Change search
Refine search result
123456 151 - 200 of 292
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 151. Lindhagen, J. E.
    et al.
    Berglund, Lars A.
    Application of bridging-law concepts to short-fibre composites - Part 2. Notch sensitivity2000In: Composites Science And Technology, ISSN 0266-3538, E-ISSN 1879-1050, Vol. 60, no 6, p. 885-893Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This is the second paper in a series of four where notch sensitivities, fracture energies and bridging laws are studied in short-fibre polymer composites. Estimates based on an order-of-magnitude criterion indicate that previous notch sensitivity studies on short-fibre composites are limited to small notch sizes in the ductile region. For this reason, centre-hole notch sensitivity is studied experimentally as a function of relatively large notch diameters in the range 15-60 mm. The materials have different matrices, glass-fibre content and fibre lengths. The onset of notch sensitivity is observed for all materials (glass-mat thermoplastics, sheet-moulding compounds and chopped-strand-mat laminates), although large notch sizes are required. The reasons for this are discussed as well as the influence of different material parameters. On the basis of the material bridging law and laminate Young's modulus, it was possible to rank different short-fibre composites with respect to notch sensitivity.

  • 152. Lindhagen, J. E.
    et al.
    Gamstedt, E. Kristofer
    Berglund, Lars A.
    Application of bridging-law concepts to short-fibre composites Part 3: Bridging law derivation from experimental crack profiles2000In: Composites Science And Technology, ISSN 0266-3538, E-ISSN 1879-1050, Vol. 60, no 16, p. 2883-2894Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This is the third paper in a series of four where notch sensitivity, fracture energy and bridging laws are studied in short-fibre polymer composites. Here, bridging laws are derived from experimental crack-opening profiles in centre-hole notched tensile specimens. The materials studied are three types of commercial glass-mat composites with different reinforcement structures and matrices. The materials have softening bridging laws and the calculated fracture energies from bridging laws are in good agreement with values determined directly by experiment. The calculated maximum local bridging stress is found to be higher than the uniaxial tensile strength. An outline of a failure criterion for notched specimens based on the crack-bridging approach is presented.

  • 153. Lindhagen, J. E.
    et al.
    Jekabsons, N.
    Berglund, Lars A.
    Application of bridging-law concepts to short-fibre composites 4. FEM analysis of notched tensile specimens2000In: Composites Science And Technology, ISSN 0266-3538, E-ISSN 1879-1050, Vol. 60, no 16, p. 2895-2901Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This is the fourth paper in a series of four where notch sensitivities, fracture energies and bridging laws in short-fibre polymer composites are investigated. In this paper finite-element modelling (FEM) of centre-hole-notched tensile specimens is performed, with different bridging laws governing crack growth. Crack lengths, crack profiles and stress distributions are predicted. The results are compared with experimentally determined crack shapes from an earlier investigation. Only with softening bridging laws can the experimental results be matched. The predicted crack lengths are sensitive to bridging-law parameters. When bridging laws determined by the double cantilever beam (DCB) method are applied, the predicted crack lengths and profiles show good correlation with the experimental results. The results support the validity of the DCB method to determine bridging laws in short-fibre composites.

  • 154. Lingois, P.
    et al.
    Berglund, Lars A.
    Modeling elastic properties and volume change in dental composites2002In: Journal of Materials Science, ISSN 0022-2461, E-ISSN 1573-4803, Vol. 37, no 21, p. 4573-4579Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A modeling approach was applied to study elastic properties and volume change in dental composites. Mechanics modeling results were compared with experimental data in model materials of known composition where the filler content was varied. Composite behavior was predicted based on polymer and filler properties in order to improve basic understanding. Model predictions agree well with data. The models were used to discuss effects of resin properties, filler volume fraction and microstructure (particle shape and filler size distribution).

  • 155. Lingois, P.
    et al.
    Berglund, Lars A.
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Greco, A.
    Maffezoli, A.
    Chemically induced residual stresses in dental composites2003In: Journal of Materials Science, ISSN 0022-2461, E-ISSN 1573-4803, Vol. 38, no 6, p. 1321-1331Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In several European countries, dental composites are replacing mercury-containing amalgams as the most common restorative materials. One problem with dental composites is residual stresses which may lead to poor performance of the restoration. In the present study, a combined modeling and materials characterization approach is presented and predictions compare well with experimental data on residual stresses. The model takes stress relaxation into account through the complete relaxation time spectrum of the resin. The approach allows for detailed parametric studies where resin and composite composition as well as cure conditions may be tailored with respect to residual stress generation.

  • 156.
    Liu, Andong
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation.
    Berglund, Lars
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites.
    A new cellulose/clay nanopaper2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 157.
    Liu, Andong
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites.
    Berglund, Lars
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites.
    Strong nanopaper2010Patent (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    The present invention refers to a nanopaper comprising clay and microfibrillated cellulose nanofibers wherein the MFC nanofibers and the layered clay are orientated substantially parallel to the paper surface. The invention further relates to a method of making the nanopaper and the use of the nanopaper.

  • 158.
    Liu, Andong
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Biofibre Materials Centre, BiMaC.
    Berglund, Lars A.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Clay nanopaper composites of nacre-like structure based on montmorrilonite and cellulose nanofibers-Improvements due to chitosan addition2012In: Carbohydrate Polymers, ISSN 0144-8617, E-ISSN 1879-1344, Vol. 87, no 1, p. 53-60Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Clay nanopaper are nanocomposites with nacre-like structure and multifunctional characteristics including high modulus, significant strength and toughness as well as fire retardancy and low oxygen transmission rate (OTR). Montmorrilonite (MTM) and nanofibrillated cellulose (NFC) hydrocolloids are combined with a chitosan (CS) solution to form high MTM content nanopaper structures by the use of a previously developed papermaking approach. Chitosan functions as flocculation agent and decreases dewatering time to less than 10% compared with MTM-NFC clay nanopaper. The effect of chitosan on the clay nanopaper structure was studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. Properties were measured by uniaxial tensile testing, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), OTR and moisture adsorption experiments. A nacre-like multilayered structure was confirmed and the chitosan-clay nanopaper showed favorable mechanical properties at clay contents as high as 44-48 wt%.

  • 159.
    Liu, Andong
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Berglund, Lars A.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Fire-retardant and ductile clay nanopaper biocomposites based on montmorrilonite in matrix of cellulose nanofibers and carboxymethyl cellulose2013In: European Polymer Journal, ISSN 0014-3057, E-ISSN 1873-1945, Vol. 49, no 4, p. 940-949Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Nacre-mimetic clay bionanocomposites of high clay content show interesting properties although low strain to failure is a limitation. For this reason, three-component nanocomposite films were prepared based on sodium montmorrilonite clay (MTM), a water-soluble cellulose derivative (CMC) of fairly high molar mass, in combination with nanofibrillated cellulose (NFC) from wood pulp. The nanocomposite is cast from an aqueous colloidal dispersion. First, the effects of CMC content on CMC/MTM compositions with high volume fraction of MTM (36-83 vol.%) were studied by FE-SEM, XRD, UV, DMTA and TGA. In addition, fire retardance and oxygen permeability characteristics were measured. The effect of NFC nanofiber addition to the matrix phase was then evaluated. This two-phase CMC/NFC matrix phase results in significantly improved modulus, strength but also strain to failure. NFC has a favorable effect by shifting catastrophic failure mechanisms to higher strains.

  • 160.
    Liu, Andong
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites.
    Medina, Lilian
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites.
    Berglund, Lars A.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites.
    High-Strength Nanocomposite Aerogels of Ternary Composition: Poly(vinyl alcohol), Clay, and Cellulose Nanofibrils2017In: ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces, ISSN 1944-8244, Vol. 9, no 7, p. 6453-6461Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Clay aerogels are foam-like materials with potential to combine high mechanical performance with fire retardancy. However, the compression strength of these aerogels is much lower than theoretically predicted values. High-strength aerogels with more than 95% porosity were prepared from a ternary material system based on PVA, MTM clay platelets and cellulose nanofibrils (CNF). A hydrocolloidal suspension of the three components, was subjected to freezedrying so that a low-density aerogel foam was formed. Cell structure was studied by FE-SEM microscopy. Interactions at the molecular scale were observed by XRD and FT-IR. Crosslinking was carried out using glutaraldehyde or borax, and moisture stability was investigated. These biobased ternary aerogels showed much better compression strength than previously studied materials, and show higher strength than high-performance sandwich foam cores such as crosslinked PVC foams.

  • 161.
    Liu, Andong
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Walther, Andreas
    Ikkala, Olli
    Belova, Lyuba
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering, Engineering Material Physics.
    Berglund, Lars A.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Clay Nanopaper with Tough Cellulose Nanofiber Matrix for Fire Retardancy and Gas Barrier Functions2011In: Biomacromolecules, ISSN 1525-7797, E-ISSN 1526-4602, Vol. 12, no 3, p. 633-641Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Nacre-mimicking hybrids of high inorganic content (> 50 wt %) tend to show low strain-to-failure. Therefore, we prepared clay nanopaper hybrid composite montmorillonite platelets in a continuous matrix of nanofibrillated cellulose (NFC) with the aim of harnessing the intrinsic toughness of fibrillar networks. Hydrocolloid mixtures were used in a filtration approach akin to paper processing. The resulting multilayered structure of the nanopaper was studied by FE-SEM, FTIR, and XRD. Uniaxial stress strain curves measured in tension and thermal analysis were carried out by DMTA and TGA. In addition, fire retardance and oxygen permeability characteristics were measured. The continuous NFC matrix is a new concept and provides unusual ductility to the nanocomposite, allowing inorganic contents as high as 90% by weight. Clay nanopaper extends the property range of cellulose nanopaper and is of interest in self-extinguishing composites and in oxygen barrier layers.

  • 162. Liu, X. H.
    et al.
    Wu, Q. J.
    Berglund, Lars A.
    Polymorphism in polyamide 66/clay nanocomposites2002In: Polymer, ISSN 0032-3861, E-ISSN 1873-2291, Vol. 43, no 18, p. 4967-4972Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Polyamide 66/clay nanocomposites (PA66CN) were prepared via melt compounding method by using a new kind of organophilic clay, which was obtained through co-intercalation of epoxy resin and quaternary ammonium into Na-montmorillorlite. The silicate layers were dispersed homogeneously and nearly exfoliated in polyamide 66 (PA66) matrix. The introduction of silicate layers induced the appearance of the gamma phase in PA66CN at room temperature, more clay loadings would amplify this phenomenon; the addition of clay also changed the structure of the a crystalline phase. The presence of silicate layers increased the crystallization rate and had a strong hetero phase nucleation effect on PA66 matrix. The lower Brill transition temperature of PA66CN can be attributed to the strong interaction between polyamide chains and surfaces of silicate layers.

  • 163. Liu, X. H.
    et al.
    Wu, Q. J.
    Berglund, Lars A.
    Fan, J. Q.
    Qi, Z. N.
    Polyamide 6-clay nanocompositles/polypropylene-grafted-maleic anhydride alloys2001In: Polymer, ISSN 0032-3861, E-ISSN 1873-2291, Vol. 42, no 19, p. 8235-8239Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Polyamide 6-clay nanocomposites (PA6CN) based on montmorillonite typically show some brittleness with clay addition. In order to address this problem, PA6CN/PP-g-MAH alloys were prepared through blending PA6CN with polypropylene-grafted-maleic anhydride (PP-g-MAH). The mechanical properties, dynamic mechanical temperature spectra, morphology and water absorption of the alloys were studied. Compared with PA6CN, the notched impact strength of the alloys increased greatly while the alloys still maintained higher stiffness and strength than that of PA 6. The morphological studies via scanning electron microscopy (SEM) showed a PP-g-MAH toughen phase dispersed in PA6CN matrix. As the PP-g-MAH content was increased, reduced water absorption was observed.

  • 164. Liu, X. H.
    et al.
    Wu, Q. J.
    Berglund, Lars A.
    Lindberg, H.
    Fan, J. Q.
    Qi, Z. N.
    Polyamide 6/clay nanocomposites using a cointercalation organophilic clay via melt compounding2003In: Journal of Applied Polymer Science, ISSN 0021-8995, E-ISSN 1097-4628, Vol. 88, no 4, p. 953-958Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Polyamide 6/clay nanocomposites (PA6CN) were prepared via the melt compounding method by using a new kind of organophilic clay, which was obtained through cointercalation of epoxy resin and quaternary ammonium into Na-montmorillonite. The dispersion effect of this kind of organophilic clay in the matrix was studied by means of X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM); the silicate layers were dispersed homogeneously and nearly exfoliated in the matrix. This was probably the result of the strong interaction between epoxy groups and amide end groups of PA6. The mechanical properties and heat distortion temperature (HDT) of PA6CN increased dramatically. The notched Izod impact strength of PA6CN was 80% higher than that of PA6 when the clay loading was 5 wt%. Even at 10 wt% clay content, the impact strength was still higher than that of PA6. The finely dispersed silicate layers and the strong interaction between silicate layers and matrix decreased the water absorption. At 10 wt% clay content, PA6CN only absorbs half the amount of water compared with PA6. The dynamic mechanical properties of PA6CN were also studied.

