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  • 151.
    Pang, Xi
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Mörtberg, Ulla
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Sallnäs, Ola
    Nordström, Eva-Maria
    Böttcher, Hannes
    Trade-offs and synergies among ecosystem services and biodiversity under different forest management scenarios: Case study of a forest landscape in southern Sweden2015In: 9th International Association for Landscape Ecology (IALE) World Congress, 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 152.
    Pang, Xi
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Mörtberg, Ulla
    Sallnäs, Ola
    Trubins, Renats
    Nordström, Eva-Maria
    Böttcher, Hannes
    Ecological network assessment of forest bioenergy options using the landscape simulator LandSim: a case study of Kronoberg, southern SwedenManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The need to adapt to climate change as well as to secure the supply of energy has led to a shift in energy consumption from fossil fuel to renewables. In this context, forest biomass is a resource that is increasingly utilised for bioenergy purposes in Sweden, which along with the extraction of industrial wood may conflict with other sustainability goals such as those related to biodiversity conservation. In order to balance between main sustainability objectives, land zoning policies and related management regimes has been proposed, differentiating between the main management categories protected areas, multi-purpose forestry and intensive forestry. The aim of this project was to develop methods and tools for integrated sustainability assessment of forest biomass extraction, in particular from bioenergy and biodiversity perspectives.

    For this purpose, the landscape simulator LandSim was developed and applied in a case study in Kronoberg County in southern Sweden. Forest growth and management was simulated in 5-year time steps for the period 2010-2110. The management followed two land zoning scenarios, one applying even-aged forestry on all forest land except for protected areas (EAF-tot), and one was applying continuous cover forestry on parts of the forest land, combined with protected areas and a shorter rotation time on the other parts (CCF-int). The outcome of the simulations was raster data on tree species, volume and age for each time step and scenario. From the outcome, harvested volumes and bioenergy feedstock yields were derived. The same outcome was used for an ecological network assessment, using the indicator Equivalent Connected Area (ECA) for two model species tied to mature and old coniferous and southern broadleaved forest, respectively.

    The results showed that the EAF-tot scenario implied higher yields of biomass feedstock for bioenergy than the CCF-int scenario, while the CCF-int scenario displayed more even yields over the years. By contrast, the CCF-int scenario performed substantially better than the EAF-tot scenario when it came to the ECA indicators. However, the CCF-int scenario involved a range of assumptions mirroring major uncertainties on habitat suitability, which yielded separate results and thus will need further exploration. Moreover, in order to support the model species and related biodiversity components, the forest management would need to allow larger areas to become suitable habitat, as well as to plan for habitat amount and connectivity on landscape scale in order to not only increase habitat size but also ECAs. Conclusively, the modelling framework linking the landscape simulator with the ecological network model could be used for integrated sustainability assessment of bioenergy options, integrating main policy concerns when assessing renewable energy options.

  • 153.
    Pang, Xi
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Mörtberg, Ulla
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Sallnäs, Ola
    Trubins, Renats
    Nordström, Eva-Maria
    Böttcher, Hannes
    Habitat network assessment of forest bioenergy options using the landscape simulator LandSim: A case study of Kronoberg, southern Sweden2017In: Ecological Modelling, ISSN 0304-3800, E-ISSN 1872-7026, Vol. 345, p. 99-112Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Forest biomass is a renewable resource that is increasingly utilised for bioenergy purposes in Sweden, which along with the extraction of industrial wood may conflict with biodiversity conservation. The aim of this paper is to present a method for integrated sustainability assessment of forest biomass extraction, particularly from bioenergy and biodiversity perspectives. The landscape simulator LandSim was developed and linked with models for the assessment of biomass yields and habitat networks representing prioritised biodiversity components. It was applied in a case study in Kronoberg County in southern Sweden. Forest growth and management were simulated for the period 2010-2110, following two land zoning scenarios, one applying even-aged forest management on all forest land except for protected areas (EAF-tot), and one applying continuous cover forest management on parts of the forest land, combined with protected areas and an intensified even-aged management on the other parts (CCF-int). The EAF-tot scenario implied higher yields of biomass feedstock for bioenergy, the CCF-int scenario only giving 66% of that yield, while the CCF-int scenario performed substantially better when it came to the habitat network indicators, if habitat suitability was ensured. Conclusively, the case study confirmed that the modelling framework of the LEcA tool, linking the landscape simulator LandSim with the biomass yield assessment and the habitat network model can be used for integrating main policy concerns when assessing renewable energy options.

