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  • 151. Song, Han
    et al.
    Dotzauer, Erik
    Thorin, Eva
    Yan, Jinyue
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemical Engineering and Technology, Energy Processes.
    Techno-economic analysis of an integrated biorefinery system for poly-generation of power, heat, pellet and bioethanol2014In: International journal of energy research (Print), ISSN 0363-907X, E-ISSN 1099-114X, Vol. 38, no 5, p. 551-563Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Bioethanol is an alternative to fossil fuels in the transportation sector. The use of pellet for heating is also an efficient way to mitigate greenhouse gas emissions. This paper evaluates the techno-economic performance of a biorefinery system in which an existing combined heat and power (CHP) plant is integrated with the production of bioethanol and pellet using straw as feedstock. A two-stage acid hydrolysis process is used for bioethanol production, and two different drying technologies are applied to dry hydrolysis solid residues. A sensitivity analysis is performed on critical parameters such as the bioethanol selling price and feedstock price. The bioethanol production cost is also calculated for two cases with either 10 year or 15 year payback times. The results show that the second case is currently a more feasible economic configuration and reduces production costs by 36.4%-77.3% compared to other types of poly-generation plants that are not integrated into existing CHP plants.

  • 152. Song, Han
    et al.
    Starfelt, Fredrik
    Daianova, Lilia
    Yan, Jinyue
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemical Engineering and Technology, Energy Processes.
    Influence of drying process on the biomass-based polygeneration system of bioethanol, power and heat2012In: Applied Energy, ISSN 0306-2619, E-ISSN 1872-9118, Vol. 90, no 1, p. 32-37Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    One of the by-products from bioethanol production using woody materials is lignin solids, which can be utilized as feedstock for combined heat and power (CHP) production. In this paper, the influence of integrating a drying process into a biomass-based polygeneration system is studied, where the exhaust flue gas is used to dry the lignin solids instead of direct condensation in the flue gas condenser (FGC). The evaporated water vapor from the lignin solids is mixed with the drying medium for consequent condensation. Thus, the exhaust flue gas after the drying still has enough humidity to produce roughly the same amount of condensation heat as direct condensation in the existing configuration. The influence of a drying process and how it interacts with the FGC in CHP production as a part of the polygeneration system is analyzed and evaluated. If a drying process is integrated with the polygeneration system, overall energy efficiency is only increased by 3.1% for CHP plant, though the power output can be increased by 5.5% compared with the simulated system using only FGC.

  • 153. Song, Han
    et al.
    Thorin, Eva
    Dotzauer, Erik
    Nordlander, Eva
    Yan, Jinyue
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemical Engineering and Technology, Energy Processes.
    Modeling and optimization of a regional waste-to-energy system: A case study in central Sweden2013In: Waste Management, ISSN 0956-053X, E-ISSN 1879-2456, Vol. 33, no 5, p. 1315-1316Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 154. Starfelt, F.
    et al.
    Thorin, E.
    Dotzauer, E.
    Yan, Jinyue
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemical Engineering and Technology, Energy Processes.
    Performance evaluation of adding ethanol production into an existing combined heat and power plant2010In: Bioresource Technology, ISSN 0960-8524, E-ISSN 1873-2976, Vol. 101, no 2, p. 613-618Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, the configuration and performance of a polygeneration system are studied by modelling the integration of a lignocellulosic wood-to-ethanol process with an existing combined heat and power (CHP) plant. Data from actual plants are applied to validate the simulation models. The integrated polygeneration system reaches a total efficiency of 50%, meeting the heating load in the district heating system. Excess heat from the ethanol production plant supplies 7.9 MW to the district heating system, accounting for 17.5% of the heat supply at full heating load. The simulation results show that the production of ethanol from woody biomass is more efficient when integrated with a CHP plant compared to a stand-alone production plant. The total biomass consumption is reduced by 13.9% while producing the same amounts of heat, electricity and ethanol fuel as in the stand-alone configurations. The results showed that another feature of the integrated polygeneration system is the longer annual operating period compared to existing cogeneration. Thus, the renewable electricity production is increased by 2.7% per year.

  • 155. Starfelt, Fredrik
    et al.
    Yan, Jinyue
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemical Engineering and Technology, Energy Processes.
    Case study of energy systems with gas turbine cogeneration technology for an eco-industrial park2008In: International journal of energy research (Print), ISSN 0363-907X, E-ISSN 1099-114X, Vol. 32, no 12, p. 1128-1135Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Eco-industrial parks (EIP) are clusters of industry corporations that collaborate with reusing waste and energy-efficient use of resources with no or minor impact on the environment. This paper presents a case study that examines the feasibility of using gas turbine technology in one industrial park, located in the Dongguan city of the Guangdong province in China. A model of a gas turbine-based combined heat and power (CHP) plant with a heat recovery steam generator for absorption cooling was developed and simulated. A steam-injected gas turbine has been selected in the system to increase electricity production and to generate steam. The study includes performance analysis of the cogeneration plant in terms of thermal efficiency, cost estimation, and greenhouse gas emission. The gas turbine-based cogeneration system has been compared with a baseline reference case that is defined as if all the energy to the industrial park is supplied from the local electricity grid. The results show that the gas turbine-based cogeneration system can reach a total efficiency of 58% and reduce CO, emissions with 12 700 tons per year. A sensitivity analysis on the costs of the system has also been made based on fuel costs and the interest rate, which shows that the investigated system is economically profitable at natural gas prices below 4.4 RMB m(-3) with fixed electricity prices and at electricity prices above 736 RMB MWh(-1) with fixed natural gas prices. The sensitivity analysis based on the interest rate showed that the proposed system is economically feasible with interest rates up to 16%.

  • 156. Stigson, Peter
    et al.
    Dotzauer, Erik
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES).
    Yan, Jinyue
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemical Engineering and Technology.
    Climate And Energy Policy Evaluation In Terms Of Relative Industrial Performance And Competitiveness2009In: International Journal of Green Energy, ISSN 1543-5075, E-ISSN 1543-5083, Vol. 6, no 5, p. 450-465Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Due to differences in greenhouse-gas abatement costs within the industrial sectors, there is an ongoing discussion on potential negative competitive effects of climate and energy policies. This article argues that policymakers must acknowledge the relative performance of industrial operations parallel to the competitors, the compulsoriness of policies, and the harmonization of policies accordingly. To this end, the authors suggest a tool aimed for robust participatory policy evaluations at decision-maker levels. The tool promotes policy learning, transparency, and consensus building, hence contributing to more effective and efficient policy design and management process. The tool is exemplified in a Swedish context.

  • 157. Stigson, Peter
    et al.
    Dotzauer, Erik
    Yan, Jinyue
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemical Engineering and Technology, Energy Processes.
    Improving policy making through government-industry policy learning: The case of a novel Swedish policy framework2009In: Applied Energy, ISSN 0306-2619, E-ISSN 1872-9118, Vol. 86, no 4, p. 399-406Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Climate change poses an unprecedented challenge for policy makers. This paper analyzes how industry sector policy expertise can contribute to improved policy making processes. Previous research has identified that policy making benefit by including non-governmental policy analysts in learning processes. Recent climate and energy policy developments, including amendments and the introduction of new initiatives, have rendered current policy regimes as novel to both governments and the industry. This increases business investment risk perceptions and may thus reduce the effectiveness and efficiency of the policy framework. In order to explore how government-industry policy learning can improve policy making in this context, this article studied the Swedish case. A literature survey analyzed how policy learning had been previously addressed, identifying that the current situation regarding novel policies had been overlooked. Interviews provided how industrial actors view Swedish policy implementation processes and participatory aspects thereof. The authors conclude that an increased involvement of the industry sector in policy design and management processes can be an important measure to improve the effectiveness and efficiency of climate and energy policies.

  • 158. Stigson, Peter
    et al.
    Dotzauer, Erik
    Yan, Jinyue
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemical Engineering and Technology, Energy Processes.
    Negotiated Agreements as a vehicle for Policy Learning2010In: INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF GLOBAL WARMING, ISSN 1758-2083, Vol. 2, no 2, p. 97-117Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The paper evaluates to which extent that different designs of Voluntary Agreements (VAs) can work as catalysts for Policy Learning (PL) and thus contribute to improved policy design and management processes. Through a literature study, it is found that VAs in the form of Negotiated Agreements (NAs) are more successful in promoting PL than other types of VAs that have less focus on the participatory aspect of the policy processes. The paper contributes to the existing VA policy literature through highlighting the predominately overseen learning values of implementing NA as well as providing policy recommendations on VA learning processes.

  • 159. Tan, S.
    et al.
    Hashim, H.
    Lee, C.
    Taib, M. R.
    Yan, Jinyue
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemical Engineering and Technology, Energy Processes.
    Economical and environmental impact of waste-T o-energy (WTE) alternatives for waste incineration, landfill and anaerobic digestion2014In: Energy Procedia, 2014, p. 704-708Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper aims to evaluate the economical and environmental impact of waste incineration, landfill gas recovery system (LFGRS), and anaerobic digestion (AD) for municipal solid waste (MSW) management in Malaysia and subsequently assess the potential of each technology for energy uses and carbon reduction. An existing landfill, Taman Beringin, in Malaysia is selected as the case study, which is one of the largest national sites for waste management. The results present that incineration is the most economical profitable and climate-friendly WTE alternative as compared to an conventional landfill. With the production of 1430 MWh/d of heat and 480 MWh/d of electricity from 1000 t/d of MSW input, waste incineration is able to reach 287% of profit increment or 450 TUSD/d and 2250 tCO2/d of carbon avoidance by fossil fuel replacement as compared to baseline.

  • 160. Tan, S.
    et al.
    Yang, Jin
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemical Engineering and Technology, Energy Processes. China University of Geoscience, China.
    Yan, Jinyue
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemical Engineering and Technology, Energy Processes. Mälardalen University.
    Lee, C.
    Hashim, H.
    Chen, B.
    A holistic low carbon city indicator framework for sustainable development2016In: Applied Energy, ISSN 0306-2619, E-ISSN 1872-9118Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many cities are pursuing the low-carbon practices to reduce CO2 and other environmental emissions. However, it is still unclear which aspects a low-carbon city (LCC) covers and how to quantify and certify its low carbon level. In this paper, an indicator framework for the evaluation of LCC was established from the perspectives of Economic, Energy pattern, Social and Living, Carbon and Environment, Urban mobility, Solid waste, and Water. A comprehensive evaluation method was employed for LCC ranking by using the entropy weighting factor method. The benchmark values for LCC certification were also identified. The framework was applied to 10 global cities to rank their low-carbon levels. The comparison of cities at different levels of economic, social, and environmental development enhances the holistic of the study. The results showed that Stockholm, Vancouver, and Sydney ranked higher than the benchmark value, indicating these cities achieved a high level of low-carbon development. São Paulo, London, and Mexico City are still in the slow transition towards LCC. Beijing and New York each has much lower LCC level than the benchmark value due to the poor environmental performance and infrastructure supports caused by intensive human activities. The proposed indicator system serves as a guideline for the standardization of LCC and further identifies the key aspects of low-carbon management for different cities.

  • 161. Tan, Sie Ting
    et al.
    Hashim, Haslenda
    Lim, Jeng Shiun
    Ho, Wai Shin
    Lee, Chew Tin
    Yan, Jinyue
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemical Engineering and Technology, Energy Processes. Mälardalen University, Sweden.
    Energy and emissions benefits of renewable energy derived from municipal solid waste: Analysis of a low carbon scenario in Malaysia2014In: Applied Energy, ISSN 0306-2619, E-ISSN 1872-9118, Vol. 136, p. 797-804Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ineffective waste management that involves dumping of waste in landfills may degrade valuable land resources and emit methane gas (CH4), a more potent greenhouse gas than carbon dioxide (CO2). The incineration of waste also emits polluted chemicals such as dioxin and particle. Therefore, from a solid waste management perspective, both landfilling and incineration practices pose challenges to the development of a green and sustainable future. Waste-to-energy (WtE) has become a promising strategy catering to these issues because the utilisation of waste reduces the amount of landfilled waste (overcoming land resource issues) while increasing renewable energy production. The goal of this paper is to evaluate the energy and carbon reduction potential in Malaysia for various WtE strategies for municipal solid waste (MSW). The material properties of the MSW, its energy conversion potential and subsequent greenhouse gases (GHG) emissions are analysed based on the chemical compositions and biogenic Carbon fractions of the waste. The GHG emission reduction potential is also calculated by considering fossil fuel displacement and CH4 avoidance from landfilling. In this paper, five different scenarios are analysed with results indicating a integration of landfill gas (LFG) recovery systems and waste incinerator as the major and minor WtE strategies shows the highest economical benefit with optimal GHG mitigation and energy potential. Sensitivity analysis on the effect of moisture content of MSW towards energy potential and GHG emissions are performed. These evaluations of WtE strategies provides valuable insights for policy decision in MSW management practices with cost effective, energy benefit, environmental protection.

  • 162. Tan, Sieting
    et al.
    Yang, Jin
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE). Beijing Normal Univ.
    Yan, Jinyue
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemical Engineering and Technology, Energy Processes.
    Development of the Low-carbon City Indicator (LCCI) Framework2015In: CLEAN, EFFICIENT AND AFFORDABLE ENERGY FOR A SUSTAINABLE FUTURE, Elsevier, 2015, p. 2516-2522Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper proposes a 3-layer top-down indicator framework for the evaluation, implementation and standardization of low carbon cities (LCC). Layer 1 accounts for city carbon emission related indicators. Layer 2 expands the scope of layer 1 and probes into factors closely related to carbon emissions. Layer 3 focus on the implementation pathways. Specifically, we laid the focus on Layer 2 in this paper. An indicator system for the evaluation of LCC was established from the perspectives of economic, energy pattern, technology, social and living, carbon & environment, urban accessibility and waste. A comprehensive evaluation method was employed for city ranking in terms of low carbon level. The framework was then applied to 10 global cities to rank their low carbon levels. Results showed that the low carbon level of cities in Europe is much higher than that in Asia (Beijing) and America (New York) due to better environmental performance and infrastructure supports caused by less human activities. (C) 2015 Published by Elsevier Ltd. This is an open access article under the CC BY-NC-ND license

  • 163.
    Tan, Yuting
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemical Engineering and Technology. Tianjin University, China .
    Li, X.
    Zhao, L.
    Li, Hailong
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemical Engineering and Technology.
    Yan, Jinyue
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemical Engineering and Technology, Energy Processes. Malardalen University, Sweden .
    Yu, Z.
    Study on utilization of waste heat in cement plant2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper discusses three options for waste heat recovery in cement plant, they are dual-pressure power generation system, post-combustion capture system using MEA and the combined one. Model of power generation system was developed. Technical analysis was made from aspects of power generating capacity and CO2 capture ratio. In addition, economic evaluation was conducted to assess the performance of three systems targeting on higher Net Present Value (NPV). Variation of economic parameters were considered like carbon credit (10-90$/ton) and price of electricity (0.06-0.18$/kWh). Optimal option can be selected for waste heat utilization based on economic evaluation results in this paper.

  • 164.
    Tan, Yuting
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemical Engineering and Technology, Energy Processes.
    Nookuea, W.
    Li, H.
    Thorin, E.
    Yan, Jinyue
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemical Engineering and Technology, Energy Processes. Mälardalen University, Sweden.
    Cryogenic technology for biogas upgrading combined with carbon capture-a review of systems and property impacts2017In: Proceedings of the 9th International Conference on Applied Energy, Elsevier, 2017, Vol. 142, p. 3741-3746Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    CO2 makes a major contribution to the climate change, and biomass renewable energy and carbon capture and storage (CCS) can be deployed to mitigate the CO2 emission. Cryogenic process for biogas upgrading combined with carbon capture is one of the most promising technologies. This paper reviewed the state-of-the-art of cryogenic systems for biogas upgrading combined with carbon capture, and introduced the status and progress of property impacts on the cryogenic systems with emphasize on phase equilibrium. The existing cryogenic systems can be classified as flash liquefaction system, distillation system, and liquefaction combined with desublimation system. The flash liquefaction system produces biomethane and CO2 in lower purity than the other two systems. Thermodynamic optimization on the flash liquefaction system and liquefaction combined with desublimation system should be done further, and comprehensive comparison between three cryogenic systems needs to be carried out. As to the phase equilibrium, PR EOS is safe to be used in predicting VLE and SVLE with an independent thermodynamic model describing the fugacity of the solid phase. However, the impacts of binary mixing parameter, different EOS models and mixing rules, on the performance of the cryogenic system need to be identified in the future.

  • 165.
    Tan, Yuting
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemical Engineering and Technology, Energy Processes.
    Nookuea, W.
    Li, H.
    Thorin, E.
    Yan, Jinyue
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemical Engineering and Technology, Energy Processes.
    Evaluation of viscosity and thermal conductivity models for CO2 mixtures applied in CO2 cryogenic process in carbon capture and storage (CCS)2017In: Applied Thermal Engineering, ISSN 1359-4311, E-ISSN 1873-5606, Vol. 123, p. 721-733Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The cryogenic process is used for CO2 purification in oxy-fuel combustion power plant, and multi-stream heat exchanger is one of the most important components. Viscosity and thermal conductivity are key transport properties in the design of plate-fin multi-stream heat exchanger. It is necessary to evaluate the impacts of viscosity and thermal conductivity models on the design of the heat exchanger. In this paper, different viscosity models and thermal conductivity models for CO2 mixtures with non-condensable impurities were first evaluated separately by comparing the calculated results with experimental data. Results show that for viscosity, the absolute average deviation of KRW model is the smallest, which is 1.3%. For thermal conductivity, model developed by Ely and Hanley, with absolute average deviation of 3.5%, is recommended. The impact of property models on the design of plate-fin multi-stream heat exchanger was also analyzed. The thermal conductivity model has a noticeable impact on the plate-fin multi-stream heat exchanger design, and the deviation in design size of heat exchanger by using different thermal conductivity models may reach up to 7.5%. The future work on how to improve the property models was discussed.

  • 166.
    Tan, Yuting
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemical Engineering and Technology, Energy Processes.
    Nookuea, W.
    Li, H.
    Thorin, E.
    Yan, Jinyue
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemical Engineering and Technology, Energy Processes. Mälardalen University, Sweden.
    Property Impacts on Plate-fin Multi-stream Heat Exchanger (Cold Box) Design in CO2 Cryogenic Process: Part I. Heat Exchanger Modeling and Sensitivity Study2017In: 8th International Conference on Applied Energy, ICAE 2016; Beijing; China; 8 October 2016 through 11 October 2016, Elsevier, 2017, Vol. 105, p. 4587-4594Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The multi-stream plate-fin heat exchanger is one of the most important components in the CO2 cryogenic system. Appropriate design methodology and in-depth analysis of property on the heat exchanger are of importance. This paper, as part I of the two-paper series, presented the design procedure for the multi-stream plate-fin heat exchanger in CO2 cryogenic process. Sensitivity study was also conducted to analyze the impacts of thermos-physical properties including density, viscosity, heat capacity and thermal conductivity. The results show that thermal conductivity has the most significant impact and it should be prioritized to develop a more accurate thermal conductivity model for the heat exchanger design. In addition, viscosity has least significant impact but the higher uncertainty range of viscosity may lead to a higher possible deviation in volume design.

  • 167.
    Tan, Yuting
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemical Engineering and Technology, Energy Processes.
    Nookuea, W.
    Li, H.
    Thorin, E.
    Yan, Jinyue
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemical Engineering and Technology, Energy Processes. Mälardalen University, Sweden.
    Property Impacts on Plate-fin Multi-stream Heat Exchanger (Cold Box) Design in CO2 Cryogenic Process: Part II. Evaluation of Viscosity and Thermal Conductivity Models2017In: 8th International Conference on Applied Energy, ICAE 2016; Beijing; China; 8 October 2016 through 11 October 2016, Elsevier, 2017, Vol. 105, p. 4595-4600Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Viscosity and thermal conductivity are key transport properties in the design of plate-fin multi-stream heat exchanger in CO2 cryogenic processes. It is necessary to evaluate the reliabilities of viscosity and thermal conductivity models. In addition, the differences in design of multi-stream heat exchanger by using different property models need to be studied as well. In this paper, viscosity models and thermal conductivity models of CO2 mixtures with non-condensable gas impurities were evaluated separately by comparison with existing experimental data. Recommendations were given on model selections and their impact on the design of plate-fin multi-stream heat exchanger were analyzed. The results show that for viscosity, the uncertainty range of Wilke's model is the smallest with a maximum absolute deviation of 6.1%. This model is therefore recommended to be used. For thermal conductivity, GERG model, with a maximum absolute deviation of 8.7% is preferred. The choice of thermal conductivity model has a noticeable impact on the plate-fin multi-stream heat exchanger design, and the maximum deviation by using different thermal conductivity models is 7.5%.

  • 168.
    Tan, Yuting
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemical Engineering and Technology, Energy Processes.
    Nookuea, Worrada
    Li, Hailong
    Thorin, Eva
    Yan, Jinyue
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemical Engineering and Technology, Energy Processes.
    Evaluation of viscosity and thermal conductivity models for CO2 mixtures applied in CO2 cryogenic process in carbon capture and storage (CCS)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The cryogenic process is used for CO2 purification in oxy-fuel combustion power plant, and multi-stream heat exchanger is one of the most important components. Viscosity and thermal conductivity are key transport properties in the design of plate-fin multi-stream heat exchanger. It is necessary to evaluate the impacts of viscosity and thermal conductivity models on the design of the heat exchanger. In this paper, different viscosity models and thermal conductivity models for CO2 mixtures with non-condensable impurities were first evaluated separately by comparing the calculated results with experimental data. Results show that for viscosity, the absolute average deviation (AAD) of KRW model is the smallest, which is 1.3%. For thermal conductivity, GERG model, with AAD of 3.5%, is recommended. The impact of property models on the design of plate-fin multi-stream heat exchanger was also analyzed. The thermal conductivity model has a noticeable impact on the plate-fin multi-stream heat exchanger design, and the deviation in design size of heat exchanger by using different thermal conductivity models may reach up to 7.5%. The future work on how to improve the property models was discussed.

  • 169.
    Tan, Yuting
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemical Engineering and Technology, Energy Processes.
    Nookuea, Worrada
    Li, Hailong
    Thorin, Eva
    Yan, Jinyue
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemical Engineering and Technology, Energy Processes.
    Improving design of multi-stream heat exchanger in CO2 cryogenic capture process with considerations of impacts of thermophysical propertiesManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Oxy-fuel combustion is one of the most promising technologies for CO2 capture for power plants. In oxy-fuel combustion plants, cryogenic process can be applied for CO2 purification because the main impurities in flue gas are non-condensable gases. The multi-stream plate-fin heat exchanger is one of the most important components in the CO2 cryogenic system.  In-depth understanding of the impact of property on the heat exchanger are of importance for appropriate design. This paper presented the design procedure for the plate-fin multi-stream heat exchanger for the CO2 cryogenic process. Sensitivity study was conducted to analyze the impacts of thermos-physical properties including density, viscosity, heat capacity and thermal conductivity. The results show that thermal conductivity has the most significant impact and it should be prioritized to develop a more accurate thermal conductivity model for the heat exchanger design. In addition, viscosity has less significant impact but the larger deviation range of viscosity may lead to higher uncertainties in volume design and annual capital cost of heat exchanger.

