Change search
Refine search result
12345 151 - 200 of 245
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 151.
    Finnveden, Göran
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies.
    Toller, Susanna
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies.
    Wadeskog, A
    Miliutenko, S
    Miljöindikatorer för bygg- och fastighetssektorn: 1993-20072011Report (Other academic)
  • 152.
    Finnveden, Göran
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies.
    Tyskeng, Sara
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies.
    Comparison of Energy Use and Environmental Impacts of Recycling and Incineration2008In: Proceedings of Global Waste Management Symposium, 2008Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 153.
    Finnveden, Göran
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies.
    Wadeskog, A
    Ekvall, T
    Engström, R
    Hjelm, O
    Palm, V
    Miljödata för produktgrupper: Använding av Input-Outputanalyser i miljöstrategiska verktyg2007Report (Other academic)
  • 154.
    Finnveden, Göran
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies (moved 20130630).
    Åkerman, Jonas
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies (moved 20130630).
    Lägg Förbifarten i malpåse2009In: Svenska dagbladet, ISSN 1101-2412, no 24-04-09Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 155.
    Finnveden, Göran
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Åkerman, Jonas
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Not planning a sustainable transport system2014In: Environmental impact assessment review, ISSN 0195-9255, E-ISSN 1873-6432, Vol. 46, p. 53-57Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The overall objective of the Swedish transport policy is to ensure the economically efficient and sustainable provision of transport services for people and business throughout the country. More specifically, the transport sector shall, among other things, contribute to the achievement of environmental quality objectives in which the development of the transport system plays an important role in the achievement of the objectives. The aim of this study is to analyse if current transport planning supports this policy. This is done by analysing two recent cases: the National Infrastructure Plan 2010-2021, and the planning of Bypass Stockholm, a major road investment. Our results show that the plans are in conflict with several of the environmental quality objectives. Another interesting aspect of the planning processes is that the long-term climate goals are not included in the planning processes, neither as a clear goal nor as factor that will influence future transport systems. In this way, the longterm sustainability aspects are not present in the planning. We conclude that the two cases do not contribute to a sustainable transport system. Thus, several changes must be made in the processes, including putting up clear targets for emissions. Also, the methodology for the environmental assessments needs to be further developed and discussed.

  • 156.
    Finnveden, Göran
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies.
    Åkerman, Jonas
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies.
    Not planning a sustainable transport system: Swedish case studies2011In: Proceedings of World Renewable Energy Congress 2011, 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The overall objective of the Swedish transport policy is to ensure the economically efficient and sustainable provision of transport services for people and business throughout the country. More specifically the transport sector shall contribute to the achievement of environmental quality objectives where the development of the transport system plays an important role in the achievement of the objectives. The aim of this study is to analyse if current transport planning supports this policy. This is done by analyzing two recent cases: the national infrastructure plan 2010-2021 and the planning of Bypass Stockholm, a major road investment. Our results show that the plans are in conflict with several of the environmental quality objectives. Another interesting aspect of the planning processes is that the long-term climate goals are not included in the planning processes, neither as a clear goal nor as factor which will influence the future transport system. In this way the long-term sustainability aspects are not present in the planning. We conclude that the two cases do not contribute to a sustainable transport system. Thus, several changes must be made in the processes, including putting up clear targets for emissions.

  • 157.
    Finnveden, Göran
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Åkerman, Jonas
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Redovisa hur vi ska klimatmålen, Bildt2013In: Expressen, no 27/4, p. 4-Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    I en artikel i Expressen den 24 mars hyllar Carl Bildt det ökade resandet. Han skriver om dess fördelar. De är vi överens om.

    Det är när han skriver om resandets nackdelar som det blir konstigt.

  • 158.
    Finnveden, Göran
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies.
    Åkerman, Jonas
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies.
    Höjer, Mattias
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies.
    Elbilar gör inte Förbifarten förenlig med klimatmålen2010Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 159.
    Finnveden, Göran
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies (moved 20130630).
    Åkerman, Jonas
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies (moved 20130630).
    Höjer, Mattias
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies (moved 20130630).
    Underkänt till både Maud och Maria2010In: Expressen, ISSN 1103-923X, p. 4-Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 160.
    Finnveden, Göran
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies (moved 20130630).
    Åkermann, Jonas
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies (moved 20130630).
    Bypass Stockholm, the environment and climate: a case study in road planning2009Report (Other academic)
  • 161.
    Finnveden, Göran
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment.
    Åkermann, Jonas
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment.
    Förbifart Stockholm, miljön och klimatet: en fallstudie inom vägplaneringen2009Report (Other academic)
  • 162. Gentil, Emmanuel C.
    et al.
    Damgaard, Anders
    Hauschild, Michael
    Finnveden, Göran
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies.
    Eriksson, Ola
    Thorneloe, Susan
    Kaplan, Pervin Ozge
    Barlaz, Morton
    Muller, Olivier
    Matsui, Yasuhiro
    Ii, Ryota
    Christensen, Thomas H.
    Models for waste life cycle assessment: Review of technical assumptions2010In: Waste Management, ISSN 0956-053X, E-ISSN 1879-2456, Vol. 30, no 12, p. 2636-2648Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A number of waste life cycle assessment (LCA) models have been gradually developed since the early 1990s, in a number of countries, usually independently from each other. Large discrepancies in results have been observed among different waste LCA models, although it has also been shown that results from different LCA studies can be consistent. This paper is an attempt to identify, review and analyse methodologies and technical assumptions used in various parts of selected waste LCA models. Several criteria were identified, which could have significant impacts on the results, such as the functional unit, system boundaries, waste composition and energy modelling. The modelling assumptions of waste management processes, ranging from collection, transportation, intermediate facilities, recycling, thermal treatment, biological treatment, and landfilling, are obviously critical when comparing waste LCA models. This review infers that some of the differences in waste LCA models are inherent to the time they were developed. It is expected that models developed later, benefit from past modelling assumptions and knowledge and issues. Models developed in different countries furthermore rely on geographic specificities that have an impact on the results of waste LCA models. The review concludes that more effort should be employed to harmonise and validate non-geographic assumptions to strengthen waste LCA modelling.