  • 154.
    Pang, Xi
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Mörtberg, Ulla
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Trubins, Renats
    SLU.
    Sallnäs, Ola
    SLU.
    The LEcA Tool for energy-environment systems analysis2016Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 155.
    Pang, Xi
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
    Mörtberg, Ulla
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
    Trubins, Renats
    Sallnäs, Ola
    Trade-offs analysis between bioenergy feedstock and other forest ecosystem services2018Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 156.
    Pang, Xi
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Mörtberg, Ulla
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Trubins, Renats
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences.
    Sallnäs, Ola
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences.
    Mizgeris, Gintautas
    Kulbokas, Gintaras
    Galinis, Arvydas
    Lekavicius, Vidas
    The Landscape simulation and Ecological Assessment (LEcA) tool: Linking with the energy model MESSAGE2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 157.
    Pang, Xi
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering. International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA), Ecosystems Services and Management Program, Laxenburg, Austria.
    Nordström, Eva-Maria
    Böttcher, Hannes
    Trubins, Renats
    Mörtberg, Ulla
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
    Trade-offs and synergies among ecosystem services under different forest management scenarios: The LEcA tool2017In: Ecosystem Services, ISSN 2212-0416, E-ISSN 2212-0416, Vol. 28, p. 67-79Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Forests provide a multitude of ecosystem services. In Sweden, the goal to replace fossil fuels could induce substantial changes in the current management and use of forests. Therefore, methods and tools are needed to assess synergies and trade-offs between ecosystem services for policy and planning alternatives. The aim of this study was to develop methods for integrated sustainability assessment of forest management strategies for long-term provisioning of various ecosystem services. For this purpose, the Landscape simulation and Ecological Assessment (LEcA) tool was developed to analyse synergies and trade-offs among five ecosystem services: bioenergy feedstock and industrial wood production, forest carbon storage, recreation areas and habitat networks. Forest growth and management were simulated for two scenarios; the EAF-tot scenario dominated by even-aged forestry (EAF), and the CCF-int scenario with a combination of continuous-cover forestry (CCF) and intensified EAF. The results showed trade-offs between industrial wood and bioenergy production on one side and habitat, recreation and carbon storage on the other side. The LEcA tool showed great potential for evaluation of impacts of alternative policies for land zoning and forest management on forest ecosystem services. It can be used to assess the consequences of forest management strategies related to renewable energy and conservation policies.

  • 158.
    Pang, Xi
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Nordström, Eva-Maria
    SLU Umeå.
    Mörtberg, Ulla
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Böttcher, Hannes
    International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA), Laxenburg.
    Sallnäs, Ola
    SLU Alnarp.
    Trade-offs and synergies among ecosystem services and biodiversity under different forest management scenarios: A case study of a forest landscape in southern Sweden2013Report (Refereed)
  • 159.
    Pang, Xi
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Sustainability Assessment and Management.
    Trubins, Renats
    Lekavicius, Vidas
    Galinas, Arvydas
    Mozgeris, Gintautas
    Kulbokas, Gintaras
    Mörtberg, Ulla
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Sustainability Assessment and Management.
    Renewable energy goals and the use of forest resources2019Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 160.
    Pang, Xi
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
    Trubins, Renats
    Lekavicius, Vidas
    Mozgeris, Gintautas
    Kulbokas, Gintaras
    Galnis, Arvydas
    Mörtberg, Ulla
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
    The Landscape simulation and Ecological Assessment (LEcA) tool: Renewable energy goals and the use forest resources2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Demands on forest bioenergy feedstock are projected to increase in many countries due to climate change mitigation requiring renewable energy sources. However, national energy planning may need to be informed about local and landscape conditions in order to promote sustainable use of forest biomass resources as well as other ecosystem services. Therefore, integrated modelling of energy use and resource availability is called for.

    The aim of this study was to analyse the forest biomass potential for Lithuania for energy pathways, while comparing the projected use of forest bioenergy feedstock with available resources applying environmental restrictions. This was performed using the Landscape simulation and Ecological Assessment (LEcA) tool and the energy model MESSAGE, while discussing links between these in order to better connect energy planning on national and local levels.

    The results showed that under a Biomass-Low pathway and business-as-usual forest management, demands would be met up to 2050, while a Biomass-High pathway and more intensive forest management may lead to difficulties to meet the demands in the later end of the period. Linking the energy model with the LEcA tool enable iterations and information exchange for comparison between demand and supply, and may contribute to a sustainable and efficient use of forest as bioenergy feedstock resource.

  • 161.
    Pang, Xi
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Sustainability Assessment and Management.
    Trubins, Renats
    Mozgeris, Gintautas
    Lekavicius, Vidas
    Galinis, Arvydas
    Kulbokas, Gintaras
    Mörtberg, Ulla
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Sustainability Assessment and Management.
    Will the demand for forest bioenergy feedstock be met?: Linking forest simulation with energy scenarios for LithuaniaManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 162.
    Pang, Xi
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
    Trubins, Renats
    Vidas, Lekavicius
    Galinas, Arvydas
    Mozgeris, Gintautas
    Kulbokas, Gintaras
    Mörtberg, Ulla
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Sustainability Assessment and Management.
    Forest bioenergy feedstock in Lithuania – renewable energy goals and the use of forest resources2019In: Energy Strategy Reviews, ISSN 2211-467X, E-ISSN 2211-4688, Vol. 24, p. 244-253Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Demands on forest bioenergy feedstock are expected to increase in many countries due to climate change mitigation. However, sustainable use of forest biomass resources can be ensured only if local and landscape conditions are taken into account, linking energy use to its resource base. The aim of this study was to analyse the forest biomass potential for Lithuania’s energy pathways, while comparing the projected demand of forest bioenergy feedstock with resource projections. This was performed using the Landscape simulation and Ecological Assessment (LEcA) tool and the energy model MESSAGE. Biomass demand can be met up to 2050, after which demands under a Biomass Low pathway can still be met by the domestic forest resource if other wood uses are reduced, while Biomass High leads to a biomass deficit regarding domestic forest resource. Information exchange between the energy model and the LEcA tool enables an integrated sustainability assessment, and may contribute to a sustainable and efficient use of forest as a bioenergy feedstock resource.

  • 163.
    Petersson, Mona
    et al.
    Södertörn University College.
    Hammer, Monica
    Södertörn University College.
    Mörtberg, Ulla
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Trade-offs and ecosystem services in landscape planning and governance: A case study of the implementation of the EU Water Framework Directive2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 164. Petersson, Monica
    et al.
    Hammer, Monica
    Mörtberg, Ulla
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering, Environmental Management and Assessment.
    Water quality in a landscape perspective: a case study of the implementation of the EU Water Framework Directive2010Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction/Problem IdentificationThe EU Water Framework Directive was introduced the year 2000 to protect and secure all water resources within the European Union. The directive is designed to have an ecosystem management approach where the water quality and quantity is administrated in relation to the borders of the river basin. During the period from 2000 to 2015 the European countries and their new water authorities are into the implementation process of the directive; classifying the status of their water resources, designing the river basin management plan, as well as the programme of measures. In Sweden five water authorities are responsible for the implementation process, each handling river basins at different scale levels from local to regional size entering the same coastal waters.Analysis/Results and Implications for Policy and/or ResearchIn this case study, focusing on the ongoing implementation of the EU Water Framework Directive (WFD) in Sweden, we analyze some of the opportunities and challenges for a sustainable governance of water resources applying an ecosystem management approach. The study area is the Lake Mälaren drainage basin within the Northern Baltic Sea River Basin District in Sweden. This district covers the Lake Mälaren drainage basin and Stockholm archipelago region constituting an ecological and geographic gradient from inland to freshwater archipelago and further to the brackish archipelago in the Baltic Sea. The drainage basin represents an area with a long history both in agricultural as well as mining history, which are quite separated in different sub-catchments. Historic mining remnants from at least the 12th century leaking metals and acid water into rivers and creeks in the western upstream parts of the catchment, and intense agriculture in the lowland areas in the vicinity of the lake in the downstream parts is leaking nutrients adding to the eutrophication. Most rivers within the area have been modified during the history; dammed for mills, rivers straightened and wetlands dredged to increase the land matching the increase of inhabitants. Also the present day situation show differences when it comes to land-use within the catchment, where the north western part is rural and low populated, and at the same time one third of the Swedish population is found within lake Mälaren catchment. The densest population is found in cities at the shore of the lake, with a increas-ing density towards Stockholm. At regional level future scenarios due to climate change varies, but in some simulations there is an increased precipitation in the area creating a risk scenario of flooding that may result in a transgression in the lowland areas, degraded water quality and increased nutrient levels. Studying the drainage basin of Lake Mälaren therefore makes it possible to compare different water issues between sub-catchments within the same drainage basin, and also at different geographi-cal scales since water quality priorities can be scale related.The study is based on hydrological data, and data of the physical characteristics of the Lake Mälaren river basin and the different sub-catchments characteristics (area, shape, land use...), and analyzed using GIS techniques. The sub-catchments are compared concerning different scientific aspects as well as issues addressed by the stakeholders. The complexity of large river basins is discussed, and the importance of different solutions in upstream and downstream sub-catchments due to variable Workshop 1: Integrated Pollution Prevention and Control    57landscape character, land use and history. In the light of the new EU Water Framework Directive the study point to the importance of flexible river basin management from regional to local scale, and vice versa, to create an adaptive ecosystem management where problems can be discussed and solved at a proper scale level.

  • 165.
    Siyal, Shahid Hussain
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems Analysis.
    Mentis, Dimitris
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems Analysis.
    Mörtberg, Ulla
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Samo, S. R.
    Howells, Mark
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems Analysis.
    A preliminary assessment of wind generated hydrogen production potential to reduce the gasoline fuel used in road transport sector of Sweden2015In: International journal of hydrogen energy, ISSN 0360-3199, E-ISSN 1879-3487, Vol. 40, p. 6501-6511Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Hydrogen produced with the help of local wind energy resource can be considered as a key energy carrier, which can play a major role in switching the transport fuels from fossil to renewable. In this paper, we preliminary assessed the wind generated hydrogen production potential in order to provide the environmentally clean, renewable and cheap fuel to the road transport sector of Sweden. Vestas-112 wind turbine (V-112) and proton exchange membrane (PEM) electrolyzer were used as main components. Land use restrictions related to wind to hydrogen energy installation were also taken into account. Geographic Information System (GIS) tool was used for this study. We estimated that in Sweden, 25,580 ktons/year of hydrogen can be produced by using local wind energy resource, which is equivalent to 860 TWh of energy. Moreover, by using per capita gasoline consumption of Sweden, it was also estimated that during year 2011, 2900 ktons of imported gasoline was used in transport sector, which emitted 8700 ktons of CO2 into the local atmosphere of country. It was also estimated that in Sweden, gasoline consumption and CO2 emission can be reduced to 50% by using only 530 ktons i.e. (2%) of total local wind generated hydrogen production.

  • 166.
    Siyal, Shahid Hussain
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems Analysis.
    Mörtberg, Ulla
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Mentis, Dimitris
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems Analysis.
    Welsch, Manuel
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems Analysis.
    Babelon, Ian
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Howells, Mark
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems Analysis.
    Wind energy assessment considering geographic and environmental restrictions in Sweden: A GIS-based approach2015In: Energy, ISSN 0360-5442, E-ISSN 1873-6785, Vol. 83, p. 447-461Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The wind energy being a freely available and low-carbon energy source has got the focus of decision makers around the world, because wind energy systems can reduce the dependence of a nation on fossil fuels and can contribute to a sustainable development of both climate and energy. However, wind power comes with certain environmental impacts and land use constraints that should be taken into account, in order to reach main sustainability goals concerning biodiversity and ecosystem services. The Swedish national goal regarding wind energy development has been set to 30 TWh by the year 2020, of which 20 TWh should come from the on-shore wind energy resource. Therefore, wind energy development in Sweden could play an important role in achieving the future energy and environmental targets. In this regard, we assessed the wind energy potential available in Sweden using a GIS-based approach. We aimed to estimate the technical onshore wind energy potential available in Sweden by considering system performance, topographic limitations, environmental, and land use constraints in the form of two restriction scenarios. The results of this paper can draw the attention of decision makers to reach a sustainable wind energy development in Sweden. The results achieved in this paper suggest that Sweden possesses sufficient wind energy potential and land area available for wind energy installations, which can be used to meet the future renewable energy targets in Sweden.

  • 167. Suwala, W
    et al.
    Wyrwa, A
    Pluta, M
    Jedrysik, E
    Karl, U
    Fehrenbach, D
    Wietschel, M
    Bossman, T
    Elsland, R
    Fichtner, W
    Genoese, M
    Hartel, R
    Bublitz, A
    Merkel, E
    Poganietz, W-R
    Silveira, Semida
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy and Climate Studies, ECS.
    Morfeldt, Johannes
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy and Climate Studies, ECS.
    Mörtberg, Ulla
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Höjer, Mattias
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
    Brown, Nils
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
    Pang, Xi
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Möst, D
    Muller, T
    Gunkel, D
    Blesl, M
    Kuder, R
    Beestermöller, R
    Nijs, W
    Shaping our energy system – combining European modelling expertise: Case studies of the European energy system in 20502013Report (Refereed)
  • 168.
    Tessema, Selome M.
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Lyon, Steve W.
    Stockholm University.
    Setegn, Shimelis G.
    Florida International University, Departmet of Earth and Environment.
    Mörtberg, Ulla
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Effects of different retention parameter estimation methods on the prediction of surface runoff using the SCS curve number method2014In: Water resources management, ISSN 0920-4741, E-ISSN 1573-1650, Vol. 28, no 10, p. 3241-3254Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Quantifying different hydrological components is an initial step for sustainable water resources planning and management. One rising concern is the conflict between the environment, hydropower and agriculture mainly in lowland areas where a large share of the base flows need to be abstracted. The Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) model was used to understand the hydrological processes of the Upper Awash River Basin with the emphasis on analyzing the different options for surface runoff generation using the Soil Conservation Service (SCS) Curve Number (CN) method. In this study, SWAT was applied incorporating two methods for estimating the retention parameter (S) for the SCS-CN method. The first allowed S to vary with soil profile moisture content (SM method) and the second allowed S to vary with accumulated plant evapotranspiration (PT method). Hydrograph comparison indicated that the PT method was better in simulating peak flows while the SM method was better in simulating the low flows. While the predicted stream flow hydrographs showed an agreement between the two methods, the simulated annual water balance indicated a disagreement in quantifying the different hydrological components. After evapotranspiration, base flow was the dominant component simulated in the SM method whereas surface runoff was the foremost in the PT method simulation. The analysis indicated that care must be taken when selecting an appropriate tool for quantifying hydrologic system to be used for decision making especially for un-gauged catchments where validation of model results is not possible.

  • 169.
    Tessema, Selome M.
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering, Environmental Management and Assessment.
    Setegn, Shimelis G.
    Florida International University, Departmet of Earth and Environment.
    Mörtberg, Ulla
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering, Environmental Management and Assessment.
    Watershed modeling as a tool for sustainable water resources management: SWAT model application in the Awash River basin, Ethiopia2015In: Sustainability of Integrated Water Resources Management / [ed] Setegn, S.G. and Donoso, M.C., Switzerland: Springer, 2015, p. 579-606Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Improving the reliability of streamflow prediction under limited data conditions is a vital step to achieve a sustainable water management system. In many areas, when planning for balancing water demands for hydropower, irrigation, and ecosystem services as well as preventing flood risk, major gaps exist on baseline information of water resources. The prediction of streamflow requires adequate understanding of the characteristics of the river basin. Awash River basin has been a subject of large-scale flooding for several years mainly due to heavy rains and inadequate water resource management. The lack of decision support tools and limitation of available data hinder research and development in the area. The main objective of this study was to characterize the hydrological components of the upper part of Awash River basin under limited data condition. The optimal approach for this purpose was considered to be statistical analysis of the time series hydrometeorological data and to adapt existing hydrological models. The physically based Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) model was successfully calibrated and validated in the watershed. The performance of the model was evaluated based on the streamflow prediction at four subbasin outlets and the main outlet of the river basin. Model validation indicated that daily streamflows were predicted reasonably which was verified by Nash-Sutcliffe values ranging from 0.55 to 0.71. The evaluations from tributary rivers indicate that the drainage area is one of the important factors that affect the direct transferring of parameter values from one watershed to another. The catchment characteristics and its different hydrological components of the water balance are discussed.

  • 170.
    Tessema, Selome
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering, Environmental Management and Assessment.
    Mörtberg, Ulla
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering, Environmental Management and Assessment.
    Hydropower and environmental assessment: tools for decision support2011Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In order to reach the targets of the EU Directive on renewable energy, hydropower plays an important role, with high expectations on the utilisation also for balancing wind power. However, water is a resource with many interested stakeholders and environmental impacts of hydropower, especially under short-term regulation regimes, may be substantial. Ecological impacts may occur which conflict with designated habitats and species protected by the EU Birds and Habitats Directives. Further, the EU Water Framework Directive advocates an integrated water management approach, with the overarching goal of achieving good ecological status for all European water bodies by 2015, with some exceptions. Also other EU legislation such as the Directives on environmental impact assessment of plans and programmes as well as on projects calls for a holistic and systematic approach for assessing environmental impacts, for integrating stakeholders and for finding a balance between different types of resource use, in this case water use. Therefore, there is a need for methods and tools for integrated sustainability assessment of hydropower options, from large to small scale plants and as a regulating source. Such tools are needed for integration of sometimes contradicting economic and environmental objectives and stakeholder perspectivces in the decision-making process, for assessment of environmental impacts and for design of flow regimes meeting combined energy and ecological demands. Apart from forecasting and predicting the quantity and quality of water, different models can help in predicting the impacts of natural and anthropogenic changes on water resources, quantifying the spatial and temporal availability of the resources and help integrate and design environmental flows. However, main challenges lie in choosing and utilizing these models for a specific basin and managerial plan. The project aims at investigating such methods and tools, applying a selection of these in case studies for comparing their capacity for use in environmental impact assessment and for analysing and assessing interacting energy-environment systems. The results will include a methodlogical framework and a model comparison, setting a baseline for further studies of integrated sustainability assessment of hydropower options.

    The project is part of the StandUp for Energy collaboration between Uppsala University, the Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), the Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences (SLU) and Luleå University of Technology

  • 171.
    Tessema, Selome
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering, Environmental Management and Assessment.
    Setegn, Shimelis
    Florida International University.
    Mörtberg, Ulla
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering, Environmental Management and Assessment.
    Analysis of two retention parameter estimation methods for curve number methodology on stream flow prediction2011In: Ecosystem services in soil and water researchFocus on Soils and Water Symposium: Programme and Abstracts / [ed] Maria Kahlert & Annemieke Gärdenäs, 2011, p. 56-56Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The balance between water use for hydropower and irrigation, sustaining ecosystem services and preventing flood risk is essential to consider in water management for sustainable use. One rising concern is the conflict between the environment and agriculture mainly in lowland areas, where total base flows are abstracted for irrigation without compromising ecological conservation. Hence, it is important to understand the water balance and quantify the dominant components in a watershed to allocate water for all purposes.

    Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) model was used to understand the hydrological process of the Upper Awash River Basin with the emphasis on analyzing surface runoff generation using the Soil Conservation Service (SCS) curve number method. SWAT incorporates two methods for estimating the retention parameter (S) for SCS curve number method; allowing S to vary with soil profile moisture content (SM) and to let S vary with accumulated plant evapotranspiration (PT). The PT method being more dependent on forcing data than soil data provides another dimension of applicability for data limited watersheds. The results were analyzed by visual comparison of the observed and simulated hydrographs and model performance measures. The hydrographs comparison indicated that the PT method was better in peak flow prediction while SM method outperformed in simulating the low flows. The performance measures (Nash-Sutcliffe Efficiency, Coefficient of Determination and Percent Bias) indicate better prediction by PT method. While the methods agree on predicting the hydrographs, they contradict in the annual water balance assessments. After evapotranspiration, base flow is the dominant component in SM method whereas surface runoff is the foremost in PT method. The results from the PT method agree with the outcome discussed in previous study. Furthermore, it has the advantage of governing by a single parameter that could be calibrated separately to control the base flow and surface runoff contribution to the total flow.

    The analysis shows that care must be taken in selecting a way for quantifying, especially for ungauged catchments where validation of model result is unattainable.

  • 172.
    Uttam, Kedar
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering, Environmental Management and Assessment.
    Balfors, Berit
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering, Environmental Management and Assessment.
    Faith-Ell, Charlotta
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering. WSP.
    Mörtberg, Ulla
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering, Environmental Management and Assessment. KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Perspectives on inter-linking impact assessment and green procurement: The case of green energy2013In: Journal of Environmental Assessment Policy and Management, ISSN 1464-3332, E-ISSN 1757-5605, Vol. 15, no 2, p. 1340004-1-1340004-25Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The construction sector consumes significant quantities of energy and contributes substantially to greenhouse gas emissions. It is imperative that the sector considers a renewable component to its energy procurement. The sector has adopted various policy instruments such as impact assessment and green procurement for improving its environmental performance. Green procurement involves the procurement of services, products and also energy that meet environmental requirements. This paper focused primarily on the conceptualisation of the inter-link between impact assessment and green procurement. Furthermore, interviews were conducted with three fundamental categories of stakeholders that involved client, contractor and energy company. Although the interview responses showed varied perspectives on the inter-link, most of the interviewees acknowledged its need and suggested certain approaches towards establishing the inter-link. The highlighted approach was to consider the use of commercially available environmental certification tools and focus on areas such as partnerships. Future research should examine how environmental certification tools could facilitate the inter-link and how partnerships need to be arranged therein.

  • 173.
    Uttam, Kedar
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering, Environmental Management and Assessment.
    Balfors, Berit
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering, Environmental Management and Assessment.
    Faith-Ell, Charlotta
    WSP.
    Mörtberg, Ulla
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering, Environmental Management and Assessment.
    Procuring green energy in the construction sector2011In: 'IAIA11 Conference Proceedings'Impact Assessment and Responsible Development for Infrastructure, Business and Industry, International Association for Impact Assessment , 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper intends to explore the opportunities for procuring renewable energy in the construction sector through impact assessment (IA). The paper draws attention towards a significant instrument called green procurement (GP). GP involves buying of services, products and also energy that meet environmental requirements. The paper is based on a study, which was carried out in order to envisage the link between IA and GP. The purpose of the study was, therefore, to gain an understanding on the potentiality of this link. The paper indicates that the link between IA and GP could facilitate the discussion on renewable energy procurement at the IA phase. The study also investigated various innovative partnership systems and made an attempt to understand how such partnerships could strengthen the link. The paper highlights that new partnering arrangements between the government, market and the public, which could ensure the delivery of commitments made during the IA stage, need to be adopted during such a linkage. Further, the construction sector, as a significant consumer of energy, could play the potential role of prime movers. Prime movers are actors who facilitate the diffusion and development of a new technology. Such a capacity could be tapped through linking IA and GP. The prime movers need not be restricted to one player; it could also be a constellation of partners. This network needs to be investigated in the future. Future research is imperative also in terms of the strategic mechanisms required to develop the connection between IA and GP.

    Download full text (pdf)
    IAIA11_UKetal
  • 174.
    Uttam, Kedar
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering, Environmental Management and Assessment.
    Balfors, Berit
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering, Environmental Management and Assessment.
    Faith-Ell, Charlotta
    WSP.
    Mörtberg, Ulla
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering, Environmental Management and Assessment.
    Procuring green energy in the construction sector: perspectives on inter-connecting green procurement and impact assessmentManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The construction sector consumes significant quantities of energy, thus contributing to almost 50 percent of the global greenhouse gas emissions. The construction sector must consider a renewable component to their energy procurement as a means to improve their environmental performance. In order to improve the sector’s environmental performance, various policy instruments have been adopted. This paper draws attention towards policy instruments, namely, green procurement and impact assessment. Green procurement involves the procurement of services, products and also energy that meet environmental requirements. Impact assessment is a process used to evaluate the environmental impacts of a proposed development, and also to plan mitigation measures. This paper primarily uses the conceptualisation of the inter-link between impact assessment and green procurement. Furthermore, a literature review was conducted to identify some of the priority areas that could encourage the procurement of renewable energy in the construction sector. These priority areas include partnerships, planning at early stages of the project development for renewable energy procurement, renewable energy technology and policy integration. Additionally, interviews were conducted with various categories of stakeholders in the Swedish construction sector. The interviews focused on the inter-link between impact assessment and green procurement, and   the priority areas for encouraging the procurement of renewable energy. The interview responses show varied perceptions on the inter-link. Nonetheless, most of them acknowledge the need for the inter-link. The interview process indicates that there is a prevailing tendency within the Swedish construction sector to adopt various commercially available environmental assessment and certification tools. Furthermore, the stakeholders regard partnerships and planning at early stages as the topmost priority areas to consider. The interview process helped in mapping the direction for future research. Future research should investigate the contribution of impact assessment process towards the procurement process. This should also include the establishment of mechanisms for inter-connecting green procurement and impact assessment. In so doing, future research should also examine how the inter-link could be facilitated by certification tools. In addition, the future research should examine and discuss how partnerships need to be arranged within the context of the inter-link.

  • 175.
    Uttam, Kedar
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering, Environmental Management and Assessment.
    Balfors, Berit
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering, Environmental Management and Assessment.
    Mörtberg, Ulla
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering, Environmental Management and Assessment.
    Promoting renewable energy in the construction sector using environmental impact assessment as a tool2010Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 176.
    Uttam, Kedar
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering, Environmental Management and Assessment.
    Balfors, Berit
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering, Environmental Management and Assessment.
    Mörtberg, Ulla
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering, Environmental Management and Assessment.
    Promoting renewable energy through green procurement and impact assessment2011In: Linköping Electronic Conference Proceedings 57: Volume 12 Sustainable Cities and Regions / [ed] Professor Bahram Moshfegh, Linköping University Electronic Press , 2011, p. 3002-3009Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    With urbanization, the construction sector (CS) has been consuming great quantities of energy and contributing to almost 50 percent of the global GHG emissions. Thus, it is imperative for the CS to adopt a sustainable energy system (SES). Renewable energy (RE) is foreseen as a viable option to promote SES. However, adopting RE in CS involves challenges within the areas of both RE development and infrastructure planning (IP). These challenges call for research not only on technology, but also on policy aspects and systems thinking. Thus, the aim of this paper is to understand the scope for incorporating discussions on RE use within the policy instruments (PIs) used in the IP process. The method involved literature review from the perspective of the synthesis of PIs that have the capacities to accommodate discussions on sustainability during planning.

    The paper highlights a PI called green procurement (GP), which involves procuring services and products that meet environmental requirements. GP could go far to ensure that the energy procured is renewable. The paper indicates that the discussion on procuring RE could be routed through synthesis of GP and impact assessment, which is a PI for evaluating environmental impacts, with the capacity to assist IP.

    Download full text (pdf)
    WREC2011_UKetal
  • 177.
    Walter, Martina
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering, Environmental Management and Assessment.
    Mörtberg, Ulla
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering, Environmental Management and Assessment.
    Balfors, Berit
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering, Environmental Management and Assessment.
    Methods and tools for integration of landscape level ecological impacts in environmental assessment2010Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In infrastructure planning and design there is a need  for methods for integrated assessment of impacts of infrastructure on landscape  level. Infrastructure cause a wide range of such impacts, not at least on  biodiversity. These impacts affect the ecological processes on a landscape  scale, since they contribute to loss and fragmentation of natural habitat.  Thus, prediction of ecological impacts aiming to minimize these adverse impacts  on biodiversity is necessary. Methods for describing and evaluating ecological  values of landscapes are urged for including the formulation of targets and the  prediction and assessment of impacts on biodiversity on a landscape scale. Such  methods should facilitate the integration of multiple criteria and qualities of  the landscapes and link them to existing planning frameworks in infrastructure  planning, among others environmental impact assessment (EIA) and strategic environmental  assessment (SEA).

    The aim of this project is to develop methods and tools for  the integration of biodiversity objectives in infrastructure planning.  Particular focus will be on tools for landscape assessment which are linked  with targets for biodiversity values in landscapes and compatible with  environmental impact assessment at the project and strategic levels. Strategies  and methods for landscape ecological assessment will be developed based on the  experiences from various examples through the advancement and application of  GIS-based habitat models. The habitat models will be developed using  geological, hydrologic, vegetation, infrastructure and other development data  as independent variables and selected ecological profiles as dependent  variables. The outcome will be models of habitat networks that include habitat  suitability and connectivity that can be synthesized and visualized in maps and  used in strategies for landscape ecological assessment in planning and environmental  assessment. The project will result in tools compatible with integrated  assessment on landscape level, which support localisation decisions with  multiple objectives within the infrastructure sector.

  • 178.
    Wretling, Vincent
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Sustainability Assessment and Management.
    Balfors, Berit
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Sustainability Assessment and Management.
    Gunnarsson-Östling, Ulrika
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Sustainability Assessment and Management.
    Hörnberg, Christina
    Mörtberg, Ulla
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Sustainability Assessment and Management.
    The (lacking) role of SEA within local energy and climate planning - Pathways forward. Advances in European SEA and strategic planning2020Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The recent upsurge in voluntary local energy and climate planning is generally appraised. Nevertheless, as these plans are produced informally, SEA legislation does not apply. Findings concerning Swedish energy planning point towards that SEA often is lacking even when the directive does apply, due to lack of knowledge and the conviction that these plans are sustainable ‘by default’. Thus, many energy and climate plans may miss procedural and substantive benefits of SEA, for example to highlight interactions between pathways for decarbonisation and other sustainability objectives. This paper raises questions concerning current energy and climate planning practices and discuss pathways forward.  

  • 179.
    Wretling, Vincent
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Sustainability Assessment and Management.
    Balfors, Berit
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Sustainability Assessment and Management.
    Mörtberg, Ulla
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Sustainability Assessment and Management.
    Balancing wind power deployment and sustainability objectives in Swedish planning and permittingManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Wind power can be a critical renewable energy technology in efforts to achieve the global climate targets. However, local impacts do occur, which demands careful consideration in planning and permitting. Sweden has set an ambition to triple land-based wind power by 2040, and municipalities play a key role in both the planning and permitting process, due to a planning monopoly and veto power in the permitting process. This calls for an investigation of Swedish wind power governance, with a particular focus on recent trends in municipal wind power planning, how wind power is balanced in relation to sustainability objectives in planning and permitting, and insights from practitioners regarding their capacities and drivers.

    Results

    The results show that about two-thirds of Swedish municipalities have conducted wind power planning in some form, but this basis for decision-making has become outdated due to a lack of institutional capacity at the municipal level. Secondly, the study finds that many municipalities perceive that there are insufficient incentives for a continued wind power expansion. Lastly, the study sheds light on a large heterogeneity within wind power planning practice concerning how trade-offs between wind power deployment and other sustainability aspects are handled, as well as a lack of coherence between planning and permitting.

    Conclusions

    It is concluded that the current state of municipal wind power planning raises questions regarding the legitimacy of municipal decision-making in terms of perceived justice among local inhabitants and highlights the need for updated wind power plans. Moreover, to promote local acceptance in the future, formalised financial compensation and strategic initiatives that enable the localisation of electricity-intensive industry within municipalities with large-scale wind power production can be two key components. The results also highlight the need for additional support at the municipal level, including access to critical competencies and relevant knowledge to enable trade-offs between the different sustainability considerations in an informed and balanced manner. Finally, regional dialogues with key actors would facilitate the handling of inter-municipal issues, in particular by fostering co-operation regarding inter-municipal wind sites.

  • 180.
    Wretling, Vincent
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Sustainability Assessment and Management.
    Balfors, Berit
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Sustainability Assessment and Management.
    Mörtberg, Ulla
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Sustainability Assessment and Management.
    Balancing wind power deployment and sustainability objectives in Swedish planning and permitting2022In: Energy, Sustainability and Society, E-ISSN 2192-0567, Vol. 12, no 1, article id 48Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Wind power is a critical renewable energy technology in efforts to achieve the global climate targets. However, local impacts do occur, which demands careful consideration in planning and permitting. Sweden has setan ambition to triple land-based wind power by 2040, and municipalities play a key role in both the planning and permitting process, due to a planning monopoly and veto power in the permitting process. This calls for an investigationof Swedish wind power governance, with a particular focus on recent trends in municipal wind power planning, how wind power is balanced in relation to sustainability objectives in planning and permitting, and insights frompractitioners regarding their capacities and drivers.

    Results: The results show that about two-thirds of Swedish municipalities have conducted wind power planning in some form, but this basis for decision-making has become outdated due to a lack of institutional capacity at the municipal level. Secondly, the study finds that many municipalities perceive that there are insufficient incentives for a continued wind power expansion. Lastly, the study sheds light on a large heterogeneity within wind power planning practice concerning how trade-offs between wind power deployment and other sustainability aspects are handled, as well as a lack of coherence between planning and permitting.

    Conclusions: It is concluded that the current state of municipal wind power planning raises questions regarding the legitimacy of municipal decision-making in terms of perceived justice among local inhabitants and highlights the need for updated wind power plans. Moreover, to promote local acceptance in the future, formalised financial compensation and strategic initiatives that enable the localisation of electricity-intensive industry within municipalities with large-scale wind power production can be two key components. The results also highlight the need for additional support at the municipal level, including access to critical competence and relevant knowledge to enable trade-offs between the different sustainability considerations in an informed and balanced manner. Finally, regional dialogue with key actors, such as the military, Sami representatives and grid operators, would facilitate the handling of inter-municipal issues, in particular by fostering co-operation regarding inter-municipal wind sites.

  • 181.
    Wretling, Vincent
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Sustainability Assessment and Management.
    Mörtberg, Ulla
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Sustainability Assessment and Management.
    Manolan Kandy, Deepa
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Sustainability Assessment and Management.
    Balfors, Berit
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Sustainability Assessment and Management.
    Regional planning for wind power2019Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 182.
    Zetterberg, Andreas
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Mörtberg, Ulla
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Balfors, Berit
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Making graph theory operational for landscape ecological assessments, planning, and design2010In: Landscape and Urban Planning, ISSN 0169-2046, E-ISSN 1872-6062, Vol. 95, no 4, p. 181-191Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Graph theory and network analysis have become established as promising ways to efficiently explore and analyze landscape or habitat connectivity. However, little attention has been paid to making these graph-theoretic approaches operational within landscape ecological assessments, planning. and design. In this paper, a set of both theoretical and practical methodological developments are presented to address this issue. In highly fragmented landscapes, many species are restricted to moving among small, scattered patches of different resources. instead of one, large patch. A life-cycle based approach is therefore introduced, in which a metapatch is constructed, spanning over these resources, scattered across the landscape. The importance of spatially explicit and geographically defined representations of the network in urban and regional planning and design is stressed, and appropriate, context-dependent visualizations of these are suggested based on experience from real-world planning cases. The study moves beyond the issue of conservation of currently important structures, and seeks to identify suitable redesigns of the landscape to improve its social-ecological qualities, or increase resilience. By introducing both a system-centric and a site-centric analysis, two conflicting perspectives can be addressed. The first answers the question "what can I do for the network", and the second, "what can the network do for me". A method for typical planning strategies within each of these perspectives is presented. To illustrate the basic principles of the proposed methods, an ecological study on the European common toad (Bufo bufo) in Stockholm. Sweden is presented, using the betweenness centrality index to capture important stepping-stone structures.

  • 183.
    Zetterberg, Andreas
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering, Environmental Management and Assessment.
    Mörtberg, Ulla
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering, Environmental Management and Assessment.
    Bodin, Örjan
    Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm University.
    Saura, Santiago
    Dept. of Forest Management and Economics, E.T.S.I. Montes, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid.
    Sprawl or dense?: Assessing impacts of regional development plans on landscape network connectivityManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The management of landscape connectivity has been identified as one of the most important measures to counteract negative impacts on biodiversity by habitat loss and fragmentation. Such management must be able to cross spatial and temporal administrative and ecological scales. The use of graph-theory and network-based landscape-ecological tools has gained considerable interest as a promising way forward to address these issues. However, despite urgent needs to adapt and implement network-based connectivity analysis in planning, assessment and decision-making, surprisingly little attention has been paid to developing approaches for their effective practical application. In this paper, a large-scale assessment of the Regional Development Plan for the Stockholm Region (RUFS 2010) was carried out, argued to be the first graph-theoretic assessment of landscape connectivity for real proposed planning alternatives. In addition, it is the first time where the analysis of connectivity was an integral part in the planning process. Three planning alternatives were compared with the current situation for four different habitat types and one hundred different dispersal capacities. Three families of network metrics representing different underlying processes were selected, that have previously been shown to capture the variability of a larger set of metrics. The sprawl alternative emerged as having the largest negative impact while the dense alternative had the smallest. However, when comparing the impact with the amount of habitat consumed, the sprawl alternative emerged as being the most efficient in several situations. In order to achieve a better understanding of the underlying processes, a spatial study was carried out. The analysis leads to important insights on the planning of connectivity in an urbanizing region, argued to be applicable within a broad set of urbanizing regions throughout the world.

     

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