation at rate-limiting steps of transcription and provide a nucleotide-resolution technique for tracking composition of engaged transcription complexes.

  • 194.
    Vinuesa, Ricardo
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Engineering Mechanics, Fluid Mechanics and Engineering Acoustics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Azizpour, Hossein
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Intelligent systems, Robotics, Perception and Learning, RPL.
    Leite, Iolanda
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Intelligent systems, Robotics, Perception and Learning, RPL.
    Balaam, Madeline
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Dignum, V.
    Domisch, S.
    Felländer, A.
    Langhans, S. D.
    Tegmark, M.
    Nerini, Francesco Fuso
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems Analysis.
    The role of artificial intelligence in achieving the Sustainable Development Goals2020In: Nature Communications, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 11, no 1, article id 233Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The emergence of artificial intelligence (AI) and its progressively wider impact on many sectors requires an assessment of its effect on the achievement of the Sustainable Development Goals. Using a consensus-based expert elicitation process, we find that AI can enable the accomplishment of 134 targets across all the goals, but it may also inhibit 59 targets. However, current research foci overlook important aspects. The fast development of AI needs to be supported by the necessary regulatory insight and oversight for AI-based technologies to enable sustainable development. Failure to do so could result in gaps in transparency, safety, and ethical standards.

  • 195.
    von der Weid, Jean Pierre
    et al.
    Centre for Telecommunication Studies, Pontifical Catholic University of Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, 22451-900, RJ, Brazil.
    Correia, Marlon M.
    Centre for Telecommunication Studies, Pontifical Catholic University of Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, 22451-900, RJ, Brazil.
    Tovar, Pedro
    Department of Physics, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, K1N 6N5, Ontario, Canada.
    Gomes, Anderson S.L.
    Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, Recife, 50670-901, PE, Brazil.
    Margulis, Walter
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Laser Physics. Centre for Telecommunication Studies, Pontifical Catholic University of Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, 22451-900, RJ, Brazil, RJ.
    A mode-locked random laser generating transform-limited optical pulses2024In: Nature Communications, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 15, no 1, article id 177Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ever since the mid-1960’s, locking the phases of modes enabled the generation of laser pulses of duration limited only by the uncertainty principle, opening the field of ultrafast science. In contrast to conventional lasers, mode spacing in random lasers is ill-defined because optical feedback comes from scattering centres at random positions, making it hard to use mode locking in transform limited pulse generation. Here the generation of sub-nanosecond transform-limited pulses from a mode-locked random fibre laser is reported. Rayleigh backscattering from decimetre-long sections of telecom fibre serves as laser feedback, providing narrow spectral selectivity to the Fourier limit. The laser is adjustable in pulse duration (0.34–20 ns), repetition rate (0.714–1.22 MHz) and can be temperature tuned. The high spectral-efficiency pulses are applied in distributed temperature sensing with 9.0 cm and 3.3 × 10−3 K resolution, exemplifying how the results can drive advances in the fields of spectroscopy, telecommunications, and sensing.

  • 196. Wampach, L.
    et al.
    Heintz-Buschart, A.
    Fritz, J. V.
    Ramiro-Garcia, J.
    Habier, J.
    Herold, M.
    Narayanasamy, S.
    Kaysen, A.
    Hogan, A. H.
    Bindl, L.
    Bottu, J.
    Halder, R.
    Sjöqvist, Conny
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    May, P.
    Andersson, Anders F.
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    de Beaufort, C.
    Wilmes, P.
    Birth mode is associated with earliest strain-conferred gut microbiome functions and immunostimulatory potential2018In: Nature Communications, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 9, no 1, article id 5091Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The rate of caesarean section delivery (CSD) is increasing worldwide. It remains unclear whether disruption of mother-to-neonate transmission of microbiota through CSD occurs and whether it affects human physiology. Here we perform metagenomic analysis of earliest gut microbial community structures and functions. We identify differences in encoded functions between microbiomes of vaginally delivered (VD) and CSD neonates. Several functional pathways are over-represented in VD neonates, including lipopolysaccharide (LPS) biosynthesis. We link these enriched functions to individual-specific strains, which are transmitted from mothers to neonates in case of VD. The stimulation of primary human immune cells with LPS isolated from early stool samples of VD neonates results in higher levels of tumour necrosis factor (TNF-α) and interleukin 18 (IL-18). Accordingly, the observed levels of TNF-α and IL-18 in neonatal blood plasma are higher after VD. Taken together, our results support that CSD disrupts mother-to-neonate transmission of specific microbial strains, linked functional repertoires and immune-stimulatory potential during a critical window for neonatal immune system priming.

  • 197.
    Wang, Fei
    et al.
    BGI Shenzhen, BGI Qingdao, Qingdao Europe Adv Inst Life Sci, Lars Bolund Inst Regenerat Med, Qingdao, Peoples R China.;Aarhus Univ, Dept Biomed, Aarhus, Denmark.;BGI Shenzhen, Shenzhen, Peoples R China..
    Karlsson, Max
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science.
    Fagerberg, Linn
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Protein Engineering.
    Uhlén, Mathias
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Protein Engineering. Karolinska Inst, Dept Neurosci, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Chen, Dongsheng
    BGI Shenzhen, Shenzhen, Peoples R China.;Suzhou Inst Syst Med, Suzhou, Peoples R China..
    Lin, Lin
    Aarhus Univ, Dept Biomed, Aarhus, Denmark.;Aarhus Univ Hosp, Steno Diabet Ctr Aarhus, Aarhus, Denmark..
    Luo, Yonglun
    BGI Shenzhen, BGI Qingdao, Qingdao Europe Adv Inst Life Sci, Lars Bolund Inst Regenerat Med, Qingdao, Peoples R China.;Aarhus Univ, Dept Biomed, Aarhus, Denmark.;BGI Shenzhen, Shenzhen, Peoples R China.;Aarhus Univ Hosp, Steno Diabet Ctr Aarhus, Aarhus, Denmark..
    Endothelial cell heterogeneity and microglia regulons revealed by a pig cell landscape at single-cell level2022In: Nature Communications, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 13, no 1, article id 3620Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Pigs are valuable large animal models for biomedical and genetic research, but insights into the tissue- and cell-type-specific transcriptome and heterogeneity remain limited. By leveraging single-cell RNA sequencing, we generate a multiple-organ single-cell transcriptomic map containing over 200,000 pig cells from 20 tissues/organs. We comprehensively characterize the heterogeneity of cells in tissues and identify 234 cell clusters, representing 58 major cell types. In-depth integrative analysis of endothelial cells reveals a high degree of heterogeneity. We identify several functionally distinct endothelial cell phenotypes, including an endothelial to mesenchymal transition subtype in adipose tissues. Intercellular communication analysis predicts tissue- and cell type-specific crosstalk between endothelial cells and other cell types through the VEGF, PDGF, TGF-beta, and BMP pathways. Regulon analysis of single-cell transcriptome of microglia in pig and 12 other species further identifies MEF2C as an evolutionally conserved regulon in the microglia. Our work describes the landscape of single-cell transcriptomes within diverse pig organs and identifies the heterogeneity of endothelial cells and evolutionally conserved regulon in microglia.

  • 198. Wang, Guo-dong
    et al.
    Zhai, Weiwei
    Yang, He-chuan
    Fan, Ruo-xi
    Cao, Xue
    Zhong, Li
    Wang, Lu
    Liu, Fei
    Wu, Hong
    Cheng, Lu-guang
    Poyarkov, Andrei D.
    Poyarkov, Nikolai A., Jr.
    Tang, Shu-sheng
    Zhao, Wen-ming
    Gao, Yun
    Lv, Xue-mei
    Irwin, David M.
    Savolainen, Peter
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Gene Technology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Wu, Chung-I
    Zhang, Ya-ping
    The genomics of selection in dogs and the parallel evolution between dogs and humans2013In: Nature Communications, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 4, p. 1860-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The genetic bases of demographic changes and artificial selection underlying domestication are of great interest in evolutionary biology. Here we perform whole-genome sequencing of multiple grey wolves, Chinese indigenous dogs and dogs of diverse breeds. Demographic analysis show that the split between wolves and Chinese indigenous dogs occurred 32,000 years ago and that the subsequent bottlenecks were mild. Therefore, dogs may have been under human selection over a much longer time than previously concluded, based on molecular data, perhaps by initially scavenging with humans. Population genetic analysis identifies a list of genes under positive selection during domestication, which overlaps extensively with the corresponding list of positively selected genes in humans. Parallel evolution is most apparent in genes for digestion and metabolism, neurological process and cancer. Our study, for the first time, draws together humans and dogs in their recent genomic evolution.

  • 199. Wang, Q.
    et al.
    Zhang, Q.
    Zhang, Q. -W
    Li, Xin
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Theoretical Chemistry and Biology.
    Zhao, C. -X
    Xu, T. -Y
    Qu, D. -H
    Tian, H.
    Color-tunable single-fluorophore supramolecular system with assembly-encoded emission2020In: Nature Communications, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 11, no 1, article id 158Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Regulating the fluorescent properties of organic small molecules in a controlled and dynamic manner has been a fundamental research goal. Although several strategies have been exploited, realizing multi-color molecular emission from a single fluorophore remains challenging. Herein, we demonstrate an emissive system by combining pyrene fluorophore and acylhydrazone units, which can generate multi-color switchable fluorescent emissions at different assembled states. Two kinds of supramolecular tools, amphiphilic self-assembly and γ-cyclodextrin mediated host-guest recognition, are used to manipulate the intermolecular aromatic stacking distances, resulting in the tunable fluorescent emission ranging from blue to yellow, including a pure white-light emission. Moreover, an external chemical signal, amylase, is introduced to control the assembly states of the system on a time scale, generating a distinct dynamic emission system. The dynamic properties of this multi-color fluorescent system can be also enabled in a hydrogel network, exhibiting a promising potential for intelligent fluorescent materials.

  • 200.
    Wang, Qisi
    et al.
    Univ Zurich, Phys Inst, Winterthurerstr 190, CH-8057 Zurich, Switzerland..
    von Arx, K.
    Univ Zurich, Phys Inst, Winterthurerstr 190, CH-8057 Zurich, Switzerland.;Chalmers Univ Technol, Dept Phys, SE-41296 Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Mazzone, D. G.
    Paul Scherrer Inst, Lab Neutron Scattering & Imaging, CH-5232 Villigen, Switzerland..
    Mustafi, S.
    Univ Zurich, Phys Inst, Winterthurerstr 190, CH-8057 Zurich, Switzerland..
    Horio, M.
    Univ Zurich, Phys Inst, Winterthurerstr 190, CH-8057 Zurich, Switzerland..
    Kuespert, J.
    Univ Zurich, Phys Inst, Winterthurerstr 190, CH-8057 Zurich, Switzerland..
    Choi, J.
    Univ Zurich, Phys Inst, Winterthurerstr 190, CH-8057 Zurich, Switzerland..
    Bucher, D.
    Univ Zurich, Phys Inst, Winterthurerstr 190, CH-8057 Zurich, Switzerland..
    Wo, H.
    Fudan Univ, State Key Lab Surface Phys, Shanghai 200433, Peoples R China.;Fudan Univ, Dept Phys, Shanghai 200433, Peoples R China..
    Zhao, J.
    Fudan Univ, State Key Lab Surface Phys, Shanghai 200433, Peoples R China.;Fudan Univ, Dept Phys, Shanghai 200433, Peoples R China..
    Zhang, W.
    Paul Scherrer Inst, Photon Sci Div, Swiss Light Source, CH-5232 Villigen, Switzerland..
    Asmara, T. C.
    Paul Scherrer Inst, Photon Sci Div, Swiss Light Source, CH-5232 Villigen, Switzerland..
    Sassa, Y.
    Chalmers Univ Technol, Dept Phys, SE-41296 Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Månsson, Martin
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics.
    Christensen, N. B.
    Tech Univ Denmark, Dept Phys, DK-2800 Lyngby, Denmark..
    Janoschek, M.
    Univ Zurich, Phys Inst, Winterthurerstr 190, CH-8057 Zurich, Switzerland.;Paul Scherrer Inst, Lab Neutron & Muon Instrumentat, CH-5232 Villigen, Switzerland..
    Kurosawa, T.
    Hokkaido Univ Sapporo, Dept Phys, Sapporo, Hokkaido 0600810, Japan..
    Momono, N.
    Hokkaido Univ Sapporo, Dept Phys, Sapporo, Hokkaido 0600810, Japan.;Muroran Inst Technol, Dept Appl Sci, Muroran, Hokkaido 0508585, Japan..
    Oda, M.
    Hokkaido Univ Sapporo, Dept Phys, Sapporo, Hokkaido 0600810, Japan..
    Fischer, M. H.
    Univ Zurich, Phys Inst, Winterthurerstr 190, CH-8057 Zurich, Switzerland..
    Schmitt, T.
    Paul Scherrer Inst, Photon Sci Div, Swiss Light Source, CH-5232 Villigen, Switzerland..
    Chang, J.
    Univ Zurich, Phys Inst, Winterthurerstr 190, CH-8057 Zurich, Switzerland..
    Uniaxial pressure induced stripe order rotation in La1.88Sr0.12CuO42022In: Nature Communications, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 13, no 1, article id 1795Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Static stripe order is detrimental to superconductivity. Yet, it has been proposed that transverse stripe fluctuations may enhance the inter-stripe Josephson coupling and thus promote superconductivity. Direct experimental studies of stripe dynamics, however, remain difficult. From a strong-coupling perspective, transverse stripe fluctuations are realized in the form of dynamic "kinks"-sideways shifting stripe sections. Here, we show how modest uniaxial pressure tuning reorganizes directional kink alignment. Our starting point is La1.88Sr0.12CuO4 where transverse kink ordering results in a rotation of stripe order away from the crystal axis. Application of mild uniaxial pressure changes the ordering pattern and pins the stripe order to the crystal axis. This reordering occurs at a much weaker pressure than that to detwin the stripe domains and suggests a rather weak transverse stripe stiffness. Weak spatial stiffness and transverse quantum fluctuations are likely key prerequisites for stripes to coexist with superconductivity. Transverse stripe order fluctuations may promote superconductivity, but experimental verifications remain difficult. Here, the authors report that a mild uniaxial pressure changes the ordering pattern and pins the stripe order to the crystal axis in La1.88Sr0.12CuO4.

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