  • 165. Liu, X. H.
    et al.
    Wu, Q. J.
    Berglund, Lars A.
    Qi, Z. N.
    Investigation on unusual crystallization behavior in polyamide 6/montmorillonite nanocomposites2002In: Macromolecular materials and engineering (Print), ISSN 1438-7492, E-ISSN 1439-2054, Vol. 287, no 8, p. 515-522Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The crystallization behavior and crystal structure of polyamide 6/montmorillonite (PA6/MMT) nanocomposites were investigated by differential scanning calorimetry and X-ray diffraction, and an interesting behavior was observed. The material was prepared via melt compounding using an organophilic clay obtained by co-intercalation of epoxy resin and quaternary ammonium into Na-montmorillonite. A maximum in degree of crystallinity was obtained at 5 wt.-% MMT and the reasons for this, based on the MMT layer distribution, were discussed. The degree of crystallinity showed a strong dependence on the cooling rates. In contrast with typical behavior, a higher cooling rate resulted in a higher degree of crystallinity. In nanocomposites, the gamma-crystalline phase was dominant.

  • 166. Liu, X. H.
    et al.
    Wu, Q. J.
    Zhang, Q. X.
    Berglund, Lars A.
    Mo, Z. S.
    High-temperature X-ray diffraction studies on polyamide6/clay nanocomposites upon annealing2002In: Polymer Bulletin, ISSN 0170-0839, E-ISSN 1436-2449, Vol. 48, no 05-apr, p. 381-387Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The influence of nanodispersed clay on the alpha crystalline structure of polyamide 6 (PA6) was examined in-situ with X-ray diffraction (XRD) between room temperature and melting. In pure PA6 upon annealing the alpha crystalline phase was substituted by an unstable pseudohexagonal phase at 150degreesC, then it transformed into a new stable crystalline structure - high temperature alpha' phase above the transition temperature. However, in PA6/clay nanocomposite (PA6CN), the alpha phase did not present crystalline phase transition on heating. The increase in the annealing temperature only led to continuous intensity variation. The different behaviors were caused by the confined spaces formed by silicate layers, which constrained the mobility of the polymer chains in-between.

  • 167.
    Ljungdahl, Jonas
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering.
    Berglund, Lars
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Transverse mechanical behaviour and moisture adsorption of waterlogged archaeological wood from the Vasa ship2007In: Holzforschung, ISSN 0018-3830, E-ISSN 1437-434X, Vol. 61, no 3, p. 279-284Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Damage on the hull of the 17th century Swedish warship Vasa has been observed recently. Damage in the form of indentations in the wood is caused by high compressive loads from the support structure. In the process of developing an improved support structure, radial mechanical properties and the deformation mechanisms of Vasa oak are particularly important. Causes of differences in PEG content and oak degradation are also of interest. The radial modulus and compressive strength of Vasa oak are 50% lower than for recent oak. Furthermore, a significant change in failure mechanism is observed. More brittle separation fracture of the rays of Vasa oak is observed compared to the continuous folds of rays in recent oak. Tangential stiffness and strength are also 30% and 50% lower, respectively. Comparably small differences in moisture absorption between PEG-extracted Vasa oak and recent oak indicate a low extent of degradation of the Vasa oak.

  • 168.
    Ljungdahl, Jonas
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering.
    Berglund, Lars
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering.
    Burman, Magnus
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering.
    Transverse anisotropy of compressive failure in European oak: A digital speckle photography study2006In: Holzforschung, ISSN 0018-3830, E-ISSN 1437-434X, Vol. 60, no 2, p. 190-195Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The mechanical behaviour of European oak (Quercus robur L.) was studied in radial and tangential compression. Young's modulus and the yield strength were approximately 1.7- and 1.6-fold higher, respectively, in the radial direction. Strain fields were determined by digital speckle photography (DSP). Strains and the effective Poisson ratio could be determined separately in earlywood and latewood during deformation and failure events. In radial compression, strain data showed that rays contributed significantly to the high modulus. In addition, multiseriate ray microbuckling was observed to control yield strength. The microbuckling was localised in the low- density earlywood. In tangential compression, yield strength was controlled by vessel collapse in the low- density regions of the latewood. The strain field data provide direct evidence that the rays are the main microstructural factor controlling transverse anisotropy in European oak.

  • 169.
    Lo Re, Giada
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites.
    Engström, Joakim
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Wu, Qiong
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites.
    Malmström, Eva
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Gedde, Ulf W.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Polymeric Materials.
    Olsson, Richard
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Polymeric Materials.
    Berglund, Lars
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    Improved Cellulose Nanofibril Dispersion in Melt-Processed Polycaprolactone Nanocomposites by a Latex-Mediated Interphase and Wet Feeding as LDPE Alternative2018In: ACS Applied Nano Materials, ISSN 2574-0970, Vol. 1, no 6, p. 2669-2677Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This work reports the development of a sustainable and green one-step wet-feeding method to prepare tougher and stronger nanocomposites from biodegradable cellulose nanofibrils (CNF)/polycaprolactone (PCL) constituents, compatibilized with reversible addition fragmentation chain transfer-mediated surfactant-free poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) latex nanoparticles. When a PMMA latex is used, a favorable electrostatic interaction between CNF and the latex is obtained, which facilitates mixing of the constituents and hinders CNF agglomeration. The improved dispersion is manifested in significant improvement of mechanical properties compared with the reference material. The tensile tests show much higher modulus (620 MPa) and strength (23 MPa) at 10 wt % CNF content (compared to the neat PCL reference modulus of 240 and 16 MPa strength), while maintaining high level of work to fracture the matrix (7 times higher than the reference nanocomposite without the latex compatibilizer). Rheological analysis showed a strongly increased viscosity as the PMMA latex was added, that is, from a well-dispersed and strongly interacting CNF network in the PCL.

  • 170.
    Lo Re, Giada
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Spinella, Stephen
    NYU Tandon School of Engineering, Six Metrotech Center, Brooklyn, New York 11201, United States.
    Boujemaoui, Assya
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Vilaseca, Fabiola
    BIMATEC Group, Department of Chemical Engineering, Agricultural and Food Technology, University of Girona, C/Maria Aurèlia Capmany 61, 17003 Girona, Spain.
    Larsson, Per Tomas
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. RISE Bioeconomy, Teknikringen 56, Stockholm, SE-100 44, Sweden.
    Adås, Fredrik
    RISE Bioeconomy, Teknikringen 56, Stockholm, SE-100 44, Sweden.
    Berglund, Lars
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites.
    Poly(ε-caprolactone) Biocomposites Based on Acetylated Cellulose Fibers and Wet Compounding for Improved Mechanical Performance2018In: ACS Sustainable Chemistry & Engineering, ISSN 2168-0485, Vol. 5, no 6, p. 6753-6760Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Poly(epsilon-caprolactone) (PCL) is a ductile thermoplastic, which is biodegradable in the marine environment. Limitations include low strength, petroleum-based origin, and comparably high cost. Cellulose fiber reinforcement is therefore of interest although uniform fiber dispersion is a challenge. In this study, a one-step wet compounding is proposed to validate a sustainable and feasible method to improve the dispersion of the cellulose fibers in hydrophobic polymer matrix as PCL, which showed to be insensitive to the presence of the water during the processing. A comparison between unmodified and acetylated cellulosic wood fibers is made to further assess the net effect of the wet feeding and chemical modification on the biocomposites properties, and the influence of acetylation on fiber structure is reported (ATR-FTIR, XRD). Effects of processing on nano fibrillation, shortening, and dispersion of the cellulose fibers are assessed as well as on PCL molar mass. Mechanical testing, dynamic mechanical thermal analysis, FE-SEM, and X-ray tomography is used to characterize composites. With the addition of 20 wt % cellulosic fibers, the Young's modulus increased from 240 MPa (neat PCL) to 1850 MPa for the biocomposites produced by using the wet feeding strategy, compared to 690 MPa showed for the biocomposites produced using dry feeling. A wet feeding of acetylated cellulosic fibers allowed even a greater increase, with an additional 46% and 248% increase of the ultimate strength and Young's modulus, when compared to wet feeding of the unmodified pulp, respectively.

  • 171.
    Lo Re, Giada
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Spinella, Stephen
    NYU Polytech Sch Engn, Dept Chem & Biomol Engn, Brooklyn, NY USA.;UMONS Univ Mons, Ctr Innovat & Rech MAt Polymeres CIRMAP, Serv Mat Polymeres & Composites, Mons, Belgium..
    Vilaseca, Fabiola
    Univ Girona, Dept Chem Engn, Agr & Food Technol, Girona, Spain..
    Berglund, Lars
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Melt-processing of cellulose pulp and polycaprolactone composites: Wet feeding approach to improve the filler dispersion2017In: Abstract of Papers of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0065-7727, Vol. 253Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 172.
    Lönnberg, Hanna
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    Fogelström, Linda
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    Berglund, Lars
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    Malmström, Eva
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    Hult, Anders
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    Surface grafting of microfibrillated cellulose with poly(epsilon-caprolactone) - Synthesis and characterization2008In: European Polymer Journal, ISSN 0014-3057, E-ISSN 1873-1945, Vol. 44, no 9, p. 2991-2997Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In cellulose nanocomposites, the surface of the nanocellulosic phase is critical with respect to nanocellulose dispersion, network formation and nanocomposite properties. Microfibrillated cellulose (MFC) has been grafted with poly(epsilon-caprolactone) (PCL), via ring-opening polymerization (ROP). This changes the surface characteristics of MFC and makes it possible to obtain a stable dispersion of MFC in a nonpolar solvent; it also improves MFC's compatibility with PCL. The thermal behavior of MFC grafted with different amount of PCL has been investigated using thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). From TGA measurements, the fraction of PCL in MFC-PCL samples was estimated to 16%, 19%, and 21%. The crystallization and melting behavior of free PCL and MFC-PCL were studied with DSC, and a significant difference was observed regarding melting points, crystallization temperature, degree of crystallinity, as well as the time required for crystallization.

  • 173.
    Lönnberg, Hanna
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    Fogelström, Linda
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    Malmström, Eva
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    Zhou, Qi
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Glycoscience.
    Brumer, Harry
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Glycoscience.
    Teeri, Tuula T.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Glycoscience.
    Samir, Said
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites.
    Berglund, Lars
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites.
    Hult, Anders
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    POLY 661-Grafting of poly(e-caprolactone) from microfibrillated cellulose films: for biocomposite applications2007Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 174.
    Lönnberg, Hanna
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    Fogelström, Linda
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    Zhou, Qi
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Glycoscience.
    Hult, Anders
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    Berglund, Lars
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    Malmström, Eva
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    Investigation of the graft length impact on the interfacial toughness in a cellulose/poly(ε-caprolactone) bilayer laminate2011In: Composites Science And Technology, ISSN 0266-3538, E-ISSN 1879-1050, Vol. 71, no 1, p. 9-12Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Interfacial adhesion between immiscible cellulose–polymer interfaces is a crucial property for fibrous biocomposites. To tailor the interfacial adhesion, the grafting of polymers from cellulose films was studied using ring-opening polymerization of ε-caprolactone. The poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) grafted cellulose was analyzed with FTIR, AFM and via water CA measurements. The graft length was varied by the addition of a free initiator, enabling tailoring of the interfacial toughness. Films of microfibrillated cellulose were grafted with PCL and hot-pressed together with a PCL-film to form a bilayer laminate. Interfacial peeling toughness correlates very strongly with PCL degree of polymerization (DP). PCL grafts form physical entanglements in the PCL matrix and promote significant plastic deformation in the PCL bulk, thus increasing interfacial peeling energy.

  • 175. Mao, Rui
    et al.
    Goutianos, Stergios
    Tu, Wei
    Meng, Nan
    Yang, Guang
    Berglund, Lars A.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Peijs, Ton
    Comparison of fracture properties of cellulose nanopaper, printing paper and buckypaper2017In: Journal of Materials Science, ISSN 0022-2461, E-ISSN 1573-4803, Vol. 52, no 16, p. 9508-9519Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cellulose nanopaper consists of a dense fibrous self-binding network composed of cellulose nanofibres connected by physical entanglements, hydrogen bonding, etc. Compared with conventional printing paper, cellulose nanopaper has higher strength and modulus because of stronger fibres and inter-fibre bonding. The aim of this paper is to investigate the fracture properties of cellulose nanopaper using double edge notch tensile tests on samples with different notch lengths. It was found that strength is insensitive to notch length. A cohesive zone model was used to describe the fracture behaviour of notched cellulose nanopaper. Fracture energy was extracted from the cohesive zone model and divided into an energy component consumed by damage in the material and a component related to pull-out or bridging of nanofibres between crack surfaces which was not facilitated due to the limited fibre lengths for the case of nanopapers. For comparison, printing paper which has longer fibres than nanopaper was tested and modelled to demonstrate the importance of fibre length. Buckypaper, a fibrous network made of carbon nanotubes connected through van der Waals forces and physical entanglements, was also investigated to elaborate on the influence of inter-fibre connections.

  • 176. Martikainen, Lahja
    et al.
    Walther, Andreas
    Seitsonen, Jani
    Berglund, Lars
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Ikkala, Olli
    Deoxyguanosine Phosphate Mediated Sacrificial Bonds Promote Synergistic Mechanical Properties in Nacre-Mimetic Nanocomposites2013In: Biomacromolecules, ISSN 1525-7797, E-ISSN 1526-4602, Vol. 14, no 8, p. 2531-2535Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We show that functionalizing polymer-coated colloidal nanoplatelets with guanosine groups allows synergistic increase of mechanical properties in nacre-mimetic lamellar self-assemblies. Anionic montmorillonite (MTM) was first coated using cationic poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride) (PDADMAC) to prepare core-shell colloidal platelets, and subsequently the remaining chloride counterions allowed exchange to functional anionic 2'-deoxyguanosine 5'-monophosphate (dGMP) counterions, containing hydrogen bonding donors and acceptors. The compositions were studied using elemental analysis, scanning and transmission electron microscopy, wide-angle X-ray scattering, and tensile testing. The lamellar spacing between the clays increases from 1.85 to 2.14 nm upon addition of the dGMP. Adding dGMP increases the elastic modulus, tensile strength, and strain 33.0%, 40.9%, and 5.6%, respectively, to 13.5 GPa, 67 MPa, and 1.24%, at 50% relative humidity. This leads to an improved toughness seen as a ca. 50% increase of the work-to-failure. This is noteworthy, as previously it has been observed that connecting the core-shell nanoclay platelets covalently or ionically leads to increase of the stiffness but to reduced strain. We suggest that the dynamic supramolecular bonds allow slippage and sacrificial bonds between the self-assembling nanoplatelets, thus promoting toughness, still providing dynamic interactions between the platelets.

  • 177.
    Medina, Lilian
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Nishiyama, Yoshiharu
    Univ. Grenoble Alpes, CNRS,CERMAV, 38000 Grenoble, France.
    Daicho, Kazuho
    University of Tokyo, Japan.
    Saito, Tsuguyuki
    University of Tokyo, Japan.
    Yan, Max
    KTH.
    Nanostructure and Properties of Nacre-Inspired Clay/Cellulose Nanocomposites—Synchrotron X-ray Scattering Analysis2019In: Macromolecules, ISSN 0024-9297, E-ISSN 1520-5835, Vol. 52, no 8, p. 3131-3140Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Nacre-inspired clay nanocomposites have excellent mechanical properties, combined with optical transmittance, gas barrier properties, and fire retardancy, but the mechanical properties are still below predictions from composite micromechanics. The properties of montmorillonite clay/nanocellulose nanocomposite hybrids are investigated as a function of clay content and show a maximum Young’s modulus as high as 28 GPa. Ultimate strength, however, decreases from 280 to 125 MPa between 0 and 80 wt % clay. Small-angle and wide-angle X-ray scattering data from synchrotron radiation are analyzed to suggest nanostructural and phase interaction factors responsible for these observations. Parameters discussed include effective platelet modulus, platelet out-of-plane orientation distribution, nanoporosity, and platelet agglomeration state.

  • 178.
    Medina, Lilian
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Ansari, Farhan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Carosio, Federico
    Salajkova, Michaela
    Berglund, Lars
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Nanocomposites from Clay, Cellulose Nanofibrils, and Epoxy with Improved Moisture Stability for Coatings and Semi-Structural Applications2019In: ACS Applied Nano Materials, E-ISSN 2574-0970Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A new type of high reinforcement content clay-cellulose-thermoset nanocomposite was proposed, where epoxy precursors diffused into a wet porous clay-nanocellulose mat, followed by curing. The processing concept was scaled to > 200 µm thickness composites, the mechanical properties were high for nanocomposites and the materials showed better tensile properties at 90% RH compared with typical nanocellulose materials. The nanostructure and phase distributions were studied using transmission electron microscopy; Young’s modulus, yield strength, ultimate strength and ductility were determined as well as moisture sorption, fire retardancy and oxygen barrier properties. Clay and cellulose contents were varied, as well as the epoxy content. Epoxy had favorable effects on moisture stability, and also improved reinforcement effects at low reinforcement content. More homogeneous nano- and mesoscale epoxy distribution is still required for further property improvements. The materials constitute a new type of three-phase nanocomposites, of interest as coatings, films and as laminated composites for semi-structural applications.

  • 179.
    Medina, Lilian
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Berglund, Lars
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Brick-and-mortar biocomposites from cellulose nanofibrils and clay nanoplatelets2018In: Abstract of Papers of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0065-7727, Vol. 255Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 180.
    Medina, Lilian
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology. KTH Royal Inst Technol, Fiber & Polymer Technol, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Carosio, Federico
    Politecn Torino, Alessandria, Italy..
    Berglund, Lars
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology. KTH Royal Inst Technol, Fiber & Polymer Technol, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Mechanically strong and fire-retardant nanocomposite aerogels based on cellulose nanofibers and montmorillonite clay2016In: Abstract of Papers of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0065-7727, Vol. 252Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 181.
    Medina, Lilian
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites.
    Carosio, Federico
    Politecnico di Torino.
    Berglund, Lars
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Recyclable Nanocomposite Foams of Poly(vinyl alcohol), Clay and Cellulose Nanofibrils - Mechanical Properties and Flame RetardancyManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 182.
    Modén, Carl S.
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Lightweight Structures.
    Berglund, Lars
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites.
    A two-phase annual ring model of transverse anisotropy in softwoods2008In: Composites Science And Technology, ISSN 0266-3538, E-ISSN 1879-1050, Vol. 68, no 14, p. 3020-3028Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Transverse anisotropy in softwoods is an important phenomenon of both scientific and industrial interest. Simple one-phase hexagonal honeycomb cell models for transverse moduli of softwoods are based on cell wall bending as the only deformation mechanism. In the present study, a two-phase annual ring model is developed and includes both cell wall bending and stretching as deformation mechanisms. The proportion of cell wall bending and stretching for different cases is analysed and the importance of stretching is confirmed. A two-phase annual ring model is presented based on fixed densities for earlywood and latewood. Such a model is motivated by the large difference in density between earlywood and latewood layers. Two-phase model predictions show much better agreement with experimental data than predictions from a one-phase model. Radial modulus is dominated by bending at low density and by stretching at high density. For tangential modulus, bending is more important at all densities.

  • 183.
    Modén, Carl S.
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Lightweight Structures.
    Berglund, Lars
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites.
    Elastic deformation mechanisms of softwoods in radial tension: Cell wall bending or stretching?2008In: Holzforschung, ISSN 0018-3830, E-ISSN 1437-434X, Vol. 62, no 5, p. 562-568Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Radial softwood modulus ER is typically twice as high as the tangential modulus ET. The reason for this is unclear, although cell geometry is likely to contribute. The established hexagonal honeycomb model for prediction of ER is based on a cell wall bending mechanism only. If cell wall stretching also takes place, the dependence of ER on relative density will be different. If experimental data for ER as a function of relative density show deviations from cell wall bending predictions, this may indicate the presence of cell wall stretching. A SilviScan apparatus is used to measure density distribution. A procedure by means of digital speckle photography is then developed for measurements of local ER within the annual rings of spruce. Comparison is made between experimental data and the two expected density dependencies from cell wall bending and from stretching. The hypothesis of cell wall stretching as a contributing mechanism is supported based on the observed linear dependence of ER over a wide density range.

  • 184.
    Montanari, Celine
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Li, Yuanyuan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Chen, Hui
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Yan, Max
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics.
    Berglund, Lars A.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Transparent Wood for Thermal Energy Storage and Reversible Optical Transmittance2019In: ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces, ISSN 1944-8244, E-ISSN 1944-8252, Vol. 11, no 22, p. 20465-20472Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Functional load-bearing materials based on phase-change materials (PCMs) are under rapid development for thermal energy storage (TES) applications. Mesoporous structures are ideal carriers for PCMs and guarantee shape stability during the thermal cycle. In this study, we introduce transparent wood (TW) as a TES system. A shape-stabilized PCM based on polyethylene glycol is encapsulated into a delignified wood substrate, and the TW obtained is fully characterized; also in terms of nano- and mesoscale structures. Transparent wood for thermal energy storage (TW-TES) combines large latent heat (similar to 76 J g(-1)) with switchable optical transparency. During the heating process, optical transmittance increases by 6% and reaches 68% for 1.5 mm thick TW-TES. Characterization of the thermal energy regulation performance shows that the prepared TW-TES composite is superior to normal glass because of the combination of good heat-storage and thermal insulation properties. This makes TW-TES composites interesting candidates for applications in energy-saving buildings.

  • 185.
    Morimune-Moriya, Seira
    et al.
    Chubu Univ, Coll Engn, Dept Appl Chem, Matsumoto, Nagano 4878501, Japan..
    Salajkova, Michaela
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Zhou, Qi
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Nishino, Takashi
    Kobe Univ, Grad Sch Engn, Dept Chem Sci & Engn, Kobe, Hyogo 6578501, Japan..
    Berglund, Lars A.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Reinforcement Effects from Nanodiamond in Cellulose Nanofibril Films2018In: Biomacromolecules, ISSN 1525-7797, E-ISSN 1526-4602, Vol. 19, no 7, p. 2423-2431Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although research on nanopaper structures from cellulose nanofibrils (CNFs) is well established, the mechanical behavior is not well understood, especially not when CNF is combined with hard nanoparticles. Cationic CNF (Q-CNF) was prepared and successfully decorated by anionic nanodiamond (ND) nanoparticles in hydrocolloidal form. The Q-CNF/ND nanocomposites were filtered from a hydrocolloid and dried. Unlike many other carbon nano composites, the QCNF/ND nanocomposites were optically transparent. Reinforcement effects from the nanodiamond were remarkable, such as Young's modulus (9.8 -> 16.6 GPa) and tensile strength (209.5 -> 277.5 MPa) at a content of only 1.9% v/v of ND, and the reinforcement mechanisms are discussed. Strong effects on CNF network deformation mechanisms were revealed by loading unloading experiments. Scratch hardness also increased strongly with increased addition of ND.

  • 186. Mujika, F.
    et al.
    Mondragon, I.
    Berglund, Lars A.
    Varna, J.
    45 degrees flexure test for measurement of in-plane shear modulus2002In: Journal of composite materials, ISSN 0021-9983, E-ISSN 1530-793X, Vol. 36, no 20, p. 2313-2337Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A new method to obtain the in-plane shear modulus G(LT) for unidirectional oriented composite materials is proposed. The method is based on an original analytic way for calculating middle point displacement in a 3-point flexure test. The bending-twisting coupling effects in such a test induce the lift-off of the specimen at the fixture supports for some geometrical conditions. Thereby, contact points are located at two opposite points of the specimen. Consequently, new bending moments along the width of the specimen and twisting moments appear. By supposing resultant moments and shear forces per unit length are uniformly distributed, these distributions are calculated for static conditions along longitudinal and transverse cross sections of the specimen. After having expressed strain energy as a function of resultant moments and resultant shear forces per unit length, Second Castigliano's theorem is applied in order to calculate the middle point displacement. No similar analytic way has been encountered in classical laminated beams theory or in classical laminated plates theory. The displacement obtained in this work and the one obtained from classical laminated beams theory are particularised to the case of 45degrees fibre orientation. G(LT) expressions have been derived from those displacement expressions in three ways: two of them from the solution of this work, not considering and considering shear effects, respectively, and the third one from displacement obtained from classical laminated beams theory. Experiments have been made for different geometric conditions in order to test the influence of geometric parameters in experimental results. For span-to-width ratios up to two, the values obtained are quite constant and agree well with the in-plane shear modulus value obtained by the material manufacturer using +/-45degrees tensile test.

  • 187.
    Mushi, Ngesa Ezekiel
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Butchosa, Nuria
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Salajkova, Michaela
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Zhou, Qi
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Glycoscience.
    Berglund, Lars A.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Nanostructured membranes based on native chitin nanofibers prepared by mild process2014In: Carbohydrate Polymers, ISSN 0144-8617, E-ISSN 1879-1344, Vol. 112, p. 255-263Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Procedures for chitin nanofiber or nanocrystal extraction from Crustaceans modify the chitin structure significantly, through surface deacetylation, surface oxidation and/or molar mass degradation. Here, very mild conditions were used to disintegrate chitin fibril bundles and isolate low protein content individualized chitin nanofibers, and prepare nanostructured high-strength chitin membranes. Most of the strongly 'bound' protein was removed. The degree of acetylation, crystal structure as well as length and width of the native chitin microfibrils in the organism were successfully preserved. Atomic force microscopy and scanning transmission electron microscopy, showed chitin nanofibers with width between 3 and 4 nm. Chitin membranes were prepared by filtration of hydrocolloidal nanofiber suspensions. Mechanical and optical properties were measured. The highest data so far reported for nanostructured chitin membranes was obtained for ultimate tensile strength, strain to failure and work to fracture. Strong correlation was observed between low residual protein content and high tensile properties and the reasons for this are discussed.

  • 188.
    Mushi, Ngesa Ezekiel Zekiel
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Kochumalayil, Joby J.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Cervin, Nicholas Tchang Chang
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Zhou, Qi
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Glycoscience.
    Berglund, Lars A.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Nanostructurally Controlled Hydrogel Based on Small-Diameter Native Chitin Nanofibers: Preparation, Structure, and Properties2016In: ChemSusChem, ISSN 1864-5631, E-ISSN 1864-564XArticle in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Chitin nanofibers of unique structure and properties can be obtained from crustacean and fishery waste. These chitin nanofibers have roughly 4nm diameters, aspect ratios between 25-250, a high degree of acetylation and preserved crystallinity, and can be potentially applied in hydrogels. Hydrogels with a chitin nanofiber content of 0.4, 0.6, 0.8, 1.0, 2.0, and 3.0wt% were successfully prepared. The methodology for preparation is new, environmentally friendly, and simple as gelation is induced by neutralization of the charged colloidal mixture, inducing precipitation and secondary bond interaction between nanofibers. Pore structure and pore size distributions of corresponding aerogels are characterized using auto-porosimetry, revealing a substantial fraction of nanoscale pores. To the best of our knowledge, the values for storage (13kPa at 3wt%) and compression modulus (309kPa at 2wt%) are the highest reported for chitin nanofibers hydrogels.

  • 189.
    Mushi, Ngesa Ezekiel
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Zhou, Qi
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Glycoscience. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Berglund, Lars A.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Membrane and hydrogel properties from chitin fibril structures: Structure and properties at neutral pH2014In: Abstract of Papers of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0065-7727, Vol. 247, p. 21-CELL-Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 190. Nilsson, G.
    et al.
    Fernberg, S. P.
    Berglund, Lars A.
    Strain field inhomogeneities and stiffness changes in GMT containing voids2002In: Composites. Part A, Applied science and manufacturing, ISSN 1359-835X, E-ISSN 1878-5840, Vol. 33, no 1, p. 75-85Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    During compression moulding of glass mat thermoplastics (GMT), voids may form. However, it is not clear whether voids are as critical to mechanical performance in GMT as in thermoset composites. The present investigation also considers the general problem of damage mechanisms in GMT. Conventional tensile tests, acoustic emission, a stiffness degradation test and a speckle technique for strain field measurements are used as well as optical microscopy of polished cross-sections. The void content (up to 5%) does not significantly influence the strength or stiffness degradation process. The reason is the large inhomogeneity of the strain fields in GMT. Failure occurs in locally soft regions and void effects are of secondary importance. Details of the failure process are discussed, emphasising the large local strains in matrix-rich regions.

  • 191.
    Nilsson, Helena
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Galland, Sylvain
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites.
    Larsson, Per Tomas
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Gamstedt, E. Kristofer
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites.
    Nishino, Takashi
    Dept. of Chem. Sci. and Engng., Kobe Univ. Rokko, Nada, Kobe, Japan.
    Berglund, Lars A.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites.
    Iversen, Tommy
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    A non-solvent approach for high-stiffness all-cellulose biocomposites based on pure wood cellulose2010In: Composites Science And Technology, ISSN 0266-3538, E-ISSN 1879-1050, Vol. 70, no 12, p. 1704-1712Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    All-cellulose composites are commonly prepared using cellulose solvents. In this study, moldable all-cellulose I wood fiber materials of high cellulose purity (97%) were successfully compression molded. Water is the only processing aid. The material is interesting as a "green" biocomposite for industrial applications. Dissolving wood fiber pulps (Eucalyptus hardwood and conifer softwood) are used and the influence of pulp origin, beating and pressing temperature (20-180 degrees C) on supramolecular cellulose nanostructure is studied by solid state CP/MAS C-13 NMR. Average molar mass is determined by SEC to assess process degradation effects. Mechanical properties are determined in tensile tests. High-density composites were obtained with a Young's modulus of up to 13 GPa. In addition, nanoscale cellulose fibril aggregation was confirmed due to processing, and resulted in a less moisture sensitive material.

  • 192. Nunez, A. J.
    et al.
    Aranguren, M. I.
    Berglund, Lars A.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Toughening of wood particle composites - Effects of sisal fibers2006In: Journal of Applied Polymer Science, ISSN 0021-8995, E-ISSN 1097-4628, Vol. 101, no 3, p. 1982-1987Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sisal fibers were added to wood particle composites to enhance their toughness. The selected matrix was a commercial styrene diluted unsaturated polyester thermoset resin. Fracture tests were carried out using single-edge notched beam geometries. Stiffness, strength, critical stress intensity factor K-IQ, and work of fracture W-f of notched specimens were determined. The incorporation of sisal fibers into wood particle composites significantly changed the fracture mode of the resulting hybrid composite. For the neat matrix and the wood particle composites, once the maximum load was reached, the crack propagated in a catastrophic way. For hybrid composites, fiber bridging and pull-out were the mechanisms causing increased crack growth resistance. Addition of a 7% wt of sisal fibers almost doubled the K-IQ value of a composite containing 12% wt of woodflour. Moreover, the W-f increased almost 10-fold, for the same sample. In general, the two composite toughness parameters K-IQ and W-f increased when the fraction of sisal fibers was increased.

  • 193. Oksman, K.
    et al.
    Wallstrom, L.
    Berglund, Lars A.
    Toledo, R. D.
    Morphology and mechanical properties of unidirectional sisal-epoxy composites2002In: Journal of Applied Polymer Science, ISSN 0021-8995, E-ISSN 1097-4628, Vol. 84, no 13, p. 2358-2365Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Plant fibers are of increasing interest for use in composite materials. They are renewable resources and waste management is easier than with glass fibers. In the present study, longitudinal stiffness and strength as well as morphology of unidirectional sisal-epoxy composites manufactured by resin transfer molding (RTM) were studied. Horseshoe-shaped sisal fiber bundles (technical fibers) were nonuniformly distributed in the matrix, In contrast to many wood composites, lumen was not filled by polymer matrix. Technical sisal fibers showed higher effective modulus when included in the composite material than in the technical fiber test (40 GPa as compared with 24 GPa). In contrast, the effective technical fiber strength in the composites was estimated to be around 400 MPa in comparison with a measured technical fiber tensile strength of 550 MPa. Reasons for these phenomena are discussed.

  • 194. Oldenbo, M.
    et al.
    Fernberg, S. P.
    Berglund, Lars A.
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Mechanical behaviour of SMC composites with toughening and low density additives2003In: Composites. Part A, Applied science and manufacturing, ISSN 1359-835X, E-ISSN 1878-5840, Vol. 34, no 9, p. 875-885Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A new type of SMC material (Flex-SMC) developed for automotive exterior body panels has been investigated. Flex-SMC contains hollow glass micro-spheres and thermoplastic toughening additives. A conventional SMC (Std-SMC) was used as a reference material. Materials were tested in monotonic tension and compression. Stiffness degradation with strain as well as fracture toughness was determined. In situ SEM was used to study failure mechanisms. Flex-SMC has a density almost 20% lower than Std-SMC and has higher impact resistance. The damage threshold strain of the Flex-SMCs is higher than for Std-SMC. Flex-SMCs have more than twice the fracture toughness of Std-SMC. The major reason identified is that Flex-SMCs shows extensive fibre pullout.

  • 195. Oldenbo, M.
    et al.
    Mattsson, D.
    Varna, J.
    Berglund, Lars A.
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Global stiffness of a SMC panel considering process induced fiber orientation2004In: Journal of reinforced plastics and composites (Print), ISSN 0731-6844, E-ISSN 1530-7964, Vol. 23, no 1, p. 37-49Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A material model, that translates into a stiffness matrix, the second order fiber orientation tensor, described by Advani and Tucker, and the stiffness matrix of a composite with aligned ellipsoidal inclusions, has been implemented in a FE programme and validated. The stiffness of a SMC panel with known state of fiber orientation is calculated using FEM. The influence of process induced fiber orientation is analysed. The fiber orientation for a realistic charge pattern for the panel has been obtained through mould filling simulation in a separate project. It is found that the fiber orientation has a rather small impact on the global stiffness. Only 0.8% lower stiffness compared to isotropic material model is obtained taking into account the fiber orientation distribution. The main reason for the low impact of the process induced fiber orientation is that the charge is symmetrically placed in the mould leading to a symmetric fiber orientation distribution.

  • 196.
    Oliveira de Castro, Danielle
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Heat and Power Technology.
    Karim, Zoheb
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Medina, Lilian
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites.
    Svedberg, A.
    Wågberg, Lars
    Söderberg, Daniel
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics.
    Berglund, Lars
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Scale up of nanocellulose/hybrid inorganic films using a pilot web former2017In: International Conference on Nanotechnology for Renewable Materials 2017, TAPPI Press , 2017, p. 408-418Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 197.
    Olsson, Richard T.
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Salazar-Alvarez, German
    Institut Català de Nanotechnologia, Facultat de Ciencies, Barcelona.
    Said Azizi Sami, My Ahmed
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Berglund, Lars
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Nogués, Josep
    Institució Catalana de Recerca i Estudis Avancats (ICREA) and Departement de Física, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona.
    Gedde, Ulf W.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Nanoparticle decoration of bacterial cellulose fibres: a method to obtain porous high-surface area ultra-flexible ferromagnertic materialsManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 198.
    Olsson, Richard T.
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Samir, Azizi
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Salazar-Alvarez, German
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Belova, Liubov
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering, Engineering Material Physics.
    Ström, Valter
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering, Engineering Material Physics.
    Berglund, Lars A.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Ikkala, O.
    Nogues, J.
    Gedde, Ulf W.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Making flexible magnetic aerogels and stiff magnetic nanopaper using cellulose nanofibrils as templates2010In: Nature Nanotechnology, ISSN 1748-3387, Vol. 5, no 8, p. 584-588Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Nanostructured biological materials inspire the creation of materials with tunable mechanical properties(1-3). Strong cellulose nanofibrils derived from bacteria(4) or wood(5,6) can form ductile or tough networks(7,8) that are suitable as functional materials(9,10). Here, we show that freeze-dried bacterial cellulose nanofibril aerogels can be used as templates for making lightweight porous magnetic aerogels, which can be compacted into a stiff magnetic nanopaper. The 20-70-nm-thick cellulose nanofibrils act as templates for the non-agglomerated growth of ferromagnetic cobalt ferrite nanoparticles(11) (diameter, 40-120 nm). Unlike solvent-swollen gels(12) and ferrogels(13-15), our magnetic aerogel is dry, lightweight, porous (98%), flexible, and can be actuated by a small household magnet. Moreover, it can absorb water and release it upon compression. Owing to their flexibility, high porosity and surface area, these aerogels are expected to be useful in microfluidics devices and as electronic actuators.

  • 199. Paakko, Marjo
    et al.
    Vapaavuori, Jaana
    Silvennoinen, Riitta
    Houbenov, Nikolay
    Ras, Robin H. A.
    Ruokolainen, Janne
    Ritala, Mikko
    Lindström, Tom
    Ankerfors, Mikael
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Berglund, Lars
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Ikkala, Olli
    Flexible and hierarchically porous nanocellulose aerogels: Templates for functionalities2010In: Abstract of Papers of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0065-7727, Vol. 239Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 200. Paakko, Marjo
    et al.
    Vapaavuori, Jaana
    Silvennoinen, Riitta
    Kosonen, Harri
    Ankerfors, Mikael
    Lindström, Tom
    Berglund, Lars A.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Ikkala, Olli
    Long and entangled native cellulose I nanofibers allow flexible aerogels and hierarchically porous templates for functionalities2008Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recently it was shown that enzymatic and mechanical processing of macroscopic cellulose fibers lead to disintegration of long and entangled native cellulose I nanofibers in order to form mechanically strong aqueous gels (Paakko et al., Biomacromolecules, 2007, 8, 1934). Here we demonstrate that ( 1) such aqueous nanofibrillar gels are unexpectedly robust to allow formation of highly porous aerogels by direct water removal by freeze-drying, ( 2) they are flexible, unlike most aerogels that suffer from brittleness, and ( 3) they allow flexible hierarchically porous templates for functionalities, e. g. for electrical conductivity. No crosslinking, solvent exchange nor supercritical drying are required to suppress the collapse during the aerogel preparation, unlike in typical aerogel preparations. The aerogels show a high porosity of similar to 98% and a very low density of ca. 0.02 g cm(-3). The flexibility of the aerogels manifests as a particularly high compressive strain of ca. 70%. In addition, the structure of the aerogels can be tuned from nanofibrillar to sheet-like skeletons with hierarchical micro- and nanoscale morphology and porosity by modifying the freeze-drying conditions. The porous flexible aerogel scaffold opens new possibilities for templating organic and inorganic matter for various functionalities. This is demonstrated here by dipping the aerogels in an electrically conducting polyaniline-surfactant solution which after rinsing off the unbound conducting polymer and drying leads to electrically conducting flexible aerogels with relatively high conductivity of around 1 x 10(-2) S cm(-1). More generally, we foresee a wide variety of functional applications for highly porous flexible biomatter aerogels, such as for selective delivery/separation, tissue-engineering, nanocomposites upon impregnation by polymers, and other medical and pharmaceutical applications.

123456 151 - 200 of 292
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf