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  • 151.
    Kajko-Mattsson, Mira Miroslawa
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Fredriksson, Ralf
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Hauzenberger, Anna
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Eliciting a Retirement Process Model: Case Study 22008In: 2008 INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON COMPUTATIONAL INTELLIGENCE FOR MODELLING CONTROL & AUTOMATION / [ed] Mohammadian M, NEW YORK: IEEE , 2008, p. 339-344Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although software engineering has been quite successful in creating various development models, it has failed in defining later lifecycle process models. One of such process models concerns retirement. In this paper, we elicit a retirement process model and compare it to the standard models. Our goal is to evaluate current retirement process standards and provide feedback for their extension.

  • 152.
    Kajko-Mattsson, Mira Miroslawa
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Glassbrook Grimlund, Anna
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Nordin, Maria
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Taxonomy of predelivery/prerelease maintenance activities2005In: 17th International Conference on Software Engineering and Knowledge Engineering: SEKE 2005, 2005, p. 247-252Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Successful postdelivery and postrelease maintenance highly depends on the degree of engagement of maintenance organisations during the predelivery and prerelease maintenance phases. In this paper, we suggest taxonomy of predelivery and prerelease activities. This taxonomy is consistent with the ISO/IEC 14764 standard and it has been elicited within eight Swedish organisations.

  • 153.
    Kajko-Mattsson, Mira Miroslawa
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV. Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Lewis, G. A.
    Siracusa, D.
    Nelson, T.
    Chapin, N.
    Heydt, M.
    Nocks, J.
    Sneed, H.
    Long-term life cycle impact of agile methodologies2006Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 154.
    Kajko-Mattsson, Mira Miroslawa
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Communication: Services and Infrastucture, Software and Computer Systems, SCS.
    Lundholm, Jan
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Norrby, Jonas
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Industrial Opinion on the Effectiveness of Risk Management Methods2009In: 2009 IEEE 33RD INTERNATIONAL COMPUTER SOFTWARE AND APPLICATIONS CONFERENCE, VOL. 1, 2009, p. 636-637Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Little is known about the industrial opinion of the effectiveness of risk management. In this paper, we report on this opinion as expressed by five software organizations. According to these organizations, risk management should be a driving wheel of all projects and it should help the organizations dare take big risks in projects that might lead to high opportunities. The amount of resources assigned to risk management should depend on parameters such as product criticality, project size and project type. Finally, the organizations studied could not provide any concrete suggestions for how to evaluate risk effectiveness. All of them do risk management evaluations in a highly subjective manner.

  • 155.
    Kajko-Mattsson, Mira Miroslawa
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Makridis, Christos
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Outline of an SLA management model2008In: CSMR 2008: 12TH EUROPEAN CONFERENCE ON SOFTWARE MAINTENANCE AND REENGINEERING: DEVELOPING EVOLVABLE SYSTEMS / [ed] Kontogiannis, K; Tjortjis, C; Winter, A, LOS ALAMITOS: IEEE COMPUTER SOC , 2008, p. 308-310Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we outline a Service Level Agreement (SLA) management model. The model has been elicited within four industrial companies. Hence, it reflects current state of industrial practice.

  • 156.
    Kajko-Mattsson, Mira Miroslawa
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Meyer, Pia
    Evaluating the acceptor side of EM(3): Release Management at SAS2005In: 2005 INTERNATIONAL SYMPOSIUM ON EMPIRICAL SOFTWARE ENGINEERING (ISESE), PROCEEDINGS, NEW YORK, NY: IEEE , 2005, p. 304-313Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Today, there are no detailed standard process models encompassing the overall release management activities. To remedy this, we have created an individual release management process model, called EM(3): Release Management. In this paper, we evaluate its acceptor side against an industrial release management process performed at Scandinavian Airline Systems (SAS). We have observed some similarities and differences. Some of the observed differences will provide feedback for the improvement and further extension of EM(3): Release Management.

  • 157.
    Kajko-Mattsson, Mira Miroslawa
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Nielsen, Claus
    Winther, Per
    Vang, Brian
    Petersen, Anne
    Eliciting CM3: Emergency Problem Management at Scandinavian Airline Systems2006In: Journal of Research and Practice in Information Technology, ISSN 1443-458X, Vol. 38, no 4, p. 303-316Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Emergency software problems may present an immediate danger to public health, safety, general welfare or business. Hence, the organisations must be well prepared to handle them with the greatest expediency. Unfortunately, the software community has paid little attention to the emergency corrective maintenance. Today, we do not have any standard process models for handling emergency situations. In this paper, we outline an emergency corrective maintenance process model. The model is called CM3: Emergency Problem Management. It is based on an industrial process model as defined at Scandinavian Airline Systems. In addition to the emergency process model, we present the status within the emergency process at Scandinavian Airline Systems, and describe the lessons learned.

  • 158.
    Kajko-Mattsson, Mira Miroslawa
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Nyfjord, Jaana
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    A template for communicating information about requirements and their realization2008In: IMECS 2008: INTERNATIONAL MULTICONFERENCE OF ENGINEERS AND COMPUTER SCIENTISTS, HONG KONG: INT ASSOC ENGINEERS-IAENG , 2008, p. 1020-1025Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Structured and disciplined communication is a prerequisite for effective management of requirements. In this paper, we investigate what requirement management information is communicated within a software development cycle. We do this by studying the management of requirements information within one Canadian organization. Our results show that most of the information as designated in our template is recorded by the organization studied.

  • 159.
    Kajko-Mattsson, Mira Miroslawa
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Tsotra, Eirini
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    A model of predelivery problem management2008In: IMECS 2008: INTERNATIONAL MULTICONFERENCE OF ENGINEERS AND COMPUTER SCIENTISTS, HONG KONG: INT ASSOC ENGINEERS-IAENG , 2008, p. 976-981Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Often, one connotes problem management with a postdelivery process for resolving problems within corrective maintenance. Very seldom, however, one relates it to the testing process within development, evolution and maintenance. In this paper, we propose a model of predelivery problem management. Using the model, we study the industrial status within eight companies situated in Greece. Our results show that all the organizations studied conduct a predelivery problem management process within system testing. However, only three out of eight companies perform it within central integration testing.

  • 160.
    Kajko-Mattsson, Mira Miroslawa
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Winther, P.
    Vang, B.
    Petersen, A.
    Eliciting a model of emergency corrective maintenance at SAS2005In: SERP '05: PROCEEDINGS OF THE 2005 INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON SOFTWARE ENGINEERING RESEARCH AND PRACTICE, VOLS 1 AND 2 / [ed] Arabnia, HR; Reza, H, 2005, p. 694-700Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Disciplined corrective maintenance requires good insight into all of its inherent activities, both within planned and unplanned maintenance. In this paper, we outline an emergency corrective maintenance process model. The model has been elicited at Scandinavian Airline Systems (SAS). This paper provides a foundation for developing a more detailed model of emergency corrective maintenance process.

  • 161.
    Kajko-Mattsson, Mira
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Nikitina, Natalja
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    From knowing nothing to knowing a little: Experiences gained from process improvement in a start-up company2008In: Proceedings - International Conference on Computer Science and Software Engineering, CSSE 2008, 2008, p. 617-621Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Some software organizations still practice ad hoc development, evolution and maintenance of their systems. Many of them are typical start-up companies. They wish to become immediately profitable without paying heed to rudimentary success factors such as for instance software processes. As a result, they have little insight into and control over their activities. This paper reports on our experiences gained from our process improvement effort at Mobile Navigation, a Swedish start-up company. This effort has aided Mobile Navigation to progress from the stage of knowing almost nothing to knowing at least a little about their processes.

  • 162.
    Kajko-Mattsson, Mira
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Nyfjord, Jaana
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    State of Software Risk Management Practice2008In: IAENG International Journal of Computer Science, ISSN 1819-656X, E-ISSN 1819-9224, Vol. 35, no 4Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite the fact that risk management has beenwith us for some time, little has been reported about itsindustrial status, its co-existence with the development models,and its compliance to standard risk management processmodels. In this paper, we explore the domain of riskmanagement practice within 37 software organizations. We dothis by first comparing the industrial status against a processmodel that is synthesized from a set of current standard riskmanagement process models. We then investigate how thecompanies studied have integrated their risk management withsoftware development. Regarding the state of industrial riskmanagement practice, our results show that there are somediscrepancies between the industrial practice and the standardmodels studied. The industrial organizations have notimplemented all the important activities as prescribed by thestandard models. The standard models, on the other hand, havefailed to identify some of the important risk management phasesand activities. Hence, this paper suggests a list of issues thatneed be addressed in both the standards and the industry.Regarding the integration practice, our results recognize thatprocess integration in this domain is still in its infancy.

  • 163.
    Kajko-Mattsson, Mira
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Sjökvist, K.
    Söderström, J.
    Krogdahl, D.
    DRiMaP - A model of distributed risk management process2009In: NCM 2009 - 5th International Joint Conference on INC, IMS, and IDC, 2009, p. 994-1000Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Distributed software development creates many challenges to the primary contractors having the responsibility of delivering high quality products to their customers. To tackle these challenges, organizations must have an efficient distributed development process in place. They must also effectively manage risks within this distributed environment. In this paper, we suggest DRiMaP - a model of distributed risk management. This model has been designed at IBM Sweden.

  • 164.
    Kajko-Mattsson, Mira
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Ta, Mi
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Wilczek, Lukas
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    State of modernization practice in four Swedish organizations2007In: COMPSAC 2007: The Thirty-First Annual International Computer Software And Applications Conference, Vol I, Proceedings, 2007, p. 549-556Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Little is known about the industrial practice of modernising legacy systems. To be able to study it, we have created RaMoLeS - an end-to-end process model for modernising legacy systems. It consists of four sub-models: (1) Assessment, (2) Retirement, (3) Reengineering, and (4) Renovation. It provides guidelines for making decisions on how to approach ageing systems. In addition, it designates activities for each of its sub-models. In this paper, we evaluate the state of modernising practice in four major Swedish organisations using RaMoLeS. Our results show that most of the organisations studied do not have any defined end-to-end modernisation process model to follow. However, they conduct most of the activities as designated in the RaMoLeS framework.

  • 165.
    Kajko-Mattsson, Mira
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Tepczynski, Michal
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    A framework for the evolution and maintenance of web services2005In: IEEE Int. Conf. Softw. Maint. ICSM, 2005, p. 665-668Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we propose SERVIAM Maintenance Framework - a framework for evolving and maintaining Web services. Our framework includes organisation, role, and process changes to accommodate Web service product and use characteristics.

  • 166.
    Kajko-Mattsson, Mira
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Tepczynski, Michal
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    SERVIAM maintenance framework2006In: Proc. Annu. Hawaii Int. Conf. Syst. Sci., 2006Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Web services systems impose additional complexity upon software maintenance and evolution processes. To handle it, we propose a framework for evolving and maintaining Web service systems. Our framework includes organisation, role, and process changes. The feedback on its credibility has been provided by ten software organisations in Poland and Sweden.