  • 170.
    Tan, Yuting
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemical Engineering and Technology, Energy Processes.
    Nookuea, Worrada
    Li, Hailong
    Thorin, Eva
    Yan, Jinyue
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemical Engineering and Technology, Energy Processes. Mälardalen University, Sweden.
    Property impacts on Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) processes: A review2016In: Energy Conversion and Management, ISSN 0196-8904, E-ISSN 1879-2227, Vol. 118, p. 204-222Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The knowledge of thermodynamic and transport properties of CO2-mixtures is important for designing and operating different processes in carbon capture and storage systems. A literature survey was conducted to review the impact of uncertainty in thermos-physical properties on the design and operation of components and processes involved in CO2 capture, conditioning, transport and storage. According to the existing studies on property impacts, liquid phase viscosity and diffusivity as well as gas phase diffusivity significantly impact the process simulation and absorber design for chemical absorption. Moreover, the phase equilibrium is important for regenerating energy estimation. For CO2 compression and pumping processes, thermos-physical properties have more obvious impacts on pumps than on compressors. Heat capacity, density, enthalpy and entropy are the most important properties in the pumping process, whereas the compression process is more sensitive to heat capacity and compressibility. In the condensation and liquefaction process, the impacts of density, enthalpy and entropy are low on heat exchangers. For the transport process, existing studies mainly focused on property impacts on the performance of pipeline steady flow processes. Among the properties, density and heat capacity are most important. In the storage process, density and viscosity have received the most attention in property impact studies and were regarded as the most important properties in terms of storage capacity and enhanced oil recovery rate. However, for physical absorption, physical adsorption and membrane separation, there has been a knowledge gap about the property impact. In addition, due to the lack of experimental data and process complexity, little information is available about the influence of liquid phase properties on the design of the absorber and desorber for chemical absorption process. In the CO2 conditioning process, knowledge of the impacts of properties beyond density and enthalpy is insufficient. In the transport process, greater attention should focus on property impacts on transient transport processes and ship transport systems. In the storage process, additional research is required on the dispersion process in enhanced oil recovery and the dissolution process in ocean and saline aquifer storage.

  • 171.
    Tan, Yuting
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE).
    Nookuea, Worrada
    Li, Hailong
    Thorin, Eva
    Zhao, Li
    Yan, Jinyue
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemical Engineering and Technology, Energy Processes. Malardalen Univ.
    Property impacts on performance of CO2 pipeline transport2015In: CLEAN, EFFICIENT AND AFFORDABLE ENERGY FOR A SUSTAINABLE FUTURE, 2015, p. 2261-2267Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) is one of the most potential technologies to mitigate climate change. Using pipelines to transport CO2 from emission sources to storage sites is one of common and mature technologies. The design and operation of pipeline transport process requires careful considerations of thermo-physical properties. This paper studied the impact of properties, including density, viscosity, thermal conductivity and heat capacity, on the performance of CO2 pipeline transport. The pressure loss and temperature drop in steady state were calculated by using homogenous friction model and Sukhof temperature drop theory, respectively. The results of sensitivity study show that over-estimating density and viscosity increases the pressure loss while under-estimating of density and viscosity decreases it. Over-estimating density and heat capacity leads to lower temperature drop while underestimating of density and heat capacity result in higher temperature drop. This study suggests that the accuracy of property models for example, more accurate density model, should be developed for the CO2 transport design. (C) 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  • 172. Tian, Yishui
    et al.
    Zhao, Lixin
    Meng, Haibo
    Sun, Liying
    Yan, Jinyue
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemical Engineering and Technology, Energy Processes.
    Estimation of un-used land potential for biofuels development in (the) People's Republic of China2009In: Applied Energy, ISSN 0306-2619, E-ISSN 1872-9118, Vol. 86, p. S77-S85Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents the current status of biofuel development and estimates the potential of un-used land for biofuel development. The potential of crops including cassava, sweet potato, sweet sorghum, sugarcane, sugar beet and Jerusalem artichoke were assessed and discussed for different regions considering the geographical conditions and features of agricultural production. If reserved land resources are explored together with substitute planting implemented and unit area yield improved, potential production of bio-ethanol fuel will be 22 million tons in 2020. The study also recommends the use of winter idle lands for rapeseed plantation for biofuel production. The potential for production of biodiesel by rapeseed and cottonseed can reach to 3.59 million tons.

  • 173. Wahlund, B.
    et al.
    Yan, Jinyue
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Chemical Engineering and Technology.
    Westermark, Mats
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Chemical Engineering and Technology.
    A total energy system of fuel upgrading by drying biomass feedstock for cogeneration: a case study of Skelleftea bioenergy combine2002In: Biomass and Bioenergy, ISSN 0961-9534, E-ISSN 1873-2909, Vol. 23, no 4, p. 271-281Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Emissions of greenhouse gases, such as CO2, need to be greatly reduced to avoid the risk of harmful climate changes, One way to mitigate emissions is switching fuels, from fossil fuels to renewable energy, e.g., biomass. In this paper we investigate a new approach for improving the performance of biomass-based cogeneration plants, a bioenergy combine. The system is a conventional biomass-based combined heat and power (CHP) plant with integrated pellet production, where part of the CHP plant's heat is used for drying biomass feedstock for producing pellets, This unique integration enables increased annual operational hours and an increased use of biomass because the upgraded pellets as an energy carrier can be economically and technically transported from regions with a surplus biofuel to regions with demand for biofuel. In the studied case of this paper, the produced pellets are transported to another CHP plant for substituting fossil fuels. The total energy system of the bioenergy combine and the linked CHP plant is analysed from a perspective Of CO2 reduction and energy efficiency. The results show that the system has great potential for reducing CO2 and increasing the efficiency. Furthermore, the non-technical factors influencing the realisation of the project has also been studied through interviews, showing that the main criterion behind the investment was the potential for profitability. In addition, an important factor that facilitated the realisation was the co-operative environment between the municipality and Skeileftei Kraft. Environmental issues appeared not to be influencing direct, but indirect through government subsidies.

  • 174.
    Wahlund, Bertil
    et al.
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Chemical Engineering and Technology.
    Yan, Jinyue
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Chemical Engineering and Technology.
    Westermark, Mats
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Chemical Engineering and Technology.
    Increasing biomass utilisation in energy systems: A comparative study of CO2 reduction and cost for different bioenergy processing options2004In: Biomass and Bioenergy, ISSN 0961-9534, E-ISSN 1873-2909, Vol. 26, no 6, p. 531-544Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Emissions of greenhouse gases, such as CO2, need to be greatly reduced to avoid the risk of a harmful climate change. One powerful way to mitigate emissions is to switch fuels from fossil fuels to renewable energy, such as biomass. In this paper, we systematically investigate several bioenergy processing options, quantify the reduction rate and calculate the specific cost of reduction. This paper addresses the issue of which option Sweden should concentrate on to achieve the largest CO2 reduction at the lowest cost. The results show that the largest and most long-term sustainable CO2 reduction would be achieved by refining the woody biomass to fuel pellets for coal substitution, which have been done in Sweden. Refining to motor fuels, such as methanol, DME and ethanol, gives only half of the reduction and furthermore at a higher specific cost. Biomass refining into pellets enables transportation over long distances and seasonal storage, which is crucial for further utilisation of the woody biomass potential.

  • 175. Wang, Chengshan
    et al.
    Yan, Jinyue
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemical Engineering and Technology, Energy Processes.
    Marnay, Chris
    Djilali, Ned
    Dahlquist, Erik
    Wu, Jianzhong
    Hia, Hongjie
    Distributed Energy and Microgrids (DEM)2018In: Applied Energy, ISSN 0306-2619, E-ISSN 1872-9118, Vol. 210, p. 685-689Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 176. Wang, F.
    et al.
    Deng, S.
    Zhao, J.
    Wang, J.
    Sun, T.
    Yan, Jinyue
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemical Engineering and Technology, Energy Processes.
    Performance and economic assessments of integrating geothermal energy into coal-fired power plant with CO2 capture2017In: Energy, ISSN 0360-5442, E-ISSN 1873-6785, Vol. 119, p. 278-287Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A novel carbon capture and storage system integrated with geothermal energy was proposed to reduce energy consumption in the post-combustion CO2 capture (PCC) process. Geothermal energy at medium temperature was used to provide the heat required for solvent regeneration. A technical and economic assessment was conducted based on a 300 MWe coal-fired power plant. Additionally, the integrated system was also compared with a stand-alone geothermal power (GP) plant to evaluate individual advantages. Both an enhanced geothermal system (EGS) and a hot sedimentary aquifer (HSA) reservoir were selected to identify the effect of geological properties and heat characteristics on system performance. The results indicated that the geothermal-assisted post-combustion CO2 capture (GPCC) plant exhibited better performance than the PCC plant. The net plant average efficiency increased 5.56% and 4.42% in the EGS scenario and HSA scenario, respectively. Furthermore, the net incremental geothermal efficiency obtained corresponded to 21.34% and 20.35% in the EGS scenario and HSA scenario, respectively. The economic assessment indicated that the GPCC systems in both the EGS scenario and HSA scenario had lower marginal cost of electricity (70.84 $/MWh and 101.06 $/MWh) when compared with that of the stand-alone GP systems (151.09 $/MWh and 101.95 $/MWh). 

  • 177. Wang, F.
    et al.
    Deng, S.
    Zhao, J.
    Yan, Jinyue
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemical Engineering and Technology, Energy Processes.
    A novel ammonia-based CO2 capture process hybrid ammonia absorption refrigeration2017In: Proceedings of the 9th International Conference on Applied Energy, Elsevier, 2017, Vol. 142, p. 3734-3740Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper proposed a novel ammonia-based CO2 capture process hybrid ammonia absorption refrigeration to recovery escaped ammonia in the desorption process. The evaporated ammonia was separated with CO2 via gas-liquid phase, and throttled to produce cooling load. The phase envelope of the CO2 and NH3 mixture was investigated to guide the design of the parameters. A preliminary thermodynamic performance was presented to evaluated the performance. The results showed that the regenerator can regenerate CO2 with a ratio of 90% and this process can produce a cooling load of 113.3 MW. The parameter study indicated that it is competitive with the chilled ammonia process.

  • 178. Wang, F.
    et al.
    Deng, S.
    Zhao, J.
    Yang, G.
    Yan, Jinyue
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemical Engineering and Technology, Energy Processes.
    Integrating geothermal into coal-fired power plant with carbon capture: A comparative study with solar energy2017In: Energy Conversion and Management, ISSN 0196-8904, E-ISSN 1879-2227, Vol. 148, p. 569-582Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A new system integrating geothermal energy into post-combustion carbon capture is proposed in this paper. Geothermal energy at medium temperatures is used to provide the required thermal heat for solvent regeneration. The performance of this system is compared with solar assisted carbon capture plant via technical and economic evaluation. A 300 MWe coal-fired power plant is selected as the reference case, and two different locations based on the local climatic conditions and geothermal resources are chosen for the comparison. The results show that the geothermal assisted post-combustion carbon capture plant has better performances than the solar assisted one in term of the net power output and annual electricity generation. The net plant average efficiency based on lower heating value can be increased by 2.75% with a thermal load fraction of about 41%. Results of economic assessment show that the proposed geothermal assisted post-combustion carbon capture system has lower levelized costs of electricity and cost of carbon dioxide avoidance compared to the solar assisted post-combustion carbon capture plant. In order to achieve comparative advantages over the reference post-combustion carbon capture plant in both locations, the price of solar collector has to be lower than 70 USD/m2, and the drilling depth of the geothermal well shall be less than 2.1 km.

  • 179. Wang, F.
    et al.
    Zhao, J.
    Li, H.
    Deng, S.
    Yan, Jinyue
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemical Engineering and Technology, Energy Processes. Tianjin University, Ministry of Education of China, China.
    Preliminary experimental study of post-combustion carbon capture integrated with solar thermal collectors2017In: Applied Energy, ISSN 0306-2619, E-ISSN 1872-9118, Vol. 185, p. 1471-1480Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The amine-based chemical absorption for CO2 capture normally needs to extract steam from the steam turbine cycle for solvent regeneration. Integrating solar thermal energy enables the reduction of steam extraction and therefore, can reduce the energy penalty caused by CO2 capture. In this paper, a pilot system of the solar thermal energy assisted chemical absorption was built to investigate the system performance. Two types of solar thermal energy collectors, parabolic trough and linear Fresnel reflector, were tested. It was found that the values of operation parameters can meet the requirements of designed setting parameters, and the solar collectors can provide the thermal energy required by the reboiler, while its contribution was mainly determined by solar irradiation. The solvent regeneration was investigated by varying the heat input. The results show that the response time of the reboiler heat duty is longer than those of the reboiler temperature and desorber pressure. This work provides a better understanding about the overall operation and control of the system.

  • 180. Wang, Fu
    et al.
    Li, Hailong
    Zhao, Jun
    Deng, Shuai
    Yan, Jinyue
    Tianjin University, Ministry of Education of China, China.
    Technical and economic analysis of integrating low-medium temperature solar energy into power plant2016In: Energy Conversion and Management, ISSN 0196-8904, E-ISSN 1879-2227, Vol. 112, p. 459-469Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In order to mitigate CO2 emission and improve the efficiency of the utilization of solar thermal energy (STE), solar thermal energy is proposed to be integrated into a power plant. In this paper, seven configurations were studied regarding the integration of STE. A 300 MWe subcritical coal-fired plant was selected as the reference, chemical absorption using monoethanolamine solvent was employed for CO2 capture, and parabolic trough collectors and evacuated tube collectors were used for STE collection. Both technical analysis and economic evaluation were conducted. Results show that integrating solar energy with post-combustion CO2 capture can effectively increase power generation and reduce the electrical efficiency penalty caused by CO2 capture. Among the different configurations, Config-2 and Config6, which use medium temperature STE to replace high pressure feedwater without and with CO2 capture, show the highest net incremental solar efficiency. When building new plants, integrating solar energy can effectively reduce the levelized cost of electricity (LCOE). The lowest LCOE, 99.28 USD/MWh, results from Config-6, with a parabolic trough collector price of 185 USD/m(2). When retrofitting existing power plants, Config-6 also shows the highest net present value (NPV), while Config-2 has the shortest payback time at a carbon tax of 50 USD/ton CO2. In addition, both LCOE and NPV/payback time are clearly affected by the relative solar load fraction, the price of solar thermal collectors and the carbon tax. Comparatively, the carbon tax can affect the configurations with CO2 capture more clearly than those without CO2 capture. 

  • 181. Wang, Fu
    et al.
    Zhao, Jun
    Li, Hao
    Li, Hailong
    Zhao, Li
    Yan, Jinyue
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemical Engineering and Technology, Energy Processes. Tianjin Univ.
    Experimental study of solar assisted post-combustion carbon capture2015In: CLEAN, EFFICIENT AND AFFORDABLE ENERGY FOR A SUSTAINABLE FUTURE, 2015, p. 2246-2252Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Solar-assisted post-combustion carbon capture system is studied to compensate the energy penalty of coal-fired plant due to absorbent regeneration. The system is highly integrated with the amine-based carbon capture process coupled with solar thermal sub-system. The dynamic performance is largely affected by the variations of parameters and the fluctuations in solar collectors. An experimental facility of solar-assisted chemical absorption pilot with two types of collectors (parabolic trough and linear Fresnel) was constructed in this study. The impacts on the absorbent regeneration performance were studied on the dynamic variation of the solar heat and the operating temperature of the reboiler. The results show that an optimum ration of liquid-to-gas of 2.5-3.0 was determined at the lowest of the required regeneration energy. The study suggests that a better understanding of the key parameters associated with both capture process as well as the solar assisted sub-system if of importance for the overall operation and control. (C) 2015 Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  • 182. Wang, Jianhui
    et al.
    Conejo, Antonio J.
    Wang, Chengshan
    Yan, Jinyue
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemical Engineering and Technology, Energy Processes.
    Smart grids, renewable energy integration, and climate change mitigation - Future electric energy systems2012In: Applied Energy, ISSN 0306-2619, E-ISSN 1872-9118, Vol. 96, p. 1-3Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 183. Wang, T.
    et al.
    Liu, T.
    Luan, W.
    Tu, S. -T
    Yan, Jinyue
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemical Engineering and Technology, Energy Processes. Mälardalen University, Sweden.
    Performance Improvement of High-temperature Silicone Oil Based Thermoelectric Generator2017In: 8th International Conference on Applied Energy, ICAE 2016; Beijing; China; 8 October 2016 through 11 October 2016, Elsevier, 2017, Vol. 105, p. 1211-1218Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The recent advances in waste heat recovery technologies have provided great opportunities for energy conversion efficiency improvement. This paper proposed a metal foam filled thermoelectric generator (TEG) for the utilization of liquid waste heat resource. A prototype was designed and constructed to study the performance enhancement due to metal foam inserts. High-temperature oil based experiment was conducted to investigate the TEG performance in higher liquid temperature. The influences of hot oil inlet temperature and cold water flow rate were proved to be key operating parameters for the TEG performance. Specially, net power output and net power enhancement ratio were presented to assess the overall net power output performance. The metal foam filled TEG was demonstrated to outperform the unfilled TEG both in power generation efficiency and net power performance. In the experiments, the maximum power generation efficiency and net power enhancement ratio of metal foam inserted TEG were 2.49% and 1.33, respectively.

  • 184. Wang, Tongcai
    et al.
    Luan, Weiling
    Liu, Tongjun
    Tu, Shan-Tung
    Yan, Jinyue
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemical Engineering and Technology, Energy Processes.
    Performance enhancement of thermoelectric waste heat recovery system by using metal foam inserts2016In: Energy Conversion and Management, ISSN 0196-8904, E-ISSN 1879-2227, Vol. 124, p. 13-19Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper proposed a type of metal foams filled thermoelectric generator (TEG) for waste heat recovery. Metal foam inserts of three kinds of pore densities (5 PPI, 10 PPI and 20 PPI) were included, considering the heat transfer enhancing features of porous metal mediums. A flow channel detachable prototype was designed to experimentally investigate the influence of metal foams on the performance of thermoelectric waste heat recovery (TWHR) system. The operating parameters were further experimented to improve the thermoelectric power generation efficiency, including hot air inlet temperature, cold water flow rate, metal foam pore density and thermoelectric module (TEM) connecting mode. Moreover, the TWHR performance of the system was evaluated on power generation efficiency, heat exchange effectiveness and waste heat recovery rate, respectively. The results showed that filling metal foams in the flow channels could effectively enhance the performance of the TWHR system. The maximum power generation efficiency was 2.05%, when the TEG was filled with 5 PPI metal foams. It was 29.75% higher than the value of unfilled TEG.

  • 185. Wang, W.
    et al.
    Guo, S.
    Li, H.
    Yan, Jinyue
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemical Engineering and Technology, Energy Processes.
    Zhao, J.
    Li, X.
    Ding, J.
    Experimental study on the direct/indirect contact energy storage container in mobilized thermal energy system (M-TES)2014In: Applied Energy, ISSN 0306-2619, E-ISSN 1872-9118, Vol. 119, p. 181-189Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A mobilized thermal energy storage (TES) system has been proposed to recover and use industrial waste or excess heat for distributed users. In this paper, lab-scale test facilities have been built to understand the mechanisms of heat charging and discharging processes. The facilities consist of a direct/indirect-contact thermal energy storage container, heat transfer oil (HTO)/water tanks, an electrical boiler, HTO/water pumps and a plate heat exchanger. The organic phase change material (PCM), erythritol, which is sugar alcohol, was chosen as the working material due to its large heat density (330. kJ/kg) and suitable melting point (118. °C) for industrial low-temperature heat recovery, as well as non toxic and corrosive. Although differential scanning calorimetry tests have shown that a large temperature range exists during the phase change of erythritol, it did not affect the heat discharging during the tests of system performance. Heat charging/discharging results show that for the direct-contact storage container, heat discharging process is much faster than charging process. At the initial stage of heat charging, heat transfer oil is blocked to enter the container, resulting in a slow charging rate. Meanwhile, the PCM attached on the container wall on the bottom always melts last. It has been found that increasing the flow rate of HTO can effectively enhance the charging/discharging processes. For the indirect-contact storage container, heat charging and discharging take almost the same time; and the flow rate of HTO does not show an obvious effect on the charging and discharging processes due to the weak thermal conductivity of the solid phase change material. Comparatively, using the direct-contact storage container may achieve shorter charging/discharging processes than using the indirect-contact storage container.

  • 186. Wang, W.
    et al.
    Hu, Yukun
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemical Engineering and Technology, Energy Processes.
    Yan, Jinyue
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemical Engineering and Technology, Energy Processes. Mälardalen University, Sweden.
    Nyström, J.
    Dahlquist, E.
    Combined heat and power plant integrated with mobilized thermal energy storage (M-TES) system2010In: Frontiers of Energy and Power Engineering in China, ISSN 1673-7393, Vol. 4, no 4, p. 469-474Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Energy consumption for space and tap water heating in residential and service sectors accounts for one third of the total energy utilization in Sweden. District heating (DH) is used to supply heat to areas with high energy demand. However, there are still detached houses and sparse areas that are not connected to a DH network. In such areas, electrical heating or oil/pellet boilers are used to meet the heat demand. Extending the existing DH network to those spare areas is not economically feasible because of the small heat demand and the large investment required for the expansion. The mobilized thermal energy storage (M-TES) system is an alternative source of heat for detached buildings or sparse areas using industrial heat. In this paper, the integration of a combined heat and power (CHP) plant and an M-TES system is analyzed. Furthermore, the impacts of four options of the integrated system are discussed, including the power and heat output in the CHP plant. The performance of the M-TES system is likewise discussed.

  • 187. Wang, W.
    et al.
    Li, H.
    Guo, S.
    He, S.
    Ding, J.
    Yan, Jinyue
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemical Engineering and Technology, Energy Processes.
    Yang, J.
    Numerical simulation study on discharging process of the direct-contact phase change energy storage system2015In: Applied Energy, ISSN 0306-2619, E-ISSN 1872-9118, Vol. 150, p. 61-68Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The mobilized thermal energy storage system (M-TES) has been demonstrated as a promising technology to supply heat using waste heat in industries to distributed users, where heat discharging determines whether M-TES system can satisfy the required heating rate. The objective of this work is to investigate the solidification mechanism of phase change materials (PCM) for heat discharging in a direct-contact thermal energy storage (TES) container for M-TES. A 2-dimensional (2D) numerical simulation model of the TES tank is developed in ANSYS FLUENT, and validated with the experimental measurement. Effects of flow rate and inlet temperature of heat transfer oil (HTO) were studied. Results show that (a) the discharging process includes the formation of solidified PCM followed by the sinking of solidified PCM; (b) the discharging time of M-TES can be reduced by increasing the flow rate of heat transfer oil. When the flow rate is increased from 0.46m3/h to 0.92m3/h, the solidified PCM is increased from 25vol.% to 90vol.% within 30min; (c) the discharging time can be reduced by decreasing the inlet temperature of HTO. While the inlet temperature is reduced from 50°C to 30°C, the solidified PCM is increased from 60vol.% to 90vol.% within 30min. This work provides engineering insights for the rational design of discharging process for M-TES system.

  • 188. Wang, Weilong
    et al.
    Li, Jiang
    Wei, Xiaolan
    Ding, Jing
    Feng, Haijun
    Yan, Jinyue
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemical Engineering and Technology, Energy Processes. Malardalen Univ, Sch Business Soc & Energy, Vasteras, Sweden.
    Yang, Jianping
    Carbon dioxide adsorption thermodynamics and mechanisms on MCM-41 supported polyethylenimine prepared by wet impregnation method2015In: Applied Energy, ISSN 0306-2619, E-ISSN 1872-9118, Vol. 142, p. 221-228Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Amine-functionalized sorbents prepared by wet impregnation method shows great promises for CO2 capture from real flue gas in power plants. The objective of this work is to understand CO2 adsorption thermodynamics and mechanisms at varied polyethylenimine (PEI) loadings on mesoporous MCM-41 by wet impregnation method using a computational approach for the first time. The structures of PEI/MCM-41 sorbents were optimized using molecular dynamics (MD), and the CO2 adsorption thermodynamics at varied PEI loadings was simulated using Grand Canonical Monte Carlo (GCMC) method. Results showed a good agreement between experiments and simulation. On the surface of the MCM-41, there are high CO2-philic sites for CO2 adsorption, which were firstly covered by PEI molecular. The functionalization groups increased the interactions of the CO2 with more PEI molecular deployed on the surface of the MCM-41, then to the center of the pore. The adsorption performance of the composite sorbents depended on the adsorption cites and the space for CO2 diffusion. The CO2 adsorption thermodynamics and mechanisms at varied PEI loadings shed lights on tuning CO2 capture performance with amine-functionalized sorbents for power plant greenhouse gas control.

  • 189. Wang, Weilong
    et al.
    Yang, Xiaoxi
    Fang, Yutang
    Ding, Jing
    Yan, Jinyue
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemical Engineering and Technology, Energy Processes.
    Enhanced thermal conductivity and thermal performance of form-stable composite phase change materials by using beta-Aluminum nitride2009In: Applied Energy, ISSN 0306-2619, E-ISSN 1872-9118, Vol. 86, no 7-8, p. 1196-1200Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    beta-Aluminum nitride powder is a promising additive due to its great conductivity value, which can enhance the thermal conductivity of organic phase change materials. In this paper, a high conductivity form-stable phase change material was prepared by blending polyethylene glycol, silica gel, and P-Aluminum nitride powder. The conductivity value of the composite PCMs was determined using the Hotdisk thermal analyzer, which is based on the transient plane source technique. Experiment of heat storage and release performance was carried out to investigate heat efficiencies of TES system. The results showed that thermal conductivity of composite PCMs increased with an increase in beta-Aluminum nitride content, but the value of latent heat decreased correspondingly. There was no change on the melting temperature while different ratios of composites. The value of thermal conductivity changed from 0.3847 W m(-1) K-1 to 0.7661 W m(-1) K-1 with the increase of mass ratio of beta-Aluminum nitride from 5% to 30%. The heat storage and release rate of the composite PCMs was higher than that of pure polyethylene glycol. Crown

  • 190. Wang, Weilong
    et al.
    Yang, Xiaoxi
    Fang, Yutang
    Ding, Jing
    Yan, Jinyue
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemical Engineering and Technology, Energy Processes.
    Preparation and thermal properties of polyethylene glycol/expanded graphite blends for energy storage2009In: Applied Energy, ISSN 0306-2619, E-ISSN 1872-9118, Vol. 86, no 9, p. 1479-1483Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Expanded graphite is a promising heat transfer promoter due to its high conductivity, which improves the thermal conductivity of organic phase change materials. Moreover, it can also serve as supporting materials to keep the shape of the blends stable during the phase transition. After various investigation, the results showed that the maximum weight percentage of polyethylene glycol was as high as 90% in this paper without any leakage during the melting period, with the latent heat of 161.2 J g(-1) and the melting point of 61.46 degrees C. It was found that the value of the latent heat was related to the polyethylene glycol portion, increased with the increase in polyethylene glycol content. Moreover, the measured enthalpy of the composite phase change materials was proportional to the mass ratio of the polyethylene glycol component. The melting temperatures were almost the same with different ratios of composites. The conductivity of blends was improved significantly with the high value of 1.324 W m(-1) K-1 compared to the pure polyethylene glycol conductivity of 0.2985 W m(-1) K-1.

  • 191. Wang, X.
    et al.
    Nordlander, E.
    Thorin, E.
    Yan, Jinyue
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemical Engineering and Technology, Energy Processes. School of Sustainable Development of Society and Technology, Mälardalen University, 72123 Västerås, Sweden.
    Microalgal biomethane production integrated with an existing biogas plant: A case study in Sweden2013In: Applied Energy, ISSN 0306-2619, E-ISSN 1872-9118, Vol. 112, no SI, p. 478-484Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Microalgae are considered as potential sources for biodiesel production due to the higher growth rate than terrestrial plants. However, the large-scale application of algal biodiesel would be limited by the downstream cost of lipid extraction and the availability of water, CO2 and nutrients. A possible solution is to integrate algae cultivation with existing biogas plant, where algae can be cultivated using the discharges of CO2 and digestate as nutrient input, and then the attained biomass can be converted directly to biomethane by existing infrastructures. This integrated system is investigated and evaluated in this study. Algae are cultivated in a photobioreactor in a greenhouse, and two cultivation options (greenhouse with and without heating) are included. Life cycle assessment of the system was conducted, showing that algal biomethane production without greenhouse heating would have a net energy ratio of 1.54, which is slightly lower than that (1.78) of biomethane from ley crop. However, land requirement of the latter is approximately 68 times that of the former, because the area productivity of algae could reach at about 400t/ha (dry basis) in half a year, while the annual productivity of ley crop is only about 5.8t/ha. For the case of Växtkraft biogas plant in Västerås, Sweden, the integrated system has the potential to increase the annual biomethane output by 9.4%. This new process is very simple, which might have potential for scale-up and commercial application of algal bioenergy.

  • 192. Wei, Yi-Ming
    et al.
    Wang, Lu
    Liao, Hua
    Wang, Ke
    Murty, Tad
    Yan, Jinyue
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemical Engineering and Technology, Energy Processes. Malardalen Univ MDU, Vasteras, Sweden.
    Responsibility accounting in carbon allocation: A global perspective2014In: Applied Energy, ISSN 0306-2619, E-ISSN 1872-9118, Vol. 130, p. 122-133Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Regarding the carbon emissions allocation principles, whether historical responsibility can be and how to be incorporated into the global climate framework is still under heated discussions. Here we argue that the permits share of most developed countries will sharply shrink when historical responsibilities are taken in through our assessment and comparison of six selected allocation proposals. To find a more convincing way of responsibility shift, we modify the existing method by giving each participant an independent year, decided by comparing its economic development with reference to China, as the start point to calculate its own responsibilities quantified by the historical cumulative emissions. Then we obtain carbon emission accounts of 137 countries and regions on the basis of per-capita cumulative emissions. Compared with the conventional method, there is an average 2.5% increase in emission deficits of the U.S.A, Canada and Japan, however, a 50% decline in emission deficits of OECD Europe; emission revenues of China, India and Brazil decrease by 39%. This paper presents a systematic and quantitative method to achieve a common but differentiated responsibility shift, not only between developed and developing countries but also within industrialized countries, in the hope of providing the framework for rational allocation of carbon emissions to be deliberated in the forthcoming climate change program of the United Nations.

  • 193. Wen, Z.
    et al.
    Yu, X.
    Tu, S. -T
    Yan, Jinyue
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemical Engineering and Technology, Energy Processes.
    Catalytic Biodiesel Production2013In: Air Pollution Prevention and Control: Bioreactors and Bioenergy, John Wiley & Sons, 2013, p. 383-397Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Biodiesel can be produced through transesterification process with alcohols by using batch reactors with homogeneous catalysts. However, this type of operation process exhibits low efficiency along with issues on the post-treatment or recycle of homogeneous catalysts. To improve those shortcomings, new intensified continuous reactors and heterogeneous catalysts have been developed to meet both the requirement of high-efficiency and low-pollution. This chapter will summarize the recent progress of intensified reactors and new solid heterogeneous catalysts for biodiesel production, which will provide solid foundations to analyze the potential continuous reactors and solid heterogeneous catalysts for large-scale biodiesel production. Furthermore, the economic analysis and ecological issues are also demonstrated in the end.

  • 194. Wen, Zhenzhong
    et al.
    Yu, Xinhai
    Tu, Shan-Tung
    Yan, Jinyue
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemical Engineering and Technology, Energy Processes.
    Dahlquist, Erik
    Biodiesel production from waste cooking oil catalyzed by TiO2-MgO mixed oxides2010In: Bioresource Technology, ISSN 0960-8524, E-ISSN 1873-2976, Vol. 101, no 24, p. 9570-9576Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mixed oxides of TiO2-MgO obtained by the sal-gel method were used to convert waste cooking oil into biodiesel. Titanium improved the stability of the catalyst because of the defects induced by the substitution of Ti ions for Mg ions in the magnesia lattice. The best catalyst was determined to be MT-1-923, which is comprised of an Mg/Ti molar ratio of 1 and calcined at 923 K, based on an assessment of the activity and stability of the catalyst. The main reaction parameters, including methanol/oil molar ratio, catalyst amount, and temperature, were investigated. The catalytic activity of MT-1-923 decreased slowly in the reuse process. After regeneration, the activity of MT-1-923 slightly increased compared with that of the fresh catalyst due to an increase in the specific surface area and average pore diameter. The mixed oxides catalyst. TiO2-MgO, showed good potential in large-scale biodiesel production from waste cooking oil.

  • 195. Wen, Zhenzhong
    et al.
    Yu, Xinhai
    Tu, Shan-Tung
    Yan, Jinyue
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemical Engineering and Technology, Energy Processes.
    Dahlquist, Erik
    Intensification of biodiesel synthesis using zigzag micro-channel reactors2009In: Bioresource Technology, ISSN 0960-8524, E-ISSN 1873-2976, Vol. 100, no 12, p. 3054-3060Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Zigzag micro-channel reactors have been fabricated and used for continuous alkali-catalyzed biodiesel synthesis. The influences of the main geometric parameters on the performance of the micro-channel reactors were experimentally studied. it has been found that the zigzag micro-channel reactor with smaller channel size and more turns produces smaller droplets which result in higher efficiency of biodiesel synthesis. Compared to conventional stirred reactors, the time for high methyl ester conversion can be shortened significantly with the methyl ester yield of 99.5% at the residence time of only 28 s by using the optimized zigzag micro-channel reactor, which also exhibits less energy consumption for the same amount of biodiesel during biodiesel synthesis. The results indicate that zigzag micro-channel reactors can be designed as compact and mini-fuel processing plant for distributive applications.

  • 196. Wen, Zhenzhong
    et al.
    Yu, Xinhai
    Tu, Shan-Tung
    Yan, Jinyue
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemical Engineering and Technology, Energy Processes.
    Dahlquist, Erik
    Synthesis of biodiesel from vegetable oil with methanol catalyzed by Li-doped magnesium oxide catalysts2010In: Applied Energy, ISSN 0306-2619, E-ISSN 1872-9118, Vol. 87, no 3, p. 743-748Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The preparation of a Li-doped MgO for biodiesel synthesis has been investigated by optimizing the catalyst composition and calcination temperatures. The results show that the formation of strong base sites is particularly promoted by the addition of Li, thus resulting in an increase of the biodiesel synthesis. The catalyst with the Li/Mg molar ratio of 0.08 and calcination temperature of 823 K exhibits the best performance. The biodiesel conversion decreases with further increasing Lift molar ratio above 0.08, which is most likely attributed to the separated lithium hydroxide formed by excess Li ions and a concomitant decrease of BET values. In addition, the effects of methanol/oil molar ratio, reaction time, catalyst amount, and catalyst stability were also investigated for the optimized Li-doped MgO. The metal leaching from the Li-doped MgO catalysts was detected, indicating more studies are needed to stabilize the catalysts for its application in the large-scale biodiesel production facilities.

  • 197. Whalen, Joann
    et al.
    Xu, Charles (Chunbao)
    Shen, Fei
    Kumar, Amit
    Eklund, Mats
    Yan, Jinyue
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemical Engineering and Technology, Energy Processes. Mälardalen University, Sweden.
    Sustainable biofuel production from forestry, agricultural and waste biomass feedstocks2017In: Applied Energy, ISSN 0306-2619, E-ISSN 1872-9118, Vol. 198, p. 281-283Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 198. Wolf, J.
    et al.
    Anheden, M.
    Yan, Jinyue
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemical Engineering and Technology, Energy Processes.
    Comparison of nickel- and iron-based oxygen carriers in chemical looping combustion for CO2 capture in power generation2005In: Fuel, ISSN 0016-2361, E-ISSN 1873-7153, Vol. 84, no 7-8, p. 993-1006Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In chemical looping combustion (CLC), a solid oxygen carrier circulates between two fluidised bed reactors and transports oxygen from the combustion air to the fuel: thus, the fuel is not mixed with air and an inherent CO2 separation occurs. In this paper, CLC is integrated in a natural gas fired combined cycle (NGCC). In this system, nickel- and iron-based oxygen carriers are compared regarding the system's electrical and exergy efficiencies. Furthermore, the feasibility of CLC in two interconnected pressurised fluidised bed reactors (IPFBR) is studied for both oxygen carriers. The hypothetical layout plus dimensions of the IPFBR is presented for a capacity of 800 MW input of natural gas. Finally, top-firing is proposed as an option to overcome the apparent limitation in operating temperature of the reactor equipment and/or the oxygen carriers. The results indicate that there is no significant difference in the system's efficiency if both oxygen carriers could operate at the same temperature. However, CLC seems easier to be technically realised in an IPFBR with a nickel-based oxygen carrier.

  • 199. Wolf, J.
    et al.
    Barone, F.
    Yan, Jinyue
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Chemical Engineering and Technology.
    Performance analysis of evaporative biomass air turbine cycle with gasification for topping combustion2002In: Journal of engineering for gas turbines and power, ISSN 0742-4795, E-ISSN 1528-8919, Vol. 124, no 4, p. 757-761Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper investigates the performance of a new power cycle, a so called evaporative biomass air turbine (EvGT-BAT) cycle with gasification for topping combustion. The process integrates an externally fired gas turbine (EFGT), an evaporative gas turbine (EvGT), and biomass gasification. Through such integration, the system may provide the potential for adapting features from different advanced solid-fuel-based power generation technologies, e.g., externally fired gas turbine, integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC), and fluidized bed combustion, thus improving the system performance and reducing the technical difficulties. In the paper the features of the EvGT-BAT cycle have been addressed. The thermal efficiencies for different integrations of the gasification for topping combustion and the heat recovery have been analyzed. By drying the biomass feedstock, the thermal efficiency of the EvGT-BAT cycle can be increased by more than three percentage points. The impact of the outlet air temperature of the high-temperature heat exchanger has also been studied in the present system. Finally, the size of the gasifier for topping combustion has been compared with the one in IGCC, which illustrates that the gasifier of the studied system can be much smaller compared to IGCC The results of the study will be useful for the future engineering development of advanced solid fuel power generation technologies.

  • 200. Wolf, J.
    et al.
    Yan, Jinyue
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemical Engineering and Technology, Energy Processes.
    Parametric study of chemical looping combustion for tri-generation of hydrogen, heat, and electrical power with CO2 capture2005In: International journal of energy research (Print), ISSN 0363-907X, E-ISSN 1099-114X, Vol. 29, no 8, p. 739-753Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article, a novel cycle configuration has been studied, termed the extended chemical looping combustion integrated in a steam-injected gas turbine cycle. The products of this system are hydrogen, heat, and electrical power. Furthermore, the system inherently separates the CO2 and hydrogen that is produced during the combustion. The core process is an extended chemical looping combustion (exCLC) process which is based on classical chemical looping combustion (CLC). In classical CLC, a solid oxygen carrier circulates between two fluidized bed reactors and transports oxygen from the combustion air to the fuel; thus, the fuel is not mixed with air and an inherent CO2 separation occurs. In exCLC the oxygen carrier circulates along with a carbon carrier between three fluidized bed reactors, one to oxidize the oxygen carrier, one to produces and separate the hydrogen, and one to regenerate the carbon carrier. The impacts of process parameters, such as flowrates and temperatures have been studied on the efficiencies of producing electrical power, hydrogen, and district heating and on the degree of capturing CO2. The result shows that this process has the potential to achieve a thermal efficiency of 54% while 96% of the CO2 is captured and compressed to 110 bar.

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