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  • 201.
    Wang, Shennan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Glycoscience.
    Li, Lengwan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites.
    Zha, Li
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Glycoscience.
    Koskela, Salla
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Glycoscience. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Berglund, Lars
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Zhou, Qi
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Glycoscience. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Wood xerogel for fabrication of high-performance transparent wood2023In: Nature Communications, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 14, no 1, article id 2827Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Optically transparent wood has been fabricated by structure-retaining delignification of wood and subsequent infiltration of thermo- or photocurable polymer resins but still limited by the intrinsic low mesopore volume of the delignified wood. Here we report a facile approach to fabricate strong transparent wood composites using the wood xerogel which allows solvent-free infiltration of resin monomers into the wood cell wall under ambient conditions. The wood xerogel with high specific surface area (260 m2 g–1) and high mesopore volume (0.37 cm3 g–1) is prepared by evaporative drying of delignified wood comprising fibrillated cell walls at ambient pressure. The mesoporous wood xerogel is compressible in the transverse direction and provides precise control of the microstructure, wood volume fraction, and mechanical properties for the transparent wood composites without compromising the optical transmittance. Transparent wood composites of large size and high wood volume fraction (50%) are successfully prepared, demonstrating potential scalability of the method.

  • 202. Wang, Yang
    et al.
    Sun, Huijuan
    Tan, Shijing
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Theoretical Chemistry and Biology.
    Feng, Hao
    Cheng, Zhengwang
    Zhao, Jin
    Zhao, Aidi
    Wang, Bing
    Luo, Yi
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Theoretical Chemistry and Biology.
    Yang, Jinlong
    Hou, J. G.
    Role of point defects on the reactivity of reconstructed anatase titanium dioxide (001) surface2013In: Nature Communications, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 4, p. 2214-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The chemical reactivity of different surfaces of titanium dioxide (TiO2) has been the subject of extensive studies in recent decades. The anatase TiO2(001) and its (1 x 4) reconstructed surfaces were theoretically considered to be the most reactive and have been heavily pursued by synthetic chemists. However, the lack of direct experimental verification or determination of the active sites on these surfaces has caused controversy and debate. Here we report a systematic study on an anatase TiO2(001)-(1 x 4) surface by means of microscopic and spectroscopic techniques in combination with first-principles calculations. Two types of intrinsic point defects are identified, among which only the Ti3+ defect site on the reduced surface demonstrates considerable chemical activity. The perfect surface itself can be fully oxidized, but shows no obvious activity. Our findings suggest that the reactivity of the anatase TiO2(001) surface should depend on its reduction status, similar to that of rutile TiO2 surfaces.

  • 203.
    Wei, Xin-Feng
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Polymeric Materials.
    Yang, Wei
    College of Polymer Science and Engineering, Sichuan University, 610065, Chengdu, PR China.
    Hedenqvist, Mikael S.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Polymeric Materials.
    Plastic pollution amplified by a warming climate2024In: Nature Communications, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 15, no 1, article id 2052Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Climate change and plastic pollution are interconnected global challenges. Rising temperatures and moisture alter plastic characteristics, contributing to waste, microplastic generation, and release of hazardous substances. Urgent attention is essential to comprehend and address these climate-driven effects and their consequences.

  • 204.
    Wei, Yi-Ming
    et al.
    Beijing Inst Technol, Ctr Energy & Environm Policy Res, Beijing 100081, Peoples R China.;Beijing Inst Technol, Sch Management & Econ, Beijing 100081, Peoples R China.;Beijing Key Lab Energy Econ & Environm Management, Beijing 100081, Peoples R China..
    Han, Rong
    Beijing Inst Technol, Ctr Energy & Environm Policy Res, Beijing 100081, Peoples R China.;Beijing Key Lab Energy Econ & Environm Management, Beijing 100081, Peoples R China..
    Wang, Ce
    Beijing Inst Technol, Ctr Energy & Environm Policy Res, Beijing 100081, Peoples R China.;Beijing Inst Technol, Sch Management & Econ, Beijing 100081, Peoples R China..
    Yu, Biying
    Beijing Inst Technol, Ctr Energy & Environm Policy Res, Beijing 100081, Peoples R China.;Beijing Inst Technol, Sch Management & Econ, Beijing 100081, Peoples R China.;Beijing Key Lab Energy Econ & Environm Management, Beijing 100081, Peoples R China..
    Liang, Qiao-Mei
    Beijing Inst Technol, Ctr Energy & Environm Policy Res, Beijing 100081, Peoples R China.;Beijing Inst Technol, Sch Management & Econ, Beijing 100081, Peoples R China.;Beijing Key Lab Energy Econ & Environm Management, Beijing 100081, Peoples R China..
    Yuan, Xiao-Chen
    Beijing Inst Technol, Ctr Energy & Environm Policy Res, Beijing 100081, Peoples R China.;Beijing Inst Technol, Sch Management & Econ, Beijing 100081, Peoples R China.;Beijing Key Lab Energy Econ & Environm Management, Beijing 100081, Peoples R China..
    Chang, Junjie
    Beijing Inst Technol, Ctr Energy & Environm Policy Res, Beijing 100081, Peoples R China..
    Zhao, Qingyu
    Beijing Inst Technol, Sch Management & Econ, Beijing 100081, Peoples R China.;Beijing Key Lab Energy Econ & Environm Management, Beijing 100081, Peoples R China..
    Liao, Hua
    Beijing Inst Technol, Ctr Energy & Environm Policy Res, Beijing 100081, Peoples R China.;Beijing Inst Technol, Sch Management & Econ, Beijing 100081, Peoples R China.;Beijing Key Lab Energy Econ & Environm Management, Beijing 100081, Peoples R China..
    Tang, Baojun
    Beijing Inst Technol, Ctr Energy & Environm Policy Res, Beijing 100081, Peoples R China.;Beijing Inst Technol, Sch Management & Econ, Beijing 100081, Peoples R China.;Beijing Key Lab Energy Econ & Environm Management, Beijing 100081, Peoples R China..
    Yan, Jinyue
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering, Energy Processes.
    Cheng, Lijing
    Chinese Acad Sci, Int Ctr Climate & Environm Sci, Inst Atmospher Phys, Beijing 100029, Peoples R China..
    Yang, Zili
    SUNY Binghamton, Dept Econ, Binghamton, NY 13902 USA..
    Self-preservation strategy for approaching global warming targets in the post-Paris Agreement era2020In: Nature Communications, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 11, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A strategy that informs on countries' potential losses due to lack of climate action may facilitate global climate governance. Here, we quantify a distribution of mitigation effort whereby each country is economically better off than under current climate pledges. This effort-sharing optimizing approach applied to a 1.5 degrees C and 2 degrees C global warming threshold suggests self-preservation emissions trajectories to inform NDCs enhancement and long-term strategies. Results show that following the current emissions reduction efforts, the whole world would experience a washout of benefit, amounting to almost 126.68-616.12 trillion dollars until 2100 compared to 1.5 degrees C or well below 2 degrees C commensurate action. If countries are even unable to implement their current NDCs, the whole world would lose more benefit, almost 149.78-791.98 trillion dollars until 2100. On the contrary, all countries will be able to have a significant positive cumulative net income before 2100 if they follow the self-preservation strategy. The emission allocation strategies of global scenarios do not specify the potential benefits from extra climate mitigation efforts. Here the authors show that compared to the current Nationally Distributed Contributions, the proposed self-preservation strategy might generate 126-616 trillion dollars of additional benefits by 2100.

  • 205.
    Wiedorn, Max O.
    et al.
    DESY, Ctr Free Electron Laser Sci, Notkestr 85, D-22607 Hamburg, Germany.;Univ Hamburg, Dept Phys, Luruper Chaussee 149, D-22761 Hamburg, Germany.;Univ Hamburg, Hamburg Ctr Ultrafast Imaging, Luruper Chaussee 149, D-22761 Hamburg, Germany..
    Oberthuer, Dominik
    DESY, Ctr Free Electron Laser Sci, Notkestr 85, D-22607 Hamburg, Germany..
    Bean, Richard
    European XFEL GmbH, Holzkoppel 4, D-22869 Schenefeld, Germany..
    Schubert, Robin
    Univ Hamburg, Hamburg Ctr Ultrafast Imaging, Luruper Chaussee 149, D-22761 Hamburg, Germany.;Univ Hamburg, Inst Biochem & Mol Biol, Lab Struct Biol Infect & Inflammat, Notkestr 85, D-22607 Hamburg, Germany.;Integrated Biol Infrastruct Life Sci Facil Europe, Holzkoppel 4, D-22869 Schenefeld, Germany..
    Werner, Nadine
    Univ Hamburg, Inst Biochem & Mol Biol, Lab Struct Biol Infect & Inflammat, Notkestr 85, D-22607 Hamburg, Germany..
    Abbey, Brian
    La Trobe Univ, Ctr Excellence Adv Mol Imaging, La Trobe Inst Mol Sci, Dept Chem & Phys,ARC, Bundoora, Vic 3086, Australia..
    Aepfelbacher, Martin
    Univ Med Ctr Hamburg Eppendorf UKE, Inst Med Microbiol Virol & Hyg, D-20246 Hamburg, Germany..
    Adriano, Luigi
    DESY, Notkestr 85, D-22607 Hamburg, Germany..
    Allahgholi, Aschkan
    DESY, Notkestr 85, D-22607 Hamburg, Germany..
    Al-Qudami, Nasser
    European XFEL GmbH, Holzkoppel 4, D-22869 Schenefeld, Germany..
    Andreasson, Jakob
    Uppsala Univ, Dept Cell & Mol Biol, Lab Mol Biophys, S-75124 Uppsala, Sweden.;Czech Acad Sci, ELI Beamlines, Inst Phys, Na Slovance 2, Prague 18221, Czech Republic.;Chalmers Univ Technol, Dept Phys, Condensed Matter Phys, S-41296 Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Aplin, Steve
    DESY, Ctr Free Electron Laser Sci, Notkestr 85, D-22607 Hamburg, Germany..
    Awel, Salah
    DESY, Ctr Free Electron Laser Sci, Notkestr 85, D-22607 Hamburg, Germany.;Univ Hamburg, Hamburg Ctr Ultrafast Imaging, Luruper Chaussee 149, D-22761 Hamburg, Germany..
    Ayyer, Kartik
    DESY, Ctr Free Electron Laser Sci, Notkestr 85, D-22607 Hamburg, Germany..
    Bajt, Sasa
    DESY, Notkestr 85, D-22607 Hamburg, Germany..
    Barak, Imrich
    DESY, Ctr Free Electron Laser Sci, Notkestr 85, D-22607 Hamburg, Germany.;Univ Hamburg, Hamburg Ctr Ultrafast Imaging, Luruper Chaussee 149, D-22761 Hamburg, Germany..
    Bari, Sadia
    DESY, Notkestr 85, D-22607 Hamburg, Germany..
    Bielecki, Johan
    European XFEL GmbH, Holzkoppel 4, D-22869 Schenefeld, Germany..
    Botha, Sabine
    Univ Hamburg, Hamburg Ctr Ultrafast Imaging, Luruper Chaussee 149, D-22761 Hamburg, Germany.;Univ Hamburg, Inst Biochem & Mol Biol, Lab Struct Biol Infect & Inflammat, Notkestr 85, D-22607 Hamburg, Germany..
    Boukhelef, Djelloul
    European XFEL GmbH, Holzkoppel 4, D-22869 Schenefeld, Germany..
    Brehm, Wolfgang
    DESY, Ctr Free Electron Laser Sci, Notkestr 85, D-22607 Hamburg, Germany..
    Brockhauser, Sandor
    European XFEL GmbH, Holzkoppel 4, D-22869 Schenefeld, Germany.;Hungarian Acad Sci, BRC, Temesvari Krt 62, H-6726 Szeged, Hungary..
    Cheviakov, Igor
    Univ Med Ctr Hamburg Eppendorf UKE, Inst Med Microbiol Virol & Hyg, D-20246 Hamburg, Germany..
    Coleman, Matthew A.
    Lawrence Livermore Natl Lab, 7000 East Ave, Livermore, CA 94550 USA..
    Cruz-Mazo, Francisco
    Univ Seville, Dept Ingn Aeroesp & Mecan Fluidos ETSI, Seville 41092, Spain..
    Danilevski, Cyril
    European XFEL GmbH, Holzkoppel 4, D-22869 Schenefeld, Germany..
    Darmanin, Connie
    La Trobe Univ, Ctr Excellence Adv Mol Imaging, La Trobe Inst Mol Sci, Dept Chem & Phys,ARC, Bundoora, Vic 3086, Australia..
    Doak, R. Bruce
    Max Planck Inst Med Res, Jahnstr 29, D-69120 Heidelberg, Germany..
    Domaracky, Martin
    DESY, Ctr Free Electron Laser Sci, Notkestr 85, D-22607 Hamburg, Germany..
    Doerner, Katerina
    European XFEL GmbH, Holzkoppel 4, D-22869 Schenefeld, Germany..
    Du, Yang
    DESY, Ctr Free Electron Laser Sci, Notkestr 85, D-22607 Hamburg, Germany..
    Fangohr, Hans
    European XFEL GmbH, Holzkoppel 4, D-22869 Schenefeld, Germany.;Univ Southampton, Engn & Environm, Southampton SO17 1BJ, Hants, England..
    Fleckenstein, Holger
    DESY, Ctr Free Electron Laser Sci, Notkestr 85, D-22607 Hamburg, Germany..
    Frank, Matthias
    Lawrence Livermore Natl Lab, 7000 East Ave, Livermore, CA 94550 USA..
    Fromme, Petra
    Arizona State Univ, Sch Mol Sci & Biodesign, Ctr Appl Struct Discovery, Tempe, AZ 85287 USA..
    Ganan-Calvo, Alfonso M.
    Univ Seville, Dept Ingn Aeroesp & Mecan Fluidos ETSI, Seville 41092, Spain..
    Gevorkov, Yaroslav
    DESY, Ctr Free Electron Laser Sci, Notkestr 85, D-22607 Hamburg, Germany.;Hamburg Univ Technol, Vis Syst E2, Harburger Schlostr 20, D-21079 Hamburg, Germany..
    Giewekemeyer, Klaus
    European XFEL GmbH, Holzkoppel 4, D-22869 Schenefeld, Germany..
    Ginn, Helen Mary
    Div Struct Biol, Oxford OX3 7BN, England.;Diamond Light Source, Res Complex Harwell, Diamond House,Harwell Sci & Innovat Campus, Didcot OX11 0DE, Oxon, England.;Univ Oxford, Diamond House,Harwell Sci & Innovat Campus, Didcot OX11 0DE, Oxon, England..
    Graafsma, Heinz
    DESY, Notkestr 85, D-22607 Hamburg, Germany.;Mid Sweden Univ, Holmgatan 10, S-85170 Sundsvall, Sweden..
    Graceffa, Rita
    European XFEL GmbH, Holzkoppel 4, D-22869 Schenefeld, Germany..
    Greiffenberg, Dominic
    Paul Scherrer Inst, Forsch Str 111, CH-5232 Villigen, Switzerland..
    Gumprecht, Lars
    DESY, Ctr Free Electron Laser Sci, Notkestr 85, D-22607 Hamburg, Germany..
    Goettlicher, Peter
    DESY, Notkestr 85, D-22607 Hamburg, Germany..
    Hajdu, Janos
    Uppsala Univ, Dept Cell & Mol Biol, Lab Mol Biophys, S-75124 Uppsala, Sweden.;Czech Acad Sci, ELI Beamlines, Inst Phys, Na Slovance 2, Prague 18221, Czech Republic..
    Hauf, Steffen
    European XFEL GmbH, Holzkoppel 4, D-22869 Schenefeld, Germany..
    Heymann, Michael
    Max Planck Inst Biochem, Dept Cellular & Mol Biophys, D-82152 Martinsried, Germany..
    Holmes, Susannah
    La Trobe Univ, Ctr Excellence Adv Mol Imaging, La Trobe Inst Mol Sci, Dept Chem & Phys,ARC, Bundoora, Vic 3086, Australia..
    Horke, Daniel A.
    DESY, Ctr Free Electron Laser Sci, Notkestr 85, D-22607 Hamburg, Germany.;Univ Hamburg, Hamburg Ctr Ultrafast Imaging, Luruper Chaussee 149, D-22761 Hamburg, Germany..
    Hunter, Mark S.
    SLAC Natl Accelerator Lab, Linac Coherent Light Source, Menlo Pk, CA 94025 USA..
    Imlau, Siegfried
    DESY, Ctr Free Electron Laser Sci, Notkestr 85, D-22607 Hamburg, Germany..
    Kaukher, Alexander
    European XFEL GmbH, Holzkoppel 4, D-22869 Schenefeld, Germany..
    Kim, Yoonhee
    European XFEL GmbH, Holzkoppel 4, D-22869 Schenefeld, Germany..
    Klyuev, Alexander
    DESY, Notkestr 85, D-22607 Hamburg, Germany..
    Knoska, Juraj
    DESY, Ctr Free Electron Laser Sci, Notkestr 85, D-22607 Hamburg, Germany.;Univ Hamburg, Dept Phys, Luruper Chaussee 149, D-22761 Hamburg, Germany..
    Kobe, Bostjan
    Univ Queensland, Inst Mol Biosci, Sch Chem & Mol Biosci, Brisbane, Qld 4072, Australia.;Univ Queensland, Australian Infect Dis Res Ctr, Brisbane, Qld 4072, Australia..
    Kuhn, Manuela
    DESY, Notkestr 85, D-22607 Hamburg, Germany..
    Kupitz, Christopher
    Univ Wisconsin, Phys Dept, 3135 N Maryland Ave, Milwaukee, WI 53211 USA..
    Kueper, Jochen
    DESY, Ctr Free Electron Laser Sci, Notkestr 85, D-22607 Hamburg, Germany.;Univ Hamburg, Dept Phys, Luruper Chaussee 149, D-22761 Hamburg, Germany.;Univ Hamburg, Hamburg Ctr Ultrafast Imaging, Luruper Chaussee 149, D-22761 Hamburg, Germany.;Univ Hamburg, Dept Chem, Martin Luther King Pl 6, D-20146 Hamburg, Germany..
    Lahey-Rudolph, Janine Mia
    DESY, Ctr Free Electron Laser Sci, Notkestr 85, D-22607 Hamburg, Germany.;Univ Lubeck, Inst Biochem, Ctr Struct & Cell Biol Med, Ratzeburger Allee 160, D-23562 Lubeck, Germany..
    Laurus, Torsten
    DESY, Notkestr 85, D-22607 Hamburg, Germany..
    Le Cong, Karoline
    Univ Hamburg, Inst Biochem & Mol Biol, Lab Struct Biol Infect & Inflammat, Notkestr 85, D-22607 Hamburg, Germany..
    Letrun, Romain
    European XFEL GmbH, Holzkoppel 4, D-22869 Schenefeld, Germany..
    Xavier, P. Lourdu
    DESY, Ctr Free Electron Laser Sci, Notkestr 85, D-22607 Hamburg, Germany.;Max Planck Inst Struct & Dynam Matter, Luruper Chaussee 149, D-22761 Hamburg, Germany..
    Maia, Luis
    European XFEL GmbH, Holzkoppel 4, D-22869 Schenefeld, Germany..
    Maia, Filipe R. N. C.
    Uppsala Univ, Dept Cell & Mol Biol, Lab Mol Biophys, S-75124 Uppsala, Sweden.;Lawrence Berkeley Natl Lab, NERSC, Berkeley, CA 94720 USA..
    Mariani, Valerio
    DESY, Ctr Free Electron Laser Sci, Notkestr 85, D-22607 Hamburg, Germany..
    Messerschmidt, Marc
    European XFEL GmbH, Holzkoppel 4, D-22869 Schenefeld, Germany..
    Metz, Markus
    DESY, Ctr Free Electron Laser Sci, Notkestr 85, D-22607 Hamburg, Germany..
    Mezza, Davide
    Paul Scherrer Inst, Forsch Str 111, CH-5232 Villigen, Switzerland..
    Michelat, Thomas
    European XFEL GmbH, Holzkoppel 4, D-22869 Schenefeld, Germany..
    Mills, Grant
    European XFEL GmbH, Holzkoppel 4, D-22869 Schenefeld, Germany..
    Monteiro, Diana C. F.
    Univ Hamburg, Hamburg Ctr Ultrafast Imaging, Luruper Chaussee 149, D-22761 Hamburg, Germany..
    Morgan, Andrew
    DESY, Ctr Free Electron Laser Sci, Notkestr 85, D-22607 Hamburg, Germany..
    Muhlig, Kerstin
    Uppsala Univ, Dept Cell & Mol Biol, Lab Mol Biophys, S-75124 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Munke, Anna
    Uppsala Univ, Dept Cell & Mol Biol, Lab Mol Biophys, S-75124 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Muennich, Astrid
    European XFEL GmbH, Holzkoppel 4, D-22869 Schenefeld, Germany..
    Nette, Julia
    Univ Hamburg, Hamburg Ctr Ultrafast Imaging, Luruper Chaussee 149, D-22761 Hamburg, Germany..
    Nugent, Keith A.
    La Trobe Univ, Ctr Excellence Adv Mol Imaging, La Trobe Inst Mol Sci, Dept Chem & Phys,ARC, Bundoora, Vic 3086, Australia..
    Nuguid, Theresa
    Univ Hamburg, Inst Biochem & Mol Biol, Lab Struct Biol Infect & Inflammat, Notkestr 85, D-22607 Hamburg, Germany..
    Orville, Allen M.
    Diamond Light Source, Res Complex Harwell, Diamond House,Harwell Sci & Innovat Campus, Didcot OX11 0DE, Oxon, England.;Univ Oxford, Diamond House,Harwell Sci & Innovat Campus, Didcot OX11 0DE, Oxon, England..
    Pandey, Suraj
    Univ Wisconsin, Phys Dept, 3135 N Maryland Ave, Milwaukee, WI 53211 USA..
    Pena, Gisel
    DESY, Ctr Free Electron Laser Sci, Notkestr 85, D-22607 Hamburg, Germany..
    Villanueva-Perez, Pablo
    DESY, Ctr Free Electron Laser Sci, Notkestr 85, D-22607 Hamburg, Germany..
    Poehlsen, Jennifer
    DESY, Notkestr 85, D-22607 Hamburg, Germany..
    Previtali, Gianpietro
    European XFEL GmbH, Holzkoppel 4, D-22869 Schenefeld, Germany..
    Redecke, Lars
    Univ Med Ctr Hamburg Eppendorf UKE, Inst Med Microbiol Virol & Hyg, D-20246 Hamburg, Germany.;Univ Lubeck, Inst Biochem, Ctr Struct & Cell Biol Med, Ratzeburger Allee 160, D-23562 Lubeck, Germany..
    Riekehr, Winnie Maria
    Univ Lubeck, Inst Biochem, Ctr Struct & Cell Biol Med, Ratzeburger Allee 160, D-23562 Lubeck, Germany..
    Rohde, Holger
    Univ Med Ctr Hamburg Eppendorf UKE, Inst Med Microbiol Virol & Hyg, D-20246 Hamburg, Germany..
    Round, Adam
    European XFEL GmbH, Holzkoppel 4, D-22869 Schenefeld, Germany..
    Safenreiter, Tatiana
    DESY, Ctr Free Electron Laser Sci, Notkestr 85, D-22607 Hamburg, Germany..
    Sarrou, Iosifina
    DESY, Ctr Free Electron Laser Sci, Notkestr 85, D-22607 Hamburg, Germany..
    Sato, Tokushi
    DESY, Ctr Free Electron Laser Sci, Notkestr 85, D-22607 Hamburg, Germany.;European XFEL GmbH, Holzkoppel 4, D-22869 Schenefeld, Germany..
    Schmidt, Marius
    Univ Wisconsin, Phys Dept, 3135 N Maryland Ave, Milwaukee, WI 53211 USA..
    Schmitt, Bernd
    Paul Scherrer Inst, Forsch Str 111, CH-5232 Villigen, Switzerland..
    Schoenherr, Robert
    Univ Lubeck, Inst Biochem, Ctr Struct & Cell Biol Med, Ratzeburger Allee 160, D-23562 Lubeck, Germany..
    Schulz, Joachim
    European XFEL GmbH, Holzkoppel 4, D-22869 Schenefeld, Germany..
    Sellberg, Jonas A.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Biomedical and X-ray Physics.
    Seibert, M. Marvin
    Uppsala Univ, Dept Cell & Mol Biol, Lab Mol Biophys, S-75124 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Seuring, Carolin
    SAS, Inst Mol Biol, Dubravska Cesta 21, Bratislava 84551, Slovakia..
    Shelby, Megan L.
    Lawrence Livermore Natl Lab, 7000 East Ave, Livermore, CA 94550 USA..
    Shoeman, Robert L.
    Max Planck Inst Med Res, Jahnstr 29, D-69120 Heidelberg, Germany..
    Sikorski, Marcin
    European XFEL GmbH, Holzkoppel 4, D-22869 Schenefeld, Germany..
    Silenzi, Alessandro
    European XFEL GmbH, Holzkoppel 4, D-22869 Schenefeld, Germany..
    Stan, Claudiu A.
    Rutgers Univ Newark, Phys Dept, Newark, NJ 07102 USA..
    Shi, Xintian
    Paul Scherrer Inst, Forsch Str 111, CH-5232 Villigen, Switzerland..
    Stern, Stephan
    DESY, Ctr Free Electron Laser Sci, Notkestr 85, D-22607 Hamburg, Germany.;European XFEL GmbH, Holzkoppel 4, D-22869 Schenefeld, Germany..
    Sztuk-Dambietz, Jola
    European XFEL GmbH, Holzkoppel 4, D-22869 Schenefeld, Germany..
    Szuba, Janusz
    European XFEL GmbH, Holzkoppel 4, D-22869 Schenefeld, Germany..
    Tolstikova, Aleksandra
    DESY, Ctr Free Electron Laser Sci, Notkestr 85, D-22607 Hamburg, Germany..
    Trebbin, Martin
    Univ Hamburg, Hamburg Ctr Ultrafast Imaging, Luruper Chaussee 149, D-22761 Hamburg, Germany.;Univ Buffalo, Dept Chem, 359 Nat Sci Complex, Buffalo, NY 14260 USA.;Univ Hamburg, Inst Nanostruct & Solid State Phys, Dept Phys, Luruper Chaussee 149, D-22761 Hamburg, Germany..
    Trunk, Ulrich
    DESY, Notkestr 85, D-22607 Hamburg, Germany..
    Vagovic, Patrik
    DESY, Ctr Free Electron Laser Sci, Notkestr 85, D-22607 Hamburg, Germany.;European XFEL GmbH, Holzkoppel 4, D-22869 Schenefeld, Germany..
    Ve, Thomas
    Griffith Univ, Inst Glyc, Southport, Qld 4222, Australia..
    Weinhausen, Britta
    European XFEL GmbH, Holzkoppel 4, D-22869 Schenefeld, Germany..
    White, Thomas A.
    DESY, Ctr Free Electron Laser Sci, Notkestr 85, D-22607 Hamburg, Germany..
    Wrona, Krzysztof
    European XFEL GmbH, Holzkoppel 4, D-22869 Schenefeld, Germany..
    Xu, Chen
    European XFEL GmbH, Holzkoppel 4, D-22869 Schenefeld, Germany..
    Yefanov, Oleksandr
    DESY, Ctr Free Electron Laser Sci, Notkestr 85, D-22607 Hamburg, Germany..
    Zatsepin, Nadia
    Arizona State Univ, Dept Phys, Tempe, AZ 85287 USA..
    Zhang, Jiaguo
    Paul Scherrer Inst, Forsch Str 111, CH-5232 Villigen, Switzerland..
    Perbandt, Markus
    Univ Hamburg, Hamburg Ctr Ultrafast Imaging, Luruper Chaussee 149, D-22761 Hamburg, Germany.;Univ Hamburg, Inst Biochem & Mol Biol, Lab Struct Biol Infect & Inflammat, Notkestr 85, D-22607 Hamburg, Germany.;Univ Med Ctr Hamburg Eppendorf UKE, Inst Med Microbiol Virol & Hyg, D-20246 Hamburg, Germany..
    Mancuso, Adrian P.
    European XFEL GmbH, Holzkoppel 4, D-22869 Schenefeld, Germany..
    Betzel, Christian
    Univ Hamburg, Hamburg Ctr Ultrafast Imaging, Luruper Chaussee 149, D-22761 Hamburg, Germany.;Univ Hamburg, Inst Biochem & Mol Biol, Lab Struct Biol Infect & Inflammat, Notkestr 85, D-22607 Hamburg, Germany.;Integrated Biol Infrastruct Life Sci Facil Europe, Holzkoppel 4, D-22869 Schenefeld, Germany..
    Chapman, Henry
    DESY, Ctr Free Electron Laser Sci, Notkestr 85, D-22607 Hamburg, Germany.;Univ Hamburg, Dept Phys, Luruper Chaussee 149, D-22761 Hamburg, Germany.;Univ Hamburg, Hamburg Ctr Ultrafast Imaging, Luruper Chaussee 149, D-22761 Hamburg, Germany..
    Barty, Anton
    DESY, Ctr Free Electron Laser Sci, Notkestr 85, D-22607 Hamburg, Germany..
    Megahertz serial crystallography2018In: Nature Communications, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 9, article id 4025Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The new European X-ray Free-Electron Laser is the first X-ray free-electron laser capable of delivering X-ray pulses with a megahertz inter-pulse spacing, more than four orders of magnitude higher than previously possible. However, to date, it has been unclear whether it would indeed be possible to measure high-quality diffraction data at megahertz pulse repetition rates. Here, we show that high-quality structures can indeed be obtained using currently available operating conditions at the European XFEL. We present two complete data sets, one from the well-known model system lysozyme and the other from a so far unknown complex of a beta-lactamase from K. pneumoniae involved in antibiotic resistance. This result opens up megahertz serial femtosecond crystallography (SFX) as a tool for reliable structure determination, substrate screening and the efficient measurement of the evolution and dynamics of molecular structures using megahertz repetition rate pulses available at this new class of X-ray laser source.

  • 206.
    Wojek, Bastian M.
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Materials- and Nano Physics, Material Physics, MF.
    Hårdensson Berntsen, Magnus
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Materials- and Nano Physics, Material Physics, MF.
    Jonsson, Viktor
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Materials- and Nano Physics, Material Physics, MF. KTH, Centres, Nordic Institute for Theoretical Physics NORDITA.
    Szczerbakow, A.
    Dziawa, P.
    Kowalski, B. J.
    Story, T.
    Tjernberg, Oscar
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Materials- and Nano Physics, Material Physics, MF. KTH, Centres, Nordic Institute for Theoretical Physics NORDITA.
    Direct observation and temperature control of the surface Dirac gap in a topological crystalline insulator2015In: Nature Communications, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 6, article id 8463Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Since the advent of topological insulators hosting Dirac surface states, efforts have been made to gap these states in a controllable way. A new route to accomplish this was opened up by the discovery of topological crystalline insulators where the topological states are protected by crystal symmetries and thus prone to gap formation by structural changes of the lattice. Here we show a temperature-driven gap opening in Dirac surface states within the topological crystalline insulator phase in (Pb,Sn) Se. By using angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy, the gap formation and mass acquisition is studied as a function of composition and temperature. The resulting observations lead to the addition of a temperature-and composition-dependent boundary between massless and massive Dirac states in the topological phase diagram for (Pb,Sn) Se (001). Overall, our results experimentally establish the possibility to tune between massless and massive topological states on the surface of a topological system.

  • 207.
    Wu, Chuanyan
    et al.
    Lund Univ, Dept Clin Sci, Malmö, Sweden.;Shandong Univ, Sch Control Sci & Engn, Jinan, Shandong, Peoples R China.;Shandong Management Univ, Sch Intelligent Engn, Jinan, Shandong, Peoples R China..
    Hong, Mun-Gwan
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science.
    Schwenk, Jochen M.
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science.
    De Marinis, Yang
    Lund Univ, Dept Clin Sci, Malmö, Sweden.;Shandong Univ, Sch Control Sci & Engn, Jinan, Shandong, Peoples R China.;Univ Sci & Technol China, Dept Endocrinol & Metab, Div Life Sci Med, Hefei, Peoples R China..
    Elevated circulating follistatin associates with an increased risk of type 2 diabetes2021In: Nature Communications, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 12, no 1, article id 6486Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The hepatokine follistatin is elevated in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D) and promotes hyperglycemia in mice. Here we explore the relationship of plasma follistatin levels with incident T2D and mechanisms involved. Adjusted hazard ratio (HR) per standard deviation (SD) increase in follistatin levels for T2D is 1.24 (CI: 1.04-1.47, p < 0.05) during 19-year follow-up (n = 4060, Sweden); and 1.31 (CI: 1.09-1.58, p < 0.01) during 4-year follow-up (n = 883, Finland). High circulating follistatin associates with adipose tissue insulin resistance and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (n = 210, Germany). In human adipocytes, follistatin dose-dependently increases free fatty acid release. In genome-wide association study (GWAS), variation in the glucokinase regulatory protein gene (GCKR) associates with plasma follistatin levels (n = 4239, Sweden; n = 885, UK, Italy and Sweden) and GCKR regulates follistatin secretion in hepatocytes in vitro. Our findings suggest that GCKR regulates follistatin secretion and that elevated circulating follistatin associates with an increased risk of T2D by inducing adipose tissue insulin resistance.

  • 208.
    Xia, Chen
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Heat and Power Technology. KTH Royal Inst Technol, Dept Energy Technol, SE-10044 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Mi, Youquan
    Hubei Univ, Fac Phys & Elect Sci, Key Lab Ferro & Piezoelect Mat & Devices Hubei Pr, Wuhan 430062, Hubei, Peoples R China..
    Wang, Baoyuan
    Hubei Univ, Fac Phys & Elect Sci, Key Lab Ferro & Piezoelect Mat & Devices Hubei Pr, Wuhan 430062, Hubei, Peoples R China..
    Lin, Bin
    Univ Elect Sci & Technol China, Sch Mat & Energy, Chengdu 611731, Sichuan, Peoples R China..
    Chen, Gang
    Northeastern Univ, Liaoning Key Lab Met Sensor & Technol, Shenyang 110819, Liaoning, Peoples R China..
    Zhu, Bin
    Hubei Univ, Fac Phys & Elect Sci, Key Lab Ferro & Piezoelect Mat & Devices Hubei Pr, Wuhan 430062, Hubei, Peoples R China.;China Univ Geosci, Fac Mat Sci & Chem, Wuhan 430074, Hubei, Peoples R China.;Loughborough Univ, Dept Aeronaut & Automot Engn, Ashby Rd, Loughborough LE11 3TU, Leics, England..
    Shaping triple-conducting semiconductor BaCo0.4Fe0.4Zr0.1Y0.1O3-delta into an electrolyte for low-temperature solid oxide fuel cells2019In: Nature Communications, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 10, article id 1707Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Interest in low-temperature operation of solid oxide fuel cells is growing. Recent advances in perovskite phases have resulted in an efficient H+/O2-/e(-) triple-conducting electrode BaCo0.4Fe0.4Zr0.1Y0.1O3-delta for low-temperature fuel cells. Here, we further develop BaCo0.4Fe0.4Zr0.1Y0.1O3-delta for electrolyte applications by taking advantage of its high ionic conduction while suppressing its electronic conduction through constructing a BaCo0.4Fe0.4Zr0.1Y0.1O3-delta-ZnO p-n heterostructure. With this approach, it has been demonstrated that BaCo0.4Fe0.4Zr0.1Y0.1O3-delta can be applied in a fuel cell with good electrolyte functionality, achieving attractive ionic conductivity and cell performance. Further investigation confirms the hybrid H+/O2- conducting capability of BaCo0.4Fe0.4Zr0.1Y0.1O3-delta-ZnO. An energy band alignment mechanism based on a p-n heterojunction is proposed to explain the suppression of electronic conductivity and promotion of ionic conductivity in the heterostructure. Our findings demonstrate that BaCo0.4Fe0.4Zr0.1Y0.1O3-delta is not only a good electrode but also a highly promising electrolyte. The approach reveals insight for developing advanced low-temperature solid oxide fuel cell electrolytes.

  • 209.
    Xia, Haisheng
    et al.
    School of Mechanical Engineering, Tongji University, 201804, Shanghai, China; Translational Research Center, Shanghai YangZhi Rehabilitation Hospital (Shanghai Sunshine Rehabilitation Center), Tongji University, 201619, Shanghai, China; Institute of Artificial Intelligence, Hefei Comprehensive National Science Center, 230026, Hefei, China.
    Zhang, Yuchong
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Intelligent systems, Robotics, Perception and Learning, RPL.
    Rajabi, Nona
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Intelligent systems, Robotics, Perception and Learning, RPL.
    Taleb, Farzaneh
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Intelligent systems, Robotics, Perception and Learning, RPL.
    Yang, Qunting
    Department of Automation, University of Science and Technology of China, 230026, Hefei, China.
    Kragic, Danica
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Intelligent systems, Robotics, Perception and Learning, RPL.
    Li, Zhijun
    School of Mechanical Engineering, Tongji University, 201804, Shanghai, China; Translational Research Center, Shanghai YangZhi Rehabilitation Hospital (Shanghai Sunshine Rehabilitation Center), Tongji University, 201619, Shanghai, China; Institute of Artificial Intelligence, Hefei Comprehensive National Science Center, 230026, Hefei, China.
    Shaping high-performance wearable robots for human motor and sensory reconstruction and enhancement2024In: Nature Communications, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 15, no 1, article id 1760Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Most wearable robots such as exoskeletons and prostheses can operate with dexterity, while wearers do not perceive them as part of their bodies. In this perspective, we contend that integrating environmental, physiological, and physical information through multi-modal fusion, incorporating human-in-the-loop control, utilizing neuromuscular interface, employing flexible electronics, and acquiring and processing human-robot information with biomechatronic chips, should all be leveraged towards building the next generation of wearable robots. These technologies could improve the embodiment of wearable robots. With optimizations in mechanical structure and clinical training, the next generation of wearable robots should better facilitate human motor and sensory reconstruction and enhancement.

  • 210. Xie, Zi Kang
    et al.
    Zong, Qiu Gang
    Yue, Chao
    Zhou, Xu Zhi
    Liu, Zhi Yang
    He, Jian Sen
    Hao, Yi Xin
    Göttingen.
    Ng, Chung Sang
    Zhang, Hui
    Yao, Shu Tao
    Pollock, Craig
    3771 Mariposa Lane.
    Le, Guan
    Ergun, Robert
    Lindqvist, Per-Arne
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Electrical Engineering, Space and Plasma Physics.
    Electron scale coherent structure as micro accelerator in the Earth's magnetosheath2024In: Nature Communications, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 15, no 1, p. 886-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Turbulent energy dissipation is a fundamental process in plasma physics that has not been settled. It is generally believed that the turbulent energy is dissipated at electron scales leading to electron energization in magnetized plasmas. Here, we propose a micro accelerator which could transform electrons from isotropic distribution to trapped, and then to stream (Strahl) distribution. From the MMS observations of an electron-scale coherent structure in the dayside magnetosheath, we identify an electron flux enhancement region in this structure collocated with an increase of magnetic field strength, which is also closely associated with a non-zero parallel electric field. We propose a trapping model considering a field-aligned electric potential together with the mirror force. The results are consistent with the observed electron fluxes from ~50 eV to ~200 eV. It further demonstrates that bidirectional electron jets can be formed by the hourglass-like magnetic configuration of the structure.

  • 211. Xue, Nan
    et al.
    Khodaparast, Sepideh
    Zhu, Lailai
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics.
    Nunes, Janine K.
    Kim, Hyoungsoo
    Stone, Howard A.
    Laboratory layered latte2017In: Nature Communications, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 8, article id 1960Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Inducing thermal gradients in fluid systems with initial, well-defined density gradients results in the formation of distinct layered patterns, such as those observed in the ocean due to double-diffusive convection. In contrast, layered composite fluids are sometimes observed in confined systems of rather chaotic initial states, for example, lattes formed by pouring espresso into a glass of warm milk. Here, we report controlled experiments injecting a fluid into a miscible phase and show that, above a critical injection velocity, layering emerges over a time scale of minutes. We identify critical conditions to produce the layering, and relate the results quantitatively to double-diffusive convection. Based on this understanding, we show how to employ this single-step process to produce layered structures in soft materials, where the local elastic properties vary step-wise along the length of the material.

  • 212.
    Yang, Cheolhee
    et al.
    Department of Chemistry, Pohang University of Science and Technology (POSTECH), Pohang, Gyeongbuk, 37673, Republic of Korea.
    Ladd Parada, Marjorie
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Glycoscience.
    Nam, Kyeongmin
    Department of Chemistry, Pohang University of Science and Technology (POSTECH), Pohang, Gyeongbuk, 37673, Republic of Korea.
    Jeong, Sangmin
    Department of Chemistry, Pohang University of Science and Technology (POSTECH), Pohang, Gyeongbuk, 37673, Republic of Korea.
    You, Seonju
    Department of Chemistry, Pohang University of Science and Technology (POSTECH), Pohang, Gyeongbuk, 37673, Republic of Korea.
    Späh, Alexander
    Department of Physics, AlbaNova University Center, Stockholm University, SE-106 91, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Pathak, Harshad
    Department of Physics, AlbaNova University Center, Stockholm University, SE-106 91, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Eklund, Tobias
    Department of Physics, AlbaNova University Center, Stockholm University, SE-106 91, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Lane, Thomas J.
    SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, CA, 94025, USA.
    Lee, Jae Hyuk
    Pohang Accelerator Laboratory, POSTECH, Pohang, Gyeongbuk, 37673, Republic of Korea.
    Eom, Intae
    Pohang Accelerator Laboratory, POSTECH, Pohang, Gyeongbuk, 37673, Republic of Korea.
    Kim, Minseok
    Pohang Accelerator Laboratory, POSTECH, Pohang, Gyeongbuk, 37673, Republic of Korea.
    Amann-Winkel, Katrin
    Department of Physics, AlbaNova University Center, Stockholm University, SE-106 91, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Perakis, Fivos
    Department of Physics, AlbaNova University Center, Stockholm University, SE-106 91, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Anders
    Department of Physics, AlbaNova University Center, Stockholm University, SE-106 91, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Kim, Kyung Hwan
    Department of Chemistry, Pohang University of Science and Technology (POSTECH), Pohang, Gyeongbuk, 37673, Republic of Korea.
    Melting domain size and recrystallization dynamics of ice revealed by time-resolved x-ray scattering2023In: Nature Communications, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 14, no 1, article id 3313Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The phase transition between water and ice is ubiquitous and one of the most important phenomena in nature. Here, we performed time-resolved x-ray scattering experiments capturing the melting and recrystallization dynamics of ice. The ultrafast heating of ice I is induced by an IR laser pulse and probed with an intense x-ray pulse which provided us with direct structural information on different length scales. From the wide-angle x-ray scattering (WAXS) patterns, the molten fraction, as well as the corresponding temperature at each delay, were determined. The small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) patterns, together with the information extracted from the WAXS analysis, provided the time-dependent change of the size and the number of liquid domains. The results show partial melting (~13%) and superheating of ice occurring at around 20 ns. After 100 ns, the average size of the liquid domains grows from about 2.5 nm to 4.5 nm by the coalescence of approximately six adjacent domains. Subsequently, we capture the recrystallization of the liquid domains, which occurs on microsecond timescales due to the cooling by heat dissipation and results to a decrease of the average liquid domain size.

  • 213.
    Yang, Hanmin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering, Process.
    Zaini, Ilman Nuran
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering, Process.
    Pan, Ruming
    School of Energy Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, 150001, Harbin, China.
    Jin, Yanghao
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering, Process.
    Wang, Yazhe
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM).
    Li, Lengwan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Bolívar Caballero, José Juan
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering, Process.
    Shi, Ziyi
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering, Process.
    Subasi, Yaprak
    Department of Chemistry - Ångström Laboratory, Structural Chemistry, Uppsala University, Lägerhyddsvägen 1, 751 21, Uppsala, Sweden, Lägerhyddsvägen 1.
    Nurdiawati, Anissa
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Sustainability, Industrial Dynamics & Entrepreneurship.
    Wang, Shule
    International Innovation Center for Forest Chemicals and Materials, College of Chemical Engineering, Nanjing Forestry University, Longpan Road 159, 210037, Nanjing, China, Longpan Road 159; Jiangsu Province Key Laboratory of Biomass Energy and Materials, Institute of Chemical Industry of Forest Products, Chinese Academy of Forestry (CAF), No. 16, Suojin Five Village, 210042, Nanjing, China, No. 16, Suojin Five Village.
    Shen, Yazhou
    Department of Mechanical Engineering, Imperial College London, SW7 2AZ, London, UK.
    Wang, Tianxiang
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Building Materials.
    Wang, Yue
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Building Materials.
    Sandström, Linda
    Department of Biorefinery and Energy, RISE Research Institutes of Sweden AB, Box 726, SE-941 28, Piteå, Sweden.
    Jönsson, Pär
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering, Process.
    Yang, Weihong
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering, Process.
    Han, Tong
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering, Process.
    Distributed electrified heating for efficient hydrogen production2024In: Nature Communications, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 15, no 1, article id 3868Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study introduces a distributed electrified heating approach that is able to innovate chemical engineering involving endothermic reactions. It enables rapid and uniform heating of gaseous reactants, facilitating efficient conversion and high product selectivity at specific equilibrium. Demonstrated in catalyst-free CH4 pyrolysis, this approach achieves stable production of H2 (530 g h−1 L reactor−1) and carbon nanotube/fibers through 100% conversion of high-throughput CH4 at 1150 °C, surpassing the results obtained from many complex metal catalysts and high-temperature technologies. Additionally, in catalytic CH4 dry reforming, the distributed electrified heating using metallic monolith with unmodified Ni/MgO catalyst washcoat showcased excellent CH4 and CO2 conversion rates, and syngas production capacity. This innovative heating approach eliminates the need for elongated reactor tubes and external furnaces, promising an energy-concentrated and ultra-compact reactor design significantly smaller than traditional industrial systems, marking a significant advance towards more sustainable and efficient chemical engineering society.

  • 214.
    Yang, Hao
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Organic chemistry.
    Liu, Yawen
    Department of Chemistry-Ångström, Physical Chemistry, Uppsala University, 75120, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Ding, Yunxuan
    Center of Artificial Photosynthesis for Solar Fuels and Department of Chemistry, School of Science, Westlake University, 310024, Hangzhou, China.
    Li, Fusheng
    State Key Laboratory of Fine Chemicals, Institute of Artificial Photosynthesis, DUT-KTH Joint Education and Research Centre on Molecular Devices, Dalian University of Technology, 116024, Dalian, China.
    Wang, Linqin
    Center of Artificial Photosynthesis for Solar Fuels and Department of Chemistry, School of Science, Westlake University, 310024, Hangzhou, China.
    Cai, Bin
    Department of Chemistry-Ångström, Physical Chemistry, Uppsala University, 75120, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Zhang, Fuguo
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Organic chemistry.
    Liu, Tianqi
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Organic chemistry.
    Boschloo, Gerrit
    Department of Chemistry-Ångström, Physical Chemistry, Uppsala University, 75120, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Johansson, Erik M.J.
    Department of Chemistry-Ångström, Physical Chemistry, Uppsala University, 75120, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Sun, Licheng
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Organic chemistry. Center of Artificial Photosynthesis for Solar Fuels and Department of Chemistry, School of Science, Westlake University, 310024, Hangzhou, China; State Key Laboratory of Fine Chemicals, Institute of Artificial Photosynthesis, DUT-KTH Joint Education and Research Centre on Molecular Devices, Dalian University of Technology, 116024, Dalian, China.
    Monolithic FAPbBr3 photoanode for photoelectrochemical water oxidation with low onset-potential and enhanced stability2023In: Nature Communications, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 14, no 1, article id 5486Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite considerable research efforts on photoelectrochemical water splitting over the past decades, practical application faces challenges by the absence of efficient, stable, and scalable photoelectrodes. Herein, we report a metal-halide perovskite-based photoanode for photoelectrochemical water oxidation. With a planar structure using mesoporous carbon as a hole-conducting layer, the precious metal-free FAPbBr3 photovoltaic device achieves 9.2% solar-to-electrical power conversion efficiency and 1.4 V open-circuit voltage. The photovoltaic architecture successfully applies to build a monolithic photoanode with the FAPbBr3 absorber, carbon/graphite conductive protection layers, and NiFe catalyst layers for water oxidation. The photoanode delivers ultralow onset potential below 0 V versus the reversible hydrogen electrode and high applied bias photon-to-current efficiency of 8.5%. Stable operation exceeding 100 h under solar illumination by applying ultraviolet-filter protection. The photothermal investigation verifies the performance boost in perovskite photoanode by photothermal effect. This study is significant in guiding the development of photovoltaic material-based photoelectrodes for solar fuel applications.

  • 215.
    Yang, Jing
    et al.
    Southern Univ Sci & Technol, Shenzhen Grubbs Inst, Dept Chem, Shenzhen 518055, Peoples R China.;Southern Univ Sci & Technol, Guangdong Prov Key Lab Energy Mat Elect Power, Shenzhen 518055, Peoples R China..
    Wang, Lei
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Organic chemistry.
    Zhan, Shaoqi
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Theoretical Chemistry and Biology.
    Zou, Haiyuan
    Southern Univ Sci & Technol, Shenzhen Grubbs Inst, Dept Chem, Shenzhen 518055, Peoples R China.;Southern Univ Sci & Technol, Guangdong Prov Key Lab Energy Mat Elect Power, Shenzhen 518055, Peoples R China..
    Chen, Hong
    Southern Univ Sci & Technol, Sch Environm Sci & Engn, Shenzhen 518055, Peoples R China..
    Ahlquist, Mårten S. G.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Theoretical Chemistry and Biology.
    Duan, Lele
    Southern Univ Sci & Technol, Shenzhen Grubbs Inst, Dept Chem, Shenzhen 518055, Peoples R China.;Southern Univ Sci & Technol, Guangdong Prov Key Lab Energy Mat Elect Power, Shenzhen 518055, Peoples R China.;Dalian Univ Technol DUT, DUT KTH Joint Educ & Res Ctr Mol Devices, State Key Lab Fine Chem, Dalian 116012, Peoples R China..
    Sun, Licheng
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Organic chemistry. Dalian Univ Technol DUT, DUT KTH Joint Educ & Res Ctr Mol Devices, State Key Lab Fine Chem, Dalian 116012, Peoples R China.;Westlake Univ, Sch Sci, Ctr Artificial Photosynth Solar Fuels, Hangzhou 310024, Peoples R China..
    From Ru-bda to Ru-bds: a step forward to highly efficient molecular water oxidation electrocatalysts under acidic and neutral conditions2021In: Nature Communications, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 12, no 1, article id 373Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Significant advances during the past decades in the design and studies of Ru complexes with polypyridine ligands have led to the great development of molecular water oxidation catalysts and understanding on the O-O bond formation mechanisms. Here we report a Ru-based molecular water oxidation catalyst [Ru(bds)(pic)(2)] (Ru-bds; bds(2-) = 2,2-bipyridine-6,6 ' -disulfonate) containing a tetradentate, dianionic sulfonate ligand at the equatorial position and two 4-picoline ligands at the axial positions. This Ru-bds catalyst electrochemically catalyzes water oxidation with turnover frequencies (TOF) of 160 and 12,900s(-1) under acidic and neutral conditions respectively, showing much better performance than the state-of-art Ru-bda catalyst. Density functional theory calculations reveal that (i) under acidic conditions, the high valent Ru intermediate Ru-V=O featuring the 7-coordination configuration is involved in the O-O bond formation step; (ii) under neutral conditions, the seven-coordinate Ru-IV=O triggers the O-O bond formation; (iii) in both cases, the I2M (interaction of two M-O units) pathway is dominant over the WNA (water nucleophilic attack) pathway. Developing efficient molecular water oxidation catalysts for artificial photosynthesis is a challenging task. Here the authors introduce a ruthenium based complex with negatively charged sulfonate groups to effectively drive water oxidation under both acidic and neutral conditions.

  • 216.
    Yao, Lun
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Shabestary, Kiyan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Björk, Sara M.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Asplund-Samuelsson, Johannes
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Joensson, Haakan N.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Jahn, Michael
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Hudson, Elton P.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Pooled CRISPRi screening of the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp PCC 6803 for enhanced industrial phenotypes2020In: Nature Communications, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 11, no 1, article id 1666Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cyanobacteria are model organisms for photosynthesis and are attractive for biotechnology applications. To aid investigation of genotype-phenotype relationships in cyanobacteria, we develop an inducible CRISPRi gene repression library in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803, where we aim to target all genes for repression. We track the growth of all library members in multiple conditions and estimate gene fitness. The library reveals several clones with increased growth rates, and these have a common upregulation of genes related to cyclic electron flow. We challenge the library with 0.1 M L-lactate and find that repression of peroxiredoxin bcp2 increases growth rate by 49%. Transforming the library into an L-lactate-secreting Synechocystis strain and sorting top lactate producers enriches clones with sgRNAs targeting nutrient assimilation, central carbon metabolism, and cyclic electron flow. In many examples, productivity can be enhanced by repression of essential genes, which are difficult to access by transposon insertion.

  • 217. Yu, Tao
    et al.
    Zhou, Yongjin J.
    Wenning, Leonie
    Liu, Quanli
    Krivoruchko, Anastasia
    Siewers, Verena
    Nielsen, Jens
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Gene Technology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    David, Florian
    Metabolic engineering of Saccharomyces cerevisiae for production of very long chain fatty acid-derived chemicals2017In: Nature Communications, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 8, article id 15587Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Production of chemicals and biofuels through microbial fermentation is an economical and sustainable alternative for traditional chemical synthesis. Here we present the construction of a Saccharomyces cerevisiae platform strain for high-level production of very-long-chain fatty acid (VLCFA)-derived chemicals. Through rewiring the native fatty acid elongation system and implementing a heterologous Mycobacteria FAS I system, we establish an increased biosynthesis of VLCFAs in S. cerevisiae. VLCFAs can be selectively modified towards the fatty alcohol docosanol (C22H46O) by expressing a specific fatty acid reductase. Expression of this enzyme is shown to impair cell growth due to consumption of VLCFA-CoAs. We therefore implement a dynamic control strategy for separating cell growth from docosanol production. We successfully establish high-level and selective docosanol production of 83.5 mg l(-1) in yeast. This approach will provide a universal strategy towards the production of similar high value chemicals in a more scalable, stable and sustainable manner.

  • 218. Yu, Xiaodi
    et al.
    Matico, Rosalie E.
    Miller, Robyn
    Chauhan, Dhruv
    Van Schoubroeck, Bertrand
    Grauwen, Karolien
    Suarez, Javier
    Pietrak, Beth
    Haloi, Nandan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Biophysics. KTH, Centres, SeRC - Swedish e-Science Research Centre.
    Yin, Yanting
    Tresadern, Gary John
    Perez-Benito, Laura
    Lindahl, Erik
    Bottelbergs, Astrid
    Oehlrich, Daniel
    Van Opdenbosch, Nina
    Sharma, Sujata
    Structural basis for the oligomerization-facilitated NLRP3 activation2024In: Nature Communications, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 15, no 1, p. 1164-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The NACHT-, leucine-rich-repeat-, and pyrin domain-containing protein 3 (NLRP3) is a critical intracellular inflammasome sensor and an important clinical target against inflammation-driven human diseases. Recent studies have elucidated its transition from a closed cage to an activated disk-like inflammasome, but the intermediate activation mechanism remains elusive. Here we report the cryo-electron microscopy structure of NLRP3, which forms an open octamer and undergoes a ~ 90° hinge rotation at the NACHT domain. Mutations on open octamer's interfaces reduce IL-1β signaling, highlighting its essential role in NLRP3 activation/inflammasome assembly. The centrosomal NIMA-related kinase 7 (NEK7) disrupts large NLRP3 oligomers and forms NEK7/NLRP3 monomers/dimers which is a critical step preceding the assembly of the disk-like inflammasome. These data demonstrate an oligomeric cooperative activation of NLRP3 and provide insight into its inflammasome assembly mechanism.

  • 219.
    Zhai, Panlong
    et al.
    Dalian Univ Technol, Frontiers Sci Ctr Smart Mat Oriented Chem Engn, Sch Chem Engn, State Key Lab Fine Chem, Dalian 116024, Peoples R China..
    Wang, Chen
    Dalian Univ Technol, Frontiers Sci Ctr Smart Mat Oriented Chem Engn, Sch Chem Engn, State Key Lab Fine Chem, Dalian 116024, Peoples R China..
    Zhao, Yuanyuan
    Dalian Univ Technol, State Key Lab Struct Anal, Optimizat & CAE Software Ind Equipment, Dalian 116024, Peoples R China..
    Zhang, Yanxue
    Dalian Univ Technol, State Key Lab Struct Anal, Optimizat & CAE Software Ind Equipment, Dalian 116024, Peoples R China..
    Gao, Junfeng
    Dalian Univ Technol, State Key Lab Struct Anal, Optimizat & CAE Software Ind Equipment, Dalian 116024, Peoples R China..
    Sun, Licheng
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH). Westlake Univ, Ctr Artificial Photosynth Solar Fuels, Sch Sci, Hangzhou 310024, Peoples R China.;Westlake Univ, Sch Sci, Dept Chem, Hangzhou 310024, Peoples R China..
    Hou, Jungang
    Dalian Univ Technol, Frontiers Sci Ctr Smart Mat Oriented Chem Engn, Sch Chem Engn, State Key Lab Fine Chem, Dalian 116024, Peoples R China..
    Regulating electronic states of nitride/hydroxide to accelerate kinetics for oxygen evolution at large current density2023In: Nature Communications, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 14, no 1, article id 1873Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Rational design efficient transition metal-based electrocatalysts for oxygen evolution reaction (OER) is critical for water splitting. However, industrial water-alkali electrolysis requires large current densities at low overpotentials, always limited by intrinsic activity. Herein, we report hierarchical bimetal nitride/hydroxide (NiMoN/NiFe LDH) array as model catalyst, regulating the electronic states and tracking the relationship of structure-activity. As-activated NiMoN/NiFe LDH exhibits the industrially required current density of 1000 mA cm(-2) at overpotential of 266 mV with 250 h stability for OER. Especially, in-situ electrochemical spectroscopic reveals that heterointerface facilitates dynamic structure evolution to optimize electronic structure. Operando electrochemical impedance spectroscopy implies accelerated OER kinetics and intermediate evolution due to fast charge transport. The OER mechanism is revealed by the combination of theoretical and experimental studies, indicating as-activated NiMoN/NiFe LDH follows lattice oxygen oxidation mechanism with accelerated kinetics. This work paves an avenue to develop efficient catalysts for industrial water electrolysis via tuning electronic states. Rational design of efficient electrocatalysts for oxygen evolution reaction is critical for water-alkali electrolysis. Here, the authors fabricate a NiMoN/NiFe layered double hydroxide and show the accelerated oxygen evolution kinetics are due to the heterointerface.

  • 220.
    Zhai, Panlong
    et al.
    Dalian Univ Technol, Sch Chem Engn, State Key Lab Fine Chem, Dalian, Peoples R China..
    Xia, Mingyue
    Dalian Univ Technol, Minist Educ, Lab Mat Modificat Laser Ion & Electron Beams, Dalian, Peoples R China..
    Wu, Yunzhen
    Dalian Univ Technol, Sch Chem Engn, State Key Lab Fine Chem, Dalian, Peoples R China..
    Zhang, Guanghui
    Dalian Univ Technol, Sch Chem Engn, State Key Lab Fine Chem, Dalian, Peoples R China..
    Gao, Junfeng
    Dalian Univ Technol, Minist Educ, Lab Mat Modificat Laser Ion & Electron Beams, Dalian, Peoples R China..
    Zhang, Bo
    Dalian Univ Technol, Sch Chem Engn, State Key Lab Fine Chem, Dalian, Peoples R China..
    Cao, Shuyan
    Dalian Univ Technol, Sch Chem Engn, State Key Lab Fine Chem, Dalian, Peoples R China..
    Zhang, Yanting
    Dalian Univ Technol, Sch Chem Engn, State Key Lab Fine Chem, Dalian, Peoples R China..
    Li, Zhuwei
    Dalian Univ Technol, Sch Chem Engn, State Key Lab Fine Chem, Dalian, Peoples R China..
    Fan, Zhaozhong
    Dalian Univ Technol, Sch Chem Engn, State Key Lab Fine Chem, Dalian, Peoples R China..
    Wang, Chen
    Dalian Univ Technol, Sch Chem Engn, State Key Lab Fine Chem, Dalian, Peoples R China..
    Zhang, Xiaomeng
    Dalian Univ Technol, Sch Chem Engn, State Key Lab Fine Chem, Dalian, Peoples R China..
    Miller, Jeffrey T.
    Purdue Univ, Davidson Sch Chem Engn, W Lafayette, IN 47907 USA..
    Sun, Licheng
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry. Dalian Univ Technol, Sch Chem Engn, State Key Lab Fine Chem, Dalian, Peoples R China.;Westlake Univ, Sch Sci, Ctr Artificial Photosynth Solar Fuels, Hangzhou, Peoples R China..
    Hou, Jungang
    Dalian Univ Technol, Sch Chem Engn, State Key Lab Fine Chem, Dalian, Peoples R China..
    Engineering single-atomic ruthenium catalytic sites on defective nickel-iron layered double hydroxide for overall water splitting2021In: Nature Communications, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 12, no 1, article id 4587Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Rational design of single atom catalyst is critical for efficient sustainable energy conversion. However, the atomic-level control of active sites is essential for electrocatalytic materials in alkaline electrolyte. Moreover, well-defined surface structures lead to in-depth understanding of catalytic mechanisms. Herein, we report a single-atomic-site ruthenium stabilized on defective nickel-iron layered double hydroxide nanosheets (Ru-1/D-NiFe LDH). Under precise regulation of local coordination environments of catalytically active sites and the existence of the defects, Ru-1/D-NiFe LDH delivers an ultralow overpotential of 18mV at 10mAcm(-2) for hydrogen evolution reaction, surpassing the commercial Pt/C catalyst. Density functional theory calculations reveal that Ru-1/D-NiFe LDH optimizes the adsorption energies of intermediates for hydrogen evolution reaction and promotes the O-O coupling at a Ru-O active site for oxygen evolution reaction. The Ru-1/D-NiFe LDH as an ideal model reveals superior water splitting performance with potential for the development of promising water-alkali electrocatalysts. Rational design of single atom catalyst is critical for efficient sustainable energy conversion. Single-atomic-site ruthenium stabilized on defective nickel-iron layered double hydroxide nanosheets achieve superior HER and OER performance in alkaline media.

  • 221.
    Zhai, Panlong
    et al.
    Dalian Univ Technol, Sch Chem Engn, State Key Lab Fine Chem, Dalian 116024, Peoples R China..
    Zhang, Yanxue
    Dalian Univ Technol, Minist Educ, Lab Mat Modificat Laser Ion & Electron Beams, Dalian 116024, Peoples R China..
    Wu, Yunzhen
    Dalian Univ Technol, Sch Chem Engn, State Key Lab Fine Chem, Dalian 116024, Peoples R China..
    Gao, Junfeng
    Dalian Univ Technol, Minist Educ, Lab Mat Modificat Laser Ion & Electron Beams, Dalian 116024, Peoples R China..
    Zhang, Bo
    Dalian Univ Technol, Sch Chem Engn, State Key Lab Fine Chem, Dalian 116024, Peoples R China..
    Cao, Shuyan
    Dalian Univ Technol, Sch Chem Engn, State Key Lab Fine Chem, Dalian 116024, Peoples R China..
    Zhang, Yanting
    Dalian Univ Technol, Sch Chem Engn, State Key Lab Fine Chem, Dalian 116024, Peoples R China..
    Li, Zhuwei
    Dalian Univ Technol, Sch Chem Engn, State Key Lab Fine Chem, Dalian 116024, Peoples R China..
    Sun, Licheng
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Organic chemistry. Dalian Univ Technol, Sch Chem Engn, State Key Lab Fine Chem, Dalian 116024, Peoples R China.;Westlake Univ, Coll Sci, Hangzhou 310024, Peoples R China..
    Hou, Jungang
    Dalian Univ Technol, Sch Chem Engn, State Key Lab Fine Chem, Dalian 116024, Peoples R China..
    Engineering active sites on hierarchical transition bimetal oxides/sulfides heterostructure array enabling robust overall water splitting2020In: Nature Communications, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 11, no 1, article id 5462Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Rational design of the catalysts is impressive for sustainable energy conversion. However, there is a grand challenge to engineer active sites at the interface. Herein, hierarchical transition bimetal oxides/sulfides heterostructure arrays interacting two-dimensional MoOx/MoS2 nanosheets attached to one-dimensional NiOx/Ni3S2 nanorods were fabricated by oxidation/hydrogenation-induced surface reconfiguration strategy. The NiMoOx/NiMoS heterostructure array exhibits the overpotentials of 38mV for hydrogen evolution and 186mV for oxygen evolution at 10mAcm(-2), even surviving at a large current density of 500mAcm(-2) with long-term stability. Due to optimized adsorption energies and accelerated water splitting kinetics by theory calculations, the assembled two-electrode cell delivers the industrially relevant current densities of 500 and 1000mAcm(-2) at record low cell voltages of 1.60 and 1.66V with excellent durability. This research provides a promising avenue to enhance the electrocatalytic performance of the catalysts by engineering interfacial active sites toward large-scale water splitting. While water splitting is an appealing carbon-neutral strategy for renewable energy generation, there is a need to develop new active, cost-effective catalysts. Here, authors prepare a nickel-molybdenum oxide/sulfide heterojunctions as bifunctional H-2 and O-2 evolution electrocatalysts.

  • 222. Zhan, Qiuqiang
    et al.
    Liu, Haichun
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Theoretical Chemistry and Biology.
    Wang, Baoju
    Wu, Qiusheng
    Pu, Rui
    Zhou, Chao
    Huang, Bingru
    Peng, Xingyun
    Ågren, Hans
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Theoretical Chemistry and Biology.
    He, Sailing
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Electromagnetic Engineering. South China Normal University, China.
    Achieving high-efficiency emission depletion nanoscopy by employing cross relaxation in upconversion nanoparticles2017In: Nature Communications, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 8, no 1, article id 1058Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Stimulated emission depletion microscopy provides a powerful sub-diffraction imaging modality for life science studies. Conventionally, stimulated emission depletion requires a relatively high light intensity to obtain an adequate depletion efficiency through only light–matter interaction. Here we show efficient emission depletion for a class of lanthanide-doped upconversion nanoparticles with the assistance of interionic cross relaxation, which significantly lowers the laser intensity requirements of optical depletion. We demonstrate two-color super-resolution imaging using upconversion nanoparticles (resolution ~ 66 nm) with a single pair of excitation/depletion beams. In addition, we show super-resolution imaging of immunostained cytoskeleton structures of fixed cells (resolution ~ 82 nm) using upconversion nanoparticles. These achievements provide a new perspective for the development of photoswitchable luminescent probes and will broaden the applications of lanthanide-doped nanoparticles for sub-diffraction microscopic imaging.

  • 223. Zhang, J.
    et al.
    Liu, Y.
    Sha, G.
    Jin, S.
    Hou, Ziyong
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering. Shenyang National Laboratory for Materials Science, Chongqing University, Chongqing, China.
    Bayat, M.
    Yang, N.
    Tan, Q.
    Yin, Y.
    Liu, S.
    Hattel, J. H.
    Dargusch, M.
    Huang, X.
    Zhang, M. -X
    Designing against phase and property heterogeneities in additively manufactured titanium alloys2022In: Nature Communications, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 13, no 1, article id 4660Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Additive manufacturing (AM) creates digitally designed parts by successive addition of material. However, owing to intrinsic thermal cycling, metallic parts produced by AM almost inevitably suffer from spatially dependent heterogeneities in phases and mechanical properties, which may cause unpredictable service failures. Here, we demonstrate a synergistic alloy design approach to overcome this issue in titanium alloys manufactured by laser powder bed fusion. The key to our approach is in-situ alloying of Ti−6Al−4V (in weight per cent) with combined additions of pure titanium powders and iron oxide (Fe2O3) nanoparticles. This not only enables in-situ elimination of phase heterogeneity through diluting V concentration whilst introducing small amounts of Fe, but also compensates for the strength loss via oxygen solute strengthening. Our alloys achieve spatially uniform microstructures and mechanical properties which are superior to those of Ti−6Al−4V. This study may help to guide the design of other alloys, which not only overcomes the challenge inherent to the AM processes, but also takes advantage of the alloy design opportunities offered by AM.

  • 224. Zhang, K.
    et al.
    Fu, Qiang
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Theoretical Chemistry and Biology.
    Pan, N.
    Yu, X.
    Liu, J.
    Luo, Yi
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Theoretical Chemistry and Biology.
    Wang, X.
    Yang, J.
    Hou, J.
    Direct writing of electronic devices on graphene oxide by catalytic scanning probe lithography2012In: Nature Communications, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 3, p. 1194-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Reduction of graphene oxide at the nanoscale is an attractive approach to graphene-based electronics. Here we use a platinum-coated atomic force microscope tip to locally catalyse the reduction of insulating graphene oxide in the presence of hydrogen. Nanoribbons with widths ranging from 20 to 80 nm and conductivities of &gt;104Sm-1 are successfully generated, and a field effect transistor is produced. The method involves mild operating conditions, and uses arbitrary substrates, atmospheric pressure and low temperatures (≤115 °C).

  • 225.
    Zhang, Peili
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry.
    Li, L.
    Nordlund, D.
    Chen, Hong
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry.
    Fan, Lizhou
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry.
    Zhang, Biaobiao
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry.
    Sheng, Xia
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Organic chemistry.
    Daniel, Quentin
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry.
    Sun, Licheng
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Organic chemistry.
    Dendritic core-shell nickel-iron-copper metal/metal oxide electrode for efficient electrocatalytic water oxidation2018In: Nature Communications, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 9, no 1, article id 381Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Electrochemical water splitting requires efficient water oxidation catalysts to accelerate the sluggish kinetics of water oxidation reaction. Here, we report a promisingly dendritic core-shell nickel-iron-copper metal/metal oxide electrode, prepared via dealloying with an electrodeposited nickel-iron-copper alloy as a precursor, as the catalyst for water oxidation. The as-prepared core-shell nickel-iron-copper electrode is characterized with porous oxide shells and metallic cores. This tri-metal-based core-shell nickel-iron-copper electrode exhibits a remarkable activity toward water oxidation in alkaline medium with an overpotential of only 180 mV at a current density of 10 mA cm-2. The core-shell NiFeCu electrode exhibits pH-dependent oxygen evolution reaction activity on the reversible hydrogen electrode scale, suggesting that non-concerted proton-electron transfers participate in catalyzing the oxygen evolution reaction. To the best of our knowledge, the as-fabricated core-shell nickel-iron-copper is one of the most promising oxygen evolution catalysts.

  • 226.
    Zhang, Shao-jie
    et al.
    Chinese Acad Sci, Kunming Inst Zool, State Key Lab Genet Resources & Evolut, Kunming 650223, Yunnan, Peoples R China.;Yunnan Univ, State Key Lab Conservat & Utilizat Bio Resource Y, Kunming 650091, Yunnan, Peoples R China..
    Wang, Guo-Dong
    Chinese Acad Sci, Kunming Inst Zool, State Key Lab Genet Resources & Evolut, Kunming 650223, Yunnan, Peoples R China.;Chinese Acad Sci, Ctr Excellence Anim Evolut & Genet, Kunming 650223, Yunnan, Peoples R China..
    Ma, Pengcheng
    Chinese Acad Sci, Kunming Inst Zool, State Key Lab Genet Resources & Evolut, Kunming 650223, Yunnan, Peoples R China..
    Zhang, Liang
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Gene Technology.
    Yin, Ting-Ting
    Chinese Acad Sci, Kunming Inst Zool, State Key Lab Genet Resources & Evolut, Kunming 650223, Yunnan, Peoples R China..
    Liu, Yan-hu
    Chinese Acad Sci, Kunming Inst Zool, State Key Lab Genet Resources & Evolut, Kunming 650223, Yunnan, Peoples R China..
    Otecko, Newton O.
    Chinese Acad Sci, Kunming Inst Zool, State Key Lab Genet Resources & Evolut, Kunming 650223, Yunnan, Peoples R China..
    Wang, Meng
    Yunnan Univ, State Key Lab Conservat & Utilizat Bio Resource Y, Kunming 650091, Yunnan, Peoples R China..
    Ma, Ya-ping
    Yunnan Univ, State Key Lab Conservat & Utilizat Bio Resource Y, Kunming 650091, Yunnan, Peoples R China..
    Wang, Lu
    Yunnan Univ, State Key Lab Conservat & Utilizat Bio Resource Y, Kunming 650091, Yunnan, Peoples R China..
    Mao, Bingyu
    Chinese Acad Sci, Kunming Inst Zool, State Key Lab Genet Resources & Evolut, Kunming 650223, Yunnan, Peoples R China.;Chinese Acad Sci, Ctr Excellence Anim Evolut & Genet, Kunming 650223, Yunnan, Peoples R China..
    Savolainen, Peter
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Gene Technology.
    Zhang, Ya-Ping
    Chinese Acad Sci, Kunming Inst Zool, State Key Lab Genet Resources & Evolut, Kunming 650223, Yunnan, Peoples R China.;Yunnan Univ, State Key Lab Conservat & Utilizat Bio Resource Y, Kunming 650091, Yunnan, Peoples R China..
    Genomic regions under selection in the feralization of the dingoes2020In: Nature Communications, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 11, no 1, article id 671Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Dingoes are wild canids living in Australia, originating from domestic dogs. They have lived isolated from both the wild and the domestic ancestor, making them a unique model for studying feralization. Here, we sequence the genomes of 10 dingoes and 2 New Guinea Singing Dogs. Phylogenetic and demographic analyses show that dingoes originate from dogs in southern East Asia, which migrated via Island Southeast Asia to reach Australia around 8300 years ago, and subsequently diverged into a genetically distinct population. Selection analysis identifies 50 positively selected genes enriched in digestion and metabolism, indicating a diet change during feralization of dingoes. Thirteen of these genes have shifted allele frequencies compared to dogs but not compared to wolves. Functional assays show that an A-to-G mutation in ARHGEF7 decreases the endogenous expression, suggesting behavioral adaptations related to the transitions in environment. Our results indicate that the feralization of the dingo induced positive selection on genomic regions correlated to neurodevelopment, metabolism and reproduction, in adaptation to a wild environment.

  • 227.
    Zhang, Yichen
    et al.
    National Key Laboratory for Multimedia Information Processing, School of Computer Science, Peking University, Beijing, 100871, China.
    He, Gan
    National Key Laboratory for Multimedia Information Processing, School of Computer Science, Peking University, Beijing, 100871, China.
    Ma, Lei
    National Key Laboratory for Multimedia Information Processing, School of Computer Science, Peking University, Beijing, 100871, China; Beijing Academy of Artificial Intelligence (BAAI), Beijing, 100084, China.
    Liu, Xiaofei
    National Key Laboratory for Multimedia Information Processing, School of Computer Science, Peking University, Beijing, 100871, China; School of Information Science and Engineering, Yunnan University, Kunming, 650500, China.
    Hjorth, J. J. Johannes
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Computer Science, Computational Science and Technology (CST).
    Kozlov, Alexander
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Computer Science, Computational Science and Technology (CST). Department of Neuroscience, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, SE-17165, Sweden.
    He, Yutao
    National Key Laboratory for Multimedia Information Processing, School of Computer Science, Peking University, Beijing, 100871, China.
    Zhang, Shenjian
    National Key Laboratory for Multimedia Information Processing, School of Computer Science, Peking University, Beijing, 100871, China.
    Hellgren Kotaleski, Jeanette
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Computer Science, Computational Science and Technology (CST). KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Department of Neuroscience, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, SE-17165, Sweden.
    Tian, Yonghong
    National Key Laboratory for Multimedia Information Processing, School of Computer Science, Peking University, Beijing, 100871, China; School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Shenzhen Graduate School, Peking University, Shenzhen, 518055, China.
    Grillner, Sten
    Department of Neuroscience, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, SE-17165, Sweden.
    Du, Kai
    Institute for Artificial Intelligence, Peking University, Beijing, 100871, China.
    Huang, Tiejun
    National Key Laboratory for Multimedia Information Processing, School of Computer Science, Peking University, Beijing, 100871, China; Beijing Academy of Artificial Intelligence (BAAI), Beijing, 100084, China; Institute for Artificial Intelligence, Peking University, Beijing, 100871, China.
    A GPU-based computational framework that bridges neuron simulation and artificial intelligence2023In: Nature Communications, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 14, no 1, article id 5798Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Biophysically detailed multi-compartment models are powerful tools to explore computational principles of the brain and also serve as a theoretical framework to generate algorithms for artificial intelligence (AI) systems. However, the expensive computational cost severely limits the applications in both the neuroscience and AI fields. The major bottleneck during simulating detailed compartment models is the ability of a simulator to solve large systems of linear equations. Here, we present a novel Dendritic Hierarchical Scheduling (DHS) method to markedly accelerate such a process. We theoretically prove that the DHS implementation is computationally optimal and accurate. This GPU-based method performs with 2-3 orders of magnitude higher speed than that of the classic serial Hines method in the conventional CPU platform. We build a DeepDendrite framework, which integrates the DHS method and the GPU computing engine of the NEURON simulator and demonstrate applications of DeepDendrite in neuroscience tasks. We investigate how spatial patterns of spine inputs affect neuronal excitability in a detailed human pyramidal neuron model with 25,000 spines. Furthermore, we provide a brief discussion on the potential of DeepDendrite for AI, specifically highlighting its ability to enable the efficient training of biophysically detailed models in typical image classification tasks.

  • 228.
    Zhang, Zhenbo
    et al.
    Univ Manchester, Sch Mat, Manchester M13 9PL, Lancs, England.;ShanghaiTech Univ, Sch Creat & Arts, Ctr Adaptat Syst Engn, Shanghai 201210, Peoples R China..
    Yang, Zhibiao
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering, Properties. Shanghai Jiao Tong Univ, Sch Mat Sci & Engn, Shanghai Key Lab Adv High Temp Mat & Precis Formi, Shanghai 200240, Peoples R China..
    Lu, Song
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering, Properties.
    Harte, Allan
    Univ Manchester, Sch Mat, Manchester M13 9PL, Lancs, England..
    Morana, Roberto
    BP Explorat Operating Co Ltd, Chertsey Rd, Sunbury On Thames TW16 7LN, Middx, England..
    Preuss, Michael
    Univ Manchester, Sch Mat, Manchester M13 9PL, Lancs, England..
    Strain localisation and failure at twin-boundary complexions in nickel-based superalloys2020In: Nature Communications, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 11, no 1, article id 4890Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Twin boundaries (TBs) in Ni-based superalloys are vulnerable sites for failure in demanding environments, and a current lack of mechanistic understanding hampers the reliable lifetime prediction and performance optimisation of these alloys. Here we report the discovery of an unexpected gamma '' precipitation mechanism at TBs that takes the responsibility for alloy failure in demanding environments. Using multiscale microstructural and mechanical characterisations (from millimetre down to atomic level) and DFT calculations, we demonstrate that abnormal gamma '' precipitation along TBs accounts for the premature dislocation activities and pronounced strain localisation associated with TBs during mechanical loading, which serves as a precursor for crack initiation. We clarify the physical origin of the TBs-related cracking at the atomic level of gamma ''-strengthened Ni-based superalloys in a hydrogen containing environment, and provide practical methods to mitigate the adverse effect of TBs on the performance of these alloys.

  • 229.
    Zhao, Yilong
    et al.
    State Key Laboratory of Fine Chemicals, Institute of Artificial Photosynthesis, DUT-KTH Joint Education and Research Centre on Molecular Devices, Dalian University of Technology, 116024, Dalian, China.
    Ding, Yunxuan
    Center of Artificial Photosynthesis for Solar Fuels and Department of Chemistry, School of Science, Westlake University, 310024, Hangzhou, China.
    Li, Wenlong
    State Key Laboratory of Fine Chemicals, Institute of Artificial Photosynthesis, DUT-KTH Joint Education and Research Centre on Molecular Devices, Dalian University of Technology, 116024, Dalian, China; Center of Artificial Photosynthesis for Solar Fuels and Department of Chemistry, School of Science, Westlake University, 310024, Hangzhou, China.
    Liu, Chang
    State Key Laboratory of Fine Chemicals, Institute of Artificial Photosynthesis, DUT-KTH Joint Education and Research Centre on Molecular Devices, Dalian University of Technology, 116024, Dalian, China.
    Li, Yingzheng
    State Key Laboratory of Fine Chemicals, Institute of Artificial Photosynthesis, DUT-KTH Joint Education and Research Centre on Molecular Devices, Dalian University of Technology, 116024, Dalian, China.
    Zhao, Ziqi
    State Key Laboratory of Fine Chemicals, Institute of Artificial Photosynthesis, DUT-KTH Joint Education and Research Centre on Molecular Devices, Dalian University of Technology, 116024, Dalian, China.
    Shan, Yu
    State Key Laboratory of Fine Chemicals, Institute of Artificial Photosynthesis, DUT-KTH Joint Education and Research Centre on Molecular Devices, Dalian University of Technology, 116024, Dalian, China.
    Li, Fei
    State Key Laboratory of Fine Chemicals, Institute of Artificial Photosynthesis, DUT-KTH Joint Education and Research Centre on Molecular Devices, Dalian University of Technology, 116024, Dalian, China.
    Sun, Licheng
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Organic chemistry. State Key Laboratory of Fine Chemicals, Institute of Artificial Photosynthesis, DUT-KTH Joint Education and Research Centre on Molecular Devices, Dalian University of Technology, 116024, Dalian, China; Center of Artificial Photosynthesis for Solar Fuels and Department of Chemistry, School of Science, Westlake University, 310024, Hangzhou, China.
    Li, Fusheng
    State Key Laboratory of Fine Chemicals, Institute of Artificial Photosynthesis, DUT-KTH Joint Education and Research Centre on Molecular Devices, Dalian University of Technology, 116024, Dalian, China.
    Efficient urea electrosynthesis from carbon dioxide and nitrate via alternating Cu–W bimetallic C–N coupling sites2023In: Nature Communications, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 14, no 1, article id 4491Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Electrocatalytic urea synthesis is an emerging alternative technology to the traditional energy-intensive industrial urea synthesis protocol. Novel strategies are urgently needed to promote the electrocatalytic C–N coupling process and inhibit the side reactions. Here, we report a CuWO4 catalyst with native bimetallic sites that achieves a high urea production rate (98.5 ± 3.2 μg h−1 mg−1cat) for the co-reduction of CO2 and NO3− with a high Faradaic efficiency (70.1 ± 2.4%) at −0.2 V versus the reversible hydrogen electrode. Mechanistic studies demonstrated that the combination of stable intermediates of *NO2 and *CO increases the probability of C–N coupling and reduces the potential barrier, resulting in high Faradaic efficiency and low overpotential. This study provides a new perspective on achieving efficient urea electrosynthesis by stabilizing the key reaction intermediates, which may guide the design of other electrochemical systems for high-value C–N bond-containing chemicals.

  • 230. Zheng, Fengshan
    et al.
    Rybakov, Filipp N.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics, Statistical Physics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics, Condensed Matter Theory.
    Kiselev, Nikolai S.
    Song, Dongsheng
    Kovács, András
    Du, Haifeng
    Blügel, Stefan
    Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E.
    Magnetic skyrmion braids2021In: Nature Communications, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 12, article id 5316Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Skyrmions are vortex-like spin textures that form strings in magnetic crystals. Due to the analogy to elastic strings, skyrmion strings are naturally expected to braid and form complex three-dimensional patterns, but this phenomenon has not been explored yet. We found that skyrmion strings can form braids in cubic crystals of chiral magnets. This finding is confirmed by direct observations of skyrmion braids in B20-type FeGe using transmission electron microscopy. The theoretical analysis predicts that the discovered phenomenon is general for a wide family of chiral magnets. These findings have important implications for skyrmionics and propose a solid-state framework for applications of the mathematical theory of braids.

  • 231.
    Zhong, Wen
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Edfors, Fredrik
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Systems Biology.
    Gummesson, Anders
    Gothenburg Univ, Sahlgrenska Acad, Inst Med, Dept Mol & Clin Med, Gothenburg, Sweden.;Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Dept Clin Genet & Genom, Reg Vastra Gotaland, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Bergstroem, Goeran
    Gothenburg Univ, Sahlgrenska Acad, Inst Med, Dept Mol & Clin Med, Gothenburg, Sweden.;Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Dept Clin Physiol, Reg Vastra Gotaland, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Fagerberg, Linn
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Systems Biology.
    Uhlén, Mathias
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Systems Biology.
    Next generation plasma proteome profiling to monitor health and disease2021In: Nature Communications, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 12, no 1, article id 2493Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The need for precision medicine approaches to monitor health and disease makes it important to develop sensitive and accurate assays for proteome profiles in blood. Here, we describe an approach for plasma profiling based on proximity extension assay combined with next generation sequencing. First, we analyze the variability of plasma profiles between and within healthy individuals in a longitudinal wellness study, including the influence of genetic variations on plasma levels. Second, we follow patients newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes before and during therapeutic intervention using plasma proteome profiling. The studies show that healthy individuals have a unique and stable proteome profile and indicate that a panel of proteins could potentially be used for early diagnosis of diabetes, including stratification of patients with regards to response to metformin treatment. Although validation in larger cohorts is needed, the analysis demonstrates the usefulness of comprehensive plasma profiling for precision medicine efforts. The proximity extension assay (PEA) is a popular tool to measure plasma protein levels. Here, the authors extend the proteome coverage of PEA by combining it with next-generation sequencing, enabling the analysis of nearly 1500 proteins from minute amounts of plasma.

  • 232. Zhou, Y.
    et al.
    Iacocca, E.
    Awad, A. A.
    Dumas, R. K.
    Zhang, F. C.
    Braun, H. B.
    Åkerman, Johan
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Materials- and Nano Physics, Material Physics, MF. University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Dynamically stabilized magnetic skyrmions2015In: Nature Communications, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 6, article id 8193Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Magnetic skyrmions are topologically non-trivial spin textures that manifest themselves as quasiparticles in ferromagnetic thin films or noncentrosymmetric bulk materials. So far attention has focused on skyrmions stabilized either by the Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction (DMI) or by dipolar interaction, where in the latter case the excitations are known as bubble skyrmions. Here we demonstrate the existence of a dynamically stabilized skyrmion, which exists even when dipolar interactions and DMI are absent. We establish how such dynamic skyrmions can be nucleated, sustained and manipulated in an effectively lossless medium under a nanocontact. As quasiparticles, they can be transported between two nanocontacts in a nanowire, even in complete absence of DMI. Conversely, in the presence of DMI, we observe that the dynamical skyrmion experiences strong breathing. All of this points towards a wide range of skyrmion manipulation, which can be studied in a much wider class of materials than considered so far.

  • 233. Zhou, Yongjin J.
    et al.
    Buijs, Nicolaas A.
    Zhu, Zhiwei
    Qin, Jiufu
    Siewers, Verena
    Nielsen, Jens
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Gene Technology.
    Production of fatty acid-derived oleochemicals and biofuels by synthetic yeast cell factories2016In: Nature Communications, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 7, article id 11709Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sustainable production of oleochemicals requires establishment of cell factory platform strains. The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is an attractive cell factory as new strains can be rapidly implemented into existing infrastructures such as bioethanol production plants. Here we show high-level production of free fatty acids (FFAs) in a yeast cell factory, and the production of alkanes and fatty alcohols from its descendants. The engineered strain produces up to 10.4 gl(-1) of FFAs, which is the highest reported titre to date. Furthermore, through screening of specific pathway enzymes, endogenous alcohol dehydrogenases and aldehyde reductases, we reconstruct efficient pathways for conversion of fatty acids to alkanes (0.8 mgl(-1)) and fatty alcohols (1.5 gl(-1)), to our knowledge the highest titres reported in S. cerevisiae. This should facilitate the construction of yeast cell factories for production of fatty acids derived products and even aldehyde-derived chemicals of high value.

  • 234. Zhu, Jianfei
    et al.
    Jiang, Wei
    Liu, Yichao
    Yin, Ge
    Yuan, Jun
    He, Sailing
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Electromagnetic Engineering. Zhejiang University, China; South China Normal University, China.
    Ma, Yungui
    Three-dimensional magnetic cloak working from d.c. to 250 kHz2015In: Nature Communications, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 6, article id 8931Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Invisible cloaking is one of the major outcomes of the metamaterial research, but the practical potential, in particular for high frequencies (for example, microwave to visible light), is fatally challenged by the complex material properties they usually demand. On the other hand, it will be advantageous and also technologically instrumental to design cloaking devices for applications at low frequencies where electromagnetic components are favourably uncoupled. In this work, we vastly develop the bilayer approach to create a three-dimensional magnetic cloak able to work in both static and dynamic fields. Under the quasi-static approximation, we demonstrate a perfect magnetic cloaking device with a large frequency band from 0 to 250 kHz. The practical potential of our device is experimentally verified by using a commercial metal detector, which may lead us to having a real cloaking application where the dynamic magnetic field can be manipulated in desired ways.

  • 235.
    Zhu, Shaotong
    et al.
    Univ Texas Southwestern Med Ctr, Dept Neurosci, Dallas, TX 75390 USA.;Inst Prot Innovat, 4 Blackfan Circle, Boston, MA 02115 USA..
    Sridhar, Akshay
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Teng, Jinfeng
    Univ Texas Southwestern Med Ctr, Dept Neurosci, Dallas, TX 75390 USA..
    Howard, Rebecca J.
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Biochem & Biophys, Sci Life Lab, Solna, Sweden..
    Lindahl, Erik
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Biophysics.
    Hibbs, Ryan E.
    Univ Texas Southwestern Med Ctr, Dept Neurosci, Dallas, TX 75390 USA..
    Structural and dynamic mechanisms of GABA(A) receptor modulators with opposing activities2022In: Nature Communications, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 13, no 1, article id 4582Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    gamma-Aminobutyric acid type A (GABA(A)) receptors are pentameric ligand-gated ion channels abundant in the central nervous system and are prolific drug targets for treating anxiety, sleep disorders and epilepsy. Diverse small molecules exert a spectrum of effects on gamma-aminobutyric acid type A (GABA(A)) receptors by acting at the classical benzodiazepine site. They can potentiate the response to GABA, attenuate channel activity, or counteract modulation by other ligands. Structural mechanisms underlying the actions of these drugs are not fully understood. Here we present two high-resolution structures of GABA(A) receptors in complex with zolpidem, a positive allosteric modulator and heavily prescribed hypnotic, and DMCM, a negative allosteric modulator with convulsant and anxiogenic properties. These two drugs share the extracellular benzodiazepine site at the alpha/gamma subunit interface and two transmembrane sites at beta/alpha interfaces. Structural analyses reveal a basis for the subtype selectivity of zolpidem that underlies its clinical success. Molecular dynamics simulations provide insight into how DMCM switches from a negative to a positive modulator as a function of binding site occupancy. Together, these findings expand our understanding of how GABA(A) receptor allosteric modulators acting through a common site can have diverging activities. GABA(A) receptors are important targets for anxiety, sedation and anesthesia. Here, the authors present structures bound by zolpidem (Ambien), the most prescribed hypnotic in the US, and DMCM, a negative modulator, providing insights into receptor modulation.

  • 236. Zhu, Yong
    et al.
    Wang, Degao
    Huang, Qing
    Du, Jian
    Sun, Licheng
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Organic chemistry.
    Li, Fei
    Meyer, Thomas J.
    Stabilization of a molecular water oxidation catalyst on a dye−sensitized photoanode by a pyridyl anchor2020In: Nature Communications, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 11, no 1, article id 4610Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Understanding and controlling the properties of water-splitting assemblies in dye-sensitized photoelectrosynthesis cells is a key to the exploitation of their properties. We demonstrate here that, following surface loading of a [Ru(bpy)3]2+ (bpy = 2,2′-bipyridine) chromophore on nanoparticle electrodes, addition of the molecular catalysts, Ru(bda)(L)2 (bda = 2,2′-bipyridine-6,6′-dicarboxylate) with phosphonate or pyridyl sites for water oxidation, gives surfaces with a 5:1 chromophore to catalyst ratio. Addition of the surface-bound phosphonate derivatives with L = 4-pyridyl phosphonic acid or diethyl 3-(pyridin-4-yloxy)decyl-phosphonic acid, leads to well-defined surfaces but, following oxidation to Ru(III), they undergo facile, on-surface dimerization to give surface-bound, oxo-bridged dimers. The dimers have a diminished reactivity toward water oxidation compared to related monomers in solution. By contrast, immobilization of the Ru-bda catalyst on TiO2 with the 4,4′-dipyridyl anchoring ligand can maintain the monomeric structure of catalyst and gives relatively stable photoanodes with photocurrents that reach to 1.7 mA cm−2 with an optimized, applied bias photon-to-current efficiency of 1.5%.

2345 201 - 236 of 236
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