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  • 201.
    Boon, Edward
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Veligurska, Olga
    KTH.
    DIFFERENTIATION BETWEEN BUSINESS SCHOOL RESPONSIBILITY EFFORTS ACROSS REGIONS: A CONTENT ANALYSIS OF PRME SHARING INFORMATION ON PROGRESS REPORTS2015In: IDEAS IN MARKETING: FINDING THE NEW AND POLISHING THE OLD, Springer, 2015, p. 680-683Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 202.
    Borgefors, Simon
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Lahlou, Mehdi
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    How Founding Teams and External Investors Drive Success: Entrepreneurial Guidance for Swedish Technology Startups and Their Investors2017Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Human capital assessment is an integral part of the in-depth evaluation conducted by Venture Capitalists (VCs) before an investment decision. Furthermore, an effective collaboration between external investors and the founding team can be vital for the success of a startup venture. This thesis aims to improve this assessment and collaboration by providing an empirical account of historically successful Swedish tech startups and their founding teams (FT). We employ semi-structured interviews with 13 entrepreneurs who in total have founded over 50 ventures in order to deduce patterns to the characteristics, compositions and views of successful founding management teams. We compile and discuss their views concerning aspects such as organizational culture, team performance and their relationships with external financiers. The focus of this thesis was in part guided by our commissioner, Almi Invest.

    Based on our interviews and literature review, we present several findings which may be of interest to both investors and entrepreneurs. Some of our key findings are that successful Swedish tech startups are generally composed of diverse teams where the founders share some previous association and complement each other with regards to both competencies and personalities. They view culture and vision as important aspects, with values acting as the uniting factor that drives cohesion and performance. We also find that their views are largely influenced by previous experiences. Finally, we highlight some perceived inefficiencies in the collaboration between investors and entrepreneurs, mainly with regards to post-investment activities and the process of raising capital. Our findings suggest a lack of transparency between entrepreneurs and financiers regarding the investor activity levels, where entrepreneurs generally feel that VCs fall short on their promises. We suggest some areas of improvement where VCs might tune their practices to better suit the needs of their portfolio companies and improve overall performance.

  • 203.
    Borhanazad, Arian
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Economics and Management (Div.).
    Tran, Martin
    Improved Sourcing Flexibility through Strategic Procurement: A Case Study in a Global Manufacturing Company2012Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Background –

    Increase in global competition, technological changes and demanding customers have resulted in more knowledge-intensive, unstable, complicated and an uncertain environment. In order to overcome these demand uncertainties and tough circumstances, manufacturers are required to investigate methods to increase flexibility. To achieve the flexibility improvements, each component of supply chain such as suppliers, manufacturing plants, warehouses, and distributors must possess the potential to be flexible. Theory implies that the main link between company’s upstream supply chain namely suppliers and its own business unit are the sourcing strategy. Usually sourcing practitioners distinguish between sourcing strategies using portfolio models. They normally categorize purchased items based on the strategic importance of the item and characteristics of its supply market. It is a critical issue to explore how different sourcing strategies, for different categories of procured items, can influence sourcing flexibility.

    Purpose–

    The purpose has been diagnosed as to study how the prerequisites of Bombardier’s procurement procedures along with its associated strategies, can affect the flexibility that can

    be provided through sourcing namely sourcing flexibility. This study desires to investigate the concept of sourcing flexibility with considerations on category level. It can be beneficial to investigate how different strategies, related to different categories of procured component, can influence the level of sourcing flexibility specified to that category. This would lead us to two key questions: How can sourcing flexibility be defined in Bombardier and why is it required? How can sourcing strategies influence sourcing flexibility considering different categories of components?

    Methodology–

    To provide appropriate definitions for sourcing flexibility and strategic procurement, this study went through a comprehensive review on the relevant literatures. By a deep analysis, accompanied with several unstructured interviews on one of the undergoing projects in the company, the drivers for the sourcing flexibility have been diagnosed. The procured components have been categorized into four categories of strategic, bottleneck, leverage, and noncritical through 4 different structured quantitative questionnaires. 33 diverse individuals with purchasing and/or engineering background answered those questionnaires. The categorization criteria have been extracted out from two models suggested by Kraljic (1983) and Olsen & Ellram (1997). Four independent components, one from each category, were selected for further observations. Finally, the links between sourcing strategies and sourcing flexibilities were expansively analyzed through 9 semi structured interviews with company’s strategic purchasers and suppliers’ representatives.

    Conclusion–

    Sourcing flexibility can be defined from two perspectives. First one refers to the capability of the focal firm to change the structure of its upstream supply chain. Second aspect refers to the ability of company’s suppliers to provide it with flexibility in three dimensions of delivery, volume and product. Both two aspects along with related dimensions can be measured in three different conditions of required, actual and potential by using range, mobility and uniformity as measuring elements. The results showed that the first perspective has a direct relationship to the sourcing strategies that focal firm may apply for different categories of procured component. Furthermore, the availability of second perspective is highly dependent on the relationship between the focal company and its suppliers, where strategic procurement plays an indispensable role. Based on the results the required level of sourcing flexibility, related to each category, differs significantly with other categories. The findings also suggested that the levels of delivery, volume and product flexibility have a close connection to the diverse strategies and attributes of the four different categories. Additionally they are well dependent on the internal operational capabilities of the suppliers along with the established relationship between buyer and supplier.

    Originality/Value–

    Main portions of previous studies have explored the concepts of sourcing flexibility and strategic procurement separately. Although, there exists some narrow numbers that have analyzed the relationship between sourcing strategies and sourcing flexibility to some limited extent. This study tries to contribute to the existing literature by empirically exploring the principal reasons for companies necessitating to increase sourcing flexibility. It investigates how sourcing flexibility can be improved through strategic procurement. The main contribution is to consider sourcing flexibility from the category perspective. Latter is a subject that has been neglected in the previous literatures. It is extremely hard to find literature which has analyzed sourcing flexibility at the category level. This report analyses the level of sourcing flexibility specified to different categories of strategic, bottleneck, leverage, and noncritical components. It suggests some factors that may influence the

    selection of a specific sourcing flexibility strategy regarding different component categories. Finally, it may introduce some extra elements that can be influential on the level of sourcing flexibility dimensions. Some examples of those influential elements are bargaining power and establishment of a close relationship.

  • 204. Bourne, Clare
    et al.
    Grove, Amy
    Macintyre, Mairi
    Angelis, Jannis
    Operations Management, Warwick Business School.
    Social marketing for self care2009In: Proceedings of the 20th Annual Production and Operations Management Society Conference, 2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 205. Bourne, Clare
    et al.
    Macintyre, Mairi
    Grove, Amy
    Angelis, Jannis
    Operations Management, Warwick Business School.
    The role of access to patient information in fostering sustainable healthcare: A community care perspective in the UK2010In: Proceedings of the 6th International Conference on Environmental, Cultural, Economic and Social Sustainability, 2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 206. Breuer, Wolfgang
    et al.
    Felde, Moritz
    Steininger, Bertram
    Department of Finance, RWTH Aachen University, Templergraben 64, Aachen, 52056, Germany.
    The Financial Impact of Firm Withdrawals from “State Sponsor of Terrorism” Countries2017In: Journal of Business Ethics, ISSN 0167-4544, E-ISSN 1573-0697, Vol. 144, no 3, p. 533-547Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Using an event-study framework, we examine the stock market reaction to the announcement of firm withdrawal from countries designated as "State Sponsors of Terrorism" by the U.S. Department of State. We find that such announcements are, on average, linked to a statistically significant increase in firm value-an effect which already kicks in a few days before the announcement date. The observed abnormal returns are positively associated with the U.S. domicile, the intensity of a firm's hitherto existing engagement in a designated country, the number of countries that it withdraws from, as well as with a withdrawal from Iran compared to a withdrawal from other countries. Evidence suggests an increase in demand for stocks of withdrawing firms as a plausible cause of the positive stock price reaction. Pension and endowment funds are significantly less likely to own strategic stakes in firms with intensive involvements in countries designated as "State Sponsors of Terrorism." We find some statistical evidence that firms remaining active in such countries have abnormally positive returns in the long run.

  • 207.
    Broström, Anders
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Economics.
    Ekman Rising, Marianne
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    Geschwind, Lars
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Learning.
    Lindgren, Monica
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    Packendorff, Johann
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management. Sevenday.
    Instrumentalisation of academic work: Creeping, myopic and individualising processes and their consequences2019Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 208.
    Broström, Anders
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre of Excellence for Science and Innovation Studies, CESIS.
    McKelvey, Maureen
    Sandström, Christian
    Investing in Localized Relationships with Universities: What are the Benefits for RD Subsidiaries of Multinational Enterprises?2009In: Industry and Innovation, ISSN 1366-2716, E-ISSN 1469-8390, Vol. 16, no 1, p. 59-78Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In spite of a long-standing interest in the distribution of knowledge spillovers from university research, there is only limited theoretical understanding of if and when opportunities to interact with a research university constitute a significant force of attraction for globally mobile investment in RD. Based on an empirical investigation of the benefits of interaction with universities, this paper proposes an analytical framework and four ideal types of strategy for localised collaboration between RD subsidiaries and universities. This taxonomy, which largely transcends industry sectors, and the illustrative cases presented in this paper provide insights into the potential scope for localised university-industry interaction from the perspective of multinational enterprises. By connecting the empirical results to the question whether these benefits are significant enough to enhance a region's attractiveness as a location for RD, we are able to develop a better understanding of the alternative strategies for policymakers and university leaders interested in stimulating such linkages.

  • 209.
    Brown, Terrence
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.). Luleå University of Technology, Sweden.
    Sensor-based entrepreneurship: A framework for developing new products and services2017In: Business Horizons, ISSN 0007-6813, E-ISSN 1873-6068, Vol. 60, no 6, p. 819-830Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As the Internet of Things (IoT) begins to dominate the technology landscape, there will be new products and services that will become technically and financially feasible. Internet technologies and advancements in social interac- tion tools have led to an increase in the use of the crowd as a provider of business solutions. Yet, we have seen a mere fraction of the possibilities of crowdsourcing technologies. This is because most of the development, discussion, and research around crowdsourcing has focused on active-input crowdsourcing. However, the real transformative pressure will come from passive sources of data generated primarily by developing and growing sensor technologies. This next generation of crowdsour- cing will be a game changer for entrepreneurial opportunities. As crowdsourcing systems proliferate, more input will be acquired from sensors, artificial intelligence, bots, and other devices. As a result of this explosion, the variety of product and service opportunities will swell as entrepreneurs become more aware of technologies merging–—such as the combination of crowdsourcing, sensors, and big data into a new type of entrepreneurship: sensor-based entrepreneurship. The purpose of this research is to contribute by (1) clarifying the next generation of crowdsourcing and (2) developing and presenting a framework to help sensor-based entrepreneurs plan, develop, and map their new products and services.

  • 210.
    Brown, Terrence
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.). Luleå University of Technology, Luleå, Sweden.
    Boon, Edward
    Pitt, Leyland
    Seeking funding in order to sell: Crowdfunding as a marketing tool2017In: Business Horizons, ISSN 0007-6813, E-ISSN 1873-6068, Vol. 60, no 2, p. 189-195Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Websites such as Indiegogo and Kickstarter have attracted much attention for their ability to enable organizations and individuals to raise funds from ordinary people who contribute for a number of reasons. This phenomenon is called crowd- funding. Crowdfunding permits organizations and individuals to obtain investments they otherwise might not receive from more traditional sources such as banks, angel investors, and stock markets. A number of now well-known startups had their origins in crowdfunding. More recently, established organizations have begun to use crowd- funding websites not only as a source of finance, but also as marketing platforms. In this way, they have been able to ensure a ready market for their new offerings, with full sales pipelines, and to use the platforms as vehicles to boost brand image and gain support for brand-related causes. This adaptation of crowdfunding for marketing purposes is not without its problems, however, and organizations would be well advised to consider not only the opportunities these platforms provide, but also their limitations

  • 211.
    Brown, Terrence
    et al.
    Scandinavian International Management Institute.
    Kraus, Sascha
    Universität Liechtenstein.
    Entrepreneurial venturing as the process of opportunity, growth and value creation2009In: International Journal of Entrepreneurial Venturing, ISSN 1742-5360, E-ISSN 1742-5379, Vol. 1, no 1, p. 1-4Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 212.
    Brown, Terrence
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Business Development and Entrepreneurship.
    Kraus, Sascha
    Universität Liechtenstein.
    Why are gaps important to the opportunity development process?2010In: International Journal of Entrepreneurial Venturing, ISSN 1742-5360, E-ISSN 1742-5379, Vol. 1, no 3, p. 349-351Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 213. Brunch, Jessica
    et al.
    Bellgran, Monica
    Angelis, Jannis
    Operations Management, Warwick Business School.
    Information management for production system design with a new portfolio approach2011In: Proceedings of the 21st International Conference on Production Research, 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 214.
    Bygren, Kathrine
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Entrepreneurship and innovation. 1990.
    The digitalization impact on accounting firms business models2016Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Technological revolutions have occurred for markets and industries since the rise of organized communities and societies. In the past few years a technological revolution has been in process with the growth of digitalized markets. This has resulted in a shift of analog business becoming digitalized. Digitization is a structural change for industries and the Swedish economy is affected by it. This put a demand on many industries to adapt digitalized techniques, in order to stay competitive and survive this technical shift. Adapting to a technical revolution puts pressure on the business strategies and requires companies to model new ones. With the digitization, new requirements have arisen for companies to create new business models, value chains and ways of organizing activities, in order to manage the business strategies. Digitization has been seen to change innovation processes and some experts believe it will change whole markets. The accounting industry is one of the industries that has been seen to have a growth in digitalization and is expected to grow even more. The accounting industry is like many other industries are experiencing the need for a change due to digital technologies. Therefore, this study aims to investigate how digital accounting businesses could set up a general business model, in order to be a successfully digitalized business.

    This has been conducted through a multiple case study, with the aim to provide generalized findings of business model elements and barriers/facilitators for digitalization affecting the business model. The multiple case studies has been conducted through interviews with different accounting companies, that market themselves as digitalized actors.

    The findings of the research indicate that digitalization had a direct affect on how companies should strategically organize a business. Many of the implications on digitalized accounting will have direct impact on strategies, actions and processes. The digitalization will require company cultures, which are digitalization friendly. Some of the found results are: digitization will give accounting companies digital accounting tools, knowledge sharing and communication channels. It will put pressure on employees for having different knowledge than analogue businesses and more expertise skills. Digitalization it is estimated to affect the offerings provided to customers. The digitalization is also most likely to have key partners, targeted customer segment, cost structure and revenue streams specific for being digitalized. Digitalization of the accounting industry is likely to change the market from being a supplier driven to becoming demand driven and new actors with less accounting knowledge could get a opening for entering the market. And there are many barriers and a few facilitators for being a digitalized accounting business. This has been taken in consideration when mapping a general business model for a digital accounting firm in this report.

  • 215.
    Bäcklander, Gisela
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Management.
    Autonomous, yet Aligned: Challenges of Self-Leadership in Context2019Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In this thesis, I add to theories of management of knowledge work at the micro-level, by an examination of self-leadership in knowledge work and organizational attempts to foster it at the individual and team levels, in the empirical settings of innovative software development, consultants, and activity based working; the methods are mainly interviews and thematic analysis (I-III), and survey and statistical analysis (IV). The main research question has been: How can organizations support sustainable and productive self-leadership in their employees?

       In paper I, a ‘seeing work’-skill emerged in all interviews with managers, implicating situational judgment and attention as core to what is ultimately seen as successful self-direction. In paper II, consultants indicate the expectation to “infer” demands as leading to internalization of demands and seeing oneself as a source of stress. While consultants expressed a belief in internal self-discipline strategies of a more reactive nature to self-lead, in fact, external and proactive strategies (selecting or modifying the working environment) were the most effective in practice, echoing recent research on limited self-regulatory resources.

       Paper IV examined quantitatively the hypothesis, based on papers I & II, that having timely access to work relevant information (“information richness”) would have a stronger relationship with lower cognitive stress and better performance, than internal, self-focused self-leadership strategies, in the setting of Activity Based Working Environments where employees have high autonomy to decide how, where, when, and with whom to perform work. This hypothesis was confirmed, suggesting that when organizational situations cannot be strongly structured, for example because the best work process is not known, or innovation or different collaboration constellations are needed, they need instead to be enriched so that employee orientation and co-ordination does not become too much of a burden on the individual employee, disrupting cognitive functioning and performance.

       Paper III is a case study of agile coaches at Spotify and how they practise enabling leadership, a key balancing force of complexity leadership theory (Uhl-Bien, Marion, & McKelvey, 2007). Coaches practise enabling leadership by increasing the context‐sensitivity of others, supporting other leaders, establishing and reinforcing simple principles, observing group dynamics, surfacing conflict and facilitating and encouraging constructive dialogue. The AC as complexity leader values being present, observing and reacting in the moment. Findings suggest flexible structure provided by an attentive coach may prove a fruitful way to navigate and balance autonomy and alignment in organizations.

       The re-conceptualization of self-leadership in this thesis points to the importance for the individual of 1) being able to navigate ”weak situations” and to ”see” or ”create” one’s own work tasks so as to make a valuable contribution to the organization, and 2) for the ability to offload cognitive demands onto the environment, in a broad sense. Supporting self-leadership, then, would mean supporting these two main mechanisms. And with a resource perspective, organizations can offer support by building or offering resources, of various kinds, that allow for employees to have more resources to spare for where and when they are truly needed.

  • 216.
    Bäcklander, Gisela
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Doing Complexity Leadership Theory: How agile coaches at Spotify practice enabling leadership2019In: Creativity and Innovation Management, ISSN 0963-1690, E-ISSN 1467-8691, Vol. 28, no 1, p. 42-60Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Complexity leadership theory (CLT) is about balancing formal and informal organisation to leverage dynamics of Complex Adaptive Systems (CAS) and produce learning, creativity, and adaptation in organisations. Based on interviews with sixteen agile coaches (AC) at Spotify, this study examines how AC practice enabling leadership, a key balancing force in complexity leadership. Coaches practice enabling leadership by increasing the context-sensitivity of others, supporting other leaders, establishing and reinforcing simple principles, observing group dynamics, surfacing conflict and facilitating and encouraging constructive dialogue. The AC as complexity leader values being present,observing and reacting in the moment. Findings suggest flexible structure provided by an attentive coach may prove a fruitful way to navigate and balance autonomy and alignment in organisations.

  • 217.
    Bäcklander, Gisela
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Management.
    Rosengren, Calle
    Kaulio, Matti
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Managing Intensity in Knowledge Work: Self-Leadership Practices among Danish Management ConsultantsIn: Journal of Management and Organization, ISSN 1833-3672, E-ISSN 1839-3527Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper examines the sources of knowledge workers’ work intensity and the self-leading strategies they apply to deal with it. The paper is based on focus group interviews with management consultants in a Danish management consultancy firm. Work intensity was identified as resulting from a combination of: (1) a results-only focus, (2) vagueness, (3) boundaryless work, and (4) low control of the quantitative load. A framework for self-leading strategies is developed based on the dimensions of reactive/proactive and self-focused/externally-focused strategies in different combinations. The results indicate that while consultants expressed a belief in internal self-discipline strategies of a more reactive nature, in fact, external and proactive strategies were the most effective in practice. In conclusion, the paper contributes to an extension of self-leadership theory to better account for current research on self-control.

  • 218.
    Bäcklander, Gisela
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Management.
    Rosengren, Calle
    Kaulio, Matti
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Managing Intensity in Knowledge Work: Self-Leadership Practices among Danish Management ConsultantsIn: Journal of Management and Organization, ISSN 1833-3672, E-ISSN 1839-3527Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper examines the sources of knowledge workers’ work intensity and the self-leading strategies they apply to deal with it. The paper is based on focus group interviews with management consultants in a Danish management consultancy firm. Work intensity was identified as resulting from a combination of: (1) a results-only focus, (2) vagueness, (3) boundaryless work, and (4) low control of the quantitative load. A framework for self-leading strategies is developed based on the dimensions of reactive/proactive and self-focused/externally-focused strategies in different combinations. The results indicate that while consultants expressed a belief in internal self-discipline strategies of a more reactive nature, in fact, external and proactive strategies were the most effective in practice. In conclusion, the paper contributes to an extension of self-leadership theory to better account for current research on self-control.

  • 219.
    Carlström, Emil
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Business Development and Entrepreneurship.
    Nordqvist, Jesper
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Business Development and Entrepreneurship.
    Drivers and challenges for growing hauliers: What services can Scania offer to contribute to haulier growth?2012Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Scania is a leading European developer and manufacturer of trucks, buses and engines, based in Södertälje in Sweden. From traditionally having been focused on offering their customer high quality products, Scania is now moving towards becoming a solution provider. This requires a combination of products and services and a deeper understanding of their customers’ business.

    Hauliers are one of Scania’s most important customer segments. In order to improve its solution offer, Scania wants to gain a deeper understanding about how hauliers develop. Recent studies at Scania have shown deficiencies in knowledge about haulier development. To fill this gap, this master’s thesis was initiated with the purpose of

    "gaining insight into haulier development and listing implications for Scania‟s business and service development". The aim of the study was to identify drivers, challenges and other important factors for growing hauliers. This result was then used to understand how Scania can contribute to its haulier customers’ growth by offering services.

    Seven hauliers were selected based on a number of criteria and studied closely. The results showed a gap between the services offered by Scania today and the services suggested after analyses. Particularly, it indicated that non vehicle related services could help hauliers make crucial steps in their development. Scania is advised to further deepen its understanding about haulier development. By doing this, Scania would take an important step into becoming the solution provider it aims to be.

  • 220.
    Case, Peter
    et al.
    University of the West of England.
    Cicmil, SvetlanaUniversity of the West of England.Hodgson, DamianManchester Business School.Lindgren, MonicaKTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).Packendorff, JohannKTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Proceedings of the 5th Making Projects Critical workshop2010Conference proceedings (editor) (Refereed)
  • 221.
    Ceylan, Serkan
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Using the Mental Force of The Employee: Entrepreneurship and Innovation Management Master’s Thesis2009Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 15 credits / 22,5 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study is to analyse the problem that the companies do not use the potential of their employees on innovations and intrapreneurial processes.

    The source of innovation is usually the entrepreneur. These are individuals that come up with new ideas of what the market is likely to want or desire. These people have usually gathered this knowledge through interaction with consumers. Sometimes it is the imaginative impulsive desire on their part to offer something new or different, at other times it is an improvement on previous knowledge. However in a corporate or large organisation environment it is often the employees who come up with innovative ideas because of their close contacts with consumers of the product or service of the company. They are very close to the ground realities and can be a great source of finding out the consumer desires or preferences. Although they are employees, they have the entrepreneurial spirit to understand the need of urge to meet the expectations. This gives them the same satisfaction an entrepreneur would feel on the success and acceptance of his innovative idea.

    Therefore being innovative is not the sole domain of the leaders, corporate or individual. The potential of the workers and employees remains unexploited in this direction.

    This study will try to find out the importance of the mental force of the employee on the survival of the company in this competitive world, from the perspective of innovation and intrapreneurship.

  • 222.
    Chen, Lujie
    et al.
    Linköpings Universitet.
    Tang, Ou
    Linköpings Universitet.
    Feldmann, Andreas
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Management.
    Applying GRI Reports for the Investigation of Environmental Management Practices and Company Performance in Sweden, China and India2015In: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 98, no 1, p. 36-46Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The relationship between environmental management practices (EMPs) and company performance has recently been debated in literature and is of interest for both industrial managers and political decision-makers. This paper investigates the relationship between EMPs and firm performance in manufacturing companies in Sweden, China and India. With the content analysis of Global Reporting Initiative (GRI) reports and financial reports of sample companies, the levels of EMPs and the companies' financial performances were coded. Further statistical assessment was conducted in order to identify patterns and correlations. The results indicate that only selected EMPs have been employed differently in three different countries. Most EMPs clearly do not have a positive correlation with the financial performance; i.e. employing EMPs does not necessarily improve the economic consequence of companies. Nevertheless, a number of EMPs do have a strong correlation with improving innovation performance in various companies. It is also interesting to note that a negative correlation exists between the Environmental standard for suppliers and Sales growth. This is possibly due to increasing operational costs and a delay in market acceptance. This research illustrates the possibility of using standard environmental data from GRI reports as a resource for future studies of EMPs. In order to improve long-term financial performance, this study also suggests that innovation should gain a substantial amount of attention when EMPs are employed.

  • 223.
    Chipp, Kerry
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM).
    When is your call important to us?In: Journal of Service Management, ISSN 1757-5818, E-ISSN 1757-5826Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose:

    A widespread narrative is that consumers are empowered, a condition attained from technology. Empirical results have been mixed. Despite a growing interest in consumer power, service dominant logic only addresses agency, not power. The current paper reviews how SD-logic can accommodate power.

     

    Design/methodology/approach:

     A conceptual paper

     

    Findings:

    Different conceptions of power are reviewed, amongst which discursive power is argued as the most compatible with SD-logic. The relationship between agency, power and the institutional context is discussed. Power is then argued as accessed at three levels: macro, meso and micro.

     

    Originality/value:

    The paper demonstrates how SD-logic can incorporate discursive notions of power. Three concepts of resourceness are developed: resource assets, resource deficits and resource compensation. Seven propositions are put forward.

     

    The full text will be freely available from 2020-03-02 11:47
  • 224.
    Chipp, Kerry
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Carter, Marcus
    GIBS, University of Pretoria.
    Chiba, Manoj
    GIBS, University of Pretoria.
    Through the Pyramid: Implications of interconnectedness in Africa2019In: European Business Review, ISSN 0955-534X, E-ISSN 1758-7107, Vol. 31, no 3, p. 289-303, article id EBR-01-2018-0006Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Many markets are conceptualized as a stratified low- and middle-income “pyramid” of consumers. Emerging markets are sites of rapid consumer mobility, and thus the middle class there is connected to, and often supports, low-income relatives and employees. Therefore, this paper aims to establish that African income groups are not insular, but rather interrelated and have strong social ties reinforced with longstanding communal values, such as ubuntu.

    Design/methodology/approach: Using a between-subjects experimental vignette design, the propensity of the middle class to cover low-income individuals on an insurance product was assessed.

    Findings: Income strata are interrelated and can inform value propositions, which is demonstrated in this paper with insurance, where the middle class are willing to include others, depending on their social proximity, on their insurance cover.

    Research limitations/implications: The context for this study was personal home insurance; hence, the generalisability of the results is circumscribed. Other more tangible forms of cover, such as medical, funeral or educational insurance, may engender far stronger effects.

    Practical implications: Marketers tend to view low- and middle-income consumers as independent. A view of their interrelation will change the design of many products and services, such as a service catered to the poor but targeted at their support networks. An example of such a service is insurance, which is traditionally hard to sell to the poor. A less atomistic approach to income strata could have implications for vicarious consumption, as well as a reconsideration of the disposable income of both groups.

    Originality/value: The pyramid is an interconnected network of social and economic ties.

  • 225.
    Chipp, Kerry
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.). Gordon Institute of Business Science University of Pretoria, South Africa.
    Mkwanazi, Penny
    GIBS, University of Pretoria.
    Kapelianis, Dimitri
    Ukukhothana: Conspicuous consumption and destruction in an emerging economy2019In: Journal of Business Research, ISSN 0148-2963, E-ISSN 1873-7978Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigates “ukukhothana” as a form of conspicuous consumption and destruction among poor black youth in South Africa. In highly-stylized public displays, competing crews gather to flaunt and taunt: they parade their wealth—typically luxury brands, but also cash—while boasting of their superiority. The displays culminate with acts of conspicuous destruction during which the luxury products are ripped, smashed, or burned. Based on qualitative research conducted in several townships, including depth interviews and observation, this study yields insights into the main features of ukukhothana as well as the drivers for engaging in this behavior. We identify three drivers: costly signaling, sexual signaling, and elements of power and powerlessness. Ukukhothana diverges from other forms of conspicuous consumption as it is both a stylized art form and a subversive form of power and resistance to the conditions of structural poverty.

    The full text will be freely available from 2020-01-08 14:30
  • 226.
    Chipp, Kerry
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Williams, Patricia
    GIBS, University of Pretoria.
    Lindgreen, Adam
    Copenhagen Business School.
    Value-in-Acquisition: An institutional view2019In: European Journal of Marketing, ISSN 0309-0566, E-ISSN 1758-7123, Vol. 55, no 11, p. 2373-2396, article id EJM-11-2017-0910Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract

    Purpose

    By combining consumer culture theory and service dominant logic, this study proposes that value might be understood as value-in-acquisition, such that value outcomes result from the acquisition process in which broader social forces shape the exchange process.

    Design/methodology/approach

    This study addresses low-income consumers, for whom societal arrangements strongly determine service interactions. Qualitative interviews reveal service value processes and outcomes for low-income consumers during acquisition processes.

    Findings

    For low-income consumers, inclusion, status, resource access and emotional relief represent key value outcomes. Important value processes shape those value outcomes, reflecting broader societal arrangements at macro, meso and micro levels. Marketing constitutes an institutional arrangement that establishes an empowered “consumer” role. Value processes are hindered if consumers sense that their agency in this role is diminished, because marketing interactions give precedence to other social roles.

    Research limitations/implications

    Marketing should be studied as an institutional arrangement that shapes value creation processes during acquisition. Micro-level value processes have important implications for service quality and service value. Value outcomes thus might be designed in the acquisition process, not just for the offering.

    Practical implications

    The acquisition process for any good or service should be designed with its own value proposition, separate to the core product or service. Careful design of value processes during acquisition could mitigate conflict between social roles and those of consumption.

    Originality/value

    There is value in the acquisition process, independent of the value embedded in the goods and services.

  • 227.
    Christian, Eliasson
    et al.
    Jönköping International Business School.
    Brown, Terrence
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Industrial Economics and Management.
    Exploring the difference between the entrepreneurial orientation scale and the entrepreneurial management scale as predictor of performance2004Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 228.
    Christian, Eliasson
    et al.
    Jönköping International Business School.
    Brown, Terrence
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Industrial Economics and Management.
    Knowledge-based resources, entrepreneurial management and firm performance2004Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 229.
    Cicmil, Svetlana
    et al.
    University of the West of England.
    Hodgson, Damian
    Manchester Business School.
    Lindgren, Monica
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Gender, Organisation and Management.
    Packendorff, Johann
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Gender, Organisation and Management.
    Project management behind the facade2009In: Ephemera : Theory and Politics in Organization, ISSN 2052-1499, E-ISSN 1473-2866, Vol. 9, no 2, p. 78-92Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 230.
    Cicmil, Svetlana
    et al.
    University of the West of England.
    Lindgren, Monica
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Can a 'projectified' society be a 'sustainable' society: A juncture of two logics or a contradiction in terms?2010Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 231.
    Cicmil, Svetlana
    et al.
    University of the West of England.
    Lindgren, Monica
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    Packendorff, Johann
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    The project (management) discourse and its consequences: On vulnerability and un-sustainability in project-based work2016In: New technology, work and employment, ISSN 0268-1072, E-ISSN 1468-005X, Vol. 31, no 1, p. 58-76Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we examine how the discourses related to project-based work and management are drawn upon in the organising of contemporary work, and the implications they have for project workers. We are interested in how project workers and projectified organisations become vulnerable to decline, decay and exhaustion and why they continue to participate in, and so sustain, projectification processes. The critical perspective taken here, in combination with our empirical material from the ICT sector, surfaces an irreversible decline of the coping capacity of project workers and draws attention to the addictive perception of resilience imposed on and internalised by them as a condition of success and longevity. Under those circumstances, resilience is made sense of and internalised as coping with vulnerability by letting some elements of life being destroyed; thus re-emerging as existentially vulnerable rather than avoiding or resisting the structures and processes that perpetuate vulnerability.

  • 232.
    Cicmil, Svetlana
    et al.
    University of the West of England.
    Lindgren, Monica
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    Packendorff, Johann
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    Vulnerable projectification2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 233. Conti, Robert
    et al.
    Angelis, Jannis
    Cooper, Cary
    Gender inclusive job and process designIn: New technology, work and employment, ISSN 0268-1072, E-ISSN 1468-005XArticle in journal (Refereed)
  • 234. Conti, Robert
    et al.
    Angelis, Jannis
    University of Cambridge.
    Cooper, Cary
    Faragher, Brian
    Gill, Colin
    Effects of just-in-time/lean production practices on worker job stress2004In: Proceedings of the Academy of Management Annual Meeting, 2004Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 235. Conti, Robert
    et al.
    Angelis, Jannis
    University of Oxford.
    Cooper, Cary
    Faragher, Brian
    Gill, Colin
    Gender and lean production implementation2005In: Reformulating Industrial Relations in Liberal Market Economies / [ed] K. Devine and J. Grenier, Captus , 2005, p. 89-104Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 236. Conti, Robert
    et al.
    Angelis, Jannis
    University of Cambridge.
    Cooper, Cary
    Faragher, Brian
    Gill, Colin
    Gender and lean production implementation2004In: Proceedings of the 41st Annual Canadian Industrial Relations Association Conference, 2004Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 237. Conti, Robert
    et al.
    Angelis, Jannis
    University of Cambridge.
    Cooper, Cary
    Faragher, Brian
    Gill, Colin
    Gender sensibility to particular lean practices2004In: Proceedings of the Decision Sciences Institute Conference, 2004Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 238. Conti, Robert
    et al.
    Angelis, Jannis
    University of Cambridge.
    Cooper, Cary
    Faragher, Brian
    Gill, Colin
    Must lean be mean?: The verdict2004In: Proceedings of the 15th Annual Production and Operations Management Society Conference, 2004Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 239. Conti, Robert
    et al.
    Angelis, Jannis
    Cooper, Cary
    Faragher, Brian
    Gill, Colin
    The effects of lean production on worker job stress2006In: International Journal of Operations & Production Management, ISSN 0144-3577, E-ISSN 1758-6593, Vol. 26, no 9-10, p. 1013-1038Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose-This empirical paper seeks to address the neglected work condition aspect of lean production (LP) implementation, specifically the relationship between LP and worker job stress. Design/methodology/approach-The Karasek job stress model was used to link shopfloor practices to expected worker stress. The model incorporates the effects of job demands (physical and psychological), job control and social support. The study employs management and worker questionnaires, management interviews and structured plant tours. The response variable is total worker job stress-the sum of the physical and mental stress levels. The independent variable for the first question is the degree of lean implementation at the sites. Findings-The results are based on 1,391 worker responses at 21 sites in the four UK industry sectors. About 11 tested practices are significantly related to stress and an unexpected non-linear response of stress to lean implementation is identified. Results indicate that LP is not inherently stressful, with stress levels significantly related to management decisions in designing and operating LP systems. Practical implications-The hypotheses tests shed light on the relationships between LP practices and job stress, and reveal a significant managerial influence on stress levels. The regression model shows the scale and significant lean practices of this influence, with the work practices explaining 30 percent of job stress variations. The stress reduction and stress control opportunities identified in the study show the potential for designing and operating effective lean systems while also controlling stress levels. Originality/value-This is the first known multi-industry empirical study of the relationship of job stress to a range of lean practices and to the degree of lean implementation.

  • 240. Conti, Robert
    et al.
    Angelis, Jannis
    University of Cambridge.
    Cooper, Cary
    Faragher, Brian
    Gill, Colin
    Women, men, and lean production2004In: Proceedings of the International Industrial Relations Association Conference, 2004Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 241. Conti, Robert
    et al.
    Angelis, Jannis
    University of Oxford.
    Cooper, Cary
    Gill, Colin
    Gender differences in lean production2005In: Proceedings of the 16th Annual Production and Operations Management Society Conference, 2005Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 242.
    Crespin-Mazet, Florence
    et al.
    Kedge Business School Marseille.
    Goglio Primard, Karine
    Kedge Business School Marseille.
    Havenvid, Malena Ingemansson
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Real Estate and Construction Management, Project Communication.
    Linné, Åse
    Uppsala University.
    Innovating in project-based organizations: patterns of interaction over time2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The construction sector is often identified as less innovative than other industries due to its project-based character and the lack of long-term relationships (Miozzo and Dewick, 2004; Bygballe et al., 2010). Even though individual projects are viewed as innovative arenas for problem solving and creating new ideas and solutions, the latter are however seldom scaled up and turned into widespread innovations (Winch, 2014). According to the IMP literature, this problem originates from the disconnection between the temporary project environment and the permanent organization of firms: project-led learning and solutions are hard to transfer to the wider organization and hence difficult to turn into business learning (Dubois and Gadde, 2002a; Brady and Davies, 2004; Hartmann and Dorée, 2015). This paper addresses this inherent paradox by focusing on the following research question: How can construction firms capitalize on new ideas and solutions across local and global company levels and their temporary and permanent internal networks in generating new innovations?

    This paper draws on a critical case (Yin, 2005) in the sense that we use it to “confirm, challenge, or extend” (Yin 2005, p. 40) IMP theory, specifically contributing to innovation in networks (Corsaro et al., 2012). In the case, there are two channels for new idea generation and innovation; one on the local project level and one on the global corporate management level. However, both are “failures” in terms of institutionalization of new knowledge into innovations. The case highlights the mechanisms mobilized by the firm’s staff over a long period (longitudinal perspective) to overcome the disconnections between the local and global firm levels and between its temporary and permanent organizational levels.  It highlights insights regarding the structure and dynamics of internal networks and especially the role of individuals in these networks. Due to the role of individuals and group dynamics in managing tensions, we had to expand the conceptual background from IMP and innovation networks to the community-of-practice lens (Wenger, 1998). This process corresponds to an “abductive” approach to research (Dubois and Gadde, 2002b).

    While IMP studies highlight the key role of interaction and high-involvement relationships in innovation processes both for the emergence of new solutions and for supporting their widespread use, few of these studies provide an in-depth analysis of how these learning and innovation processes transcend different organizational levels. In other words, how new solutions move from the project level to the firm level and vice-versa (Bygballe and Ingemansson, 2014). The community-of-practice literature enables us to dig more deeply in these processes by focusing on the individual and group dynamics (shared identity) and hence provides complementary insights to innovation in networks on the “social fabric” of learning and innovation (Wenger, 1998).

    The case study is structured around three major paradoxes (Andriopoulos & Lewis, 2018) which emerged during the firm’s internal innovation journey and reveals the way these paradoxes have been handled by local and/or global managers. The first paradox deals with the decision regarding the organizational level driving innovation (local versus global leadership), the second deals with the level of standardization or adaptation of the innovation to enhance its widespread use (adaptation to local context versus standardization); the third relates to the decision regarding autonomy versus control of the firm’s staff in the innovation journey.

    The results highlight that innovation in construction requires a connecting mechanism between top-down (global firm level) and bottom-up (local firm and project level) processes for idea development to turn into company-wide knowledge and practices. In this regard, communities of practice can play a key role in functioning as “vessels” for ideas and knowledge in both directions. However, while these informal structures are useful in favoring such ideation processes based on informal and emergent mechanisms, they also prove insufficient to turn these innovations into widespread solutions both within and outside the firm. Formal hierarchical structures and business networks are then required facilitate the widespread use of innovations.

    REFERENCES

    Andriopoulos & Lewis, (2018), “Exploitation-exploration Tensions and Organizational Ambidexterity: managing paradoxes of Innovation”, Organization Science, Vol.20, n°4, pp696-717

    Brady, T. and Davies, A. (2004), “Building project capabilities, from exploratory to exploitative learning”, Organization Studies, Vol. 29 No. 9, pp. 1601-1621.

    Bygballe, L., Jahre, M., Swärd, A., 2010, Partnering relationships in construction: A literature review, Journal of Purchasing & Supply Management, 16, 239-253.

    Bygballe, L. and Ingemansson, M. (2014) The Logic of Innovation in Construction, Industrial Marketing Management, 43:3, pp. 512-524

    Corsaro, D, Ramos, C, Henneberg, S. and Naude, P. (2012), “The impact of network configurations on value constellations in business markets – The case of an innovation network”, Industrial Marketing Management, Vol. 41, 54-67.

    Dubois, A., & Gadde, L. E. (2002a). The construction industry as a loosely coupled system: implications for productivity and innovation. Construction Management & Economics20 (7), 621-631.

    Dubois, A. and Gadde, L. -E. (2002b), “Systematic combining: An abductive approach to case research”, Journal of Business Research, vol. 55, p. 553–560.

    Hartmann, A. and Dorée, A. (2015), Learning between projects: More than sending messages in bottles”, International journal of project management, Vol. 33 No. 2, pp. 341-351.

    Miozzo, M. and Dewick, P. (2004), Innovation in Construction. A European Analysis, Edward Elgar Publishing Ltd., Cheltenham.

    Patton, M. Q. 2002. Qualitative Research and Evaluation Methods. Sage, Thousand Oaks, CA.

    Wenger, E. (1998). Communities of practice: Learning, meaning and identity. New York, NY: Cambridge University Press.

    Winch, G. M. (2014). Three domains of project organising. International Journal of Project Management, 32(5), 721-731.

    Yin, R. 2005. Case Study Research. Design and Methods. Sage, Thousand Oaks, CA.

  • 243.
    Crespin-Mazet, Florence
    et al.
    Kedge Business School Marseille .
    Goglio Primard, Karine
    Kedge Business School Marseille .
    Havenvid, Malena Ingemansson
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Real Estate and Construction Management, Project Communication.
    Linné, Åse
    Uppsala Universitet.
    The innovation journey in construction : considering the connecting role of communities and networks of practice2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The construction sector is often identified as a less innovative than other industries, due to its project-based character and the lack of-term relationships. This impacts how actors interact, learn and innovate over time. Even though projects are innovative arenas for new ideas and solutions, they are scaled up and turned into widespread innovations. This problem is deemed to originate from the disconnection between the temporary project environment and the permanent organisation of firms: project-led learning and solutions are hard to transfer to the wider organisation of the firm and hence, to turn into business-learning. This paper addresses this inherent paradox by focusing on the following research question: how can construction firms capitalize on new ideas and solutions across the local and global company levels and their temporary andpermanent networks in generating innovations?

  • 244.
    Crevani, Lucia
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Economics and Management (Div.) (closed (20130101). KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Gender, Organisation and Management (closed (20130101).
    Clearing for Action: Leadership as a Relational Phenomenon2011Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Although leadership is deemed to matter, scholars seldom pay attention to the phenomenon itself, as it is happening. Hence definitions abound, but there is a lack of vocabulary for expressing what leadership is about without ending up talking of individual leaders and/or descriptions of abstract “goodness”. Such an idealised and individualistic construct of leadership has consequences, both in theory and practice, in terms of providing a reductionist account, segregating and putting people in hierarchies, reinforcing the dominance of masculinities, and constraining how leadership is to be performed. Therefore, in order to contribute to our still limited knowledge of leadership beyond ideals and individualised conceptions, the purpose of this thesis is to add to our understanding of leadership as a social phenomenon going on at work and to contribute to developing a vocabulary for it.

    Reading the empirical material more and more closely, produced through an ethnography-inspired approach at two Swedish organisations and consisting of transcripts of interactions and interviews, the initial research question, “how is leadership shared in practice?” is subsequently modified and different strands of theories are applied: shared leadership, postheroic leadership and a radical processual view of leadership. In this way, different understandings of leadership are analysed. As a result, the theoretical concepts of organisational becoming, relational leadership and work practices are combined in an alternative approach. Two leadership practices are thus identified: constructing positions and positioning, and constructing issues. Such an analysis also leads to an alternative way of understanding leadership: leadership as clearing for action. Clearing is both a space, a bounded space, and an action. Therefore it expresses a relational perspective in which there are no stable entities, by suggesting a more dynamic view, at the same time as it also conveys the idea that we are talking about a constrained space.

    I thus define clearing for action as an emergent bounded aggregate of actions and talks that become possible, making others impossible or less probable. Actors and their worlds are constructed in certain ways that expand or contract the space of possible action. The result is a specific reading of leadership to add to the field of leadership studies. In this reading, leadership is an ordinary, repeated, social achievement at work in which possibilities for action and talk are constructed in constrained terms.

     

  • 245.
    Crevani, Lucia
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Economics and Management (Div.). KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Gender, Organisation and Management.
    Is there leadership in a fluid world?: The idea of ”Clearing for action” as a possible way of conceptualizing the ongoing production of direction in organizing2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 246.
    Crevani, Lucia
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Economics and Management (Div.) (closed (20130101). KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Gender, Organisation and Management (closed (20130101).
    Leadership, not leaders: Abstract of a study trying a process perspective on leadership2007In: Nordic Academy of Management, 2007Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 247.
    Crevani, Lucia
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Economics and Management (Div.). KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Gender, Organisation and Management.
    Leadership or organizing?: Leadership practices in processes of organizational becoming2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 248.
    Crevani, Lucia
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Gender, Organisation and Management (closed (20130101).
    Naming it as leadership: A relational construction of leadership as an alternative to heroic masculinity in an empirical study of two Swedish companies2008In: Engendering Leadership conference, 2008Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 249.
    Crevani, Lucia
    et al.
    Mälardalen University.
    Ekman, Marianne
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    Lindgren, Monica
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    Packendorff, Johann
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    Leadership cultures and discursive hybridisation: On the cultural production of leadership in higher education reforms2015In: International Journal of Public Leadership, ISSN 2056-4929, Vol. 11, no 3/4, p. 147-165Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    The purpose of this paper is to explore the concept of leadership culture and analyse how leadership cultures are produced in higher education reforms, in a hybridised discursive context of traditional academic values and emerging managerialism and leaderism.

    Design/methodology/approach

    Building on a perspective on leadership as a cultural phenomenon emerging in processes in which societal, sectorial and professional discursive resources are invoked, this study adds to earlier studies on how notions of leadership are involved in the transformation of higher education organisations. To this end, the method combines a traditional qualitative study of change initiatives over a long period of time with participative observation. Focusing on two vignettes, the analysis centres on how several discursive resources are drawn upon in daily interaction.

    Findings

    The emergence of hybrid leadership cultures in which several discursive resources are drawn upon in daily interaction is illustrated. This paper emphasises how hybrid cultures develop through confirmation, re-formulation and rejection of discursive influences.

    Research limitations/implications

    An extended empirical material would enable further understanding of what cultural constructions of leadership that become confirmed, re-formulated or rejected. International comparisons would also enrich the analysis.

    Practical implications

    This paper may influence leadership, leadership development and change initiatives in higher education organization.

    Originality/value

    The perspective proposed builds on recent developments in leadership studies and expands the means for focusing on social processes rather than individuals.

  • 250.
    Crevani, Lucia
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    Ekman, Marianne
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    Lindgren, Monica
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    Packendorff, Johann
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    Leadership cultures in transition: On the cultural construction of leadership in university change processes2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In contemporary organizational research, the development of leadership norms andideal in public sector reform has been a recurring theme. The current changeprocesses in the higher education sector is in this paper analysed as the changes inleadership cultures, i.e. as processes in which discursive understandings ofleadership are drawn upon in the construction of norms, ideals and practices relatedto the production of organisational direction. The aim of this paper is thus to analyseleadership cultures under production in the reforms of higher education, in adiscursive context of increased managerialism and leaderism. Building on aperspective on leadership as a cultural phenomenon emerging in interactionprocesses in which societal, sectorial and professional discursive resources areinvoked, we intend to add to earlier studies on how notions of leadership are involvedin the transformation of higher education organisations. This perspective does notonly allow a more fine-grained analysis of how these transformations unfold –involving not only clear discursive clashes but also instances of hybrid cultures andcreeping changes in the discursive resources drawn upon – but also a criticalanalysis of changed power relations as ‘truths’ on professionalism and leadership aregradually re-formulated. Departing from two vignettes from sessions with juniortenure track participants at a Swedish university, our analysis centres on theemergence of hybrid leadership cultures in which several discursive resources aredrawn upon in daily interaction. Where earlier research often tends to handle therelation between traditional academic/bureaucratic discourses and emergentmanagerialist/leaderist ones as a clear and distinct shift, we emphasise how hybridcultures develop through confirmation, re-formulation and rejection of discursiveinfluences.

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