kth.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
1234567 151 - 200 of 1799
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 151.
    Bobke, Alexandra
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Örlü, Ramis
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Schlatter, Philipp
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Turbulent asymptotic suction boundary layers: Effect of domain size and development time2016In: Springer Proceedings in Physics, Springer, 2016, p. 173-177Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A series of large-eddy simulations of a turbulent asymptotic suction boundary layer (TASBL) was performed in a periodic domain, on which uniform suction was applied over a flat plate. The Reynolds number (defined as the ratio between free-stream and suction velocity) was Re=333" role="presentation" style="border: 0px; font-variant: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: normal; font-family: inherit; margin: 0px; padding: 0px; vertical-align: baseline; outline: 0px; display: inline; word-spacing: normal; word-wrap: normal; white-space: nowrap; float: none; direction: ltr; max-width: none; max-height: none; min-width: 0px; min-height: 0px; position: relative;">Re=333Re=333and a variety of domain sizes were considered in temporal simulations in order to investigate the effect of the computational domain size and temporal development length. The asymptotic state is related to high friction Reynolds numbers and was found to require large computational domains and development lengths.

  • 152.
    Bodin, Olle
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics. KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Centres, Competence Center for Gas Exchange (CCGEx). KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Wang, Yue
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Mihaescu, Mihai
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics. KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Centres, Competence Center for Gas Exchange (CCGEx). KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Fuchs, Laszlo
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics. KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Centres, Competence Center for Gas Exchange (CCGEx). KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    LES of the Exhaust Flow in a Heavy-Duty Engine2014In: Oil & gas science and technology, ISSN 1294-4475, E-ISSN 1953-8189, Vol. 69, no 1, p. 177-188Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The flow in the exhaust port and the exhaust manifold of a heavy-duty Diesel engine has been studied using the Large Eddy Simulation approach. Some of the flow characteristics in these components are: flow unsteadiness and separation combined with significant geometry-induced secondary flow motion. Detailed analysis of these features may add understanding which can be used to decrease the flow losses and increase the eciency of downstream components such as turbochargers and EGR coolers. Few LES studies of the flow in these components have been conducted in the past and this, together with the complexity of the flow are the motivations for this work. This paper shows that in the exhaust port, even global parameters like total pressure losses are handled better by LES than RANS. Flow structures of the type that afect both turbine performance and EGR cooler efficiency are generated in the manifold and these are found to vary significantly during the exhaust pulse. This paper also clearly illustrates the need to make coupled simulations in order to handle the complicated boundary conditions of these gas exchange components.

  • 153.
    Bodén, Hans
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Acoustic properties of perforates under high level multi-tone excitation2013In: 19th AIAA/CEAS Aeroacoustics Conference, American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, 2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper discusses the effect of high level multi-tone acoustic excitation on the acoustic properties of perforates. It is based on a large experimental study of the nonlinear properties of these types of samples without mean grazing or bias flow. Compared to previously published results the present investigation concentrates on the effect of multiple harmonics. It is known from previous studies that high level acoustic excitation at one frequency will change the acoustic impedance of perforates at other frequencies, thereby changing the boundary condition seen by the acoustic waves. This effect could be used to change the impedance boundary conditions and for instance increase the absorption. It could obviously also pose a problem for the correct modelling of sound transmission through ducts lined with such impedance surfaces. Experimental results are compared to a quasi-stationary model. The effect of the combination of frequency components and phase in the excitation signal is studied.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 154.
    Bodén, Hans
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Determination of the acoustic properties of liners under high level multi-tone excitation2016In: 22nd AIAA/CEAS Aeroacoustics Conference, 2016, 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper discusses the effect of high level multi-tone acoustic excitation on the acoustic properties of acoustic liners and perforates. It is based on an experimental study of the nonlinear properties of these types of samples without mean grazing or bias flow. Compared to previous studies results from normal incidence impedance tube measurements are compared to liners placed in a grazing incidence configuration. It is known from previous studies that high level acoustic excitation at one frequency will change the acoustic impedance of perforates at other frequencies, thereby changing the boundary condition seen by the acoustic waves. This effect could be used to change the impedance boundary conditions and for instance increase the absorption. It could also pose a problem for the correct modelling of sound transmission through ducts lined with such impedance surfaces. The effect of the combination of frequency components is also studied. 

  • 155.
    Bodén, Hans
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, MWL Flow acoustics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    In-duct source characterization for multiple sources2009In: 16th International Congress on Sound and Vibration 2009, ICSV 2009, 2009, p. 2664-2671Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper discusses experimental techniques for detecting if there are multiple sources in a duct and obtaining the acoustic characteristics of these sources. Experimental techniques for in-duct source characterization under plane wave conditions in ducts, when we know the location of the source, are well established. In some cases there can however be sources at both ends of a duct. The paper starts with discussing the possibility to, by using a number of flush mounted microphones in the duct, detect sources located on both sides of the test section and to extract the acoustic source characteristics of the sources. First the sound field in a duct with sources at both ends is discussed and described. The theory for experimental determination of source data is then described. A discussion of the consequences of source correlation is included. The methods are first tested using loudspeakers in a duct.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 156.
    Bodén, Hans
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, MWL Flow acoustics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    One-sided multi-port techniques for characterisation of in-duct samples with nonlinear acoustic properties2012In: Journal of Sound and Vibration, ISSN 0022-460X, E-ISSN 1095-8568, Vol. 331, no 13, p. 3050-3067Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Single sided multi-port system identification techniques, using sinusoidal excitation, for studying nonlinear energy transfer to higher harmonics for samples only accessible from one side such as perforated liners used as wall treatment in aircraft engine ducts are presented. The starting point is the so called polyharmonic distortion theory used for studying microwave systems. Models of different level of complexity are developed and the system identification results are compared. Experimental results, including error analysis, for a perforate sample are presented. The use of these techniques for analysing nonlinear energy transfer to higher harmonics and to improve the understanding of the physical phenomena involved are illustrated.

  • 157.
    Bodén, Hans
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Polyharmonic distortion modelling applied to acoustic characterisation of peforates2011In: 17th AIAA/CEAS Aeroacoustics Conference 2011 (32nd AIAA Aeroacoustics Conference), 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper discusses the possibility to apply polyharmonic distortion modelling, used for nonlinear characterisation of microwave systems, to acoustic characterisation of samples with non-linear properties such as perforates and other facing sheets used in aircraft engine liners and automotive mufflers. In some previous papers multi-port techniques using sinusoidal excitation for characterization of samples with non-linear properties were developed and experimentally tested. These techniques aimed at taking non-linear energy transfer between sound field harmonics into account. Essentially linear system identification theory was however used assuming that superposition applies and that the functions studied are analytical. Polyharmonic distortion modelling does not assume that the function relating waves incident and reflected or transmitted is analytic nor does it assume application of normal superposition. This technique is tested on experimental data obtained from measurements on a perforate mounted in a duct. The similarity to the previously developed nonlinear scattering matrix techniques is demonstrated. It is shown how the results obtained can be used to analyse nonlinear energy transfer to higher harmonics.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 158.
    Bodén, Hans
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Marcus Wallenberg Laboratory MWL. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    The effect of high level multi-tone excitation on the acoustic properties of perforates and liner samples2012In: 18th AIAA/CEAS Aeroacoustics Conf. (33rd AIAA Aeroacoustics Conf.), American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, 2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper discusses the effect of high level multi-tone acoustic excitation on the acoustic properties of perforates and liner samples. It is based on a large experimental study of the nonlinear properties of these types of samples without mean grazing or bias flow. It is known from previous studies that high level acoustic excitation at one frequency will change the acoustic impedance of perforates at other frequencies, thereby changing the boundary condition seen by the acoustic waves. This effect could be used to change the impedance boundary conditions and for instance increase the absorption. It could obviously also pose a problem for the correct modelling of sound transmission through ducts lined with such impedance surfaces. First a quasi-stationary model for the acoustic properties of the perforate is discussed and the results are compared to experimental data. The effect of the combination of frequency components in the excitation signal is studied to find out if it matters if we are using tones which are harmonically related or not. The effect the phase of the frequency components is studied using both the model and experimental data. It is also discussed if a parameter controlling the impedance can be found for an arbitrary combination of tones with different frequencies.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 159.
    Bodén, Hans
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Two-sided multi-port techniques for characterisation of in-duct samples with non-linear acoustic properties2013In: Acta Acoustica united with Acustica, ISSN 1610-1928, E-ISSN 1861-9959, Vol. 99, no 3, p. 359-378Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper discusses experimental techniques for obtaining the acoustic properties of in-duct samples with non-linear acoustic characteristics. The methods developed are intended for studies of non-linear energy transfer to higher harmonics for samples accessible from both side such as perforates or other material used as top sheets in aircraft engine liners and automotive mufflers. New double sided multi-port techniques, using sinusoidal excitation, for characterisation of samples with non-linear properties are developed and experimentally tested. The results of the experimental tests show that these new techniques can give results which are useful for understanding non-linear energy transfer to higher harmonics.

  • 160.
    Bodén, Hans
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW. KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Centres, Competence Center for Gas Exchange (CCGEx). KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Engineering Mechanics, Fluid Mechanics and Engineering Acoustics, Marcus Wallenberg Laboratory MWL.
    Kabral, Raimo
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Centres, Competence Center for Gas Exchange (CCGEx). KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Engineering Mechanics, Fluid Mechanics and Engineering Acoustics, Marcus Wallenberg Laboratory MWL.
    The effect of high temperatures and grazing flow on the acoustic properties of liners2020In: Euronoise 2015, DC/ConfOrg , 2020, p. 2261-2266Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Acoustic liners are used to reduce fan noise in aircraft engine intakes but also in hot stream parts of the engine. To gain confidence in liner impedance models which are used for design it is important to make experimental tests under realistic conditions as possible. This paper present results of hot stream impedance eduction tests for single degree of freedom Helmholtz resonator liners with different configurations. These types of liners consist of a perforate top sheet backed by a honeycomb cavity to give a locally reacting wall treatment which can be characterized by an acoustic impedance. In the present case a number of different perforate sheet geometries were tested under varying grazing flow and temperature conditions. In some cases the liner test samples also included a thin layer of metallic foam. These types of liners are used for aircraft engine applications but are also of interest for IC-engine applications. It could be argued that the main effect of high temperatures is a change of medium properties such as: density, viscosity and speed of sound. If this is true the high temperature impedance could be predicted by scaling from the result at cold conditions. This is investigated in the paper by comparing measured results from liner impedance models available in the literature.

  • 161.
    Bodén, Hans
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Marcus Wallenberg Laboratory MWL. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Zhou, Lin
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Marcus Wallenberg Laboratory MWL. KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Centres, Competence Center for Gas Exchange (CCGEx).
    Acoustic Properties of an In-Duct Orifice Subjected to Bias Flow and High Level Acoustic Excitation2012In: Proceedings of the 10th International conference on Flow-Induced Vibration (& Flow-Induced Noise): FIV2012, Dublin, Ireland, 3-6 July 2012 FLOW-INDUCED VIBRATION, 2012, p. 187-193Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper experimentally investigates the acousticproperties of an orifice with bias flow under medium andhigh sound level excitation. The test included no bias flowand two bias speeds for three different frequencies. Experimentalresults are compared and discussed with theory.It is shown that bias flow makes the acoustic propertiesmuch more complex compared theory and with theno bias flow case, especially when velocity ratio betweenacoustic particle velocity and mean flow velocity is nearunity.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 162.
    Bodén, Hans
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Marcus Wallenberg Laboratory MWL. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Zhou, Lin
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Marcus Wallenberg Laboratory MWL. KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Centres, Competence Center for Gas Exchange (CCGEx).
    An experimental study of the effect of flow and high level acoustic excitation on the acoustic properties of perforates and orifices2013In: 20th International Congress on Sound and Vibration 2013, ICSV 2013: Volume 3, 2013, International Institute of Acoustics and Vibrations , 2013, p. 2545-2552Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Perforates are for instance used in mufflers for automotive applications and in acoustic liners for aircraft engines. In these applications they are often exposed to high level acoustic excitation in combination with grazing or bias flow. The paper is based on an experimental study of the nonlinear properties of these types of samples without mean grazing or bias flow as well as on a study of an orifice with bias flow under medium and high sound level excitation. The effect of grazing flow is discussed based on data from the literature. It is known from previous studies that high level acoustic excitation at one frequency will change the acoustic impedance of perforates at other frequencies, thereby changing the boundary condition seen by the acoustic waves. This effect could be used to change the impedance boundary conditions and for instance increase the absorption. It could obviously also pose a problem for the correct modeling of sound transmission through ducts lined with such impedance surfaces. Experimental results are compared to a quasi-stationary model. The effect of the combination of frequency components and phase in the excitation signal is studied. The bias flow tests included different flow speeds for different frequencies. The level of acoustic excitation is varied from much smaller to larger than the mean flow velocity. It is shown that bias flow makes the acoustic properties more complex compared to the no bias flow case, especially when the velocity ratio between acoustic particle velocity and mean flow velocity is near unity.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 163.
    Boij, Susann
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, MWL Flow acoustics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    An analysis of the acoustic energy in a flow duct with a vortex sheet2009In: MATHEMATICAL MODELING OF WAVE PHENOMENA / [ed] Nilsson B; Fishman L; Karlsson A; Nordebo S, 2009, Vol. 1106, p. 130-139Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Modelling the acoustic scattering and absorption at an area expansion in a flow duct requires the incorporation of the flow-acoustic interaction. One way to quantify the interaction is to study the energy in the incident and the scattered field respectively. If the interaction is strong, energy may be transferred between the acoustic and the main flow field. In particular, shear layers, that may be transferred between the acoustic and the main flow field. In particular, shear such as acoustic waves. The vortex sheet model is an analytical linear acoustic model, developed to study scattering of acoustic waves in duct with sharp edges including the interaction with primarily the separated flows that arise at sharp edges and corners. In the model the flow field at an area expansion in a duct is described as a jet issuing into the larger part of the duct. In this paper, the flow-acoustic interaction is described in terms of energy flow. The linear convective wave equation is solved for a two-dimensional, rectangular flow duct geometry. The resulting modes are classified as "hydrodynamic" and "acoustic" when separating the acoustic energy from the part of the energy arising from the steady flow field. In the downstream duct, the seat of modes for this complex flow field are not orthogonal. For small Strouhal numbers, the plane wave and the two hydrodynamic waves are all plane, although propagating with different wave speeds. As the Strouhal numbers increases, the hydrodynamic modes changes to get a shape where the amplitude is concentrated near the vortex sheet. In an intermediate Strouhal number region, the mode shape of the first higher order mode is very similar to the damped hydrodynamic mode. A physical interpretation of this is that we have a strong coupling between the flow field and the acoustic field when the modes are non-orthogonal. Energy concepts for this duct configuration and mean flow profile are introduced. The energy is formulated such that the vortex sheet turns out as a sink for the acoustic field, but a source for the unstable hydrodynamic were. This model is physical only close to the edge, due to an exponentially growing hydrodynamic mode. In a real flow, non-linearities will limit the growth, but this is not included in the model.

  • 164.
    Boij, Susann
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Marcus Wallenberg Laboratory MWL. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Flow effects on the acoustic end correction of a sudden in-duct area expansion2009In: Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, ISSN 0001-4966, E-ISSN 1520-8524, Vol. 126, no 3, p. 995-1004Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    For scattering of plane waves at a sudden area expansion in a duct, the presence of flow may significantly alter the reactive properties. This paper studies the influence of a mean flow field and unstable separated flow on the reactive properties of the expansion, formulated as an end correction. Theoretical and experimental results show that the expansion end correction is significantly affected by the flow and hydrodynamic waves excited at the edge of the expansion. The effects are different in three regions where the Strouhal number is small, of order 1, and large. The influence is most significant at Strouhal numbers of the order 1, with specific limiting values for large and small Strouhal numbers, respectively. In the analytic model, an important feature is the shear layer at the edge modeled as a vortex sheet with the unsteady Kutta condition applied at the edge. The influence of Mach number, Helmholtz number, and area expansion ratio is studied, and a quasistationary, small Strouhal number, approximation yields an expression for the end correction. Further, the influence of edge condition is explored, emphasizing the importance of interaction between sound and unsteady vorticity shedding at the edge of the area expansion.

  • 165.
    Bolin, Karl
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Prediction Method for Wind-Induced Vegetation Noise2009In: Acta Acoustica united with Acustica, ISSN 1610-1928, E-ISSN 1861-9959, Vol. 95, no 4, p. 607-619Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article examines the sound generated when the wind interacts with vegetation. A wind field model has been coupled to a new method for predicting sound from vegetation. This includes predictions from coniferous, deciduous and leafless trees. The proposed prediction method and an earlier model have been compared with measurements which show improved agreement, in particular in the region below 1 kHz. Comparisons between five measurement sites and predictions show satisfactory agreement for wind speeds up to 8.5 m/s. Fluctuations in the vegetation noise level due to wind turbulence can also be accurately estimated.

  • 166. Borodulin, V. I.
    et al.
    Ivanov, A. V.
    Kachanov, Y. S.
    Hanifi, Ardeshir
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW. Swedish Defense Research Agency, FOI.
    Laminar-turbulent transition delay on a swept wing2016In: AIP Conference Proceedings, American Institute of Physics (AIP), 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The paper describes the results of experiments on robustness of laminar-turbulent transition control on a swept-wing using distributed micro-sized roughness (DMSR) elements. These elements introduce controlled stationary vortices which are able to significantly modify the base flow and its stability characteristics. We have performed parametric study first varying height and period of the DMSR elements in order to find the most stabilizing effect on boundary later flow in compare to uncontrolled reference case without DMSR. Significant downstream shift of laminar-turbulent transition position due to application of DMSR is found and well documented with help of thermography. The robustness of this flow control method was studied by variation of the wind-tunnel flow quality introducing significant sound background or introducing enhanced turbulence level (applying turbulizing grids). The wind-tunnel tests performed with turbulence-generating grids (at enhanced turbulence levels) have shown that laminar-turbulent transition moves upstream in this case, while DMSR-elements loose their effectiveness for transition control (no matter in quiet sound conditions or at elevated sound background). The experiments on acoustic influence have shown that without DMSR acoustic does not effect transition location. However, in case then laminar-turbulent transition is delayed by presence of DMSR, an additional transition delay was observed when harmonic acoustic waves of certain frequency were excited.

  • 167. Borodulin, V. I.
    et al.
    Ivanov, A. V.
    Kachanov, Y. S.
    Mischenko, D. A.
    Örlü, Ramis
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Hanifi, Ardeshir
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Hein, S.
    Excitation of 3D TS-waves in a swept-wing boundary layer by surface vibrations and freestream vortices2018In: AIP Conference Proceedings, American Institute of Physics Inc. , 2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There are several kinds of velocity disturbances, which may affect the transition to turbulence in a swept wing boundary layer. Tollmien-Schlichting (TS) waves are among most important of them. The properties of TS waves and their potential competition with cross-flow waves on a swept wing are poorly studied in theoretical works and were not studied experimentally at all. This paper presents the method of excitation of fully controlled 3D TS waves via interaction of free-stream vortices and surface vibrations. The experimental approach developed here will be used for investigation of the corresponding receptivity problem.

  • 168.
    Borodulin, V. I.
    et al.
    Khristianovich Inst Theoret & Appl Mech, Novosibirsk 630090, Russia..
    Ivanov, A. V.
    Khristianovich Inst Theoret & Appl Mech, Novosibirsk 630090, Russia..
    Kachanov, Y. S.
    Khristianovich Inst Theoret & Appl Mech, Novosibirsk 630090, Russia..
    Mischenko, D. A.
    Khristianovich Inst Theoret & Appl Mech, Novosibirsk 630090, Russia..
    Örlü, Ramis
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW. KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Centres, Competence Center for Gas Exchange (CCGEx). KTH, Centres, SeRC - Swedish e-Science Research Centre.
    Hanifi, Ardeshir
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW. KTH, Centres, SeRC - Swedish e-Science Research Centre.
    Hein, S.
    DLR, Inst Aerodynam & Flow Technol, D-37073 Gottingen, Germany..
    Experimental and theoretical study of swept-wing boundary-layer instabilities. Three-dimensional Tollmien-Schlichting instability2019In: Physics of fluids, ISSN 1070-6631, E-ISSN 1089-7666, Vol. 31, no 11, article id 114104Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Extensive combined experimental and theoretical investigations of the linear evolution of three-dimensional (3D) Tollmien-Schlichting (TS) instability modes of 3D boundary layers developing on a swept airfoil section have been carried out. The flow under consideration is the boundary layer over an airfoil at 350 sweep and an angle of attack of +1.5 degrees. At these conditions, TS instability is found to be the predominant one. Perturbations with different frequencies and spanwise wavenumbers are generated in a controlled way using a row of elastic membranes. All experimental results are deeply processed and compared with results of calculations based on theoretical approaches. Very good quantitative agreement of all measured and calculated stability characteristics of swept-wing boundary layers is achieved.

  • 169.
    Borodulin, V. I.
    et al.
    Khristianovich Inst Theoret & Appl Mech, Novosibirsk 630090, Russia..
    Ivanov, A. V.
    Khristianovich Inst Theoret & Appl Mech, Novosibirsk 630090, Russia..
    Kachanov, Y. S.
    Khristianovich Inst Theoret & Appl Mech, Novosibirsk 630090, Russia..
    Mischenko, D. A.
    Khristianovich Inst Theoret & Appl Mech, Novosibirsk 630090, Russia..
    Örlü, Ramis
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Hanifi, Ardeshir
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics.
    Hein, S.
    DLR, Inst Aerodynam & Flow Technol, D-37073 Gottingen, Germany..
    Experimental and theoretical study of swept-wing boundary-layer instabilities. Unsteady crossflow instability2019In: Physics of fluids, ISSN 1070-6631, E-ISSN 1089-7666, Vol. 31, no 6, article id 064101Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Extensive combined experimental and theoretical investigations of the linear evolution of unsteady (in general) Cross-Flow (CF) and three-dimensional (3D) Tollmien-Schlichting (TS) instability modes of 3D boundary layers developing on a swept airfoil section have been carried out. CF-instability characteristics are investigated in detail at an angle of attack of -5 degrees when this kind of instability dominates in the laminar-turbulent transition process, while the 3D TS-instability characteristics are studied at an angle of attack of +1.5 degrees when this kind of instability is predominant in the transition process. All experimental results are deeply processed and compared with results of calculations based on several theoretical approaches. For the first time, very good quantitative agreement of all measured and calculated stability characteristics of swept-wing boundary layers is achieved both for unsteady CF- and 3D TS-instability modes for the case of a boundary layer developing on a real swept airfoil. The first part of the present study (this paper) is devoted to the description of the case of CF-dominated transition, while the TS-dominated case will be described in detail in a subsequent second part of this investigation.

  • 170.
    Borodulin, V. I.
    et al.
    RAS, SB, ITAM, Novosibirsk 630090, Russia..
    Ivanov, A. V.
    RAS, SB, ITAM, Novosibirsk 630090, Russia..
    Kachanov, Y. S.
    RAS, SB, ITAM, Novosibirsk 630090, Russia..
    Mischenko, D. A.
    RAS, SB, ITAM, Novosibirsk 630090, Russia..
    Örlü, Ramis
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Hanifi, Ardeshir
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Hein, S.
    DLR, Inst Aerodynam & Flow Technol, D-37073 Gottingen, Germany..
    Quantitative study of localized mechanisms of excitation of cross-flow instability modes in a swept-wing boundary layer2018In: CONFERENCE OF YOUNG SCIENTISTS IN MECHANICS, IOP PUBLISHING LTD , 2018, article id 012008Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An experimental study of two efficient receptivity mechanisms of excitation of cross-flow (CF) instability modes is carried out in a boundary layer of a real airfoil section of a swept wing due to: (i) action of localized surface vibrations, and (ii) scattering of 2D freestream vortices on them. It is found that the two mechanisms lead to rather efficient excitation of CF-modes both at surface vibration frequency and at combination 'vortexvibration' frequencies. First estimations of the corresponding localized receptivity coefficients are obtained. Direct comparison of the experimental amplification curves of the excited CF-modes with those calculated based on the linear stability theory (LST) has shown that the experimental data obtained at vibration frequency are in excellent agreement with the LST. At the same time, growth rates of the CF-modes excited at combination frequencies are found to be completely inconsistent with the LST. A possible explanation of this phenomenon via action of a new efficient distributed receptivity mechanism is suggested. This mechanism is associated with scattering of freestream vortices on rather high-amplitude CF-modes excited by surface vibrations.

  • 171. Borodulin, V. I.
    et al.
    Ivanov, A. V.
    Kachanov, Y. S.
    Mischenko, D. A.
    Örlü, Ramis
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Hanifi, Ardeshir
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Hein, S.
    Receptivity coefficients of vortex-vibrational type at excitation of 3D Tollmien-Schlichting waves in a boundary layer on a swept wing2019In: HIGH-ENERGY PROCESSES IN CONDENSED MATTER (HEPCM 2019): Proceedings of the XXVI Conference on High-Energy Processes in Condensed Matter, dedicated to the 150th anniversary of the birth of S.A. Chaplygin, American Institute of Physics (AIP), 2019, article id 030044Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The paper is devoted to the first results of an experimental quantitative study of the receptivity mechanism of a swept-wing laminar boundary layer related to scattering of 2D freestream vortices (with frequency fv) at 3D local surface vibrations (with frequency fs) resulting in an excitation of Tollmien-Schlichting (TS) waves (having combination frequencies f+ = fs+fv and f- = fs - fv). The experiments were carried out in a low-turbulence level wind tunnel on a high-precision experimental model of long-laminar-run swept airfoil (sweep angle of 35°) at a freestream speed of about 10 m/s. Controlled localized 3D surface vibrations and 2D freestream vortices were generated by special disturbance sources. Quantitative characteristics of the studied receptivity mechanism (receptivity coefficients) were estimated.

  • 172.
    Borrelli, Giuseppe
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Engineering Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW. Faculty of Aerospace Engineering, Alma Mater Studiorum – University of Bologna, Forlì, Italy.
    Guastoni, Luca
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Engineering Mechanics, Fluid Mechanics and Engineering Acoustics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Eivazi, Hamidreza
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Engineering Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Schlatter, Philipp
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Engineering Mechanics, Fluid Mechanics and Engineering Acoustics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Vinuesa, Ricardo
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Engineering Mechanics, Fluid Mechanics and Engineering Acoustics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Predicting the temporal dynamics of turbulent channels through deep learning2022In: International Journal of Heat and Fluid Flow, ISSN 0142-727X, E-ISSN 1879-2278, Vol. 96, article id 109010Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The success of recurrent neural networks (RNNs) has been demonstrated in many applications related to turbulence, including flow control, optimization, turbulent features reproduction as well as turbulence prediction and modeling. With this study we aim to assess the capability of these networks to reproduce the temporal evolution of a minimal turbulent channel flow. We first obtain a data-driven model based on a modal decom-position in the Fourier domain (which we denote as FFT-POD) of the time series sampled from the flow. This particular case of turbulent flow allows us to accurately simulate the most relevant coherent structures close to the wall. Long-short-term-memory (LSTM) networks and a Koopman-based framework (KNF) are trained to predict the temporal dynamics of the minimal-channel-flow modes. Tests with different configurations highlight the limits of the KNF method compared to the LSTM, given the complexity of the flow under study. Long-term prediction for LSTM show excellent agreement from the statistical point of view, with errors below 2% for the best models with respect to the reference. Furthermore, the analysis of the chaotic behaviour through the use of the Lyapunov exponents and of the dynamic behaviour through Poincare' maps emphasizes the ability of the LSTM to reproduce the temporal dynamics of turbulence. Alternative reduced-order models (ROMs), based on the identification of different turbulent structures, are explored and they continue to show a good potential in predicting the temporal dynamics of the minimal channel.

  • 173.
    Bouaniche, Alexandre
    et al.
    Normandie Univ, CORIA, CNRS, INSA Rouen Normandie, St Etienne Du Rouvray, France..
    Jaouen, Nicolas
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW. Normandie Univ, CORIA, CNRS, INSA Rouen Normandie, St Etienne Du Rouvray, France..
    Domingo, Pascale
    Normandie Univ, CORIA, CNRS, INSA Rouen Normandie, St Etienne Du Rouvray, France..
    Vervisch, Luc
    Normandie Univ, CORIA, CNRS, INSA Rouen Normandie, St Etienne Du Rouvray, France..
    Vitiated High Karlovitz n-decane/air Turbulent Flames: Scaling Laws and Micro-mixing Modeling Analysis2019In: Flow Turbulence and Combustion, ISSN 1386-6184, E-ISSN 1573-1987, Vol. 102, no 1, p. 235-252Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Turbulent flames with high Karlovitz numbers have deserved further attention in the most recent literature. For a fixed value of the Damkohler number (ratio between an integral mechanical time and a chemical time), the increase of the Karlovitz number (ratio between a chemical time and a micro-mixing time) by an order of magnitude implies the increase of the turbulent Reynolds number by two orders of magnitude (Bray, Symp. (Int.) Combust. 26, 1-26 1996). In the practice of real burners featuring a limited range of variation of their turbulent Reynolds number, high Karlovitz combustion actually goes with a drastic reduction of the Damkohler number. Within this context, the relation between the dilution by burnt gases and the apparition of high Karlovitz flames is discussed. Basic scaling laws are reported which suggest that the overall decrease of the burning rate due to very fast mixing can indeed be compensated by the energy brought to the reaction zone by burnt gases. To estimate the validity of these scaling laws, in particular the response of the quenching Karlovitz versus the dilution level with a vitiated stream, the micro-mixing rate is varied in a multiple-inlet canonical turbulent and reactive micro-mixing problem. A reduced n-decane/air chemical kinetics is used, which has been derived from a more detailed scheme using a combination of a directed relation graphs analysis with a Genetic Algorithm. The multiple-inlet canonical micro-mixing problem includes liquid fuel injection and dilution by burnt gases, both calibrated from conditions representative of an aeronautical combustion chamber. The results confirm the possibility of reaching, with the help of a vitiated mixture, very high Karlovitz combustion before quenching occurs.

  • 174. Boyanova, P.
    et al.
    Do-Quang, Minh
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Physicochemical Fluid Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Neytcheva, M.
    Block-preconditioners for conforming and non-conforming FEM discretizations of the Cahn-Hilliard equation2012In: Large-Scale Scientific Computing, Springer Science+Business Media B.V., 2012, Vol. 7116 LNCS, p. 549-557Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We consider preconditioned iterative solution methods to solve the algebraic systems of equations arising from finite element discretizations of multiphase flow problems, based on the phase-field model. The aim is to solve coupled physics problems, where both diffusive and convective processes take place simultaneously in time and space. To model the above, a coupled system of partial differential equations has to be solved, consisting of the Cahn-Hilliard equation to describe the diffusive interface and the time-dependent Navier-Stokes equation, to follow the evolution of the convection field in time. We focus on the construction and efficiency of preconditioned iterative solution methods for the linear systems, arising after conforming and non-conforming finite element discretizations of the Cahn-Hilliard equation in space and implicit discretization schemes in time. The non-linearity of the phase-separation process is treated by Newton's method. The resulting matrices admit a two-by-two block structure, utilized by the preconditioning techniques, proposed in the current work. We discuss approximation estimates of the preconditioners and include numerical experiments to illustrate their behaviour.

  • 175.
    Boyanova, Petia
    et al.
    Department of Information Technology, Uppsala University.
    Do-Quang, Minh
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Neytcheva, Maya
    Department of Information Technology, Uppsala University.
    Efficient Preconditioners for Large Scale Binary Cahn-Hilliard Models2012In: Computational Methods in Applied Mathematics, ISSN 1609-4840, E-ISSN 1609-9389, Vol. 12, no 1, p. 1-22Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this work we consider preconditioned iterative solution methods for numerical simulations of multiphase flow problems, modelled by the Cahn-Hilliard equation. We focus on diphasic flows and the construction and efficiency of a preconditioner for the algebraic systems arising from finite element discretizations in space and the method in time. The preconditioner utilises to a full extent the algebraic structure of the underlying matrices and exhibits optimal convergence and computational complexity properties. Various numerical experiments, including large scale examples, are presented as well as performance compar- isons with other solution methods. 

  • 176.
    Bragone, Federica
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Computer Science, Computational Science and Technology (CST).
    Rosén, Tomas
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Morozovska, Kateryna
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Computer Science, Computational Science and Technology (CST). KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Sustainability, Industrial Dynamics & Entrepreneurship.
    Laneryd, Tor
    Hitachi Energy, Västerås, Sweden.
    Söderberg, Daniel
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Engineering Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fiberprocesser.
    Markidis, Stefano
    KTH, Centres, SeRC - Swedish e-Science Research Centre. KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Computer Science, Computational Science and Technology (CST).
    Unsupervised Learning Analysis of Flow-Induced Birefringence in Nanocellulose: Differentiating Materials and ConcentrationsManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Cellulose nanofibrils (CNFs) can be used as building blocks for future sustainable materials including strong and stiff filaments. The goal of this paper is to introduce a data analysis of flow-induced birefringence experiments by means of unsupervised learning techniques. By reducing the dimensionality of the data with Principal Component Analysis (PCA) we are able to exploit information for the different cellulose materials at several concentrations and compare them to each other. Our approach aims at classifying the CNF materials at different concentrations by applying unsupervised machine learning algorithms, like k-means and Gaussian Mixture Models (GMMs). Finally, we analyze the autocorrelation function (ACF) and the partial autocorrelation function (PACF) of the first principal component, detecting seasonality in lower concentrations. The focus is given to the initial relaxation of birefringence after the flow is stopped to have a better understanding of the Brownian dynamics for the given materials and concentrations.

    Our method can be used to distinguish the different materials at specific concentrations and could help to identify possible advantages and drawbacks of one material over the other. 

  • 177.
    Brandefelt, Jenny
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Turbulence. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Kjellstrom, E
    Naslund, J O
    Strandberg, G
    Voelker, A H L
    Wohlfarth, B
    A coupled climate model simulation of Marine Isotope Stage 3 stadial climate2011In: Climate of the Past, ISSN 1814-9324, E-ISSN 1814-9332, Vol. 7, no 2, p. 649-670Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present a coupled global climate model (CGCM) simulation, integrated for 1500 yr to quasi-equilibrium, of a stadial (cold period) within Marine Isotope Stage 3 (MIS 3). The simulated Greenland stadial 12 (GS12; similar to 44 ka BP) annual global mean surface temperature (T-s) is 5.5 degrees C lower than in the simulated recent past (RP) climate and 1.3 degrees C higher than in the simulated Last Glacial Maximum (LGM; 21 ka BP) climate. The simulated GS12 is evaluated against proxy data and previous modelling studies of MIS3 stadial climate. We show that the simulated MIS 3 climate, and hence conclusions drawn regarding the dynamics of this climate, is highly model-dependent. The main findings are: (i) Proxy sea surface temperatures (SSTs) are higher than simulated SSTs in the central North Atlantic, in contrast to earlier simulations of MIS 3 stadial climate in which proxy SSTs were found to be lower than simulated SST. (ii) The Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) slows down by 50% in the GS12 climate as compared to the RP climate. This slowdown is attained without freshwater forcing in the North Atlantic region, a method used in other studies to force an AMOC shutdown. (iii) El-Nino-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) teleconnections in mean sea level pressure (MSLP) are significantly modified by GS12 and LGM forcing and boundary conditions. (iv) Both the mean state and variability of the simulated GS12 is dependent on the equilibration. The annual global mean T-s only changes by 0.10 degrees C from model years 500-599 to the last century of the simulation, indicating that the climate system may be close to equilibrium already after 500 yr of integration. However, significant regional differences between the last century of the simulation and model years 500-599 exist. Further, the difference between simulated and proxy SST is reduced from model years 500-599 to the last century of the simulation. The results of the ENSO variability analysis is also shown to depend on the equilibration.

  • 178.
    Brandefelt, Jenny
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Otto-Bliesner, B. L.
    Equilibration and variability in a Last Glacial Maximum climate simulation with CCSM32009In: Geophysical Research Letters, ISSN 0094-8276, E-ISSN 1944-8007, Vol. 36Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present results from a 1862 year simulation of the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) with the Community Climate System Model version 3 (CCSM3). A quasi steady state is reached after approximately 100 years of integration when the initial cooling trend in the annual global mean atmospheric surface temperature (T-s) levels off and even reverses. After another 150 years of integration the climate continues to cool and reaches a new equilibrium after a total of 800 years of integration. The cause of the continued adjustment of the climate to LGM forcing and boundary conditions is found in the abyssal ocean which is cooling at a rate decreasing from 0.15 degrees C per century until the new equilibrium is reached. The new equilibrium differs substantially from the first quasi steady state with 1.1 degrees C colder global mean Ts and regional differences of 5-15 degrees C in the North Atlantic region and a 30% reduction of the strength of the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (AMOC). Further, the variability in the global mean Ts is significantly larger in the new equilibrium. This variability is associated with coupled ocean-atmosphere-sea ice variations in the North Atlantic region. Citation: Brandefelt, J., and B. L. Otto-Bliesner (2009), Equilibration and variability in a Last Glacial Maximum climate simulation with CCSM3, Geophys. Res. Lett., 36, L19712, doi: 10.1029/2009GL040364.

  • 179.
    Brandt, Luca
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW. KTH, Centres, SeRC - Swedish e-Science Research Centre.
    The lift-up effect: The linear mechanism behind transition and turbulence in shear flows2014In: European journal of mechanics. B, Fluids, ISSN 0997-7546, E-ISSN 1873-7390, Vol. 47, p. 80-96Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The formation and amplification of streamwise velocity perturbations induced by cross-stream disturbances is ubiquitous in shear flows. This disturbance growth mechanism, so neatly identified by Ellingsen and Palm in 1975, is a key process in transition to turbulence and self-sustained turbulence. In this review, we first present the original derivation and early studies and then discuss the non-modal growth of streaks, the result of the lift-up process, in transitional and turbulent shear flows. In the second part, the effects on the lift-up process of additives in the fluid and of a second phase are discussed and new results presented with emphasis on particle-laden shear flows. For all cases considered, we see the lift-up process to be a very robust process, always present as a first step in subcritical transition.

  • 180.
    Brandt, L.uca
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW. KTH, Centres, SeRC - Swedish e-Science Research Centre.
    Ardekani, Mehdi Niazi
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW. KTH, Centres, SeRC - Swedish e-Science Research Centre.
    Picano, F.
    Costa, P.
    Breugem, W. -P
    Numerical study of turbulent channel flow laden with finite-size non-spherical particles2017In: 10th International Symposium on Turbulence and Shear Flow Phenomena, TSFP 2017, International Symposium on Turbulence and Shear Flow Phenomena, TSFP10 , 2017, Vol. 4Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present interface-resolved numerical simulations of turbulent channel flow laden with non-spherical rigid and neutrally-buoyant particles. We first focus on the case of oblate particles of aspect ratio 1/3 at volume fractions up to 15% and show that the turbulent drag is decreasing when increasing the particle volume fraction although the effective viscosity of the suspension actually increases. We relate the observed drag reduction to turbulence attenuation and to particle migration away from the near-wall region. Particles tend to align parallel to the wall with rotation rates significantly lower than those reported for spheres. In the second part of the study, we examine the effect of the particle slenderness on the observed drag reduction and show that the drag increases for flatter particles.

  • 181.
    Brandt, Luca
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Engineering Mechanics, Fluid Mechanics and Engineering Acoustics. Norwegian Univ Sci & Technol NTNU, Dept Energy & Proc Engn, Trondheim, Norway..
    Coletti, Filippo
    Swiss Fed Inst Technol, Dept Mech & Proc Engn, Zurich, Switzerland..
    Particle-Laden Turbulence: Progress and Perspectives2022In: Annual Review of Fluid Mechanics, ISSN 0066-4189, E-ISSN 1545-4479, Vol. 54, p. 159-189Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This review is motivated by the fast progress in our understanding of the physics of particle-laden turbulence in the last decade, partly due to the tremendous advances of measurement and simulation capabilities. The focus is on spherical particles in homogeneous and canonical wall-bounded flows. The analysis of recent data indicates that conclusions drawn in zero gravity should not be extrapolated outside of this condition, and that the particle response time alone cannot completely define the dynamics of finite-size particles. Several breakthroughs have been reported, mostly separately, on the dynamics and turbulence modifications of small inertial particles in dilute conditions and of large weakly buoyant spheres. Measurements at higher concentrations, simulations fully resolving smaller particles, and theoretical tools accounting for both phases are needed to bridge this gap and allow for the exploration of the fluid dynamics of suspensions, from laminar rheology and granular media to particulate turbulence.

  • 182.
    Brandt, Luca
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Stability, Transition and Control. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    de lange, H. C.
    Interactions between finite-length streaks and breakdown to turbulence2007In: ADVANCES IN TURBULENCE XI / [ed] Palma, JMLM; Lopes, AS, BERLIN: SPRINGER-VERLAG BERLIN , 2007, Vol. 117, p. 133-135Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 183.
    Brandt, Luca
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Duguet, Yohann
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Larsson, Robin
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Nonlinear optimal perturbations in plane Couette flow2009In: ADVANCES IN TURBULENCE XII: PROCEEDINGS OF THE 12TH EUROMECH EUROPEAN TURBULENCE CONFERENCE / [ed] Eckhardt, B., 2009, Vol. 132, p. 85-88Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 184.
    Brandt, Luca
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Picano, F.
    Breugem, W. -P
    Turbulent flow of a suspension of rigid spherical particles in plane channels2016In: Springer Proceedings in Physics, 2016, p. 311-315Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Suspensions of solid particles are frequently found in applications and environmental flows. Several studies concern the rheological properties of suspensions in laminar flows, but much less is known of turbulent suspensions. The present work fills this gap providing DNS data on dense suspensions of neutrally-buoyant rigid sphere in a turbulent channel flow at the bulk Reynolds number of Re = U0h/ν = 2800. We show that considering volume fractions Φ ≤ 0.1 the turbulent flow is similar to the unladen case with higher turbulence intensities. On the contrary, the flow behavior strongly changes at Φ = 0.2where the turbulence appears to be attenuated.

  • 185.
    Brandt, Luca
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Stability, Transition and Control. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Sipp, Denis
    Pralits, Jan O.
    Marquet, Olivier
    Effect of base-flow variation in noise amplifiers: the flat-plate boundary layer2011In: Journal of Fluid Mechanics, ISSN 0022-1120, E-ISSN 1469-7645, Vol. 687, p. 503-528Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Non-modal analysis determines the potential for energy amplification in stable flows. The latter is quantified in the frequency domain by the singular values of the resolvent operator. The present work extends previous analysis on the effect of base-flow modifications on flow stability by considering the sensitivity of the flow non-modal behaviour. Using a variational technique, we derive an analytical expression for the gradient of a singular value with respect to base-flow modifications and show how it depends on the singular vectors of the resolvent operator, also denoted the optimal forcing and optimal response of the flow. As an application, we examine zero-pressure-gradient boundary layers where the different instability mechanisms of wall-bounded shear flows are all at work. The effect of the component-type non-normality of the linearized Navier-Stokes operator, which concentrates the optimal forcing and response on different components, is first studied in the case of a parallel boundary layer. The effect of the convective-type non-normality of the linearized Navier-Stokes operator, which separates the spatial support of the structures of the optimal forcing and response, is studied in the case of a spatially evolving boundary layer. The results clearly indicate that base-flow modifications have a strong impact on the Tollmien-Schlichting (TS) instability mechanism whereas the amplification of streamwise streaks is a very robust process. This is explained by simply examining the expression for the gradient of the resolvent norm. It is shown that the sensitive region of the lift-up (LU) instability spreads out all over the flat plate and even upstream of it, whereas it is reduced to the region between branch I and branch II for the TS waves.

  • 186.
    Brandt, Luca
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Tao, Jianjun
    Peking University, China.
    Editorial: Recent advances in hydrodynamic instability and transition to turbulence2015In: Theoretical and Applied Mechanics Letters, ISSN 2095-0349, Vol. 5, no 3, p. 101-102Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 187.
    Braunbehrens, Robert
    et al.
    Innogy SE, Wind Onshore, Kapstadtring 7, D-22297 Hamburg, Germany..
    Segalini, Antonio
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics.
    A statistical model for wake meandering behind wind turbines2019In: Journal of Wind Engineering and Industrial Aerodynamics, ISSN 0167-6105, E-ISSN 1872-8197, Vol. 193, article id UNSP 103954Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A new wake model is proposed to account for wake meandering in simulations of wind-turbine wakes performed on steady solvers, through a wake-meandering description based on the dispersion theory of Taylor (1921, P. Lond. Math Soc., vol. 20, pp. 196-211). Single-turbine simulations were performed by means of the linearised solver ORFEUS. By analysing the steady wake behind a turbine, a set of parameters describing the wake was first obtained and synthesised into a look-up table. The proposed meandering model extended the simulation results by superimposing the lateral and vertical meandering motions to the steady wake. As a result, the time-averaged velocity distribution of the wake was increased in width and reduced in intensity. Through this combination, the model provides rationale for the wake-deficit decrease and for the power underestimation effects of several wake models. The new wake model is validated against the Lillgrund and Horns Rev data sets.

  • 188.
    Brethouwer, Geert
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Influence of spanwise rotation and scalar boundary conditions on passive scalar transport in turbulent channel flow2019In: Physical Review Fluids, E-ISSN 2469-990X, Vol. 4, no 1, article id 014602Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Direct numerical simulations of passive scalar transport in turbulent channel flow subject to spanwise rotation are carried out with two different boundary conditions for the scalar. In the first case the scalar transport is driven by an assigned scalar difference at the walls and in the second case by a constant mean streamwise scalar gradient. The Reynolds number Re = U(b)h/nu is fixed at 14 000 and the rotation number Ro = 2 Omega h/U-b is varied from 0 to 0.75, where U-b is the mean bulk velocity, h half the channel gap width, and Omega the rotation rate. This work is a continuation of Brethouwer [J. Fluid Mech. 844, 297 ( 2018)] to further study the influence of rotation and also the influence of scalar boundary conditions on scalar transport in channel flow. Mean scalar profiles and other scalar statistics differ in the two cases with different boundary conditions but are similar in the near-wall region in terms of local wall units. The conclusion of Brethouwer that the Reynolds analogy for scalar-momentum transfer does not apply to rotating channel flow is independent of scalar boundary conditions. Rotation influences the turbulent scalar flux differently than the Reynolds shear stress and strongly reduces the turbulent Prandtl number on the unstable channel side, irrespective of the scalar boundary conditions. Scalar structures are larger than the turbulence structures in rotating channel flow, in contrast to nonrotating channel flow where these are similar.

  • 189.
    Brethouwer, Geert
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Duguet, Yohann
    Schlatter, Philipp
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Numerical study of turbulent-laminar patterns in MHD, rotating and stratified shear flows2011In: Direct and Large-Eddy Simulation VIII, 2011, p. 125-130Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Coexisting laminar and turbulent regions have been observed in several types of wall bounded flows. In Taylor Couette flow, for example, alternating helical shaped laminar and turbulent regions have been observed within a limited Reynolds number range (Prigent et al., 2002) and oblique laminar and turbulent bands have been seen in experiments (Prigent et al., 2002) and simulations (Barkley and Tuckerman, 2005), (Duguet et al., 2010) of plane Couette flow for Reynolds numbers Re=U w h/ν between about 320 and 380. Here ±U w is the velocity of the two walls, h is the half width of the wall gap and ν is the viscosity. In this Reynolds number range the turbulent-laminar patterns seem to sustain while at lower Re the flow becomes fully laminar and at higher Re no clear laminar patterns can be distinguished and the flow eventually becomes fully turbulent. Similar oblique laminar-turbulent bands appeared as well in direct numerical simulations (DNS) of plane channel flow for friction Reynolds numbers Re τ =u τ h/ν=60 and 80 (Fukudome et al., 2009), (Tsukahara, 2010), where u τ is the friction velocity and h is again the gap half width.

  • 190.
    Brethouwer, Geert
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics.
    Lindborg, Erik
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics.
    Numerical study of vertical dispersion by stratified turbulence2009In: Journal of Fluid Mechanics, ISSN 0022-1120, E-ISSN 1469-7645, Vol. 631, p. 149-163Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Numerical simulations are carried Out to investigate vertical fluid particle dispersion in uniformly stratified stationary turbulent flows. The results are compared with the analysis of Lindborg & Brethouwer (J. Fluid Mech., vol. 614, 2008, pp. 303-314), who derived long- and short-time relations for the mean square vertical displacement of fluid particles. Several direct numerical simulations (DNSs) with different degrees of stratification and different buoyancy Reynolds numbers are carried out to test the long-time relation = 2 epsilon(P)t/N-2. Here, epsilon(P) is the mean dissipation of turbulent potential energy; N is the Brunt-Vaisala frequency; and t is time. The DNSs show good agreement with this relation, with a weak dependence on the buoyancy Reynolds number. Simulations with hyperviscosity are carried out to test the relation = (1 + pi C-PL)2 epsilon(P)t/N-2, which should be valid for shorter time scales in the range N-1 << t << T, where T is the turbulent eddy turnover time. The results of the hyperviscosity simulations come closer to this prediction with C-PL about 3 with increasing stratification. However, even in the simulation with the strongest stratification the growth of is somewhat slower than linear in this regime. Based on the simulation results it is argued that the time scale determining the evolution Of is the eddy turnover time, T, rather than the buoyancy time scale N-1, as suggested in previous studies. The simulation results are also consistent with the prediction of Lindborg & Brethouwer (2008) that the nearly flat plateau Of observed at t similar to T should scale as 4E(P)/N-2, where E-P is the mean turbulent potential energy.

  • 191.
    Brethouwer, Geert
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Turbulence. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Lindborg, Erik
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Particle Diffusion in Stably Stratified Flows2010In: PROGRESS IN TURBULENCE III / [ed] Peinke, J.; Oberlack, M.; Talamelli, A., 2010, Vol. 131, p. 163-166Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Numerical simulations are used to study the vertical dispersion of fluid particles in homogeneous turbulent flows with a stable stratification. The results of direct numerical simulations are in good agreement with the relation for the long time fluid particle dispersion, = 2 epsilon(P)t / N-2, derived by [6], though with a small dependence on the buoyancy Reynolds number. Here, is the mean square vertical particle displacement, epsilon p is the dissipation of potential energy, t is time and N is the Brunt-Vaisala frequency. A simulation with hyperviscosicity is performed to verify the relation = (1 + pi C-PL)2 epsilon(P)t / N-2 for shorter times, also derived by [6]. The agreement is reasonable and we find that C-PL similar to 3. The onset of a plateau in is observed in the simulations at t similar to E-P / epsilon(P) which scales as 4E(P) / N-2, where E-P is the potential energy.

  • 192.
    Brethouwer, Geert
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Turbulence. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW. KTH, Centres, SeRC - Swedish e-Science Research Centre.
    Schlatter, Philipp
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW. KTH, Centres, SeRC - Swedish e-Science Research Centre.
    Duguet, Yohann
    Henningson, Dan S.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Stability, Transition and Control. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW. KTH, Centres, SeRC - Swedish e-Science Research Centre.
    Johansson, Arne V.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Turbulence. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW. KTH, Centres, SeRC - Swedish e-Science Research Centre.
    Recurrent Bursts via Linear Processes in Turbulent Environments2014In: Physical Review Letters, ISSN 0031-9007, E-ISSN 1079-7114, Vol. 112, no 14, p. 144502-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Large-scale instabilities occurring in the presence of small-scale turbulent fluctuations are frequently observed in geophysical or astrophysical contexts but are difficult to reproduce in the laboratory. Using extensive numerical simulations, we report here on intense recurrent bursts of turbulence in plane Poiseuille flow rotating about a spanwise axis. A simple model based on the linear instability of the mean flow can predict the structure and time scale of the nearly periodic and self-sustained burst cycles. Poiseuille flow is suggested as a prototype for future studies of low-dimensional dynamics embedded in strongly turbulent environments.

  • 193.
    Brethouwer, Geert
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Schlatter, Philipp
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Johansson, Arne
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Effects of rapid spanwise rotation on turbulent channel flow with a passive scalar2011In: Proc. 7th International Symposium on Turbulence and Shear Flow Phenomena, 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Direct numerical simulations of fully developed turbulentchannel flow including a passive scalar rotating about thespanwise axis have been performed. The mean bulk Reynoldsnumber, Reb = Ubh/n ≥ 20000, where Ub is the bulk meanvelocity and h the channel half width, is higher than in previoussimulations and the rotation rate covers a wide range.At moderate rotation rates, turbulence on the stable channelside is significantly less damped than in DNS at lower Reb. Athigh rotation rates we observe re-occurring, quasi-periodic instabilitieson the stable channel side. Between these events theturbulence is weak, but during the instability events the wallshear stress and turbulence intensity are much stronger. Theinstabilities are caused by structures resembling Tollmien-Schlichting (TS) waves that at some instant rapidly grow, thenbecome unstable and finally break down into intense turbulence.After some time the TS waves form again and the processrepeats itself in a periodic-like manner.Mean scalar profiles are also strongly affected by rotationand large scalar fluctuations are found on the border of the stableand unstable channel side. The turbulent Prandtl/Schmidtnumber of the scalar is much less than unity if there is rotation.Predicting scalar transport in rotating channel flow willtherefore pose a challenge to turbulence models.

  • 194.
    Brethouwer, Geert
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Schlatter, Philipp
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Johansson, Arne
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Turbulence instabilities and passive scalars in rotating channel flow2011In: 13th European Turbulence Conference (ETC13): Instability, Transition, Grid Turbulence And Jets / [ed] K. Bajer, Institute of Physics Publishing (IOPP), 2011, p. 032025-Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Fully developed channel flow with a passive scalar rotating about the spanwise axis is studied by direct numerical simulations. The Reynolds number based on the bulk mean velocity Re-b is up to 30000, substantially higher than in previous studies, and the rotation rates cover a broad range. Turbulence on the stable channel side is less strongly damped at moderate rotation rates than in channel flow at lower Re-b. At high rotation rates and sufficiently high Re-b, intermittent strong instabilities occur on the stable side caused by rapidly growing modes resembling two-dimensional Tollmien-Schlichting waves which at some instant become unstable and break down into intense turbulence. The turbulence decays and after some time the waves form again and the process is repeated in a cyclic manner. Rotation also strongly affects the mean passive scalar profiles and turbulent scalar fluxes. Large scalar fluctuations are observed on the border between the stable and unstable channel sides. While in non-rotating channel flow the turbulent Prandtl number of the passive scalar is about one like in other shear flows, it is much smaller in the rotating cases.

  • 195.
    Brethouwer, Gert
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW. KTH, Centres, SeRC - Swedish e-Science Research Centre. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Engineering Mechanics.
    Comment on "Turbulence Statistics of Arbitrary Moments of Wall-Bounded Shear Flows: A Symmetry Approach"2023In: Physical Review Letters, ISSN 0031-9007, E-ISSN 1079-7114, Vol. 130, no 6, article id 069401Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 196.
    Brethouwer, Gert
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics.
    Heat transfer in rotating channel flow2019In: 11th International Symposium on Turbulence and Shear Flow Phenomena, TSFP 2019, International Symposium on Turbulence and Shear Flow Phenomena, TSFP , 2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the present study (Brethouwer, 2018, 2019) heat transfer in rotating turbulent channel flow is investigated through DNS at moderate Reynolds numbers. It is shown that rotation has a large influence on the mean temperature profiles and heat fluxes and also on the structure of the temperature field. The turbulent Prandtl number on the unstable side is strongly reduced by rotation, implying that the Reynolds analogy for momentum-heat transfer does not necessarily hold for rotating turbulent channel flow.

  • 197.
    Brethouwer, Gert
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Engineering Mechanics, Fluid Mechanics and Engineering Acoustics, Turbulence.
    Much faster heat/mass than momentum transport in rotating Couette flows2021In: Journal of Fluid Mechanics, ISSN 0022-1120, E-ISSN 1469-7645, Vol. 912, article id A31Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Heat and mass transport are generally closely correlated to momentum transport in shear flows. This so-called Reynolds analogy between advective heat or mass transport and momentum transport hinders efficiency improvements in engineering heat and mass transfer applications. I show through direct numerical simulations that in plane Couette and Taylor-Couette flow, rotation can strongly influence wall-to-wall passive tracer transport and make it much faster than momentum transport, clearly in violation of the Reynolds analogy. This difference between passive tracer transport, representative of heat/mass transport, and momentum transport is observed in steady flows with large counter-rotating vortices at low Reynolds numbers as well as in fully turbulent flows at higher Reynolds numbers. It is especially large near the neutral (Rayleigh's) stability limit. The rotation-induced Coriolis force strongly damps the streamwise/azimuthal velocity fluctuations when this limit is approached, while tracer fluctuations are much less affected. Accordingly, momentum transport is much more reduced than tracer transport, showing that the Coriolis force breaks the Reynolds analogy. At higher Reynolds numbers, this strong advective transport dissimilarity is accompanied by approximate limit cycle dynamics with intense low-frequency bursts of turbulence when approaching the neutral stability limit. The study demonstrates that simple body forces can cause clear dissimilarities between heat/mass and momentum transport in shear flows.

  • 198.
    Brethouwer, Gert
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW. KTH, Centres, SeRC - Swedish e-Science Research Centre. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Engineering Mechanics, Fluid Mechanics and Engineering Acoustics.
    Passive scalar transport in rotating turbulent channel flow2018In: Journal of Fluid Mechanics, ISSN 0022-1120, E-ISSN 1469-7645, Vol. 844, p. 297-322Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Passive scalar transport in turbulent channel flow subject to spanwise system rotation is studied by direct numerical simulations. The Reynolds number R-e= U(b)h/nu is fixed at 20 000 and the rotation number R-o= 2 Omega h/U-b is varied from 0 to 1.2, where U-b is the bulk mean velocity, h the half channel gap width and Omega the rotation rate. The scalar is constant but different at the two walls, leading to steady scalar transport across the channel. The rotation causes an unstable channel side with relatively strong turbulence and turbulent scalar transport, and a stable channel side with relatively weak turbulence or laminar-like flow, weak turbulent scalar transport but large scalar fluctuations and steep mean scalar gradients. The distinct turbulent-laminar patterns observed at certain Ro on the stable channel side induce similar patterns in the scalar field. The main conclusions of the study are that rotation reduces the similarity between the scalar and velocity field and that the Reynolds analogy for scalar-momentum transport does not hold for rotating turbulent channel flow. This is shown by a reduced correlation between velocity and scalar fluctuations, and a strongly reduced turbulent Prandtl number of less than 0.2 on the unstable channel side away from the wall at higher Ro. On the unstable channel side, scalar scales become larger than turbulence scales according to spectra and the turbulent scalar flux vector becomes more aligned with the mean scalar gradient owing to rotation. Budgets in the governing equations of the scalar energy and scalar fluxes are presented and discussed as well as other statistics relevant for turbulence modelling.

  • 199.
    Brethouwer, Gert
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Engineering Mechanics.
    Strong dissimilarity between heat and momentum transfer in rotating Couette flows2023In: International Journal of Heat and Mass Transfer, ISSN 0017-9310, E-ISSN 1879-2189, Vol. 205, article id 123920Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Rotation influences flows and transport processes in many engineering applications, however, even in canonical flow cases, the effects of rotation are not fully understood. Here, we present the results of di-rect numerical simulations of heat transfer plane Couette and Taylor-Couette flows subject to rotation about the spanwise and axial axis, respectively. Temperature is a passive scalar since buoyancy is ne-glected. The Reynolds number Re and the rotation rate Rn are systematically varied to thoroughly inves-tigate the influence of rotation on heat and momentum transfer and the Reynolds analogy. We find that with increasing anti-cyclonic rotation, the Nusselt numbers for the momentum transfer Num and heat transfer Nuh both increase at first before declining and approaching unity at rapid rotation rates when the flow becomes fully laminar. The Reynolds analogy factor RA = N uh/N um is near unity for non-rotating Couette flows, but it grows significantly with increasing rotation rate. RA reaches a maximum of approx-imately 2 at low Re up to 6 and 8 near Rn = 1 at higher Re in plane Couette and Taylor-Couette flow, respectively. The simulations thus show that the Reynolds analogy between heat and momentum trans-fer breaks down and that the heat transfer can become much faster than moment transfer when plane Couette and Taylor-Couette flows are subject to anti-cyclonic rotation. This happens at low Re as well as higher Re when the flows are fully turbulent. The turbulent Prandtl becomes much smaller than unity and the mean velocity and temperature profiles differ when the Reynolds analogy breaks down. We also present empirical models for Num and RA , which agree reasonably well to very well with the data within a limited Rn range.

  • 200.
    Brethouwer, Gert
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Turbulent bursts and linear instabilities in rotating channel flow2015In: Proceedings - 15th European Turbulence Conference, ETC 2015, TU Delft , 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recurring bursts of turbulence are observed in DNS of rotating channel flow for a range of Reynolds numbers and rotation rates. The bursts are caused by a linear instability and happen in a weakly to strongly turbulent environment. In some cases turbulence or other flow fluctuations can slow down the instability.

1234567 151 - 200 of 1799
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf