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  • 151.
    Geschwind, Lars
    et al.
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning, Organisation and leadership.
    Melin, Göran
    Linnéuniversitetets tillkomst: En studie av fusionsprocessen2011Report (Other academic)
  • 152.
    Geschwind, Lars
    et al.
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Melin, Göran
    Stronger Disciplinary Identities in Multidisciplinary Research Schools2016In: Studies in Continuing Education, ISSN 0158-037X, E-ISSN 1470-126X, Vol. 38, no 1, p. 16-28Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study, two multidisciplinary Social Sciences and Humanities research schools in Sweden have been investigated regarding disciplinary identity-making. This study investigates the meetings between different disciplines around a common thematic area of study for Ph.D. students. The Ph.D. students navigate through a complex social and organisational landscape with obligations and loyalties towards the discipline and the research school, which may be in conflict with each other. The main finding is that a multidisciplinary environment in fact creates strong disciplinary identities, partly in contrast to the purpose with the multidisciplinary research school. Encounters with Ph.D. students from other disciplines give the Ph.D. student something to relate to and to discuss e.g. with the supervisor. Another finding is that multidisciplinary research schools extend the perspectives of students. For some, new methods and theories from neighbouring disciplines were integrated and used, while for others the empirical scope of research was affected.

  • 153.
    Geschwind, Lars
    et al.
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Pinheiro, R. M.
    Raising the summit or flattening the agora?: The elitist turn in science policy in Northern Europe2017In: Journal of Baltic Studies, ISSN 0162-9778, E-ISSN 1751-7877, Vol. 48, no 4, p. 513-528Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This contribution focuses on how one hegemonic idea – excellence – which has significant impact on science and higher education policy was translated in two Nordic countries: Norway and Sweden. Building on key concepts emanating from political science and organizational sociology, the article assesses how excellence was locally translated by policy makers, leading to the rise of a series of policy measures aimed at fostering excellence in science across the board. In doing this, we investigate a key empirical dimension: the policy mechanisms or instruments launched at national levels (two Nordic countries) in the form of centers of excellence.

  • 154.
    Geschwind, Lars
    et al.
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Pinheiro, Rómulo
    Aarrevaara, Timo
    The Many Guises of Nordic Higher Education Mergers2016In: Mergers in Higher Education: The Experience from Northern Europe / [ed] Pinheiro, Rómulo; Geschwind, Lars; Aarrevaara, Timo, Springer, 2016, p. 227-236Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 155.
    Geschwind, Lars
    et al.
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Pinheiro, Rómulo
    Stensaker, Bjørn
    To be or not to be: Institutional complexity and identity formation in the organizational field of higher education2016Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 156.
    Geschwind, Lars
    et al.
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Susanna, Pehrsson
    Utvärdering av karriärstöd vid KTH2013Report (Other academic)
  • 157.
    Geschwind, Lars
    et al.
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning, Organisation and leadership.
    Swenning, A.K.
    Håkansson, A.
    Utvärdering av programmet IT i lärarutbildningen2012Report (Other academic)
  • 158.
    Geschwind, Lars
    et al.
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Söderlind, J.
    Uppföljning av doktorsprogrammen vid KTH2015Report (Other academic)
  • 159.
    Geschwind, Lars
    et al.
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning, Organisation and leadership.
    Söderlind, J.
    Utvärdering av matematik- och fysikprovet vid KTH2014Report (Other academic)
  • 160.
    Geschwind, Lars
    et al.
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Söderlind, Johan
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    Magnell, Marie
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    The teaching-research nexus in engineering education: A case study2015In: Proceedings of the 43rd SEFI Annual Conference 2015 - Diversity in Engineering Education: An Opportunity to Face the New Trends of Engineering, SEFI 2015, European Society for Engineering Education (SEFI) , 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The topic of this paper has been teaching-research links at a Swedish Technical University. In summary, the policy documents analysed present the ideal of a close link between research and teaching. However, this link is presented at an overall level, thus not in detail how this link is expected to be accomplished and performed. Moreover, it is presumed that research will have a positive influence on education based solely on the fact that all faculty members will do both research and teaching. Another aspect worth noting is the fact that the link is assumed to be established already in first cycle.

  • 161.
    Geschwind, Lars
    et al.
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning, Organisation and leadership.
    Terrell, M.
    Melin, G.
    Metautvärdering av EAE2012Report (Other academic)
  • 162.
    Geschwind, Lars
    et al.
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning, Organisation and leadership.
    Terrell, Miriam
    Vilka var humanisterna?: Miljöer och verksamhet 1900, 1950 och 20002011Report (Other academic)
  • 163.
    Gumaelius, Lena
    et al.
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Almqvist, M.
    Árnadóttir, A.
    Axelsson, A.
    Conejero, J. A.
    García-Sabater, J. P.
    Klitgaard, L.
    Kozma, Cecilia
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning, House of Science.
    Maheut, J.
    Marin-Garcia, J.
    Mickos, H.
    Nilsson, P. -O
    Norén, A.
    Pinho-Lopes, M.
    Prenzel, M.
    Ray, J.
    Roxå, T.
    Voss, M.
    Outreach initiatives operated by universities for increasing interest in science and technology2016In: European Journal of Engineering Education, ISSN 0304-3797, E-ISSN 1469-5898, p. 1-34Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Since the 1990s, the low number of students choosing to study science and technology in higher education has been on the societal agenda and many initiatives have been launched to promote awareness regarding career options. The initiatives particularly focus on increasing enrolment in the engineering programmes. This article describes and compares eight European initiatives that have been established and operated by universities (and in some cases through collaboration with other actors in society). Each initiative is summarised in a short essay that discusses motivation, organisation, pedagogical approach, and activities. The initiatives are characterised by comparing the driving forces behind their creation, how the initiative activities relate to the activities at the university, size based on the number of participants and cost per participant and pedagogical framework. There seem to be two main tracks for building outreach activities, one where outreach activities are based on the university's normal activities, and one where outreach activities are designed specifically for the visiting students.

  • 164.
    Gumaelius, Lena
    et al.
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Fahrman, Birgit
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Technology teachers' views on general pedagogical knowledge2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 165.
    Gumaelius, Lena
    et al.
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Hartell, Eva
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning, Teknikdidaktik.
    Svärdh, Joakim
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning, Teknikdidaktik.
    Teachers’ views regarding assessment in technology education2013In: Technology Education for the Future: A Play on Sustainability / [ed] P John Williams, Waikato: University of Waikato , 2013, p. 196-205Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Numerous studies have demonstrated that there is a lack of certified technology teachers in Swedish schools.

    In this study we explore possible differences between teachers with and without subject-specific education in technology didactics. The research question highlights to what extent teachers with subject-specific training (1) are using steering documents and (2) assessing students differently compared to teachers without academic subject-specific training. The collected data consists of a survey within a large teacher-training project ‘Tekniklyftet’, a technology initiative in which 28 schools in the Stockholm area have signed up for an ambitious technology education development program in their school.

    The results show that teachers with subject-specific training perceive themselves as more secure in their professional (technology) teacher role and express greater confidence in how to assess pupils in the subject of technology and also in how to use steering documents compared to non-subject specific trained teachers. 

  • 166.
    Gumaelius, Lena
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM).
    Hartell, Eva
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM).
    Svärdh, Joakim
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning, Learning in Engineering Sciences.
    Skogh, Inga-Britt
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM). Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, Philosophy.
    Buckley, Jeffrey
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM).
    Outcome analyses of educational interventions: a case study of the Swedish “Boost of Technology” intervention2018In: International journal of technology and design education, ISSN 0957-7572, E-ISSN 1573-1804, Vol. 29, no 4, p. 739-758Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In Sweden, there have been multiple large scale interventions to support compulsory school teachers generally and within specific subjects. Due to the costs associated with such interventions it is critical that interim evaluation measures exist which can indicate potential success. Additionally, evaluation measures which can measure the actual impact of interventions relative to their intended aim are also needed as validation tools. The Swedish regional 'Tekniklyftet' or 'Boost of Technology' project which ran from 2011 to 2013 is presented here as a case study exploring evaluation measures for educational interventions in technology education. Three different evaluation approaches were used as measures of the intended outcomes of the intervention. These included (1) analysing the preconditions which exist in schools for teachers of Technology, (2) analysing the use of local long term technology education planning documents (school work plans) developed during the intervention, and (3) analysing the potential change over time in student performance in Technology based on national grades at the end of compulsory school. The findings gained from each approach indicate that the Boost of Technology project was a success. However, there were shortcomings associated with each approach. They are therefore discussed in the Swedish context with the intention to support future international stakeholders in the evaluation of interventions aspiring to develop technology education.

  • 167.
    Gumaelius, Lena
    et al.
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Isaksson Persson, Helena
    CDIO implementation in Swedish upper secondary education2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 168.
    Gumaelius, Lena
    et al.
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Kolmos, Anette
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Outreach and attractiveness – a never ending story or a new approach?2016In: European Journal of Engineering Education, ISSN 0304-3797, E-ISSN 1469-5898, Vol. 41, no 6, p. 585-588Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 169.
    Gumaelius, Lena
    et al.
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Kozma, Cecilia
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning, House of Science.
    How can peer teaching be used for inspiration and education in science and technology at universities – a case study from Stockholm House of Science2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 170.
    Gumaelius, Lena
    et al.
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning, Teknikdidaktik.
    Norström, Per
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning, Teknikdidaktik.
    Difficulties and opportunities when teaching about technological systems in K-122015In: 122nd ASEE Annual Conference and Exposition: Making Value for Society, American Society for Engineering Education , 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Socio-technical systems are studied in compulsory school (pupils aged 7–16) in Sweden. The purpose is to increase pupils’ understanding of how technology and society affect one another by highlighting the interaction between technological artefacts, humans, institutions, and society at large. Many teachers find this subject difficult to teach, and therefore avoid it. To rectify this, a course module about socio-technical systems for teachers was instigated at KTH Royal Institute of Technology in Stockholm. This study was conducted during that course, and shows that teachers are affected by their educational backgrounds in their understanding of the systems; those who are trained in social sciences prioritize different aspects of the systems in their teaching than do those who have started out in the natural sciences. It also shows that the formulation of learning objectives in this area is very difficult for most teachers and few students include goals that relate to more general knowledge in areas such as genderrelated issues, historical aspects or environmental issues. Few of the students showed the ability to create a varied learning environment; searching information on the Internet and writing reports dominate the students’ suggestions. Understanding of socio-technical systems has the potential to bridge the gap between engineering and various aspects of society in education. It is therefore an essential part of technological literacy, and teacher training in the area should be improved.

  • 171.
    Gumaelius, Lena
    et al.
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Nymark, Tanja
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    The role of ‘Teknikåttan’– a competition aimed at increasing interest in science and technology for grade 8 students.2017In: NorDiNa: Nordic Studies in Science Education, ISSN 1504-4556, E-ISSN 1894-1257, Vol. 13, no 2, p. 197-217Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Since 1993, Swedish technical universities have engaged 15-year-old students and their teachers in the annual tournament “Teknikåttan” (technology for students in school year eight), which is aimed at increasing students’ interest in STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) subjects, as well as at making them aware of career possibilities within these areas. Given its large number of participating students, Teknikåttan offers a unique opportunity to study students’ understanding of and interest in STEM subjects by analysing the results collected for the participating students. This paper gives a description of the Teknikåttan tournament and presents an analysis of the results from the first round of the 2014 tournament. The data collected came from the answers of students in the Stockholm region. All questions were characterised according to three parameters, which were used to analyse answers to high-score and low-score questions and differences in answers according to gender. The analysis indicates that a difference exists in answers according to gender, such that boys scored higher than girls overall, but that girls scored higher in questions related to the subject of biology. Finally, a possible expansion of the analysis involving future tournaments is discussed.

  • 172.
    Gumaelius, Lena
    et al.
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Nymark-Kramer, T.
    The Technology-Eight Competition: An Analysis of Year 8 Students' Quiz Results2017In: NorDiNa: Nordic Studies in Science Education, ISSN 1504-4556, E-ISSN 1894-1257Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 173.
    Gumaelius, Lena
    et al.
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Skogh, Inga-Britt
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Work plans in technology: A study of technology education practice in Sweden2015In: Chatoney, M. (Ed.) Plurality and Complementarity of Approaches in Design and Technology Education, 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 174.
    Gustavsson, Linda
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.). Knowledge Foundation, Sweden.
    Nuur, Cali
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Sustainability and Industrial Dynamics.
    Söderlind, Johan
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    An impact analysis of regional industry–university interactions:the case of industrial PhD schools2016In: Industry and Higher Education, ISSN 0950-4222, Vol. 30, no 1, p. 41-51Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The authors discuss Triple Helix collaborations in the context of regional competitiveness. Through an exploratory case study, they identify and analyse the impact of the establishment of industrial PhD schools for participating industry and universities. The study was conducted in Sweden in 2014 and focuses on three industry–university initiatives involving a total of 57 doctoral students, 9 universities and 39 companies. The results indicate that PhD schools based on the dynamics of the Triple Helix can be of great benefit for both industry and regional universities. In addition, the paper identifies critical success factors for industry–university collaborations involving joint PhD education.

  • 175.
    Hallström, Stefan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Lightweight Structures.
    Kuttenkeuler, Jakob
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Naval Systems.
    Edström, Kristina
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    The Route Towards a Sustainable Design-Implement Course2007In: 3rd CDIO Conference, 2007Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 176.
    Hansen, Hanne Foss
    et al.
    Department of Political Science, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Aarrevaara, Timo
    Faculty of Social Sciences, University of Lapland, Rovaniemi, Finland.
    Geschwind, Lars
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Learning. KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning, Organisation and leadership.
    Stensaker, Björn
    Department of education, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.
    Evaluation Practices and Impact: Overload?2019In: Reforms, Organizational Change and Performance in Higher Education: A Comparative Account from the Nordic Countries / [ed] Rómulo Pinheiro Lars Geschwind Hanne Foss Hansen Kirsi Pulkkinen, Cham: Palgrave Macmillan, 2019, p. 235-266Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 177.
    Hartell, Eva
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning, Teknikdidaktik.
    Assidere Necesse Est: Necessities and complexities regarding teachers’ assessment practices in technology education2015Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis focuses on teachers’ assessment practices in primary and lower secondary schools for technology education (Sv. Teknik). It is grounded in my prior experience as a teacher but also addresses the national and international research fields of technology education and assessment.

    The thesis is based on four papers covering different aspects of teachers’ assessment practices in technology. Its aim is to contribute to knowledge regarding how teachers use assessments in primary and lower secondary school. The thesis explores: teachers’ formal documenting practices; primary teachers’ minute-by-minute classroom assessment; teachers’ views on assessment and finally teachers’ statements and motives relating to criteria for success while assessing students’ e-portfolios.

    The choice of methods varies, depending on the focus of each sub-study, including quantitative data, collected from official governmental databases, software-generated statistical data and questionnaires as well as qualitative methods such as observations and interviews.

    Formal documents proved to be unsupportive for teachers’ assessment practices. Lack of instruction and deficiencies in design templates made these documents practically useless. The classroom study shows that the studied teachers have great ambitions for their pupils to succeed but lack collegial support concerning their assessment practices. Findings also show that teachers who are specifically trained in technology show higher self-efficacy regarding their assessment practices. Based on the results from the teachers' assessments of e-portfolios, it is concluded that there is consensus among the teachers to focus on the whole rather than on particular details in student’s work. The overall results strengthen the importance of designing activities and that students should be taught and not left to unreflective doing in technology.

    Teachers’ assessment practices are complex. This thesis shows that teachers work with assessment in different ways. It is also shown that the educational environment is not supportive enough. Assessment is a necessity in the endeavour of bridging teaching and learning in technology, thus affordance for teachers’ assessment practices must be increased. 

  • 178.
    Hartell, Eva
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Bridging teaching and learning in technology education2016In: Creating contexts for learning in technology education / [ed] Howard Middleton, Adelaide, Australia, 2016, p. 95-102Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 179.
    Hartell, Eva
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Changing education in action in Sweden: The cared-for teacher2015In: Flip the System: Changing Education from the Ground Up, Taylor & Francis, 2015, p. 241-246Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 180.
    Hartell, Eva
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM). KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning, Learning in Engineering Sciences.
    Comparative judgment: How it can be used to enhance teachers' formative assessment skills and students' learning2019In: Education Canada Magazine / EdCan Network, ISSN 0013-1253, Vol. 59, no 1, p. 18-21Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Comparative judgment (CJ) is an assessment methodology based on the ranking of two pieces of work at a time. CJ can be used both as a professional development tool to sharpen assessment skills and develop shared standards, and as a way of identifying exemplars of quality that allow students to better understand learning goals and expectations

  • 181.
    Hartell, Eva
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Embedding formative assessment in practical work: Encouraging discussion and peer support2017In: Education in Chemistry, ISSN 0013-1350Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 182.
    Hartell, Eva
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    En kort redogörelse om utprövning av programmet e-scape för skapande av bedömningsunderlag i ämnet teknik med tillägg av parvisa jämförelser: Rapport till Statens skolverk2012Report (Other academic)
  • 183.
    Hartell, Eva
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    En kort redogörelse om utprövning av programmet e-scape för skapande av bedömningsunderlag i ämnet teknik. Rapport till Statens Skolverk2012Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Redogörelse av utvärderingsuppdrag från Statens skolverk ang utprovnng av digitala bedömnignsportföljer.

  • 184.
    Hartell, Eva
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Exploring the (un-)usefulness of formative assessment documents in primary technology2014In: International journal of technology and design education, ISSN 0957-7572, E-ISSN 1573-1804, Vol. 24, no 2, p. 141-161Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Every student in the Swedish compulsory school system is entitled to information regarding their progress in all school subjects given. In 2008, a mandatory assessment tool, called the individual development plan (IDP) with written assessment, was introduced by the Government. The statutory purpose was to provide teachers with a formative assessment tool to be used mandatory in the follow-up of student’s progress all thru mandatory compulsory school (year 1–9). This study explores the use of the IDP documents in technology education. Authentic documents from different municipalities, different schools and different school years have been studied. In this article findings regarding formal assessment documents and teacher’s formal assessment practice in primary (year 1–6) technology education are presented.

  • 185.
    Hartell, Eva
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning, Teknikdidaktik.
    GPS-Performance in Technology Education2010In: Knowledge in Technology Education: Volume One / [ed] Howard Middleton, Griffith Institute for Educational Research 2012 , 2010, p. 171-177Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In my research I am interested in identifying and describing the process that now takes place, around evaluations, follow ups and assessment in educational practice in Sweden from a teacher´s perspective. Article 28 of the UN Convention of the Rights of the Child, specifies that, each and every child is entitled to education. In Sweden, each school can decide on how, when, and by whom, the pupil will get tutored in a subject. However, every pupil is expected and entitled to reach, at the very minimum, the level of knowledge stipulated in the goals to attain in grade 5 and grade 9, in the national curriculum. Despite this several reports have highlighted the alarming situation of neglect of the follow-up of the pupils’ knowledge development as well as the school´s neglect of Technology education. This raises many questions about underlying factors. This paper provides a description of the process of assessment in Technology education with the focus on teachers’ views on the possibilities for follow-up, and assessment.

  • 186.
    Hartell, Eva
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning, Teknikdidaktik.
    GPS-Performance in Technology Education Part II2012In: Explorations of best practice in Technology, Design & Engineering Education: Volume One / [ed] Howard Middleton, Griffith Institute for Educational Research , 2012, p. 141-148Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There are strongconnections between assessment and learning. Assessment can have many purposes.One purpose is when the teacher acquires information in order to adjust theirteaching to better meet the pupils’ needs for future progress on their learningjourney. This paper provides findings from a qualitativestudy that explore and describe the process of assessment in Technologyeducation in the Swedish compulsory school. How do teachers follow up their pupils'progress? What equipment/assessment tools do they use, in order to 'locate'their pupils and move them forward on their learning journey? The results arebased on classroom observations and the teachers' written assessmentdocumentation.

  • 187.
    Hartell, Eva
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Hur sätter man betyg i teknik?2011In: Teknikutbildning för framtiden: perspektiv på teknikundervisning i grundskola och gymnasium / [ed] Hansson, Nordlander, Skogh, Stockholm: Liber, 2011, 1, p. 75-87Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Hur betyg och bedömning i teknik bör utformas för att främja undervisningens syfte

  • 188.
    Hartell, Eva
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Looking for a glimpse in the eye: A descriptive study of teachers’ work with assessment in technology education2013In: Technology teachers as researchers:: Philosophical and Empirical Technology Education Studies in the Swedish TUFF Research School / [ed] Inga-Britt Skogh & Marc J De Vries, Sense Publishers, 2013, 1, p. 255-283Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In order to position yourself with a Global Positioning System (GPS) device, you need (1) to have a GPS device with (2) accurate software, (3) the knowledge to use and interpret it, and last but not least (4) information from at least three different satellites in order to determine a position. Depending on the model and the coverage in the area, you can get different accuracy levels. Being a technology teacher myself, I can see many similarities between the traveller’s need for milestones along the road and the teachers’ need for several clear benchmarks to support the assessment work that supports the student’s progress. The importance of navigating at sea is familiar to me, after years of sailing on our family boat. Teaching could, in my experience, be seen in many respects as a similar activity, which put demands on all the participants. Neither teaching nor sailing is an easy, laid-back activity.

    To ‘navigate’ students towards the goals of the curriculum, while making sure to keep every student ‘on-board’, is a challenge worthy of a world sailor. Despite thorough planning, you still need to make frequent check-ups, since you know neither exactly what will happen during the journey in advance nor which way to take to reach the wanted destination. This, I find, is part of the excitement/allure with travel, both as a sailor and teacher. In this study teachers’ day-to-day work with assessment to support the student’s progress is highlighted from the perspective of technology education. How does a technology teacher gather information in order to position her/his students before deciding on what step to take next?

    Assessment and evaluation of student performance and progress in school is an ongoing process and far from consisting of only grades and test scores. Teachers make assessments/assess their students all the time with the intention of moving their students forward on their learning journey (Kimbell, 2007). They ask questions and they look for signs of response (‘a glimpse in the eye’) in the faces of their students. This subtle evaluation and appraisal work, which takes place every day in every classroom, is the focus of this article.

  • 189.
    Hartell, Eva
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning, Learning in Engineering Sciences.
    STEM and assessment: A Swedish perspective2016In: Education Technology Solutions, ISSN 1835-209X, Vol. 72, no jun/jul, p. 58-62Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 190.
    Hartell, Eva
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning, Teknikdidaktik.
    Tankar kring begreppet bedömning2015Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 191.
    Hartell, Eva
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Teachers’ self-efficacy in assessment in technology education2017In: Springer International Handbooks of Education Handbook of Technology Education / [ed] Marc J de Vries, Cham, Switzerland: Springer, 2017, 1, p. 785-800Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 192.
    Hartell, Eva
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning, Teknikdidaktik.
    The cared for teacher2015In: Flip the system: Changing education from the ground up / [ed] Jelmer Evers & René Kneyber, London New York: Routledge, 2015, 1, p. 241-246Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 193.
    Hartell, Eva
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Lärande.
    The Inefficient Loneliness: A Descriptive Study about the Complexity of Assessment for Learning in Primary Technology Education2012Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis provides findings from a qualitative study that explores the assessment process undertaken by teachers in Swedish primary technology education. The thesis aims to contribute to a deeper understanding of how teachers assess in technology education. In this study assessment with the purpose of acquiring information in order to adjust the teaching to the pupils’ needs for future progress is explored in particular. Teachers’ work with assessment is explored in two teacher-focused sub-studies. Sub-study 1 focuses on the long-cycle formative assessment and on the formal documentation of pupils’ attainment, the so-called IDP with written assessment. Sub-study 2 explores the short cycle of formative assessment and highlights two teachers’ classroom assessments practice. The results presented are built upon authentic samples of assessment documents (IDPs), classroom observations and teacher interviews.

    The study shows that the teachers are alone in the planning, executing and follow-up of technology education. Support is both asked for and needed.

  • 194.
    Hartell, Eva
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Vad använder egentligen ungarna telefonen till? Ringa?2017In: Tekniken i skolan, no 3, p. 4-5Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 195.
    Hartell, Eva
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Ändra utbildningen medan den pågår2017In: Flip the system: Förändra skolan från grunden / [ed] Jelmer Evers, René Kneyber, Per Kornhall, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2017, 1, p. 195-203Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 196.
    Hartell, Eva
    et al.
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning, Teknikdidaktik.
    Ahlkvist, Johan
    Haninge kommun.
    En kortfattad beskrivning om hur en skola i Haninge kommun har arbetat med att implementera formativ bedömning hållbart i verksamheten2014In: / [ed] IFOUS, 2014, p. 1-3Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Målet med utvecklingsarbetet är att bidra till att varje elev ska få utvecklas utefter sina förutsättningar såväl socialt som kunskapsmässigt. En lärare som inte bedömer vet inte om hon genom sin undervisning hindrar eller hjälper eleven framåt, därför är det viktigt att läraren (o elev o ledning) följer upp hur det går. Uppföljning kan man göra i olika syfte och på olika sätt. Ambitionen är att de belägg ska lockas fram ska omsättas i verksamheten till att anpassa det som sker i klassrummet till att möta elevernas behov. Syftet, med interventionen är att bidra till detta genom att implementera formativ bedömning hållbart över tid. Rektor och lärare översköljs med olika koncept, metoder, idéer mm där snabba lösningar ofta utlovas. Det kan det ibland vara svårt att orientera sig bland alla erbjudanden och att stå emot.  Utifrån Dylan Wiliams bevingade ord ”..if you are serious about raising student achievement then you have to be focusing on AfL [Assessment for Learning], and if you are not focusing on AfL you are probably not serious about raising student achievement.” (Wiliam, 2009, p. 34) Valde vi att försöka oss på att implementera formativ bedömning i undervisningen. Problemet är dock att begreppet ”formativ bedömning” är oerhört populärt för tillfället, så populärt att det är på gränsen till att vara både urvattnat och uttjatat. Den rapporterade framgång kring formativ bedömning som tar plats i klassrummet, där lärare och elever tillsammans deltar aktivt i lärandeprocessen har tidigare visat sig vara svår att få snurr i klassrummet och så även hos oss. Vi ska här berätta lite om hur Tungelsta skola har arbetat för att systematiskt öka graden av bedömning som bryggan mellan utlärt och inlärt.

  • 197.
    Hartell, Eva
    et al.
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE).
    Canty, Donal
    University of Limerick.
    Seery, Niall
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE).
    Doyle, Andrew
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Buckley, Jeffrey
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Bedömningsexempel och sambedömning med hög reliabilitet (Worked Examples and Collaborative Assessment with High Reliability)2017Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 198.
    Hartell, Eva
    et al.
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning, Teknikdidaktik.
    Gumaelius, Lena
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning, Teknikdidaktik.
    Svärdh, Joakim
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning, Teknikdidaktik.
    Investigating technology teachers’ self-efficacy on assessment2015In: International journal of technology and design education, ISSN 0957-7572, E-ISSN 1573-1804, Vol. 25, no 3, p. 321-337Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study explores possible differences in the views on assessment between two groups of teachers teaching technology in compulsory school: 1) teachers with subject-specific teacher training in technology education; and 2) teachers without such training. This topic is of particular interest because of the recent changes in the regulations that govern compulsory schools in Sweden, such that only certified teachers now will be permitted to teach and assign grades, despite the clear lack of certified teachers in technology education. The study is situated in two fields of interest—technology education and assessment. Both topics are highly relevant, especially in combination, because previous research on teachers’ assessment practices in technology is rare. In this study, the goal is to contribute to deepening the understanding of how subject-specific teacher training affects teachers’ ability to assess students’ knowledge while maintaining alignment with stated regulations. The results show significant difference between these two groups’ use of curriculum documents as the basis of their teaching and their self-efficacy in assessing student’s knowledge in technology. The results suggest interesting possibilities for curriculum alignment and indicate that the opportunities for student learning increase according to whether teachers are specifically trained in the subject. 

  • 199.
    Hartell, Eva
    et al.
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning, Teknikdidaktik. lärande.
    Holmberg, Susanne
    Haninge kommun.
    Åkesson, Jonas
    Haninge kommun.
    Att leda ledare framåt och inte till leda2015Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 200.
    Hartell, Eva
    et al.
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning, Technical Science Education.
    Norström, Per
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning, Technical Science Education.
    What is it called and how does it work?: Investigating classroom assessment through teachers' tests in elementrary technology education.2015In: Assessment and Social Justice: The 16th Annual AEA- Europe Conference, Glasgow, 2015, p. 87-88Conference paper (Refereed)
1234567 151 - 200 of 336
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