  • 163.
    Glaumann, Mauritz
    et al.
    University of Gävle.
    Malmqvist, Tove
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies.
    Svenfelt, Åsa
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies.
    Carlson, Per-Olof
    Erlandsson, Martin
    Andersson, Johnny
    Wintzell, Helene
    Finnveden, Göran
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies.
    Lindholm, Torbjörn
    Malmström, Tor-Göran
    Miljöklassning av byggnader: Slutrapport2008Report (Other academic)
  • 164.
    Glaumann, Mauritz
    et al.
    University of Gävle.
    Svenfelt, Åsa
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment. KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Malmqvist, Tove
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment.
    Finnveden, Göran
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies (moved 20130630).
    Eriksson, O
    Development of an environmental classification system for buildings through a new kind of dialogue between stakeholders and researchers2006Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 165.
    Glaumann, Mauritz
    et al.
    University of Gävle.
    Svenfelt, Åsa
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies.
    Malmqvist, Tove
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies.
    Finnveden, Göran
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies.
    Eriksson, Ola
    University of Gävle.
    Development of an environmental rating tool for buildings through a new kind of dialogue between stakeholders and researchers2009In: Archnet-IJAR : International Journal of Architectural Research, ISSN 1994-6961, E-ISSN 1938-7806, Vol. 3, no 1, p. 116-130Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Buildings need to be more environmentally benign since the building sector is responsible for about 40% of all of energy and material use in Sweden. For this reason a unique cooperation between companies, municipalities and the Government called “Building-Living and Property Management for the future”, in short “The Building Living Dialogue” has going on since 2003. The project focuses on: a) healthy indoor environment, b) efficient use of energy, and c) efficient resource management. In accordance with the dialogue targets, two research projects were initiated aiming at developing an Environmental rating tool taking into accounts both building sector requirements and expectations and national and interna-tional research findings. This paper describes the first phase in the development work where stake-holders and researchers cooperate. It includes results from inventories and based on this experience discusses procedures for developing assessment tools and what the desirable features of a broadly accepted building rating tool could be.

  • 166.
    Goronovski, Andrei
    et al.
    University of Tartu, Institute of Physics, Ostwaldi 1, 50411 Tartu, Estonia.
    Joyce, Peter James
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Sustainability Assessment and Management.
    Björklund, Anna
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
    Finnveden, Göran
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
    Tkaczyk, Alan H.
    University of Tartu, Institute of Physics, Ostwaldi 1, 50411 Tartu, Estonia.
    Impact assessment of enhanced exposure from Naturally Occurring Radioactive Materials (NORM) within LCA2018In: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 172, p. 2824-2839Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The potential impact of ionising radiation from enhanced exposure to Naturally Occurring Radioactive Materials (NORM) to humans and the environment is not currently accounted for sufficiently in Life Cycle Assessment (LCA). Here we present midpoint and endpoint characterisation factors resulting from the implementation of impact assessment models for human health and ecosystems for NORM exposure. These models build upon existing fate, exposure and effect models from the LCA and radiological literature. The newly developed models are applied to a theoretical study of the utilisation of bauxite residue, a by-product of alumina processing enriched in natural radionuclides, in building materials. The ecosystem models have significant sensitivity to uncertainties surrounding the differential environmental fate of parent and daughter radionuclides that are produced as a part of decay chains, and to assumptions regarding long term releases from landfill sites. However, conservative results for environmental exposure suggest that in addition to landfill of materials, power consumption (burning coal and mining uranium) is a potentially significant source of radiological impact to the environment. From a human perspective, exposure to NORM in the use phase of building materials is the dominant source of impact, with environmental releases of nuclides playing a comparatively minor role. At an endpoint level, the impact of NORM exposure is highly significant in comparison to other impact categories in the area of protection of human health. The dose increase is of an order of magnitude comparable to lifestyle factors. The results highlight the importance within LCA of having sufficient impact assessment models to capture all potential impacts, such that issues of burden shifting between impact measures can be captured, interpreted and resolved in the optimisation of product systems.

  • 167.
    Gunnarsson-Östling, Ulrika
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
    Edvardsson Björnberg, Karin
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, Philosophy.
    Finnveden, Göran
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
    Using the concept of sustainability to work: Interpretations in academia, policy, and planning2013In: Sustainable Stockholm: Exploring Urban Sustainability in Europe's Greenest City / [ed] Jonathan Metzger, Amy Rader Olsson, Taylor & Francis, 2013, p. 51-70Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 168.
    Hakansson, Cecilia
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms). School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Finnveden, Göran
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms). School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Indirect Rebound and Reverse Rebound Effects in the ICT-sector and Emissions of CO22015In: PROCEEDINGS OF ENVIROINFO AND ICT FOR SUSTAINABILITY 2015, 2015, p. 66-73Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It has been suggested that the ICT sector has a large potential of reducing environmental impacts in society through enabling smarter and more efficient solutions. Some of this potential may however be offset by different types of rebound and other indirect effects. There are a number of different types of rebound and other indirect effects that can be relevant. Some of them may lead to positive environmental impacts; others may lead to negative impacts. In this paper we have analysed the indirect rebound effects for the ICT-sector and also what we here call the reverse rebound effect. We have used Environmentally Extended Input-Output Analysis with data for Sweden. The results in this paper indicate that rebound effects can be significant. If efficiency improvements occur in the production of the ICT equipment, there could be a strong rebound effect which would reduce the potential decrease of emissions that could occur without the rebound effect. If on the other hand, efficiency improvements concern the electricity used by the ICT equipment, the rebound effect is expected to be smaller, and real emission reductions could be expected. The total spending on ICT products have increased and this could lead to a reversed rebound effect when less is consumed of other products and services. The results here suggest that this reversed rebound effect could be significant and lead to overall reduced emissions.

  • 169. Hellweg, S.
    et al.
    Doka, G.
    Finnveden, Göran
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment.
    Hungerbuhler, K.
    Assessing the eco-efficiency of end-of-pipe technologies with the environmental cost efficiency indicator - A case study of solid waste management2005In: Journal of Industrial Ecology, ISSN 1088-1980, E-ISSN 1530-9290, Vol. 9, no 4, p. 189-203Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The concept of eco-efficiency is increasingly being applied to judge the combined environmental and economic performance of product systems, processes, and/or companies. Eco-efficiency is often defined as the ratio of economic value added to environmental impact added. This definition is not appropriate for end-of-pipe treatment technologies because these technologies aim at improving the environmental performance of technical processes at the cost of financial expense. Therefore, an indicator for the assessment of end-of-pipe technologies has been proposed. This indicator, called environmental cost efficiency (ECE), is defined as the ratio of net environmental benefits to the difference in costs. ECE is applied to four end-of-pipe technologies for the treatment of municipal solid waste: sanitary landfill, mechanical-biological treatment, modern grate incineration, and a staged thermal process (pyrolysis and gasification). A life-cycle assessment was performed on these processes to quantify the net environmental benefit. Moreover, the approximate net costs (costs minus benefits) were quantified. The results show that, relative to grate incineration, sanitary landfills and mechanical-biological treatment are less costly but environmentally more harmful. We calculated the ECE for all combinations of technologies. The results indicate that the staged thermal process may be the most environmentally cost-efficient alternative to all other treatment technologies in the long run, followed by mechanical-biological treatment and grate incineration.

  • 170.
    Hermansson, Hélène
    et al.
    KTH.
    Finnveden, Göran
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Sustainability Assessment and Management.
    Schneider, André
    Sustainable development in higher education - what sustainability skills do industry need.2018Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 171.
    Hochschorner, Elisabeth
    et al.
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Infrastructure.
    Finnveden, Göran
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Infrastructure.
    Environmental life cycle methods in the acquisition of defence materiel2004Report (Other academic)
  • 172.
    Hochschorner, Elisabeth
    et al.
    KTH, Superseded Departments.
    Finnveden, Göran
    KTH, Superseded Departments.
    Evaluation of two simplified Life Cycle Assessment methods2003In: The International Journal of Life Cycle Assessment, ISSN 0948-3349, E-ISSN 1614-7502, Vol. 8, no 3, p. 119-128Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Goal, Scope and Background. Two methods of simplified LCA were evaluated and compared to the results of a quantitative LCA. These are the Environmentally responsible product assessment matrix developed by Graedel and Allenby and the MECO-method developed in Denmark. Methods. We used these in a case study and compared the results with the results from a quantitative LCA. The evaluation also included other criteria, such as the field of application and the level of arbitrariness. Results and Discussion. The MECO-method has some positive qualities compared to the Environmentally responsible product assessment matrix. Examples of this are that it generates information complementary to the quantitative LCA and provides the possibility to consider quantitative information when such is available. Some of the drawbacks with the Environmentally responsible product assessment matrix are that it does not include the whole lifecycle and that it allows some arbitrariness. Conclusions. Our study shows that a simplified and semi-quantitative LCA (such as the MECO-method) can provide information that is complementary to a quantitative LCA. In this case the method generates more information on toxic substances and other impacts, than the quantitative LCA. We suggest that a simplified LCA can be used both as a pre-study to a quantitative LCA and as a parallel assessment, which is used together with the quantitative LCA in the interpretation. Recommendations and Outlook. A general problem with qualitative analyses is how to compare different aspects. Life cycle assessments are comparative. The lack of a quantitative dimension hinders the comparison and can thereby hinder the usefulness of the qualitative method. There are different approaches suggested to semiquantify simplified methods in order to make quantitative comparisons possible. We think that the use of fabricated scoring systems should be avoided. If quantitative information is needed, one should consider performing a simplified quantitative LCA instead.

  • 173.
    Hochschorner, Elisabeth
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies (moved 20130630).
    Finnveden, Göran
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies (moved 20130630).
    Life Cycle Approach in the procurement process: The case of defence materiel2006In: The International Journal of Life Cycle Assessment, ISSN 0948-3349, E-ISSN 1614-7502, Vol. 11, no 3, p. 200-208Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Goal, Scope and Background. Procurement in public and non-public organisations has the potential to influence product development towards more environmentally friendly products. This article focuses on public procurement with procurement in Swedish defence as a special case. In 2003, public procurement in Sweden was 28% of the GDP. In the Swedish defence sector the amount was 2% of the GDP. The total emissions from the sector were of the same order of magnitude as from waste treatment (2% of Sweden's emissions). According to an appropriation letter from the Ministry of Defence in 1998, the Swedish Armed Forces (SAF) and the Swedish Defence Materiel Administration (FMV) are required to take environmental issues into consideration during the entire process of acquiring defence materiel. Environmental aspects are considered today, but without a life-cycle perspective. The aims of this article are to recommend suitable tools for taking environmental concerns into account, considering a product's life-cycle, in the procurement process for defence materiel in Sweden; to make suggestions for how these tools could be used in the acquisition process; and to evaluate these suggestions through interviews with actors in the acquisition process. The procurement process does not include aspects specific to Swedish defence, and it is therefore likely to be comparable to processes in other countries. Methods. The method involved a study of current literature and interviews with various actors in the acquisition process. The life cycle methods considered were quantitative Life Cycle Assessments, a simplified LCA-method called the MECO method and Life Cycle Costing (LCC). Results and Discussion. Methodology recommendations for quantitative LCA and simplified LCA are presented in the article, as well as suggestions on how to integrate LCA methods in the acquisition process. We identified four areas for use for LCA in the acquisition process: to learn about environmental aspects of the product; to fulfil requirements from customers; to set environmental requirements and to choose between alternatives. Therefore, tools such as LCAs are useful in several steps in the acquisition process. Conclusion. From the interviews, it became clear that the actors in the acquisition process think that environmental aspects should be included early in the process. The actors are interested in using LCA methods, but there is a need for an initiative from one or several of them if the method is to be used regularly in the process. Environmental and acquisition issues are handled with very little interaction in the controlling and ordering organisation. An integration of environmental and acquisition parts in these organisations is probably needed in order to integrate environmental aspects in general and life-cycle thinking in particular. Other difficulties identified are costs and time constraints. Recommendation and Perspective. In order to include the most significant aspects when procuring materiel, it is important to consider the whole life-cycle of the products. Our major recommendation is that the defence sector should work systematically through different product groups. For each product group, quantitative, traditional LCAs or simplified LCAs (in this case modified MECOs) should be performed for reference products within each product group. The results should be an identification of critical aspects in the life-cycles of the products. The studies will also form a database that can be used when making new LCAs. This knowledge should then be used when writing specifications of what to procure and setting criteria for procurement. The reports should be publicly available to allow reviews and discussions of results. To make the work more cost-effective, international co-operation should be sought. In addition, LCAs can also be performed as an integrated part of the acquisition process in specific cases.

  • 174.
    Hochschorner, Elisabeth
    et al.
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Chemical Engineering and Technology.
    Finnveden, Göran
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Chemical Engineering and Technology.
    Life Cycle Methodology in theacquisition process of Defence MaterielManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 175.
    Hochschorner, Elisabeth
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies (moved 20130630).
    Hägvall, Joakim
    Finnveden, Göran
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies (moved 20130630).
    Griffing, Evan
    Overcash, Michael
    Environmental Life Cycle Assessment of a pre- fragmented high explosive grenade2006In: Journal of chemical technology and biotechnology (1986), ISSN 0268-2575, E-ISSN 1097-4660, Vol. 81, no 3, p. 461-475Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Organisations today face increasing environmental constraints, e.g. in the form of legal and customer requirements; the defence sector is no exception. There is a need to evaluate and limit environmental effects of defence activities and materiel. In this study we used quantitative Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) and a method for simplified LCA (the Material, Energy, Chemicals and Others (MECO) method) to assess the environmental impacts of a grenade. The aims of the study are to identify aspects in the grenade's life-cycle that have the largest environmental impact, suggest improvement possibilities, make a comparison between different approaches for waste management of munitions, and to perform a demonstrative case for the application of LCA to munitions. Significant environmental aspects of the grenade's life-cycle include use of metals, use of fossil fuels, and detonation outdoors. The study shows that an LCA can be used to analyse environmental impacts from munitions. The simplified LCA gave information that is complementary to the quantitative LCA.

  • 176.
    Hochschorner, Elisabeth
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies.
    Hägvall, Joakim
    FOI, Swedish Defence Research Agency. .
    Roth, Liselott
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies.
    Tryman, Rolf
    FOI, Swedish Defence Research Agency. .
    Finnveden, Göran
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies.
    Reference report on the use of environmental life cycle methodologies in procurement in the Swedish defence2006Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 177.
    Hägvall, Joakim
    et al.
    FOI, Swedish Defence Research Agency..
    Hochschorner, Elisabeth
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Infrastructure.
    Finnveden G, Göran
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Infrastructure.
    Overcash, Michael
    Dep of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, North Carolina State Univeristy, USA.
    Griffing, Evan
    Dep of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, North Carolina State Univeristy, USA.
    Life Cycle Assessment of a PFHE Shell Grenade2004Report (Refereed)
  • 178.
    Höijer, Mattias
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Finnveden, Göran
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Vi måste våga diskutera flygets klimatpåverkan2015In: Dagens nyheter, ISSN 1101-2447, no 2015-12-18Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 179.
    Höjer, Mattias
    et al.
    School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC. KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Ahlroth, Sofia
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies (moved 20130630).
    Dreborg, Karl-Henrik
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies (moved 20130630).
    Ekvall, Tomas
    Finnveden, Göran
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies (moved 20130630).
    Hjelm, Olof
    Hochschorner, Elisabeth
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies (moved 20130630).
    Nilsson, Måns
    Stockholm Environment Institute.
    Palm, Viveka
    Scenarios in selected tools for environmental systems analysis2008In: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 16, no 18, p. 1958-1970Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A number of different tools for analysing environmental impacts of different systems have been developed. These include procedural tools such as strategic environmental assessment (SEA) and environmental management systems (EMS) as well as analytical ones such as life cycle assessment (LCA), life cycle costing (LCC), cost-benefit analysis (CBA) and the system of economic and environmental accounts (SEEA) including input-output analysis (IOA). Descriptions or scenarios of the future are typically relevant elements in these tools, since they are often used to describe impacts in the future. For futures studies a number of different approaches and techniques have been developed. In an earlier paper we have presented a typology of different types of scenarios that respond to different types of questions. These include predictive scenarios, explorative scenarios and normative scenarios. The aim of this paper is to explore connections between selected tools for environmental systems analysis and different scenario types. Although there is a clear need for futures studies in several tools for environmental systems analysis, it is interesting to note that the literature on methodologies for and case studies of combinations of futures studies and environmental systems analysis tools is rather limited. This suggests that there is a need for further research in this area including both methodoloy and practical case studies.

  • 180.
    Isacs, Lina
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Finnveden, Göran
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Dahllöf, Lisbeth
    Håkansson, Cecilia
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Petersson, Linnea
    Steen, Bengt
    Swanström, Lennart
    Wikström, Anna
    Choosing a monetary value of greenhouse gases in assessment tools2016In: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is a societal need for using monetary estimates of social impacts of CO2 and other greenhouse gases in different assessment tools, such as cost-benefit analysis and life-cycle assessment. A number of estimates are available in the literature. Since these differ by several orders of magnitude, there is ambiguity and confusion about which to use. This review aims to give some guidance on this issue. The variation in carbon value estimates depends on several uncertain aspects – which will remain uncertain – including climate sensitivity, assumptions about future emissions, and decision makers' ethical standpoints. Hence, there is no single correct monetary value for CO2: it will depend on the ethical standpoint of the user. Due to this, estimates of social costs of CO2 emissions cannot be used for calculating an optimal emission level, although they can inform such assessments. It is suggested that marginal abatement cost values are used for emissions capped by binding targets in short-term assessments, and that social cost of carbon values should be used for all other emissions. Benchmark principles for choosing a monetary carbon value are suggested along with associated estimates. Depending on the choices made with regard to ethical standpoints and assumptions about future emissions and climate sensitivity, estimates can be significantly higher than the ones typically used in assessment tools today. The estimates need continuous updating, and there is need for better understanding and communication around the limitations and uncertainties involved.

  • 181.
    Isacs, Lina
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Finnveden, Göran
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Palander, Sara
    Chalmers University of Technology.
    Steen, Bengt
    Chalmers University of Technology.
    Widerberg, Anna
    SP Technical Research Institute of Sweden.
    Wikström, Anna
    Chalmers University of Technology.
    Ingen vet kostnaden för utsläpp2014In: Dagens industri, ISSN 0346-640XArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 182. Johansson, Jessica
    et al.
    Jonsson, Daniel K.
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Infrastructure.
    Eriksson, N. Björn
    Finnveden, Göran
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Infrastructure.
    Strategisk miljöbedömning i Försvarsdepartementets beslutsprocesser2004Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 183.
    Johansson, Jessica
    et al.
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Infrastructure.
    Nilsson, Måns
    Finnveden, Göran
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Infrastructure.
    Strategisk miljöbedömning inom energisektorn2004Report (Other academic)
  • 184.
    Jonsson, Daniel K.
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies.
    Finnveden, Göran
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies.
    Lundqvist, L
    Bedömning av inverkan på transporter och energi i Statens offentliga utredningar: Analys av några SOU:er och förslag på metodik för att underlätta framtida miljöbedömning2006Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Ny eller förändrad policy som i första hand fokuserar på politikområden som inteprimärt berör transport- och energiområdet kan ändå ha långtgående konsekvenserför trafikutvecklingen och konsumtionen av el och värme. Det finns därför ett behovav att i utredningssammanhang bedöma dessa effekter.Denna rapport inleds med en översiktlig granskning med fokus på transport- ochenergieffekter av sex SOU:er. Därefter redovisas ett förslag till metodik för attbedöma sådana effekter i framtida utredningar, vilket är rapportens huvudsakligaresultat. Där ingår t.ex. tumregler och schabloner som kan användas vid bedömningarna.Metodiken är på olika sätt förknippad med miljöbedömningar av planeroch program. Vi har valt att dela upp metodiken enligt följande:• Grov bedömning – departementets perspektiv.• Övergripande bedömning – utredningskommitténs perspektiv.• Detaljerad bedömning – experternas perspektiv.Metodiken syftar till att utreda transport- och energieffekter i SOU:er men kan iförlängningen också vara till hjälp när man undersöker hur ett specifikt politisktmål kan uppnås utan att samtidigt generera fler transporter eller öka energianvändningen.Det handlar således inte bara om att bedöma konsekvenser på transportochenergiområdet av ett politiskt förslag utan också om att identifiera de bakomliggandeorsakerna till konsekvenserna och därigenom synliggöra olika sätt attundvika eller mildra dessa.

  • 185.
    Jonsson, Daniel K.
    et al.
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Civil and Environmental Engineering.
    Johansson, J
    Eriksson, N.B
    Finnveden, Göran
    Försvarsanpassad strategisk miljöbedömning: En fallstudie av planeringen inför 2004 års försvarsbeslut2004Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 186.
    Joyce, Peter James
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Sustainability Assessment and Management.
    Finnveden, Göran
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
    Håkansson, Cecilia
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Water and Environmental Engineering.
    Wood, Richard
    Norwegian Univ Sci & Technol, Dept Energy & Proc Engn, N-7491 Trondheim, Norway..
    A multi-impact analysis of changing ICT consumption patterns for Sweden and the EU: Indirect rebound effects and evidence of decoupling2019In: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 211, p. 1154-1161Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Information and Communication Technology (ICT) is one of the major areas of growth in consumption seen over the last two decades. The falling prices of ICT and increasing energy efficiency of ICT may lead to reduced spending on ICT and electricity in the future. However, lower spending in one area can trigger higher spending elsewhere, leading to 'rebound effects' which can reduce or even cancel out the environmental benefits associated with lower consumption of a given product or service, and reducing the efficacy of environmental policy. In this study we use Multi-Regional Input Output analysis to investigate trends in the consumption of, and environmental and social impacts associated with la products in Sweden and the EU. We find that ICT spending is linked to prosperity, with a clear fall as a result of the 2008 financial crisis, but a recovery since. There is some evidence that the environmental impact associated with ICE has begun to decouple from consumption in Sweden, but not at an EU level. Environmental rebound effects associated with reduced ICT consumption are strong close to, and in most cases far above 100% (so called backfire effects). This backfire effect is strongest for energy use and total material footprint, which are both close to 200% in Sweden. This means that an increased spending on ICE products and services while keeping the overall consumption level constant, would decrease environmental impacts. Environmental rebound effects are much lower for reduced energy spending (as low as 2 percent), particularly at an EU level. Rebound effects in social indicators are assessed for the first time for 10' products. We find that value added in the EU is relatively insensitive to changes in spending patterns related to ICT and energy (rebound effects similar to 100%), however rebound effects in employment are seen, particularly resulting from decreased energy spending. At an EU level, reallocation of spending resulting from lower energy consumption results in a net increase in employment, while in Sweden the reverse is true. We conclude that policies focused on reducing energy spending are likely to have a greater overall environmental effect than measures which result in reduced consumer spending on ICT. However, in light of the conflicting social rebound effects at an EU and Swedish level, the importance of understanding the broader consequences of policy decision across a broad range of measures in advance of their implementation is once again highlighted.

  • 187.
    Kabisch, Sigrun
    et al.
    UFZ Helmholtz Ctr Environm Res, Dept Urban & Environm Sociol, D-04318 Leipzig, Germany..
    Finnveden, Göran
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
    Kratochvil, Petr
    Acad Sci Czech Republ, Inst Art Hist, Prague 11000 1, Czech Republic..
    Sendi, Richard
    Urban Planning Inst Slovenia, Ljubljana 1000, Slovenia..
    Smagacz-Poziemska, Marta
    Jagiellonian Univ, Inst Sociol, PL-31110 Krakow, Poland..
    Matos, Rafaela
    LNEC, Natl Civil Engn Lab, Hydraul & Environm Dept, P-1700606 Lisbon, Portugal..
    Bylund, Jonas
    IQS IQ Samhallsbyggnad, S-11151 Stockholm, Sweden..
    New Urban Transitions towards Sustainability: Addressing SDG Challenges (Research and Implementation Tasks and Topics from the Perspective of the Scientific Advisory Board (SAB) of the Joint Programming Initiative (JPI) Urban Europe)2019In: Sustainability, ISSN 2071-1050, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 11, no 8, article id 2242Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The paper presents the requirements and challenges of urban transitions towards sustainability from the perspective of the SAB of the JPI Urban Europe. Critical reflections on the achievements and identification of gaps in the activities of JPI Urban Europe, based on the Strategic Research and Innovation Agenda SRIA (2015-2020), reveal advanced research questions, tasks, and approaches that influenced the development process of the SRIA 2.0 (released in February 2019). The authors emphasize the dilemma approach, the local context and the co-creation concept to pursue urban transitions in real-world context. Considering this frame, they propose specific domains for further research on urban transitions.

  • 188.
    Karlsson, Sigbritt
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Bengtsson, Stefan
    Finnveden, Göran
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Sustainability Assessment and Management.
    Hörstedt, Fredrik
    Höjer, Mattias
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Strategic Sustainability Studies.
    EU:s utsläppshandel otillräckligt för flyget.2018In: Dagens NyheterArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 189.
    Karlsson, Sigbritt
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Bengtsson, Stefan
    Finnveden, Göran
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Sustainability Assessment and Management.
    Hörstedt, Fredrik
    Höjer, Mattias
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Strategic Sustainability Studies.
    Hyfs och kunskap krävs i debatten om flyg och klimat.2018In: Dagens NyheterArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 190.
    Karlsson, Sigbritt
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Finnveden, Göran
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Sustainability Assessment and Management.
    KTH måste göra mer för klimatomställningen.2018In: Dagens NyheterArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 191.
    Kramers, Anna
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies (moved 20130630). School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Wangel, Josefin
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies (moved 20130630). School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Johansson, Stefan
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Ecology (moved 20130630). School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Höjer, Mattias
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies (moved 20130630). School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Finnveden, Göran
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies (moved 20130630). School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Brandt, Nils
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Ecology (moved 20130630). School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Elusive targets: Methodological considerations for cities' climate targetsManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Cities’ climate targets are dependent on system boundaries and methods of calculations. This article identify, explore and present an overview of methodological considerations of importance in order to facilitate understanding, comparing and setting targets for green house gas emissions and energy use in cities. A survey on how eight European cities set their climate targets is presented. A framework of methodological considerations that are of importance when setting targets for cities is presented. A review of existing GHG accounting protocols, three major sustainable city frameworks and a selection of scientific papers reporting on accounting methodologies was used as a basis for developing the methodological considerations. Four main categories were identified, temporal scope, object for target setting, unit of target, and range of target. For each category there is an in-depth discussion of them in relation to targets for cities. The survey of the European cities showed that there is quite a little awareness of what is, or could be, included in the targets. This makes comparison and benchmarking almost impossible today. It also shows the need for comprehensive and consistent accounting protocols and methodologies.

  • 192.
    Kramers, Anna
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms). School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Wangel, Josefin
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms). School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Johansson, Stefan
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Industrial Ecology. School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Höjer, Mattias
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms). School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Finnveden, Göran
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms). School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Brandt, Nils
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Industrial Ecology. School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Towards a comprehensive system of methodological considerations for cities' climate targets2013In: Energy Policy, ISSN 0301-4215, E-ISSN 1873-6777, Vol. 62, p. 1276-1287Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Climate targets for cities abound. However, what these targets really imply is dependent on a number of decisions regarding system boundaries and methods of calculation. In order to understand and compare cities' climate targets, there is a need for a generic and comprehensive framework of key methodological considerations. This paper identifies eight key methodological considerations for the different choices that can be made when setting targets for GHG emissions in a city and arranges them in four categories: temporal scope of target, object for target setting, unit of target, and range of target. To explore how target setting is carried out in practice, the climate targets of eight European cities were analysed. The results showed that these targets cover only a limited part of what could be included. Moreover, the cities showed quite limited awareness of what is, or could be, include in the targets. This makes comparison and benchmarking between cities difficult.

  • 193.
    Larsdotter, Karin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
    Finnveden, Göran
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Sustainability Assessment and Management.
    Creating change with seed funding.2018Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 194.
    Lazarevic, David
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Finnveden, Göran
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms). KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Life cycle aspects of nanomaterials2013Report (Other academic)
  • 195.
    Liljenström, Carolina
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Finnveden, Göran
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Data for separate collection and recycling of dry recyclable materials2015Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this report is to present environmental and economic data for some collection and recycling processes in Sweden. The data can be used in Life Cycle Assessment and Life Cycle Costing analysis as well as other tools for assessing environmental and economic impacts of different waste management systems and strategies. The report provides data on kerbside collection of plastic and metal packaging, and beverage cartons in Sweden. For each material fraction the source segregation efficiency and quality of the separated waste streams is presented, followed by data on the processes collection at the kerbside, handling at transfer and sorting stations, and primary reprocessing at the recycling plant. The waste streams are followed to the point in which the secondary material can replace virgin materials.

    For each process the following data is included (as relevant for each process): electricity, heat and fuel use, generation of waste and by products, transportation work, material input per tonne material output, process related CO2-emissions, and economic costs. The chapters that cover reprocessing at the recycling plants also include a discussion on which materials that can be replaced by waste, by-products, and the secondary material.

  • 196.
    Liljenström, Carolina
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Lazarevic, David
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Finnveden, Göran
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms). KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Silicon-based nanomaterials in a life-cycle perspective, including a case study on self-cleaning coatings2013Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Trafikverket or Trafikverket’s contractors are considering the use of several products that in some way have to do with nanotechnology for sealing and impregnating various types of surfaces, for example road safety cameras. It has been noted that the potential health and environmental risks of nanomaterials should be evaluated over their entire life cycle. Further to previous risk assessments made on the nano-products considered by Trafikverket, it is therefore relevant to analyse the product’s impacts from a life cycle perspective.

    The aims of this project are to (i) Provide a state-of-the-art background on the types, production processes, uses and current debates on the classification, and human and eco-toxicity of nano-silica and silane based nanofilms, (ii) To analyse if there are any arguments, from an environmental perspective, for the application of self-cleaning coatings to speed cameras compared to conventional practice, (iii) To qualitatively discuss the potential importance of nanoparticle emissions from self-cleaning coatings in the context of other sources of nanoparticle emissions.

    A life cycle assessment is performed for maintenance of road safety cameras in Sweden in a business as usual (BAU) scenario and in a scenario where the cameras have been coated with a self-cleaning silane based nanofilm (Nano ProHard). The functional unit is the maintenance of road safety cameras in Sweden to allow for an acceptable speed camera picture quality over one year. The life cycle impact assessment methods ReCiPe Midpoint (Hierarchist) and Cumulative Energy Demand have been used. All life cycle phases from extraction of raw materials to end-of-life have been included. Inventory data is gathered from Ecoinvent 2.2. The detergent used in the business as usual scenario is approximated with the Ecoinvent process "Soap, at plant/RER S" and the alkoxysilanes in NanoProHard with "Tetrachlorosilane, at plant/GLO S".

    Results show that the biggest impacts in the BAU-scenario are related to operation of vehicles for inspection of the road safety cameras in the maintenance phase, and to the production of soap. The biggest impacts in the Nano-scenario are related to operation of vehicles in the maintenance phase, and to production of soap, Nano ProHard Clean and Nano ProHard, mainly due to the ethanol in the product. Comparing the two scenarios (excluding operation of vehicles in the maintenance phase) it was seen that BAU had a bigger contribution than Nano in all impact categories except for fossil depletion, due to use of ethanol in the Nano-scenario. However, a sensitivity analysis revealed that this may not always be the case. It should also be noted that the toxicity in the use phase has not been assessed.

    In cases where very little detergent is used for cleaning, for example in those cases where only water is used in the BAU-scenario, it may not be beneficial to use a nanofilm. However, in case the road safety cameras are usually washed very often, and/or with big amounts of detergent, use of nanofilm could have lower GHG-emissions than maintenance in BAU-scenario. However, it can again be emphasised that the toxicity of the products in the use phase has not been assessed, and that this is an aspect that must also be considered when concluding on which maintenance regime to choose. It must also be noted that soap is not the commonly used detergent in maintenance, and that results could vary significantly depending on detergent used.

    It can be concluded that there are no clear environmental benefits if Trafikverket were to apply self-cleaning coatings to their road safety cameras, compared to conventional practice. The main source of impacts from maintenance of the road safety cameras is vehicle operation and this cannot be reduced by application of a nanofilm due to the current requirement of inspecting the cameras once per week. Considering the lack of knowledge on the product, and the possible toxicity of its components, it is not recommended that the product is used without further investigations into the type of chemicals used.

  • 197.
    Limén, Helene
    et al.
    KTH.
    Sandberg, Teresia
    KTH.
    Finnveden, Göran
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Westin, Birgitta
    KTH.
    ISCN-GULF Sustainable Campus Charter Report 20122012Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 198.
    Limén, Helene
    et al.
    KTH.
    Sandberg, Teresia
    KTH.
    Finnveden, Göran
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Westin, Birgitta
    KTH.
    ISCN-GULF Sustainable Campus Charter Report 20132014Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 199. Ljunggren Söderman, Maria
    et al.
    Eriksson, Ola
    Björklund, Anna
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
    Östblom, Göran
    Ekvall, Tomas
    Finnveden, Göran
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
    Arushanyan, Yevgeniya
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
    Sundqvist, Jan-Olov
    Integrated Economic and Environmental Assessment of Waste Policy Instruments2016In: Sustainability, ISSN 2071-1050, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 8, no 5, article id 411Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The need for new policy instruments supporting the on-going transition from end-of-pipe waste treatment to resource management has been recognized in European policy. Instruments need to be carefully assessed before implementation to promote the desired changes and avoid problem shifting. Mathematical models may assist policy makers in such assessments. This paper presents a set of soft-linked models for assessing the economic and environmental impacts of policy instruments for both the prevention and management of waste and discusses its strengths and limitations. Consisting of (1) a macro-economic model, (2) a systems engineering model for waste management and (3) a life cycle assessment model for waste management, the set is primarily suited to assessing market-based instruments and environmental regulations. Considerable resources were needed for developing and using the set, and there are clear limits as to what can be addressed. However, if only one of the models had been used, neither the range of instruments nor the scope of impacts would have been possible to cover. Furthermore, soft-linked models allow many disciplines to contribute within one harmonized framework. Such integrated assessments may become increasingly useful for continuing the implementation of policy for sustainable governance of society's material resources.

  • 200. Malmaeus, Mikael
    et al.
    Finnveden, Göran
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Sustainability Assessment and Management.
    Sundkvist, Åsa
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Strategic Sustainability Studies.
    Bradley, Karin
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Calmer, Åsa
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Fauré, Eléonore
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Strategic Sustainability Studies.
    Fuehrer, Paul
    Hagbert, Pernilla
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Hornborg, Alf
    Isaksson, Karolina
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Malmqvist, Tove
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Sustainability Assessment and Management.
    Nyblom, Åsa
    Skånberg, Kristian
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Strategic Sustainability Studies.
    Ölund, Erika
    Riskabelt att tro att tillväxt ska lösa våra problem.2018In: Svenska Dagbladet, article id 28 novemberArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
12345 151 - 200 of 245
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf