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  • 201.
    Mack, Jennifer
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE).
    Making "Mesopotälje"2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 202. Mack, Jennifer
    Making "Mesopotälje": Syriac Orthodox Christians in a Swedish Town2009Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 203.
    Mack, Jennifer
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE).
    Minaret Diplomacy: Urban Planners, Faith Spaces, and the Politics of Urban Design in Sweden2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 204. Mack, Jennifer
    New Swedes in the New Town2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 205. Mack, Jennifer
    Not Just Barberry: The Green Spaces of the Swedish ‘Concrete Suburbs,’ 1965-19902016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 206. Mack, Jennifer
    Producing the Public: Architecture, Urban Planning, and Immigration in a Swedish Town, 1965 to the Present2012Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
  • 207.
    Mack, Jennifer
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE).
    Religious Austerity: The Lutheran Limits on Mosque Architecture in Sweden2018Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 208.
    Mack, Jennifer
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE).
    Ritual Infrastructure and the Performance of Syriac Propriety in Södertälje2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 209. Mack, Jennifer
    Safety in Numbers: Architecture and the Remaking of the "Swedish Standard"2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 210.
    Mack, Jennifer
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE).
    The construction of equality: Syriac immigration and the Swedish City2017Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An industrial city on the outskirts of Stockholm, Södertälje is the global capital of the Syriac Orthodox Christian diaspora, an ethnic and religious minority group fleeing persecution and discrimination in the Middle East. Since the 1960s, this Syriac community has transformed the standardized welfare state spaces of the city’s neighborhoods into its own “Mesopotälje,” defined by houses with Mediterranean and other international influences, a major soccer stadium, and massive churches and social clubs. Such projects have challenged principles of Swedish utopian architecture and planning that explicitly emphasized the erasure of difference. In The Construction of Equality, Jennifer Mack shows how Syriac-instigated architectural projects and spatial practices have altered the city’s built environment “from below,” offering a fresh perspective on segregation in the European modernist suburbs. Combining architectural, urban, and ethnographic tools through archival research, site work, participant observation (among residents, designers, and planners), and interviews, Mack provides a unique take on urban development, social change, and the immigrant experience in Europe over a fifty-year period. Her book shows how the transformation of space at the urban scale-the creation and evolution of commercial and social districts, for example-operates through the slow accumulation of architectural projects. As Mack demonstrates, these developments are not merely the result of the grassroots social practices usually attributed to immigrants but instead are officially approved through dialogues between residents and design professionals: accredited architects, urban planners, and civic bureaucrats. Mack attends to the tensions between the “enclavization” practices of a historically persecuted minority group, the integration policies of the Swedish welfare state and its planners, and European nativism. 

  • 211. Mack, Jennifer
    The Right to the Garden: New and Old Allotments2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 212.
    Mack, Jennifer
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE).
    Urban Design from Below2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 213. Mack, Jennifer
    Urban Design from Below: Immigration and the Spatial Practice of Urbanism2014In: Public culture, ISSN 0899-2363, E-ISSN 1527-8018, Vol. 26, no 1, p. 153-185Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Outlining a theory of “urban design from below,” this essay considers how so-called users have reshaped space at the urban scale, as I trace the history of immigrants’ transformations of a Swedish modernist new town neighborhood. Here a peripheral green strip that government planners of the 1960s classified as a buffer zone has slowly become a center of social and commercial life for Syriac Christians, a group that arrived en masse in the 1970s. Since then, this “blank” space has been gradually but significantly altered through Syriac architectural projects, including an Orthodox church, banquet halls, a soccer stadium, and a television station. Current portrayals of urban design offer dystopian views of the field’s “end” or emphasize informal, reactive processes. Instead, urban design from below occurs through action and accumulation: Syriac projects have altered the physical shape and function of a large swath of urban space, building by building. Critically, these structures were made through official site planning and building permits, even as they emerged out of the frictions between the prevailing logics of Swedish planning — emphasizing formal uniformity to achieve social equality — and a Syriac spatial practice of urbanism that has commissioned material difference. If the “from above” is typically assumed to be the plans and practices of professionals, and the “from below” is usually portrayed as grassroots activism with no lasting physical effects, I investigate how Syriac buildings have transformed not only individual sites but also the city at large.

  • 214.
    Mack, Jennifer
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE).
    Visible Cities, Invisible Citizens: Immigration and the Practice of Public Space2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 215.
    Mack, Jennifer
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE).
    Herzfeld, MichaelHarvard University.
    Life Among Urban Planners: Practice, Professionalism, and Expertise in the Making of the City2020Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Urban planners project the future of cities. As experts, they draft visions of places and times that do not yet exist, prescribing the tools to be used to achieve those visions. Their choices can determine how a city will merge its public transit and automobile traffic or how it will meet a demand for thousands of new dwelling units as quickly and with as little avoidable damage as possible. Life Among Urban Planners considers planning professionals in relation to the social contexts in which they operate: the planning office, the construction site, and even in the confrontations with those affected by their work. What roles do planners have in shaping the daily practices of urban life? How do they employ, manipulate, and alter their expertise to meet the demands asked of them? The essays in this volume emphasize planners' cultural values and personal assumptions and critically examine what their persistent commitment to thinking about the future means for the ways in which people live in the present and preserve the past.

    Life Among Urban Planners explores the practices and politics of professional city-making in a wide selection of geographical areas spanning five continents. Cases include but are not limited to Bangkok, Bogotá, Chicago, Naimey, Rome, Siem Reap, Stockholm, and Warsaw. Examining the issues raised around questions of expertise, participation, and the tension between market and state forces, contributors demonstrate how certain planning practices accentuate their specific relationship to a place while others are represented to a global audience as potentially universal solutions. In presenting detailed and intimate portraits of the everyday lives of planners, the volume offers key insights into how the city interacts with the world.

  • 216.
    Mack, Jennifer
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture.
    Herzfeld, MichaelHarvard University.
    Life Among Urban Planners: Practices, Professionalism, and Expertise in the Making of the City2020Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Urban planners project the future of cities. As experts, they draft visions of places and times that do not yet exist, prescribing the tools to be used to achieve those visions. Their choices can determine how a city will merge its public transit and automobile traffic or how it will meet a demand for thousands of new dwelling units as quickly and with as little avoidable damage as possible. Life Among Urban Planners considers planning professionals in relation to the social contexts in which they operate: the planning office, the construction site, and even in the confrontations with those affected by their work. What roles do planners have in shaping the daily practices of urban life? How do they employ, manipulate, and alter their expertise to meet the demands asked of them? The essays in this volume emphasize planners' cultural values and personal assumptions and critically examine what their persistent commitment to thinking about the future means for the ways in which people live in the present and preserve the past.

    Life Among Urban Planners explores the practices and politics of professional city-making in a wide selection of geographical areas spanning five continents. Cases include but are not limited to Bangkok, Bogotá, Chicago, Naimey, Rome, Siem Reap, Stockholm, and Warsaw. Examining the issues raised around questions of expertise, participation, and the tension between market and state forces, contributors demonstrate how certain planning practices accentuate their specific relationship to a place while others are represented to a global audience as potentially universal solutions. In presenting detailed and intimate portraits of the everyday lives of planners, the volume offers key insights into how the city interacts with the world.

  • 217. Madantpour, A.
    et al.
    Cars, Göran
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE).
    Allen, J.
    Social exclusion in european cities: Processes, experiences and responses2012In: Social Exclusion in European Cities: Processes, Experiences and Responses, Taylor and Francis Inc. , 2012, p. 1-301Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Across Europe concern is rising over the disintegration of social relations and the growing number of people who are being socially excluded. social Exclustoin in European Cities, the first major study of this topic, provides a definition of social exclusion and looks at both the processes which cause it and the dimensions of the problem throughout Europe. The experiences of people living in areas or neighbourhoods with low rates of social integration are considered, illuminating the human impact of exclusion where it is most visible. Finally the contributors evaluate the various policy and community initiatives which are currently confronting the problem in a wide sample of European Cities on a variety of levels, from inform individual actions to supra-national European Union policy, and suggest new ways in which social exclusion could be tackled. With most large cities experiencing some degree of social exclusion, this is an important volume for all those working in the areas of regional policy, town planning, housing management, social work, community development, sociology, political science and urban studies.

  • 218.
    Makenzius, Micael
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Geoinformatics.
    Bylerius, Jonas
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Geoinformatics.
    A Web Application for Wildfire Spread Prediction and Visualisation in Sweden Using Geospatial Data and Technology2022Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Wildfires are powerful natural forces capable of causing extensive damage to large areas of lands and induce a high societal cost in both humanitarian, economic and environmental terms. As such there is a strong incentive to track and predict wildfires' development and spread. Traditionally heavy desktop clients are required to run the simulation-software required to perform wildfire spread predictions, which limits their use and versatility. Conversely, web-based clients are lightweight and versatile by design. By moving the processing of the simulation to a server the bulk of the workload is removed from the client.

    This project aims to produce a server-client framework for simulating wildfires, visualising the result and handling the fire data for use in the workflow of wildfire suppression and analysis. Both the parameters sent to the server and the simulation result returned to the client. It utilises a combination of HTTPS-requests and websockets-technology to communicate data and information between the client and server in real-time through the Django framework. The fire simulation is based upon the Canadian empirical fire-model Prometheus. The implementation of the algorithm were adopted in the programming language python and optimized for the Swedish climate to be easily deployed in a web-application to be used by Swedish organisations. The web-application was accessible though mobile and stationary devices where the framework calculated and visualised the progression of the wildfire in real-time.

    The wildfire progression model of the application was compared to the wildfires Enskogen and Ängra, close to the town of Kårböle during the summer of 2018. The accuracy assessment of the fire progression model found that the simulated wildfire progression tend to contain the observed fire and prone to overestimate the wildfires progression. The application was evaluated though a questionnaire which was answered by a sample group composed of persons working with wildfires or wildfire related fields. The sample group were satisfied by the application and broadly found that the application could be implemented into their workflow. 

    Much work remain to operationalise the application, such as integration of municipal data sources and other databases containing resources, risk-objects, buildings, power-lines. In spite of this Fire-engineers in emergency services state a possibility for use of the application as is, if the simulations are deemed accurate enough and provide a better basis for decision making and measures. This underlines the need of an application such as this in the field, and with further functionalities and integration's with data-systems.

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  • 219.
    Mario, Diani
    et al.
    University of Trento.
    Ernstson, Henrik
    Centre for Public Policy Research, School of Education, Communication and Society, King’s College London, London, United Kingdom.
    Lorien, Jasny
    University of Exeter.
    Civil Society as Networks of Issues and Associations: The Case of Food2022In: Knowledge and Civil Society / [ed] Glückler, J., Meyer, HD., Suarsana, L., Cham: Springer, 2022Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Scholars usually conceptualize civil society as both a discursive and an associational space. In the former, focus is on communicative practices; in the latter, attention shifts to the actors that cooperate or clash about the identification and production of collective goods. In this chapter, we sketch the contours of an approach to civil society that treats both dimensions in an integrated way. Looking at the role of food issues in urban settings as diverse as Cape Town, Bristol, and Glasgow, we borrow from social network analysis to explore first, how civic organizations combine an interest in food-related issues with attention to other themes, thus defining different, specific agendas; next, we ask if and how interest in food identifies specific clusters of cooperation within broader civil society networks.

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  • 220.
    Markowski, Peter
    KTH. Stockholm University.
    Digital transformation of the home help service sector through welfare technology2021In: Technological Change and Industrial Transformation, Taylor and Francis Inc. , 2021, p. 74-90Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 221.
    Martins, Nuno
    et al.
    Instituto de Investigação em Design Media e Cultura, Escola Superior de Design, Instituto Politécnico do Cávado e do Ave, Barcelos, Portugal.
    Brandão, Daniel
    Centro de Estudos de Comunicação e Sociedade, Instituto de Ciências Sociais, Universidade do Minho, Braga, Portugal.
    Guimarães, Leonor
    Instituto de Investigação em Design Media e Cultura, Escola Superior de Design, Instituto Politécnico do Cávado e do Ave, Barcelos, Portugal.
    Penedos-Santiago, Eliana
    Instituto de Investigação em Design Media e Cultura/Unexpected Media Lab, Faculdade de Belas Artes, Universidade do Porto, Porto, Portugal.
    Brandão, Emílio
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE). Department of Architecture and Civil Engineering, Chalmers University of Technology, Gotemburgo, Suécia.
    The Importance of Communication Design in the Process of Disseminating Community Practices in Social Neighbourhoods: The Balteiro2023In: Comunicacao e Sociedade, ISSN 1645-2089, Vol. 43, article id e023010Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article aims to demonstrate how research in communication design can contribute to disseminating community practices in economically disadvantaged contexts, such as in social housing neighbourhoods. This study stems from the ECHO research project, where the main mission is to understand and document two self-initiated community practices in the social housing neighbourhood of Balteiro, in Vila Nova de Gaia, Portugal, to disseminate them and foster their replication in similar social contexts. It begins with a literature review on the role of design on behalf of communities, focusing, in particular, on the concepts of social design and universal design, which substantiate the relevance and pertinence of the issue under study. Then, it describes the case study of Balteiro. It presents the methodologies adopted in this research, namely the interviews conducted to learn about the history of the two community practices. This provided the basis for developing a preliminary study for an online platform and a series of documentary films. This study proved the importance of involving designers in this dissemination process through multidisciplinary teams. The research work in the field should be close to the community, the institutions and the different social actors involved to understand the complexity of the study context and define how design should operate. The empirical experience from this study has shown that work in the social area should be developed locally, focused on small communities or informal organisations, and aware that results are achieved slowly and gradually.

  • 222. McMullan, Kylie
    et al.
    Blair, Amanda
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Morrison, Stacey
    Ferreira, C.
    Standing Out by Standing Up: Brand Differentiation and Minority Influence Theory: An Abstract2018In: Back to the Future:: Using Marketing Basics to Provide Customer Value / [ed] Nina Krey, Patricia Rossi, Springer Nature , 2018, p. 413-414Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper examines how Minority Influence Theory, originally from Social Psychology Literature, can be used in marketing strategy to aid brand differentiation. More specifically, it looks at a set of criteria for brands to evaluate prior to aligning themselves with controversial topics for differentiation purposes. It assesses the role of strategic brand management, using Minority Influence Theory, and suggests conditions for aligning a brand with a controversial issue successfully. This paper presents three propositions for practitioners and researchers to explore with respect to Minority Influence Theory. These are: Proposition #1 The consistency and confidence of the cause affects the likelihood of the brand benefiting from aligning with it. (a) The greater the consistency and confidence of the issue, the increased likelihood the brand will benefit from aligning. (b) The lesser the consistency and confidence of the issue, the decreased likelihood the brand will benefit from aligning. Proposition #2 The flexibility of the cause affects the likelihood of the brand benefiting from aligning with it. (a) The greater the flexibility of the issue, the increased likelihood the brand will benefit from aligning. (b) The less flexible the issue, the decreased likelihood the brand will benefit from aligning. Proposition #3 The authenticity of the brand/spokesperson to speak to the particular issue affects the likelihood of the brand benefiting from aligning with it. (a) The greater the authenticity of the brand/spokesperson to speak to a particular issue, the increased likelihood of the brand benefiting from aligning. (b) The lesser the authenticity of the brand/spokesperson to speak to a particular issue, the decreased likelihood of the brand benefitting from aligning. The case studies present examples of positive outcomes of successful alignment as well as a case where the brand was not successful. By carefully considering the framework presented, managers can determine whether aligning with a controversial issue is useful for their brand. 

  • 223.
    Milestad, Rebecka
    et al.
    Department of Urban and Rural Development, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences.
    Kratochvil, Ruth
    Division of Organic Farming, University of Natural Resources and Applied Life Sciences.
    Leitner, Heidrun
    Ökosoziales Forum Österreich.
    Axmann, Paul
    Division of Organic Farming, University of Natural Resources and Applied Life Sciences.
    Being close: the quality of social relationships in a local organic cereal and bread network in Lower Austria2010In: Journal of Rural Studies, ISSN 0743-0167, E-ISSN 1873-1392, Vol. 26, no 3, p. 228-240Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Experience of the drawbacks of a globalised and industrialised food system has generated interest in localised food systems. Local food networks are regarded as more sustainable food provision systems since they are assumed to have high levels of social embeddedness and relations of regard. This paper explores the social relations between food actors and how 'local' and 'organic' are expressed by detailing how actors describe qualities of their intra-network relationships, how they understand 'local' and how they are connected within the food system. A study from the province of Lower Austria in Austria, where organic cereals and bread are produced and marketed, serves to illuminate these issues. Actors agreed that geographical closeness contributed to the social closeness they experienced and that social relationships were a strong reason for being in the network. However, the meaning of 'local' was elastic depending on where inputs and consumers could be found. Furthermore, despite strong commitment to organic production methods and the local market, actors faced constraints that made them hybrids between organic and conventional, and between locally focused and globally dependent. Thus, the binary thinking along the local-global and organic-conventional divide does not hold. While it is important to not make a causal link between high quality of social relationships and local food networks, the case described here indicates the possibility of such a link.

  • 224.
    Mäkivierikko, Aram
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
    A Needs-Based Approach towards Fostering Long-term Engagement with Energy Feedback among Local Residents2019Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In order to reach the current climate goals, energy consumption needs to decrease in all sectors, including households, which produce 20% of the European emissions. However, it is difficult to increase residents’ engagement in their household electricity consumption as it is an ‘invisible’ form of energy, the monetary incentives are often too small and environmental incentives are not very effective. Building on the idea that an engagement mechanism should be based on user needs, and recent research showing that social influence can be an effective way to affect consumption behaviour, this thesis examines the potential of a neighbourhood-based digital local social network providing feedback on household electricity consumption as an engagement solution. By helping neighbours to know each other better, such a network could meet the basic human need of belonging to a group, while also taking advantage of the social influence between neighbours to increase the effectiveness of the energy feedback provided.

    This thesis sought to: 1) Identify needs of residents that could be served by a local social network and explore whether such a network could provide a beneficial context for energy feedback; 2) identify and evaluate a set of design principles for energy feedback and use them to propose a prototype feedback design suitable for use in a local social network; and 3) design and implement a baseline study for measuring changes in aspects of social and environmental sustainability in a neighbourhood that introduction of a local social network can achieve, such as social cohesion, trust, safety, and energy attitudes and behaviour.

    In order to achieve these objectives, the Research Through Design methodology was used. This resulted in mixed methods research using quantitative (household survey) and qualitative (focus group interviews, stakeholder consultation workshop) methods. The research was conducted in two eco-districts in Stockholm, Sweden: Hammarby Sjöstad and Stockholm Royal Seaport.

    Regarding the first objective, results from the household survey indicated a need for increased interaction between neighbours in Stockholm Royal Seaport, while the focus group discussions revealed local communication needs that a local social network could meet. However, the possibility to use social influence between neighbours in increasing the intention to save energy was shown to be rather weak, possibly because of the current low level of connection between neighbours. Regarding the second objective, a set of design principles was identified using a literature study. They were used to create a design prototype of energy feedback that was presented to potential end-users in a stakeholder consultation workshop and then refined using suggestions given in the workshop. The workshop indicated support for many of the design principles as they were indirectly mentioned in the discussions. The design principle of fair feedback was further explored, suggesting use of typical household consumption as part of a fair comparison metric and when setting reduction goals.

    Regarding the third objective, an evaluation method with baseline survey and follow-up surveys was suggested. The household survey served as a baseline for measuring social and environmental sustainability aspects in a neighbourhood. Further research is needed on the effectiveness of a local social network as an engagement mechanism for energy feedback.

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    Mäkivierikko 2019 - A Needs-Based Approach towards Fostering Long-term Engagement with Energy Feedback among Local Residents
  • 225.
    Mäkivierikko, Aram
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
    Sustaining Sustainable Behaviours of Citizens by Creating Value in Their Everyday Life2023Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Over 60% of global greenhouse gas emissions derive from household consumption patterns. To reach the 1.5-degree target set in the Paris Agreement, new interventions to influence household behaviours are needed. This thesis examined two areas, household electricity consumption and waste sorting, where behaviour plays a large role. To change behaviour, households need information and feedback regarding their consumption, but in an era of information overload it is difficult to reach individuals. This thesis explored whether households can be better reached by a service that creates value for its users, so that feedback is noticed and acted upon over a sustained period. Specific objectives were to: (1) identify needs of citizens that could be addressed with a local digital service and develop such a service; (2) design and develop elements of the service to promote selected sustainable behaviours affecting household electricity consumption and household waste sorting; and (3) evaluate whether these elements can improve awareness of sustainability matters and promote pro-environmental behaviour among residents.

    To fulfil objective (1), a local social network for neighbourhoods was designed and developed. A phone survey in Stockholm Royal Seaport confirmed low neighbour interaction, while focus group interviews in Hammarby Sjöstad identified specific local information and communication needs. To fulfil objective (2), a subset of design principles identified from the literature was used to design feedback for the local social network. The feedback was developed into a prototype through workshop and focus group discussions. To fulfil objective (3), residents were provided with feedback and interventions in two pilot studies in Stockholm, a 15-month study on electricity consumption involving 281 students at KTH and a 12-month study on waste sorting involving 61 households in Stockholm Royal Seaport having an automatic waste collection system. The study on electricity showed a 3.3 %-unit peak-hour reduction for the intervention group and 46 %-unit reduction for saving participants. Average participation in peak load reduction was 3 months, but some stayed for almost the entire period, indicating potential for long-term engagement. Incentives were not necessary, but improved outcomes. The waste study found increased plastic sorting among app users, but also challenges in data collection and analysis. Overall, the value-creating approach can be useful if user needs are met correctly, and reaches a larger user group with feedback than conventional energy apps.

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  • 226. Münster, Ursula
    et al.
    Satsuka, ShihoCederlöf, GunnelKTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Asian Environment: Connections across Borders, Landscapes, and Times2014Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This issue of RCC Perspectives offers insights into similarities and differences in the ways people in Asia have tried to master and control the often unpredictable and volatile environments of which they were part. In these histories, nonhuman actors such as capricious rivers, fluid delta regions, monsoon rains, and wild animals play an important role. In some instances, the power of nature facilitated colonial rule and exploitation; in others, it helped to subvert political control. The essays gathered here present new environmental scholarship that speaks across political boundaries, draws new connections between regions and time periods, and tells unexpected stories about the manifold relationships between nations, people, and their environment.

  • 227. Nilsson, Birgitta
    et al.
    Pousette, Sandra
    Forsman, Mikael
    Bernmark, Eva
    Mathiassen, SvendErik
    Kan förpackningsproducenter bidra till en förbättrad förpackningshantering för kvinnor i livsmedelsindustrin?: Tre fallstudier2011Report (Other academic)
  • 228. Nohlberg, M.
    et al.
    Kowalski, Stewart
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Karlsson, K.
    Ask and you shall know: Using interviews and the SBC model for social-engineering penetration testing2008In: IMETI - Int. Multi-Conf. Eng. Technol. Innov., Proc., 2008, p. 121-128Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents the result of a case study where the SBC model was used as a foundation to perform semi-structured interviews to test the security in a medical establishment. The answers were analyzed and presented in an uncomplicated graph. The purpose was to study the feasibility of letting the users participate, instead of exploiting their weaknesses. It was found that the approach of interviewing the subjects rendered interesting, and relevant, results, making it an approach that should be studied further due to its apparent gains: less ethically troublesome penetration testing, increased awareness, improved coverage and novel information as added bonuses.

  • 229. Nomokonova, Tatiana
    et al.
    Losey, Robert J.
    Fedorova, Natalia V.
    Gusev, Andrei V.
    Arzyutov, Dmitry V.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Reindeer Imagery in the Making at Ust’-Polui in Arctic Siberia2021In: Cambridge Archaeological Journal, ISSN 0959-7743, E-ISSN 1474-0540, Vol. 31, no 1, p. 161-181Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The history of reindeer domestication is a critical topic in the study of human-animal relationships across Northern Eurasia. The Iamal-Nenets region of Arctic Siberia, now a global centre of reindeer pastoralism, has been the subject of much recent research on reindeer domestication. However, tracking the beginnings of reindeer domestication in this region and elsewhere in Eurasia has proved challenging. Archaeological imagery is an under-utilized source of information for exploring animal domestication. In this paper we explore the abundant reindeer imagery found at the Iron Age site of Ust’-Polui in Iamal, dating from ~260 bce to ce 140. While reindeer were hunted in Siberia long before the occupation of Ust’-Polui, portable reindeer imagery appears abruptly at this time period, co-occurring at the site with equipment thought to be for training transport reindeer. Training and working with transport reindeer required long-term engagement with specific animals that became well known and precious to their human keepers. Creating, utilizing and depositing the reindeer imagery objects at Ust’-Polui was a way of acknowledging critical new working relationships with specific domestic reindeer.

  • 230.
    Normark, Maria
    KTH, Superseded Departments (pre-2005), Numerical Analysis and Computer Science, NADA.
    Transforming field observations into functions: on the use of an ethnographic study in the design processManuscript (Other academic)
  • 231.
    Normark, Maria
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Numerical Analysis and Computer Science, NADA.
    Work and Technology Use in Centers of Coordination: Reflections on the relationship between situated practice and artifact design2005Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other scientific)
    Abstract [en]

    The research problem explored in this thesis is how technology and work practice are related in coordinative situations (collocated and over distance). Further, the problem of how this kind of research results can be transformed and used in the development of new technology is discussed.

    Air Traffic Control and Emergency Call Centers are the two domains where the complex process of coordination in a time and safety critical setting has been studied. The methodological approach taken in the field studies is ethnographic, a qualitative method with a descriptive outcome. Air traffic controllers focus on keeping the airspace organized so that the aircraft are separated at all times, as well as are given an economic route by e.g. slowing down so that they do not have to wait in the air for traffic ahead. In order to manage the control of the national airspace, it is divided into geographical sectors each of which is controlled by 1-2 controllers. The aircraft cross many sectors during one flight and each time they cross a sector border there is a handover of responsibility between the controllers. The controllers have a large number of tools that they orchestrate in order to maintain control and keep records of the orders given to the pilots. The situation in one sector has therefore been locally stored at their work position. It is shown in the thesis how the social interaction and the technology support are ordered to broadcast the locally stored information.

    Emergency call centers at SOS Alarm are in contrast to the ATC centers fully computerized. The operators use CoordCom, a system that is currently in the process of being renewed. When a telephone call to the emergency number 112 is received in one of the 20 local centers in Sweden, a receiving operator initiates the case by interviewing the caller in order to categorize the incident. Often, an incident consists of a number of conditions that together make an emergency. It is shown that accountability of decisions and local knowledge of the center’s responsibility area are two important parts of coordination at SOS Alarm.

    A question that has been of interest during the studies is what possibilities ethnographic observations provide when used as a starting point in a design project. The final study provided a description of how the ethnographic material from the emergency call center study was explored and transformed in order to create concrete functionality and design.

    The thesis contributes with examples from the workplace studies of how people interact with each other through the technology and how skills, local knowledge and professional concerns shape the interaction. It also contributes with reflections on how descriptions and experiences of work practice and technology use in the field can serve as a foundation in shaping and designing new ideas and new functionality for future systems.

    The papers included in this thesis shows results on four issues in relation to coordination and technology:

    -Coordinative work practice and implications in using video/audio in a distributed setting

    -Support for accountability in decision-making in a distributed setting

    -The role of local knowledge and combined expertise in a local collocated center

    -The transformation of ethnographic observations in the design process

    The thesis also shows the importance of a further definition of the dichotomy of collocated and distributed work in order to inform technology. An analysis of the dichotomy based on the field study results is presented in the thesis.

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  • 232.
    Odhage, John
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Otraditionella lösningar med traditionella medel: Åtgärdsvalstudien som planeringsfenomen2017Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis aims to understand the method of strategic choice (MSC, Sw. metodik för åtgärdsvalsstudier) in Swedish transport planning as a planning phenomenon. Based on a normative interpretative approach and critical theory, underlying ideas and thinking that surround the context of MSC and how they are expressed in practice, in the guidelines and in concrete planning situations were investigated. The starting point was that changing conditions in society have necessitated reform of the transport sector and a new method has been introduced. It aims to enable a broader grip on transport issues by opening them up together with other actors, thus increasing scope and spreading responsibility for more sectors and activities, enabling new and unconventional solutions to transport problems for a sustainable future. MSC is described and interpreted here as a manifold phenomenon that reveals a tension between different perspectives and mindsets, but also leads to certain aspects being more often expressed which complicates wider and deeper perspectives on complex societal problems. More concretely, it was found that the collaboration in MSC is limited prematurely and is often limited at an early stage of the process, and that this leads to a more narrow understanding of the problem to be solved than would otherwise be the case. Furthermore, one specific perspective, namely the transport system perspective, is proposed explicitly as the basis for assessments. The study has also identified challenges related to the consideration of conflicting and contradictory knowledge claims in the process. Assessments of the effects of actions are assumed to be based upon logical premises, and not on judgments in dialogue and argumentation. However, the analysis suggested that the functional instrumental reasoning of success-oriented action does not seem to take normative and political issues into consideration in order to better address sustainable development issues in the complex, democratic and pluralist society. In conclusion, the analysis identifies the need for these processes in addressing a sustainable future to be kept open in a more inclusive and diverse way, drawing on more and different possible futures.

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  • 233. Olsson, L. E.
    et al.
    Sinha, Rajib
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
    Frostell, B.
    Friman, M.
    What Can Be Done to Change?—The Environmental and Behavioral Consequences of Interventions for Sustainable Travel2022In: Sustainability, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 14, no 3, article id 1345Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 234. Ostrom, Marcia
    et al.
    Kjeldsen, Chris
    Kummer, Susanne
    Milestad, Rebecka
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
    Schermer, Markus
    What’s going into the box? An inquiry into the social and ecological embeddedness of large-scale EU and US box schemes2017In: International Journal of Sociology of Agriculture and Food, ISSN 0798-1759, Vol. 24, no 1, p. 113-134Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Food distribution systems referred to as box schemes have gained a foothold in organic markets across Europe and North America. This model has the potential to scale up direct-marketing strategies by aggregating products from multiple producers and efficiently assembling and delivering them on a regular basis to large networks of consumers. Box scheme organizers generally seek to attract regular customers based on the distinctive attributes and values associated with their products and their unique business model that attempts to build long-term relationships between consumers and farmers. This article explores the organizational dynamics of five large, multi-farm box schemes in relation to their stated values and organizational strategies using cases from Sweden, Denmark, Austria, and the United States.

    Different aspects of ecological and social embeddedness are considered and analysed for the five cases based on their stated values and their organizational strategies, including to what degree non-economic values are identified, communicated, and applied throughout the supply chain. The value of geographical proximity is examined with respect to the tension created by consumer demand for variety throughout the seasons and the spatial organization of sourcing and distribution that such a system entails. Additionally, the organizational challenges encountered by box schemes during periods of rapid growth are compared and contrasted with respect to the different organizational strategies employed across the five cases. This article seeks to contribute to the research literature by analysing box schemes as an institutional innovation that can potentially bridge the interests shared by producers and consumers in harnessing market relationships to accomplish larger social and environmental goals.

  • 235.
    Ouertani, Mayssa
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Safety in the Urban Space2022Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Creating safe environments is a necessity within urban planning. In each element of the urban planning process, it is essential to reflect upon how the proposed plans can affect safety within the chosen environment. The purpose of the thesis is therefore to develop an analysis tool based on scientific research, to assess the perceived safety that is mediated through environmental design. The report aims to answer the following research questions,

    Which theoretical perspectives and scientific research can be used as a research basis, to develop a analysis tool that seek to increase perceived safety through environmental design?

    How can the perceived safety through the environmental design be assessed using the analysis tool?

    The method consists of a literature study, to give a broad and global insight on data as well as results that have been in previous research on safety. International studies and articles have been primarily used with few elements from the Swedish context, with the aim of obtaining a broad mapping of different contexts where safety in the physical environment has been investigated. The used search engines consist of the Royal Institute of Technology's Primo, Google and Google Scholar. Through these, the theoretical perspectives and the scientific research that underlies the work were found. 

    The analysis tool consists of a checklist that includes six different categories; Lighting and mobility, Maintenance of the physical environment, Technical monitoring, Natural monitoring, Physical design and orientation as well as Vegetation in the physical environment. Within each category there are various claims that the user of the tool will rate in an assessment scale from 1 to 5. To take position to the presented claims, the user must perform a site visit to observe the surroundings.

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  • 236. Paschen, U.
    et al.
    Paschen, Jeannette
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Wilson, Matthew
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Eriksson, T.
    Understanding Involvement of Luxury Gift Givers: An Abstract2019In: Finding New Ways to Engage and Satisfy Global Customers, Springer Nature , 2019, p. 667-668Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Givers of luxury gifts face recipients with different levels of expertise and have choices of gifts that can range from experiential to enduring in nature. Inspired by a study undertaken by Belk (1982), the current research seeks to develop a framework that allows the classification of different levels of involvement of the gift giver, based on their conjectures about the expertise of the recipients and the lasting or ephemeral nature of the gift. Following a precedent set by Paschen et al. (2016), we modify Berthon et al.’s (2009) aesthetics and ontology framework. The latter classifies luxury brands based on their aesthetic and ontological modes and is defined by the aesthetic end points of novice and expert and the ontological dichotomy of transience vs. enduring. In our modification, we develop four specific recipient categories based on the perceived expertise of the intended recipient representing the aesthetic mode and the endurance or ephemerality of the gift described in the ontological mode. The resultant typology identifies the “classic collector,” “skillful user,” “neophyte consumer,” and “paying magpie,” assigning different levels of product and task involvement to each category. In doing this, we add detail to the perspective taken in Belk’s original study on the separate aspects of involvement, where product involvement represents an enduring construct, whereas task involvement is situationally oriented and thus temporary rather than ongoing. We also present numerous implications to practice, providing insights into modifications to the marketing mix that luxury goods marketers may consider, depending on the different consumer group they are targeting. Marketing for expert gift recipients is well aligned with classic traits of luxury—emphasizing the exclusivity permeating through the price, the purchase experience, and the product itself. Gifts intended for novices, on the other hand, have to be universally known and widely available without diluting the exclusive premise of luxury. Enduring gifts generally increase the task involvement of the gift giver and therefore require marketing efforts that reduce the perceived risk. We conclude with several suggestions for further validation of the framework and related research that may arise out of this work. References Available Upon Request

  • 237.
    Perez Vico, Eugenia
    et al.
    School of Business, Innovation and Sustainability, Halmstad University, PO Box 823, 301 18, Halmstad, SE, Sweden; CIRCLE, Lund University, Box 118, 221 00, Lund, Sweden.
    Sörlin, Sverker
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Hanell, Linnea
    The Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Stockholm University, 10691, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Salö, Linus
    Centre for Research on Bilingualism, Stockholm University, 10691, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Valorizing the Humanities2024In: Making Universities Matter: Collaboration, Engagement, Impact / [ed] Pauline Mattsson, Eugenia Perez Vico & Linus Salö, Cham, Switzerland: Springer Nature, 2024, p. 211-232Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite its proven societal value, humanities knowledge tends to be marginalized in research policy; this has been a topic of debate for some time. In this chapter, we focus on the valorization of humanities knowledge, with the aim of comprehending the way this process engenders societal impact. We argue that historical impact stories offer an effective methodological approach for a deeper understanding of such valorization and its subsequent impact. Drawing on three humanities research cases from Sweden, we propose that valorization and impacts of humanities knowledge should be seen as processual and as influenced by societal actors who determine the premises and condition the somewhat unpredictable nature of such impacts. We introduce two concepts: (i) acting space, which involves access to collaborators, audiences, and channels that enable knowledge valorization, and (ii) meandering knowledge flows, which provides insight into the uneven and hard-to-predict nature of valorization. Through these concepts, we wish to provide a better and more nuanced understanding of how knowledge valorization in the humanities unfolds. By doing so, we hope to support humanities scholars to find ways of articulating their own modes of mattering.

  • 238. Pinheiro, Rómulo
    et al.
    Geschwind, Lars
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Ramirez, Francisco O.
    Vrangbaek, Karsten
    The value in comparing organizational fields and forms2016In: Towards A Comparative Institutionalism: Forms, Dynamics And Logics Across The Organizational Fields Of Health Care And Higher Education / [ed] Pinheiro, R., Geschwind, L., Ramirez, F., Vrangbaek, K., Emerald Group Publishing Limited, 2016, Vol. 45, p. 9-32Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Following the spirit of an earlier volume in the series focusing on ’Comparative Approaches to Organizational Research’, the mandate of the current volume is to provide a comparative account of dynamics across two organizational fields - health care and higher education - and, subsequently, two specific types of organizational forms - hospitals and universities. In so doing, we take a broader perspective encompassing various conceptual and theoretical points of departure emanating from, mostly, the institutional literature in the social sciences (and its various perspectives), but also from public policy and administration literatures - of relevance to scholars and the communities of practice working within either field. In this introductory paper to the volume, we provide a brief overview of developments across the two organizational fields and illuminate on the most important scholarly traditions underpinning the study of both system dynamics as a whole as well as universities and hospitals as organizations and institutions. We conclude by reflecting on the implication of the volume’s key findings in regards to comparative research within organizational studies.

  • 239.
    Pitt, Christine
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Dabirian, Amir
    Botha, E.
    Kietzmann, J.
    Diba, H.
    The Prosthetic Generation Is all Around Us: Feelings and Emotions About Knee Replacement Surgery and Their Impact on Overall Sentiment: An Abstract2018In: Back to the Future:: Using Marketing Basics to Provide Customer Value / [ed] Nina Krey, Patricia Rossi, Springer Nature , 2018, p. 561-Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In their attempts to reduce the uncertainty associated with knee replacement surgeries, patients turn to social media, where they commonly rely on the experiences expressed by other patients. In this study, we first employ IBM Watson to examine how patients talk about their emotions and express sentiment through their comments online. We then use a latent class cluster modelling procedure to segment these patients into distinct groups, according to their emotions (anger, disgust, fear, happiness, sadness and surprise), sentiment and their overall satisfaction with knee replacement surgery. Our findings show how qualitative online data can be transformed into quantitative insights regarding underlying market segments, which could then be targeted through different strategies by both marketers and healthcare practitioners. 

  • 240.
    Pitt, Christine
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Flostrand, A.
    Eriksson, T.
    Grant, P.
    How Can the Ratings be So Different?: Reasoning to Identify Factors Explaining Airbnb’s Satisfaction Rating Advantage over Hotels: An Abstract2018In: Boundary Blurred:: A Seamless Customer Experience in Virtual and Real Spaces / [ed] Nina Krey, Patricia Rossi, Springer Nature , 2018, p. 537-538Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Extant literature indicates that accessing online word of mouth (eWOM) impacts subsequent purchasing and other consumer behaviors (Chatterjee 2001; Chen et al. 2011; Teng et al. 2017). Specifically, in the context of the sharing economy, which is still relatively new to some consumers, the reviews are of increasing importance as there are few traditional indicators of service quality (Ert et al. 2016). Gretzel and Yoo (2008) observe that online reviews may contain information pertaining to the quality of a service or product, which could assist in reducing risk when purchasing experience goods. However, in the case of the travel industry, it has been observed that on average satisfaction ratings for Airbnb listings are higher than satisfaction ratings of hotel listings on TripAdvisor (Zervas et al. 2015). In this paper, we review and reason on a set of key factors which may drive this gap in rating averages. In particular six propositions are developed from the relevant literature and are organized into three groupings: expectations, experiences, and evaluation. With regard to expectations, two propositions are developed relating to price anchoring (Kahneman et al. 1982) from hotel rates during the search phase and the uncertainty surrounding the anticipation of staying in the home of a stranger. This first set of propositions suggests travelers reduce their expectations of an upcoming Airbnb stay due to the comparatively low price. The second set of propositions concern the experience specific to Airbnb that would lead to surprisingly positive experiences of an Airbnb stay itself, such as accessing local wisdom from and socially interacting with Airbnb hosts (Week 2012). The last set of two propositions relate to evaluating the experience of an Airbnb stay. The first proposition is specific to an Airbnb stay in that the previous reviews may increase the chance of the anchoring bias taking effect in the review and rating process. Whereas, the second proposition suggests the lack of anonymity (Lapidot-Lefler and Barak, 2012) as a reviewer influences guests to rate an Airbnb accommodation more positively. These six propositions are presented collectively in the form of a reported satisfaction advantage conceptual model for reference by academics and practitioners. 

  • 241.
    Popova, Kristina
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Standardization and professionalism in the work of call center operators2021In: Monitoring Obshchestvennogo Mneniya: Ekonomicheskie i Sotsial'nye Peremeny, ISSN 2219-5467, no 3, p. 105-133Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The article focuses on the work of a call center operating as an inquiry service in a major Russian city. Despite there are multiple studies of call centers within the critical studies of work, their focus traditionally lies on the managerial practices of control, while the “productive” part of work - its content and the professionalism of operators - often remains unstudied. This article examines a key part of the call center work: answering the callers' questions. Utilizing the methodology of conversation analysis to analyze the transcripts of calls, we demonstrate that the operators' work includes much more than simply reading a ready-made text from the database of answers. The operator performs the function of an interpreter, whose key task consists in establishing correspondence between the abstract information of the database and the unique life situations of the callers seeking help in the inquiry service. A professional operator is able to perform this job while balancing between often contradictory norms of everyday communication and the internal rules of the call center. Even though professionals in many spheres approach rules with flexibility, the specific of call center work implies that the professionalism of operators exists under the threat of being punished for deviating from the workplace instructions; the professionalism of operators cannot be institutionalized because of the requirement of standardization in a call center.

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  • 242.
    Raptis, Vasilios Ingvar
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Urbanism in the making: A handbook of survival2017Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Urbanization is increasing uncontrollably with accelerating speed and the problems this is causing can be seen at the symptoms they produce. Gentrification, sprawl, slums, ecological disasters, psychological effects on people are some of many problems having to do with cities. Majority of the problems appeared after industrialization and most have not been dealt with and many more are emerging. As this situation continues, urbanism is gaining a lot of attention from theorists, scholars, and people around the world, as the field that studies the phenomenon of urbanization and the urban environment. However, urbanism, as a concept, is not clearly determined and as developed as the pace in which urbanization grows and the theories seem to lack awareness of the size of the issue. Urbanism remains passive to the contemporary problems that are appearing, because by the time a theory is providing strategies to solve existing problems, new ones are emerging. Adding to this, what urbanism is and how it is implemented are still vague questions with even more vague answers. Through my research, I did not find a clear, and acceptable by all, definition of urbanism and that shows the complexity of the subject. This is an issue that has contributed, together with the magnificent speed that cities have grown with, to the borders between urban and rural disappearing. The result is a situation that cannot be described yet, but must become a source of research within urbanism, in the upcoming decades.

    This research first tackles the questions of what urban and urbanism is, to later proceed to what urbanism is concerned with. The goal is to orient oneself to the making of urbanism. A detailed cataloging of all the theories that have emerged through the years in a historical and thematic context shows what the trend has been through the decades and which problems urbanism as a broad term has decided to work with. The hope is that there will appear a pattern that can teach all new urbanists about the history of the profession and the mistakes that have been made, so that in the future the discourse about urbanism can be made on more solid grounds and on pragmatic problem solution rather than futuristic hopes and assumptions. This research will reach contemporary years so that it can be understood where the field is headed to. Successively, it is an insight into where cities might be headed, if solution finding tackles problems that appeared in the past, up to contemporary ones and the possible ones that might appear in the future.

    Urbanism is a field of research and is in constant movement and in evolution. Therefore, this research is aware that by the time of its publication it will already be outdated. Nevertheless, the goal for this research is to provide a stepping stone to further research within the field.

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  • 243.
    Rauhut, Daniel
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Den besvärliga fattigdomen2006Book (Other academic)
  • 244.
    Rauhut, Daniel
    FoU-enheten, Stockholms stad.
    Samhörighet och generositet: Om socialbidrag och krav på motprestationer2007In: Vägen till arbete. Om Stockholms stads arbete med olika grupper av arbetslösa socialbidragstagare / [ed] Daniel Rauhut, Stockholm: Fou-enheten, Stockholms stad , 2007Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 245.
    Rauhut, Daniel
    FoU-enheten, Stockholms Stad.
    Vägen till arbete. Om Stockholms stads arbete med olika grupper av arbetslösa socialbidragstagare.2007Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 246.
    Rauhut, Daniel
    FoU-enheten, Stockholms Stad.
    Vägen till Sverige. Om Stockholms stads integrationsarbete.2007Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 247.
    Rauhut, Daniel
    et al.
    FoU-enheten, Stockholms stad.
    Alander, Nina
    FoU-enheten, Stockholms stad.
    Invandrarföretagande och integration: om främjande kommunala insatser2007In: Vägen till Sverige, Stockholm: Fou-enheten, Stockholms stad , 2007Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 248.
    Rauhut, Daniel
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Hatti, NeelambarDept. of Economic History, University of Lund.Olsson, Carl-AxelDept. of Economic History, University of Lund.
    Economists and Poverty: From Adam Smith to Amartya Sen2005Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 249.
    Rauhut, Daniel
    et al.
    FoU-enheten, Stockholms stad.
    Lingärde, Svante
    FoU-enheten, Stockholms stad.
    Alander, Nina
    FoU-enheten, Stockholms stad.
    Om barnfattigdom: Ansvar, insatser och orsaker2006Book (Other academic)
  • 250.
    Rosenberg, Emelie
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI).
    Tarazona, Carlota
    Univ Politecn Madrid, Madrid, Spain..
    Mallor, Fermin
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Engineering Mechanics, Fluid Mechanics and Engineering Acoustics.
    Eivazi, Hamidreza
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Engineering Mechanics.
    Pastor-Escuredo, David
    LifeD Lab, Madrid, Spain..
    Nerini, Francesco Fuso
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems. KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Centres, KTH Climate Action Centre, CAC.
    Vinuesa, Ricardo
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Engineering Mechanics, Fluid Mechanics and Engineering Acoustics. KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Centres, KTH Climate Action Centre, CAC.
    Sentiment analysis on Twitter data towards climate action2023In: Results in Engineering (RINENG), ISSN 2590-1230, Vol. 19, article id 101287Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Understanding the progress of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) proposed by the United Nations (UN) is important, but difficult. In particular, policymakers would need to understand the sentiment within the public regarding challenges associated with climate change. With this in mind and the rise of social media, this work focuses on the task of uncovering the sentiment of Twitter users concerning climate-related issues. This is done by applying modern natural-language-processing (NLP) methods, i.e. VADER, TextBlob, and BERT, to estimate the sentiment of a gathered dataset based on climate-change keywords. A transfer-learning-based model applied to a pre-trained BERT model for embedding and tokenizing with logistic regression for sentiment classification outperformed the rule-based methods VADER and TextBlob; based on our analysis, the proposed approach led to the highest accuracy: 69%. The collected data contained significant noise, especially from the keyword 'energy'. Consequently, using more specific keywords would improve the results. The use of other methods, like BERTweet, would also increase the accuracy of the model. The overall sentiment in the analyzed data was positive. The distribution of the positive, neutral, and negative sentiments was very similar in the different SDGs.

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