  • 167.
    Kajko-Mattsson, Mira
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Winther, P.
    Vang, B.
    Petersen, A.
    An outline of CM(3): Emergency problem management2005In: EUROMICRO-SEAA 2005: 31ST EUROMICRO CONFERENCE ON SOFTWARE ENGINEERING AND ADVANCED APPLICATIONS, PROCEEDINGS, 2005, p. 292-300Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite its importance, the process for emergency corrective maintenance has received very little attention. Today, we do not have any standard process models for handling emergency situations. The only models that have been defined can be found within the industry. In this paper, we outline an emergency corrective maintenance process model and evaluate its applicability to manage the new technology systems, the Web service systems. Our model has been elicited at Scandinavian Airline Systems (SAS). It provides a basis for developing a more detailed model of emergency corrective maintenance process - CM(3): Emergency Problem Management.

  • 168.
    Kajko-Mattsson, Mira
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Yulong, Fan
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Outlining a model of a release management process2005In: Journal of Integrated Design and Process Science, ISSN 1092-0617, Vol. 9, no 4, p. 13-25Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    One of the major concerns of any maintenance organization is to deliver software releases with maximal functionality and quality within the boundaries of the resource constraints. Hence, there is a great deal of merit in establishing a well thought-out end-to-end release management process. Unfortunately, there are no detailed models encompassing the overall activities involved in such a process. To remedy this, in this paper, we outline a preliminary release management process model integrating two sides: vendor and acceptor side.

  • 169.
    Kajko-Mattsson, Miroslawa E. J.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Management of Emergency Problems at SAS2006In: Journal of Research and Practice in Information Technology, ISSN 1443-458XArticle in journal (Refereed)
  • 170. Kalyanam, Janani
    et al.
    Velupillai, Sumithra
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Numerical Analysis and Computer Science, NADA. KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Conway, Mike
    Lanckriet, Gert
    From Event Detection to Storytelling on Microblogs2016In: PROCEEDINGS OF THE 2016 IEEE/ACM INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON ADVANCES IN SOCIAL NETWORKS ANALYSIS AND MINING ASONAM 2016, IEEE, 2016, p. 437-442Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The problem of detecting events from content published on microblogs has garnered much interest in recent times. In this paper, we address the questions of what happens after the outbreak of an event in terms of how the event gradually progresses and attains each of its milestones, and how it eventually dissipates. We propose a model based approach to capture the gradual unfolding of an event over time. This enables the model to automatically produce entire timeline trajectories of events from the time of their outbreak to their disappearance. We apply our model on the Twitter messages collected about Ebola during the 2014 outbreak and obtain the progression timelines of several events that occurred during the outbreak. We also compare our model to several existing topic modeling and event detection baselines in literature to demonstrate its efficiency.

  • 171.
    Karim, Mohammad Rezaul
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Ensuring Interoperability in eDiscovery Process2010Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Digital forensics is a very important area that carries special sensibility in analyzing and studyingdigital evidence not only in cyber crime cases, but also in house or localized digital crimes.eDiscovery makes it necessary to identify the evidence which is in the form of metadata. To discoverand analyze the metadata in a proper manner for a litigation process in different environments,interoperability is one of the central problems. In order to attain interoperability, there is a standardtermed as EDRM XML v1.1. However, this standard needs further modifications and enhancements toensure real interoperability in an arbitrary eDiscovery process.A novel XML schema is proposed along with the necessary changes from the current EDRM XMLv1.1. Then, a system has been designed and deployed to manage the evidence and validate the relevantXML document. In addition, the whole eDiscovery system has been implemented based on theproposed XSD. Finally, the eDiscovery system was tested under different operating systems and theappropriate software using various scenarios and test beds. The assessment and the evaluation of thesystem demonstrated that XSD can ensure interoperability in eDiscovery process indeed.

  • 172.
    Karlström, P.
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Pargman, T. C.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Ramberg, Robert
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Tools, language technology and communication in computer assisted language learning2006In: Writing and Digital Media, Brill Academic Publishers, 2006, p. 189-198Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In this chapter, we discuss the use of Language Technology (LT) (e.g. spelling and grammar checkers) in tools for Computer Assisted Language Learning (CALL). Attempts in merging research from LT and CALL were popular during the 1960s, but has since stagnated. We argue that this state of affairs is unfortunate, and that it has several causes: technology not living up to expectations, a single-minded focus on either communication or on linguistic forms in language teaching and framing computer systems for learning as "tutors" instead of "tools." Following brief introductions to Computer Aided Language Learning and LT, we provide a framework for designing "tool"-based systems, and argue that these tools should be used in a communicative setting while simultaneously training linguistic forms.

  • 173.
    Karlström, Peter
    et al.
    KTH.
    Pargman, Teresa Cerratto
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Ramberg, Robert
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Designing for collaboration in intelligent computer assisted language learning2005In: 5th IEEE International Conference on Advanced Learning Technologies, Proceedings / [ed] Goodyear, P; Sampson, DG; Yang, DJT; Kinshuk, X; Okamoto, T; Hartley, R; Chen, NS, 2005, p. 321-322Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We discuss the design of language tools, and explore new approaches for the development of language-learning environments. We take a standpoint in the learning perspective labelled "focus on form", and investigate issues thereby generated in design. From this perspective, current intelligent tools such as grammar and spelling checkers should be re-framed in collaborative learning environments.

  • 174.
    Karlström, Petter
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Cerratto-Pargman, Teresa
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Analyzing student activity in computer assisted language learning2006In: Proc. Sixth Int. Conf. Advanced Learn. Technol. ICALT, 2006, p. 222-226Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We study the use of a computer application, intended for Computer Assisted Language Learning (CALL). We present an analytical framework for CALL, consisting of technology, interaction with technology, a relationship between technology and students, and a context where technology is situated. The application we study performs several different kinds of state of the art linguistic analyses, and is intended for writing texts while paying attention to linguistic forms. We have conducted a naturalistic field study of two informants use the tool collaboratively. Our question is in what manners these students put the tool into use. These students let initiative be taken by the CALL application, despite it being designed with student initiative in mind, and despite students being aware of features and occasions where they could take initiative. We use our framework to point out how this student-system relationship is formed, and provide guidance for future design.

  • 175. Karokola, Geoffrey
    et al.
    Kowalski, Stewart
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Yngström, Louise
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Secure e-government services: Towards a framework for integrating IT security services into e-government maturity models2011In: 2011 Information Security for South Africa - Proceedings of the ISSA 2011 Conference, 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    e-Government maturity models (eGMMs) lack security services (technical and socio/non-technical) in its critical maturity stages. The paper proposes a comprehensive framework for integrating IT security services into eGMM critical stages. The proposed framework is a result of integrating information security maturity model (ISMM) critical levels into e-government maturity model (eGMM) critical stages. The research utilizes Soft Systems Methodology (SSM) of scientific inquiry adopted from Checkland and Scholes. The paper contributes to the theoretical and empirical knowledge in the following ways: firstly, it introduces a new approach that shows how government's can progressively secure their e-government services; secondly, it outlines the security requirements (technical and non-technical) for critical maturity stages of eGMM; and thirdly, it enhances awareness and understanding to the governments and stakeholders such as practitioners, experts and citizens on the importance of security requirements being clearly defined within eGMM critical stages.

  • 176. Karokola, Geoffrey
    et al.
    Yngström, Louise
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    State of e-Government Development in the Developing World: Case of Tanzania - Security vie2009In: PROCEEDINGS OF 5TH INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON E-GOVERNMENT / [ed] Lavin M, NR READING: ACADEMIC CONFERENCES LTD , 2009, p. 92-100Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Given the fact that more governments are heavily investing in implementing and use of e-government applications - the major concern has always been on how to ensure secure prevention, detection and recovery of critical information being stored, processed, and transmitted between domains (government, business, and citizens). Traditionally, interactions between government, business communities and citizens require a physical visit to the government offices - hence little threats to paper based information assets; while with the advent of e-government application - it is possible to virtually locate the service closer to citizens - hence create needs for security. As part of an ongoing research on e-government security maturing for developing world - the current state of e-government development along with specific security issues and challenges is presented; where Tanzania is taken as a case study. The study involved six institutions located in the area, namely: President's Office, Public Service Management (PO-PSM) - responsible for administration of Tanzanian public sector; Prime Minister's Office, Regional Administration and Local Government (PMO-RALG) - responsible for instilling good governance to all level of local governments; Ministry of Lands, Housing and Human Settlements Development (MLHHSD) - responsible for land management; and Ministry of Finance and Economic Affairs (MoFEA) - responsible for manages the overall revenue, expenditure and financing of the Government. Others are Tanzania Revenue Authority (TRA) - agency responsible for government revenue collection; and the Tanzania Ports Authority (TPA) - responsible for all ports and cargo management. In the process, we used Systemic-Holistic-Approach (SHA) to explicitly investigate, evaluate, and analyze the specific security (technical and non-technical) related issues and challenges. The findings were: the level of security awareness among IT and non-IT staff; level of e-government application protection; and level of Security technical threats and nontechnical threats - 63%, 30%, 54%, 45%, 55%; 65%, 20%, 51%, 50%, 60%; and 60%, 23%, 53%, 48%, 54%; for PO-PSM; PMO-RALG; and MLHHSD respectively. Similarly the findings for MoFEA; TRA; and TPA were - 67%, 33%, 55%, 58%, 60%; 73%, 40%, 74%, 68%, 76%; and 70%, 20%, 70%, 65%, 73% respectively. Also the findings shows that to enhance security for e-government application - e-government development models need to have built in stage-wise security layers. Therefore, as most of developing countries are at their infant stages of e-government development - developers of e-government maturity models should explicitly consider integrating security as part of the model's critical requirements at all stages. This will not only ensure security for e-government critical information but also strengthen the level of trust between government and citizen.

  • 177. Karokola, Geoffrey
    et al.
    Yngström, Louise
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Kowalski, Stewart
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Secure e-government services: A comparative analysis of e-government maturity models for the developing regions - The need for security services2012In: International Journal of Electronic Government Research, ISSN 1548-3886, E-ISSN 1548-3894, Vol. 8, no 1, p. 1-25Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    E-Government offers many benefits to government agencies, citizens and the business community. However, e-Government services are prone to current and emerging security challenges posing potential threats to critical information assets. Securing it appears to be a major challenge facing governments globally. Based on the international security standards - the paper thoroughly investigates and analyzes eleven e-government maturity models (eGMMs) for security services. Further, it attempts to establish a common frame of reference for eGMM critical stages. The study utilizes the Soft Systems Methodology (SSM) of scientific inquiry/ learning cycle adopted from Checkland and Scholes. The findings show that security services (technical and non-technical) are lacking in eGMMs - implying that eGMMs were designed to measure more quantity of offered e-government services than the quality of security services. Therefore, as a step towards achieving secure e-government services the paper proposes a common frame of reference for eGMM with five critical stages. These stages will later be extended to include the required security services.

  • 178. Karunanayake, A.
    et al.
    De Zoysa, K.
    Muftic, Sead
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Mobile ATM for developing countries2008Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Society benefits from M-Commerce applications to a greater extent. The most attractive benefit of M-Commerce applications is the mobility. Even though users have a poor computer literacy, they will be able to use the M-Commerce applications easily. Additionally, the M-Commerce applications have the potential of reducing the distance barriers. In developing countries, especially in rural areas, accessing financial and banking services is a critical issue. This paper proposes a system called Mobile-ATM to address this problem by incorporating the mobile technology. Also it discusses the limitations of traditional ATM systems, the need of a new M-Commerce application to overcome the limitations and security related issues. In the proposed solution, people can withdraw money from a Mobile-ATM without going to a traditional ATM. The Mobile-ATM system uses even cheap mobile phones, functioning as payment terminals. It will reduce the limitations of traditional ATM and enables confidential and secured ATM transactions.

  • 179.
    Karunaratne, Thashmee
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Boström, Henrik
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Learning from structured data by finger printing2006In: Publications of the Finnish Artificial Intelligence Society, 2006, p. 120-126Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Current methods for learning from structured data are limited w.r.t. handling large or isolated substructures and also impose constraints on search depth and induced structure length. An approach to learning from structured data using a graph based canonical representation method of structures, called finger printing, is introduced that addresses the limitations of current methods. The method is implemented in a system, called DIFFER, which is demonstrated to compare favourable to existing state-of-art methods on some benchmark data sets. It is shown that further improvements can be obtained by combining the features generated by finger printing with features generated by previous methods.

  • 180.
    Karunaratne, Thashmee
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV. Stockholms universitet, Institutionen för data- och systemvetenskap.
    Boström, Henrik
    University of Skövde, Sweden.
    The effect of background knowledge in graph-based learning in the chemoinformatics domain2008In: Trends in Intelligent Systems and Computer Engineering / [ed] Oscar Castillo, Li Xu, Sio-Iong Ao, Springer , 2008, p. 141-153Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Typical machine learning systems often use a set of previous experiences (examples) to learn concepts, patterns, or relations hidden within the data [1]. Current machine learning approaches are challenged by the growing size of the data repositories and the growing complexity of those data [1, 2]. In order to accommodate the requirement of being able to learn from complex data, several methods have been introduced in the field of machine learning [2]. Based on the way the input and resulting hypotheses are represented, two main categories of such methods exist, namely, logic-based and graph-based methods [3]. The demarcation line between logic- and graph-based methods lies in the differences of their data representation methods, hypothesis formation, and testing as well as the form of the output produced.

    The main purpose of our study is to investigate the effect of incorporating background knowledge into graph learning methods. The ability of graph learning methods to obtain accurate theories with a minimum of background knowledge is of course a desirable property, but not being able to effectively utilize additional knowledge that is available and has been proven important is clearly a disadvantage. Therefore we examine how far additional, already available, background knowledge can be effectively used for increasing the performance of a graph learner. Another contribution of our study is that it establishes a neutral ground to compare classifi- cation accuracies of the two closely related approaches, making it possible to study whether graph learning methods actually would outperform ILP methods if the same background knowledge were utilized [9].

    The rest of this chapter is organized as follows. The next section discusses related work concerning the contribution of background knowledge when learning from complex data. Section 10.3 provides a description of the graph learning method that is used in our study. The experimental setup, empirical evaluation, and the results from the study are described in Sect. 10.4. Finally, Sect. 10.5 provides conclusions from the experiments and points out interesting extensions of the work reported in this study.

  • 181.
    Karunaratne, Thashmee
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Boström, Henrik
    University of Skövde, Sweden.
    Using background knowledge for graph based learning: a case study in chemoinformatics2007In: IMECS 2007: International Multiconference of Engineers and Computer Scientists, Vols I and II, HONG KONG: INT ASSOC ENGINEERS-IAENG , 2007, p. 153-157Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Incorporating background knowledge in the learning process is proven beneficial for numerous applications of logic based learning methods. Yet the effect of background knowledge in graph based learning is not systematically explored. This paper describes and demonstrates the first step in this direction and elaborates on how additional relevant background knowledge could be used to improve the predictive performance of a graph learner. A case study in chemoinformatics is undertaken in this regard in which various types of background knowledge are encoded in graphs that are given as input to a graph learner. It is shown that the type of background knowledge encoded indeed has an effect on the predictive performance, and it is concluded that encoding appropriate background knowledge can be more important than the choice of the graph learning algorithm.

  • 182. Kaye, J. J.
    et al.
    Laaksolahti, J.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Höök, Kristina
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Isbister, K.
    The design and evaluation process2011In: Cognitive Technologies, Springer Verlag , 2011, no 9783642151835, p. 641-656Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this chapter is to describe the design and evaluation process in the light of affective interaction. With a starting point in user-centred design we will explore what additional problems or opportunities become important when designing for affective interaction with computer systems. This chapter also provides a historical background to HCI ending with what is sometimes named the third wave of HCI – that is, designing for aesthetic, emotional experiences with and through technology. 

  • 183.
    Khan, Ahmad Salman
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Kajko-Mattsson, Mira
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Tyrberg, T.
    Comparing EM3: Predelivery maintenance model with its industrial correspondence2009In: Proceedings of the International Multiconference on Computer Science and Information Technology, IMCSIT '09, 2009, p. 573-582Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To successfully conduct postdelivery maintenance, organizations must be actively involved in the predelivery maintenance phase. For this, they need a predelivery maintenance process model. Right now, there are only two such models and they are still in their infancy. In this paper, we compare one of them, the EM3 Predelivery/Prerelease model, to its corresponding predelivery process at AMIS Software. The comparison has helped us evaluate the model in an industrial context and extend it with new activities.

  • 184.
    Khatir, Marjan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Hejazi, Seyed Mahmood
    Concordia University, Canada.
    How to find exculpatory and inculpatory evidence using a circular digital forensics process model2009In: International Journal of Electronic Security and Digital Forensics, ISSN 1751-911X, E-ISSN 1751-9128, Vol. 2, no 1, p. 68-76Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    With raising the number of cyber crimes, the need of having a proper digital forensic process also increases. Although digital forensics is practiced in recent years, there is still a big gap between previously suggested digital forensics processes and what is really needed to be done in real cases. Some problems with current processes are lack of flexible transition between phases, not having a clear method or a complete scenario for addressing reliable evidence, and not paying enough attention to management aspects and team roles. This article provides a process model by paying special attention to the team roles and management aspects as well as both exculpatory and inculpatory evidence.

  • 185.
    Khatir, Marjan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Hejazi, Seyed Mahmood
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    How to find exculpatory and inculpatory evidence using a circular digital forensics process model2008In: Global E-Security, Proceedings / [ed] Jahankhani, H; Revett, K; PalmerBrown, D, 2008, Vol. 12, p. 10-17Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    With raising the number of cyber crimes, the need of having a proper digital forensic process also increases. Although digital forensics is practiced in recent years, there is still a big gap between previously suggested digital forensics processes and what is really needed to be done in real cases. Some problems with current processes are lack of flexible transition between phases, not having a clear method or a complete scenario for addressing reliable evidence, and not paying enough attention to management aspects and team roles. This paper provides a process model by paying special attention to the team roles and management aspects as well as both exculpatory and inculpatory evidence.

  • 186.
    Khatir, Marjan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Hejazi, Seyed Mahmood
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Sneiders, Eriks
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Two-Dimensional Evidence Reliability Amplification Process Model for Digital Forensics2008In: THIRD INTERNATIONAL ANNUAL WORKSHOP ON DIGITAL FORENSICS AND INCIDENT ANALYSIS: WDFIA 2008, PROCEEDINGS / [ed] Tryfonas T, Thomas P, LOS ALAMITOS: IEEE COMPUTER SOC , 2008, p. 21-29Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Being related to law and state-of-the-art technology, digital forensics needs more discipline than traditional forensics. The variety of types of crimes, distribution of networks and complexity of information and communication technology, add to the complexity of the process or digital investigations. A rigorous and flexible process model is needed to overcome challenges and obstacles in this area. In this paper we propose a digital forensics process, called "Two-Dimensional Evidence Reliability Amplification Process Model", which presents a detailed digital forensic process model in five main phases and different roles to perform it. At the same time, this iterative process addresses four essential tasks as the umbrella activities that are applicable across all phases and subphases. We have also developed a hypothetical solution based on intersection of events and exploit mathematical operations and symbols for making an algorithm to increase the reliability of evidence. This process model is detailed enough to describe the investigation process so that it could possibly provide a guideline that investigators can take advantage of it during a forensics investigation process.

  • 187. Khoshkbarforoushha, A.
    et al.
    Tabein, Reza
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Jamshidi, P.
    Shams, F.
    Towards a metrics suite for measuring composite service granularity level appropriateness2010In: Proceedings - 2010 6th World Congress on Services, Services-1 2010, 2010, p. 245-252Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    One of the prominent principles of designing services is the matter of how abstract services should be i.e. granularity. Since service-oriented analysis and design methods lack on providing a quantitative model for service granularity level evaluation, identification of optimally granular services is the key challenge in service-oriented solution development. This article through a systematic process proposes a model namely Weighted Granularity Level Appropriateness (WGLA) which leverages and consolidates four metrics to constitute quantitative basis for granularity appropriateness analysis. These metrics are, indeed, the four quantified attributes of service granularity including business value, reusability, context-independency, and complexity. Our preliminary controlled experiment confirms the correctness of the quantitative model. In fact, by adopting WGLA metric, service granularity appropriateness analysis could be conduct quantitatively that leads to realize an optimized service-oriented solution in terms of its granularity.

  • 188.
    Kifle, Mengistu
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Mbarika, Victor W. A.
    Datta, Pratim
    Interplay of cost and adoption of tele-medicine in Sub-Saharan Africa: The case of tele-cardiology in Ethiopia2006In: Information Systems Frontiers, ISSN 1387-3326, E-ISSN 1572-9419, Vol. 8, no 3, p. 211-223Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    ...the barriers to diffusion of Tele-Medicine are not entirely technical. Cost has to simultaneously satisfy a number of stakeholders... (Anderson, Aydin and Jay, et al., 1994).

    Rising costs of the provision of healthcare have been a major issue for debate in both developing and developed countries. This is especially true of very capitalistic societies such as the United States where privatization of the healthcare sector has left many with little or no affordable healthcare. The situation is even worse in developing economies. Developing countries deal with various problems in the provision of health services and healthcare Tan et al. (E-medicine diffusion: E-medicine in Developed and Developing countries. Chapter 8 in E-health paradigm shift: Perspectives, domains and challenges. In Tan J. (Ed.), Imprint of Wiley, New York, Jossey-Bass, 2005). Some of these problems include acute shortages of healthcare professionals and medical facilities Mbarika et al. (Journal of the Association for Information Systems (JAIS) 2005;6(5):130-170). Such shortages have resulted in growing numbers of middle to upper-class citizens of developing countries traveling abroad to seek necessary health services. Using a multi-method case study research, this paper examines the role of Tele-Medicine in the healthcare system and analyzes the costs and benefits of introducing Tele-Cardiology services in Ethiopia (a Sub-Saharan African country). This is a cost comparison study for the treatment of cardiac patients traveling abroad versus patients treated via Tele-Cardiology. Our findings show that Tele-Cardiology is clinically more feasible and more cost effective compared to patients traveling abroad for treatment.

  • 189.
    Kifle, Mengistu
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Mbarika, Victor W. A.
    Datta, Pratim
    Telemedicine in sub-Saharan Africa: The case of teleophthalmology and eye care in Ethiopia2006In: Journal of The American Society For Information Science And Technology, ISSN 1532-2882, E-ISSN 1532-2890, Vol. 57, no 10, p. 1383-1393Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The authors examine the need and adoption of teleophthalmology in sub-Saharan Africa. Ethiopia, like most sub-Saharan African countries, is faced with limited specialists and health care services. These services are often concentrated in the urban areas, leaving most of the rural population (about 70% of the country) without adequate and timely health care delivery. In Ethiopia, the ratio of ophthalmologists to the population is 1:1,200,000, resulting in inadequate delivery of ophthalmology-related health care services. Using both primary and secondary data collection approaches, the authors report the need for telemedicine as well as the adoption and application of teleophthalmology in Ethiopia. Further, they present Ethiopia's teleophthalmology network, integrated teleconsultation, and teleeducation services. The authors conclude by presenting this research as a starting point to investigate further teleophthalmology and other telemedicine services for Ethiopia and by extension, other developing countries. Therefore, they bring a much-underresearched region (sub-Saharan Africa) and a much-underresearched technology (telemedicine) to the forefront of information systems (IS) research. It is the authors' hope that colleagues in the field will be motivated to investigate this '' forgotten '' region of the world that is yet to reap the full potentials of information and communications technologies (ICTs).

  • 190.
    Kilander, Fredrik
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Li, Wei
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Jansson, Carl-Gustaf
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Kanter, Theo G.
    Ericsson.
    Maguire Jr., Gerald Q.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Communication Systems, CoS.
    Distributed Context Data Management2005In: CEUR Workshop Proceedings, 2005Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We argue that general context data distribution can be achieved by establishing a network of context managers. The context managers have a uniform core which is surrounded by the appropriate functionality to make it deployable in applications, user and organizational infrastructure, and on top of sensors. When access to the context manager is mediated and policed, we say that it is a context service, a publicly recognisable, addressable and tangible entity. Clients that wish to consult the context manager for updated context information, must turn to the service interface where they may face rejection for reasons of security, personal integrity or workload.

  • 191.
    Kjellman, Arne
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    The crisis of contemporary science2006In: Kybernetes, ISSN 0368-492X, E-ISSN 1758-7883, Vol. 35, no 3-4, p. 497-521Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose - To present a new approach to scientific thinking (paradigm) that avoids the shortcomings and inconsistencies of the prevailing Newtonian approach. Design/methodology/approach - The signs of a science in crisis are reviewed and some of its shortcomings are compiled and connected to some misleading fundamental assumptions of the reigning paradigm of science. Calls attention to a current fundamental misunderstanding of the human capacity of observation - especially the negligence of the conceptual feedback loops of the human mind that make up the core of human learning capacity. Findings - When using a subject-oriented approach (SOA) to science, which takes off from the individual knowing the subject (methodological solipsism), it is possible to consistently construct a knower's science where all today's misleading assumptions can be successfully removed. This effort results in an abstract constructivist epistemology, where the reversed cause-effect chain severely upsets the classically trained mind - especially in natural science. Research limitations/implications - There is a great deal of work left to examine the soundness of these ideas and pave the way for such a profound re-orientation of traditional science that as a first step will be concerned with elucidating and explicating a wide range of problems and concerns in set and decision theory, logic, and mathematics. This is essentially to launch a research programme in these areas that as a next step includes all natural and social sciences that will appear in a new light when viewed from a first person, SOA. Practical implications - There is no other way for science to evade the prevailing crisis but to involve, in its very Kuhnian sense, a radical change of paradigm. In this view, the realist confusion, which is responsible for the genesis of Cartesian dualism and a row of other inconsistencies met with intoday's science, will slowly vanish, as will the embarrassing gulf between the natural and social sciences as well as humanism. This new "world-view" that seems radical to the scientist will appear natural to the everyday man - but its impact on human culture will be monumental. Originality/value - The SOA to science is based on a reversed cause-effect thinking that will have a heavy influence on the way people think about the world and is accordingly a concern of all human beings as well as each researcher - of whatever of discipline.

  • 192.
    Kollerbaur, Anita
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    IT for learning: A need for a new approach?2005In: HISTORY OF NORDIC COMPUTING / [ed] Bubenko, J; Impagliazzo, J; Solvberg, A, 2005, Vol. 174, p. 223-238Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents the development and use of IT for learning in Sweden during the period 1966-1986. An overview of the major activities and course of events has two phases of categorization: 1966-1973 as the orientation period and 1973-1986 as the research period. This paper describes the research project PRINCESS in some detail. PRINCESS adopted a cognitive approach to the use of IT for learning, applied an interdisciplinary, and a systems thinking approach to research. A holistic model was developed and studied empirically in several stages. The results presented 1983 are summarized, most of them are still sustainable. The impact of PRINCESS in schools and in academia is briefly discussed. Based on the experiences from more than 20 years of own research in the area, some possible explanations are elaborated on why we still after some 40 years and despite the technical development, not seem to be able to utilize the real prospects of IT for learning The conclusion is that we probably need a new approach to IT and learning and sketch a vision for a future learning environment.

  • 193.
    Kowalski, Stewart
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Nohlberg, Marcus
    Mwakalinga, Jeffy
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    A SYSTEMIC MODEL FOR SECURITY AND RISK MANAGEMENT IN TELECOM NETWORKS2008In: WMSCI 2008: 12TH WORLD MULTI-CONFERENCE ON SYSTEMICS, CYBERNETICS AND INFORMATICS, VOL VI, PROCEEDINGS / [ed] Callaos N; Lesso W; Zinn CD; Baralt J; Rutkauskas AV; Stasytyte V, ORLANDO: INT INST INFORMATICS & SYSTEMICS , 2008, p. 290-291Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 194.
    Kowalski, Stewart
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV. Department of Computer and Systems Sciences, Stockholm University.
    Pavlovska, K.
    Goldstein, M.
    Two case studies in using chatbots for security training2013In: IFIP Advances in Information and Communication Technology, 2013, p. 265-272Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper discusses the result of two case studies performed in a large international company to test the use of chatbots for internal security training. The first study targeted 26 end users in the company while the second study examined 80 security specialists. From a quantitative analytical perspective there does not appears to be any significant findings when chatbots are used for security training. However there does appear to be qualitative data that suggest that the attitudes of the respondents appear to be more positive to security when chatbots are used than with the current traditional e-learning security training courses at the company.

  • 195. Kurki-Suonio, R.
    et al.
    Benediktsson, O.
    Bubenko Jr., Janis A.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Dahlstrand, I.
    Gram, C.
    Impagliazzo, J.
    University Education on Computers: Summary of a Panel Discussion2008Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Following a session on university education, this panel discussed early Nordic visions and experiences on university computing education, contrasting them to today's needs and the international development at that time. This report gives short papers by the panelists (their opening statements), and a brief summary (the chair's interpretation) of the views that were raised in the ensuing discussion.

  • 196.
    Laaksolahti, Jarmo
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Höök, Kia
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Editorial: “Usability”2011In: Cognitive Technologies, Springer Verlag , 2011, no 9783642151835, p. 637-640Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This editorial provides a brief introduction and overview of the following 4 chapters dedicated to the design and evaluation of systems for affective interaction. In such systems affect must be a consideration from the start rather than an afterthought or they are likely to fail due to mistakes in the design. Hence one of the purposes of this part of the handbook is to accommodate affective interaction into a user-centred design loop, thereby increasing the chances of arriving at successful designs. Each chapter corresponds to a step in a generic UCD process and discusses the theoretical and practical underpinnings of activities typically found in the step, lists challenges related to bringing affective interaction into the loop, suggests methods that have proven to be useful in each step, and where appropriate gives examples of systems for affective interaction that have been designed.

  • 197.
    Lantz, Ann
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Human - Computer Interaction, MDI (closed 20111231).
    Artman, Henrik
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Human - Computer Interaction, MDI (closed 20111231).
    Ramberg, Robert
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Interaction Design as Experienced by Practitioners2005In: Nordic Design Research Conferences, 2005Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper the questions `what is interaction design´ and `what does interaction design mean to interaction designers´, are posed. We both look at the way people from within university/academia discuss interaction design as well as how people who label themselves interaction designers understand the area and describe their own practice. The empirical material presented is based on an interview study and a series of workshops. In the data three perspectives on interaction design emerged. This study illuminates that people who label themselves interaction designers assume a more holistic view on their endeavour for making interactive systems usable, they also describe their practice as being more progressive- and design oriented rather than construction- or usability oriented. In their work, respondents report on having acted almost as if they were project leaders, having an insight into the whole design process. Interaction designers build a repertoire of solutions and methods are reused.

  • 198. Larsson, A.
    et al.
    Ekenberg, Love
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Danielson, M.
    Non-uniform belief in expected utilities in interval decision analysis2005In: Proc. Int. Florida Artif. Intell. Res. Soc. Conf. Recent Adv. Artif. Intell., 2005, p. 740-745Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper demonstrates that second-order calculations add information about expected utilities when modeling imprecise information in decision models as intervals and employing the principle of maximizing the expected utility. Furthermore, due to the resulting warp in the distribution of belief over the intervals of expected utilities, the conservative Γ-maximin decision rule seems to be unnecessarily conservative and pessimistic as the belief in neighborhoods of points near interval boundaries is significantly lower than in neigh-borhoods near the centre. Due to this, a generalized expected utility is proposed.

  • 199. Larsson, A.
    et al.
    Johansson, J.
    Ekenberg, Love
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Danielson, Mats
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Decision analysis with multiple objectives in a framework for evaluating imprecision2005In: International Journal of Uncertainty Fuzziness and Knowledge-Based Systems, ISSN 0218-4885, Vol. 13, no 5, p. 495-509Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present a decision tree evaluation method for analyzing multi-attribute decisions under risk, where information is numerically imprecise. The approach extends the use of additive and multiplicative utility functions for supporting evaluation of imprecise statements, relaxing requirements for precise estimates of decision parameters. Information is modeled in convex sets of utility and probability measures restricted by closed intervals. Evaluation is done relative to a set of rules, generalizing the concept of admissibility, computationally handled through optimization of aggregated utility functions. Pros and cons of two approaches, and tradeoffs in selecting a utility function, are discussed.

  • 200.
    Li, Wei
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Towards a Person-Centric Context Aware System2006Licentiate thesis, monograph (Other scientific)
    Abstract [en]

    A recent trend is to integrate sensing, communication, and computation into every aspect of our daily life, ranging from various user devices to physical environment. The goal is to give computer systems an awareness of the users and their situations, so that they can support their diverse interaction needs at anytime, any place. A major problem hindering achieving this promising goal is that the users usually play a passive role in these systems with little possibility to interfere with the processing. Additionally, there is no option for the user to prevent being monitored by the system.

    This drawback stems from the lack of an independent and consistent user oriented viewpoint in current ubiquitous computing systems, which can easily result in the occurrence of user privacy invasion and misinterpretation of the user.

    To overcome this problem, this thesis proposes a Person-Centric Context Aware System architecture, helping to preserve an independent representation for each individual user to different computer systems. The main idea embraced in this system architecture is that the users are the owners of their personal information, thus they should have the control of how their information will be used by others.

    In the design of this system architecture, a number of important issues have been addressed with their corresponding solutions in terms of different system components. Among these issues, three are identified as the most crucial ones, and hence these issues have received most of our efforts to provide better solutions: Context Data Communication, Location Detection, and Communication Anonymity support. A prototype system constructed during the process of developing each specific solution is also presented. Together these comprise the main contributions of this thesis work. Finally, our concluding remarks are presented together with our planned future work, based on the current implementation of a Person-Centric Context Aware System.

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