Change search
Refine search result
2345678 201 - 250 of 410
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 201.
    Josefsson, Simon
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Management.
    Adoption of Automation in the Horticulture Industry: A Case Study at a Robotics Company in the U.S. and Canada2019Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this thesis is to fill the previous research gap concerning automation in the horticulture industry by discovering the adoption of automation in the U.S. and Canada, exploring the possibilities of introducing autonomous solutions and provide recommendations as to how this could create opportunities for small robotics companies targeting the industry. A case company in the U.S. and Canada was used as an example of a small robotics company for the case study. Two research questions were formulated:

    RQ1: Which major tasks in the horticulture industry should a small robotics company aim to automate?

    RQ2: What are the barriers for companies in the horticulture industry to invest in automated solutions?

    A mixed methods research with a pragmatic, inductive and exploratory approach was employed. The primary source of data was gathered from surveys, due to the geographical diversity of the region studied. The surveys reveal that the average level of automation across all respondents averaged at 47%.

    Given the strategy of the case company, a small robotics company is argued to aim to automate the following tasks: placing plant liners, sticking cuttings and planting seed, spacing of plants and containers, plant pruning, harvesting and grading production, and pesticide application.

    The horticulture industry is showing low barriers to invest in automation. The relatively high levels of automation are leading to increased trust in automation and further investments in automation. This is shown in the technology being perceived as useful amongst 75-85% of respondents and perceived as easy to use amongst 94% of respondents.

  • 202.
    Josimovic, Aleksandra
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Management.
    AI as a Radical or Incremental Technology Tool Innovation2018Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 30 credits / 45 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    As researchers found that throughout the history a common challenge for companies across different industries, when it comes to leveraging and capturing value from a technology innovation is strongly influenced by the company’s dominant business model, an established framework through which assessment takes place.

    The overall purpose of this study is to provide a deeper understanding of the role that company's dominant business model has on the assessment of the impact that new technology innovation, in this case, AI, will have on the company and the market on which company operates.

    This thesis is partially exploratory and partially descriptive with a qualitative and deductive nature. In order to answer the purpose, a research strategy of case studies was used where empirical data was collected from interviews held with 47 company’s top executives from different hierarchical levels and business units, from Sweden, Switzerland, the USA, Germany, and Finland.

    The theoretical framework that describes the how AI as a new technology tool is perceived from the Company X perspective, either as a radical, game changer, or an incremental innovation technology tool and examines the role that dominant business model has on this perception was created. The developed implementation framework had its foundation in previous research concerning innovation business model theories. The data that was collected from the company’s executives were then analyzed and compared to the model.

    The most significant findings suggest that AI as a new technology tool is perceived as a game changer, radical innovation tool for some areas within the Company X and that the company dominant business model profoundly influences this perception.

  • 203.
    Jovanovic, Marin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Management. Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Spain; ESADE Business School.
    Engwall, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Management.
    Jerbrant, Anna
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Management.
    Matching Service Offerings and Product Operations: A Key to Servitization Success2016In: Research technology management, ISSN 0895-6308, E-ISSN 1930-0166, Vol. 59, no 3, p. 29-36Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many manufacturers are moving to servitization, but making that move successfully requires considering the underlying business logic of a division or product. Differences in existing conditions, such as product characteristics or other business attributes, may determine success in transition to a services-based business model and create challenges for a firm moving, for instance, from a spare-parts model to advanced service contracts. Our study pinpoints a number of key product attributes that define how far a company can move up the service ladder. The findings suggest that the Power-by-the-Hour model pioneered by Rolls-Royce suits products that constitute critical ancillary input to, and not essential elements of, customers' core processes; that require low initial investments relative to high total costs of ownership; that are used in controllable operating environments with measurable performance requirements; and that are associated with high risk and high costs in the event of failure. Further, the service delivery system must be integrated and orchestrated to be product-specific-that is, aligned with the function and operating conditions of the product in use.

  • 204.
    Kabir, Sanzida
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Management.
    Software Licensing in Cloud Computing: A CASE STUDY ABOUT RELATIONSHIPS FROM A CLOUD SERVICE PROVIDER’S PERSPECTIVE2015Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    One of the most important attribute a cloud service provider (CSP) offers their customers through their cloud services is scalability. Scalability gives customers the ability to vary the amount of capacity when required.

    A cloud service can be divided in three service layers, Infrastructure-as-a-Service (IaaS), Platform-as-a-Service (PaaS) and Software-as-a-Service (SaaS). Scalability of a certain service depends on software licenses on these layers. When a customer wants to increase the capacity it will be determined by the CSP's licenses bought from its suppliers in advance. If a CSP scales up more than what was agreed on, then there is a risk that the CSP needs to pay a penalty fee to the supplier. If the CSP invests in too many licenses that does not get utilized, then it will be an investment loss.

    A second challenge with software licensing is when a customer outsources their applications to the CSP’s platform. As each application comes with a set of licenses, there is a certain level of scalability that cannot be exceeded. If a customer wants the CSP scale up more than usual for an application then the customer need to inform the vendors. However, a common misunderstanding is that the customer expects the CSP to notify the vendor. Then there is a risk that the vendor never gets notified and the customer is in danger of paying a penalty fee. This in turn hurts the CSP’s relationship with the customer.

    The recommendation to the CSP under study is to create a successful customer relationship management (CRM) and a supplier relationship management (SRM). By creating a CRM with the customer will minimize the occurring misunderstandings and highlight the responsibilities when a customer outsources an application to the CSP. By creating a SRM with the supplier will help the CSP to maintain a flexible paying method that they have with a certain supplier. Furthermore, it will set an example to the remaining suppliers to change their inflexible paying method. By achieving a flexible payment method with the suppliers will make it easier for the CSP to find equilibrium between scalability and licenses.

  • 205.
    KABIR, SANZIDA
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Management.
    Software Licensing in Cloud Computing: A CASE STUDY ABOUT RELATIONSHIPS FROM ACLOUD SERVICE PROVIDER’S PERSPECTIVE2015Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    One of the most important attribute a cloud service provider (CSP) offers their customers through their cloud services is scalability. Scalability gives customers the ability to vary the amount of capacity when required.

    A cloud service can be divided in three service layers, Infrastructure-as-a-Service (IaaS), Platform-as- a-Service (PaaS) and Software-as-a-Service (SaaS). Scalability of a certain service depends  on  software licenses on these layers. When a customer wants to increase the capacity it will be determined by the CSP's licenses bought from its suppliers in advance. If a CSP scales up more than what was agreed on, then there is a risk that the CSP needs to pay a penalty fee to the supplier. If the CSP invests in too many licenses that does not get utilized, then it will be an investment loss.

    A second challenge with software licensing is when a customer outsources their applications to the CSP’s platform. As each application comes with a set of licenses, there is a certain level of scalability that cannot be exceeded. If a customer wants the CSP scale up more than usual for an application then the customer need to inform the vendors. However, a common misunderstanding is that the customer expects the CSP to notify the vendor. Then there is a risk that the vendor never gets notified and the customer is in danger of paying a penalty fee. This in turn hurts the CSP’s  relationship with the customer.

    The recommendation to the CSP under study is to create a successful customer relationship management (CRM) and a supplier relationship management (SRM). By creating a CRM with the customer will minimize the occurring misunderstandings and highlight the responsibilities when a customer outsources an application to the CSP. By creating a SRM with the supplier will help the CSP to maintain a flexible paying method that they have with a certain supplier. Furthermore, it will set  an example to the remaining suppliers to change their inflexible paying method. By achieving a flexible payment method with the suppliers will make it easier for the CSP to find equilibrium between scalability and licenses.

  • 206.
    KAREFLOD, MICHAELA
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Management.
    LJUNGQUIST, JENNIFER
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Management.
    The Impact of Sustainable Bonds2018Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Environmental changes and social instability are two great challenges of today’s society. The development of the sustainable bond market is a response to these. The demand is strong but there is no clear definition of the instruments and there is no standardised way of measuring the effect of them. The purpose of this thesis is thus to study the impact of sustainable bonds, and ways to communicate it to stakeholders. The research consists of nine interviews and the results are analysed in alignment with theoretical frameworks and models evaluated in a literature review. The key findings focus on suggestions for measures and creating a common language for reporting. The main recommendation for the commissioner is to undertake the following three steps: 1) Collect and aggregate all raw data from issuers into their systems. 2) Create harmonised values of the data. 3) Include soft and general values in the calculations.

  • 207.
    Karlsson, Emil
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Management.
    Mobility for the Swedish Police Authority: A casestudy to increase efficiency in debriefing2017Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Digitalization is a topic that affects most of the industries as well as the society overalltoday. Within this topic, the use of mobile technology devices, such as smartphones,allows organizations to perform tasks in an anytime-anywhere situation – usually calledenterprise mobility. The Swedish Police Authority see the potential of this technologyshift that is happening and are currently focusing on developing tools to support thedaily operations. The debriefing process for the intervention police is an area wheredigitalization and mobility could improve the efficiency. However, it is today unknownwhat technical solution could support the operations, what features it should include,and how it should look.The purpose of this study was to investigate how mobility can support the debriefingprocess in forms of efficiency for the polices in field from an exploratory point of view.An inductive research approach was chosen together with a case study researchmethod. Semi-structured and unstructured interviews were held with 35 participantsfrom different parts of the organization to get both a breadth and depth of knowledge.The delimitation was made to study the Swedish Police Authority and more in detail theintervention police. The current debriefing process was observed and mapped in thefirst part of this study, followed by part two which included a technical specification andprototyping of a mobile debriefing tool based on interviews and observations. Thefindings from part one and part two resulted in a proposed specification of a mobiledebriefing tool for what it should include and how it should look.The study shows that the proposition of a debriefing tool can increase the efficiency forthe Swedish Police Authority by reducing the duplication of work, increase the usabilityfor the users, reduce the risk for human errors, and reduce the dependency ofstationary workplaces for debriefing. The debriefing tool includes quality assurance ofthe information gathered through a structured working process at the same time. Thefactors mentioned above can also be linked to reduced time spent on the tasks whileretain or even increase the quality of the results – which in this case is the debriefingreport.

  • 208.
    KARLSSON, INGRID
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Management.
    LINDSTRÖM, JENNY
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Management.
    Lithium-ion Battery Recycling: From a Manufacturing Strategy Perspective2018Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The electrification of the transport sector in combination with an increased demand for storage solutions for renewable energy is contributing to a rapid growth of the battery market. Lithium-ion batteries have shown to be a promising technology for efficient energy storage the last two decades. A rapidly increasing battery production will however cause challenges within waste management and put pressure on current recycling infrastructures. Within research, insufficient attention has been given to how traditional manufacturing strategy is applied within recycling environments. The objective of this study was, therefore, to investigate if and how the unique characteristics of battery recycling affect its manufacturing strategy. A case study of the planning of a battery recycling unit was conducted in collaboration with Northvolt AB to detect challenges and unique characteristics for battery recycling. A framework within manufacturing strategy was applied on the contextual study to identify underlying factors to be considered when building a large scale recycling. Based on multiple interviews with industry expert’s, critical factors were identified and classified according to the literature framework. Our research concludes that the main categories within traditional manufacturing strategy are valid within a recycling environment. On an operational level, however, it was implied that the specific characteristics for recycling have to be considered when formulating a manufacturing strategy. To concretize, it is suggested that attention is given to uncertainties in inflow, of both timing and amount of discarded products. It is important to carefully consider the variety in battery chemistry fed into the recycling process and to design a flexible process, to be prepared for future disruption. Furthermore, managerial implications for battery producers are to facilitate recycling through three key aspects; simplifying the disassembly of battery systems, developing intelligent labelling systems and to push for industry standards.

  • 209.
    KARLSSON, MICHELLE
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Management.
    VESTERLUND, CHARLOTTE
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Management.
    Managing the Innovation Paradox of Exploitation andExploration in R&D: Is measurement of innovation the key to promoteexploration?2018Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Managing the paradox of exploitation and exploration symbolises the simultaneous pursuit devoting enough resources to exploitation to ensure short-term profits and, at the same time, enough resources to exploration to ensure future organisational viability. Previous researchadvocates that sustained organisational performance and success highly depends on the interaction of exploitation and exploration or in other words, the balancing act between change and continuity. To strategically balance these contradictory requirements is a challenging task for most organisations since exploitation and exploration require fundamentally different organisational structures, processes, strategies and capabilities. Organisations that possess the ability to balance these contradictory requirements are referred to as ambidextrous organisations, what is evident is however that different ambidextrous strategies bring several distinctive challenges that organisations explicitly must deal with. Past literature advocates that management constitute an important part in creating organisational ambidexterity, but has nevertheless due to differentiations in organisational contexts resulted in ambiguous guidance in how to practically solve the tensions between exploitation and exploration. Scania the initiator of this thesis project, one of the world´s leading manufacturers within trucksand buses for heavy transport applications is sensing uncertainty in what undoubtedly used to be a relatively stable environment. Continues improvements has been a fundamental strategy in R&D for decades but in the face of a potentially disruptive technological shift, Scania senses urgency to leverage the innovation capability they possess, to reclaim the exploration space in order to act and seize upon these uncertainties. The purpose of this thesis is to explore how management can support and sustain the exploration space in a mature R&D department. This study builds upon a qualitative case study limited to a specific R&D department, Truck Chassis Development. To draw parallels and provide a deepened understanding of how the specific context of the organisation affect section managers at Truck Chassis Development in supporting and enabling exploration, interview data from several departments at R&D and sales & marketing is analysed. Results from this research show that there is an overall pressure for exploitation in R&D in general, and that section management encounter several challenges in supporting and sustaining the exploration space. An overall pressure for delivery precision crowds out time for exploration and present performance measurements are found to further add to this challenge since they are, to a large extent designed to measure and follow-up the relatively more certain and superior benefits from exploitation, implying that they tend to induce and support exploitative activities. The research findings provide managerial implications in terms of directing attention towards exploration through measurements of exploration.

  • 210.
    KASSEM, ALEXANDER
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Management.
    JAFAR HAKIM, LIAM
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Management.
    Assessing critical success factors (CSFs) for a supplier in a relationship-driven B2B-market2016Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    It is necessary for firms to consider and understand sales and buying processes to improve relationship initiation and accommodate the buyers and end-customers. Relationships within the supply chain enable firms to access beneficial abilities to overcome challenges and complexities of new products, shrinking time to market, capital intensities and thus meeting competitive challenges. Developing strategic partnerships with key supply chain actors is an emerging trend in supply chain management. Firms are seen as complex nodes in interdependent supply chain networks where competitive advantages are met by collaboration and co-creation in the business environment.

    The aim of this study is to investigate the problem areas and assess the critical success factors for a supplier within a relation driven B2B three-tier supply chain network by adopting an abductive, theory-building methodology using qualitative case studies, using the case company as a focal firm. Two different three-tier supply chains are investigated within the focal company with an endcustomer, a buyer and a supplier in each supply chain structure.

    The study offered us four dominant themes common to all findings. These are structural power within the supply chain network, relationship stability with the end-customer, market knowledge and structural network position. In our discussion, we looked for common denominators to frame our propositions. We organized the propositions in each of the four key themes that emerged from the findings. We then incorporated literature at this stage to compare and contrast our findings, essentially using the literature study as an additional source of validation.

    The main theoretical contributions of this research involve targeting a new area of  importance in the crossroads of supply chain management, customer relationship management and knowledge management, and identifying four critical success factors in a market entry on a relationship-driven industrial B2B market.

  • 211.
    Kaulio, Matti A.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Management.
    A psychological contract perspective on project networks2018In: Project Management Journal, ISSN 8756-9728, E-ISSN 1938-9507, Vol. 49, no 4, p. 81-88Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A current challenge for project network scholars is to explain “how history matters”; in other words, how past experiences of collaboration between actors in a project network are transformed into an (informal) organizational format that is replicable in future collaborations. How are project networks formed in the first place? By examining a collaboration under formation between two organizations, this article proposes that project networks can be conceptualized as psychological contracts. In this formation process, critical incidents play a key role as they define “items” in the psychological contract; in project network terms, these items define routines for collaboration.

  • 212.
    Kaulio, Matti A.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Work Science (closed 20130101). KTH, Superseded Departments (pre-2005), Industrial Economics and Management. KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Management.
    Customer, Consumer and User Involvement: A Framework and a Review of Selected Approaches1998In: Total quality management (Print), ISSN 0954-4127, E-ISSN 1360-0613, Vol. 9, no 1, p. 141-149Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Customer focus is a key component in a total quality management approach. This paper presents a review of seven different methods for customer involvement in product development, of which quality function deployment is one. Results from the review indicate that different methods support the involvement of customers at different phases of the design process, particularly in three phases: the specification phase, concept development and the prototyping. Moreover, different methods support the involvement of customers in different ways. Three types of involvement are identified: design for customers, design with customers and design by customers. The overall conclusion is that there exists a potential for improvements for practitioners who would like to further customer focus in the design process

  • 213.
    Kaulio, Matti A.
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Management.
    Thorén, Kent
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Rohrbeck, René
    Aarhus School of Business and Social Sciences, Aarhus University.
    Double Ambidexterity: How a telco incumbent used business-model and technology innovations to successfully respond to three major disruptions2017In: Creativity and Innovation Management, ISSN 0963-1690, E-ISSN 1467-8691, Vol. 26, no 4, p. 339-352Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 214.
    Kaulio, Matti
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Work Science (closed 20130101). KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Management.
    Rapp Ricciardi, Max
    Göteborgs universitet.
    Colleagues Coaching Colleagues: Coaching Groups Using the Critical Incident Technique2011Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 215.
    KIRISCIOGLU, HAZAR KUTAY
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Management. Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Politecnico di Milano.
    Substantial Effects of Word of Mouth Marketing in Telecommunications Industry2013Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 80 credits / 120 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    One of the biggest responsibilities of today’s marketing managers is to use their financial and labour resources in the most efficient way. However, any kind of traditional marketing method which is designed and spread by the seller is both costly and less influential on customer’s buying behaviour. Word of Mouth, which can simply be explained as any marketing action that leads to earn customer recommendation, (Word of Mouth Marketing Association) helps organizations to burst their sales revenues while decreasing their marketing budgets. WOM is considered as more transparent, more credible and more relevant by customers. Besides, it is a cheaper way of advertisement for organizations due to its organic spread characteristic. Therefore, marketers should focus on creating strategic marketing actions that will keep WOM effect at the peak level.

    This research attempts to disprove the common belief that, WOM cannot be controlled by the seller itself. Especially, the effort will be put on Business to Business relationships, which are usually considered more unreactive to WOM communication. In order to achieve that, author will provide a four-step WOM analysis framework to its readers. First, transactions mapping will be utilised to see possible areas of WOM development. Afterwards, WOM actors of the market will be identified and customer decision cycle elements will be disclosed in order to understand the WOM potential of a particular market. Final step of the framework will be the calculation of Customer’s Total Value which is composed of their Lifetime and Referral Values. Research also includes an online survey, whose results are converted to numerical data in order to determine Customers´ Referral Value.

    In the final part, Telefónica Data/Capacity Services´ customers will be ranked according to their total values and a Customer Value Matrix will be created. Customers will be segmented into four main groups named as Champions, Affluents, Advocates and Misers; all of which have different buying and WOM characteristics. Ultimately, tailored WOM strategies will be advised in order to maximize each group’s total value.

  • 216.
    Kjellin, Gustav
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Management.
    A Case Study Exploring the Most Important Factors in Firm Rebranding2019Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    A growing use of mergers and acquisitions as a growth strategy has led to what is often referred to as “brand accumulation”, describing a situation in which a parent firm finds itself having acquired firms to the extent that the number of brands under management exceeds the capability of the firm. This, coupled with a generational shift in the workforce that has increased the demands on brand equity amongst potential employees, has increased the need for successful firm rebrandings.

    Today, many rebranding efforts fail, and this paper attempts to highlight the most important factors affecting a rebranding initiative, in order to better understand why some of them fail and why some succeed. The study is based on a framework of success and failure factors, extracted from historical as well as contemporary research into the field of firm rebranding These factors are then evaluated through case studies.

    The research goes beyond looking at a rebrand as just the replacement of a firm logotype or graphical guidelines, and puts added focus on the larger brand visions that are often implemented as part of a rebranding. The case studies were performed at four firms from different industries who has gone through a rebranding with varying degrees of success. The interviewees had different roles at their respective firms.

    The entire paper is structured around the frame of reference constructed during the literature review, a summary of which can be found in section 2.3 on pages 27-29. These factors are the underlying basis for answering the research questions.

  • 217.
    KLIUSHNYK, ALEXANDER
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Management.
    ARMA-GARCH time series model formodelling short interest rates2013Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Interest rates play a vital role in an economy. It is the main indicator of investors 'mood and views of the future. Understanding this process and ability to model it correctly can help to minimize risks when making operations on fixed income markets.

    This thesis investigates the performance of ARMA-GARCH model applied to daily observations of interest rates. The work firstly investigates the main features of interest rates and shows the suitability of ARMA-GARCH framework for modelling interest rates.

    The effectiveness is assessed by analyzing properties of simulated data as well as pricing contingent claims. In contrast to equity derivatives, both the derivative payoff and discount factor depend on the level of interest rates.

    The findings conclude that proposed model appeared to be superior to chosen benchmark models CIR and CKLS. The simulated data has properties identical to historical and accuracy of pricing bonds and bond options is higher. Such a framework does not exclude the negative interest rates, though, and as seen recently on the markets, it is not unusual in practice. Such an approach explores a room for future research. Multivariate analysis with growth rates and inflation in time series framework is very promising.

  • 218.
    KOCH, CAROLINE
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Management.
    The limitations & opportunities of subjectivity in field studies: A reflexive study of a field study prepared by a future engineer 2013Independent thesis Basic level (university diploma), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Master theses written within the master program for engineers should be objective whether they are based on qualitative or quantitative studies. One could question if it is possible to be objective in a qualitative study, and if one even wants to eliminate the knowledge the subjective experiences result in. This thesis shows how events and feelings emerging during a field study effect the student writing the thesis, the consequences on the result of the study and the assessment of it.

    In an attempt to answer how an engineering student should handle the fact that one influences, and is influenced by, the studied objects, theories in; epistemology, objectivity, subjectivity and intersubjectivity are used. There are norms stating what is considered to be a legitimate way to present a study’s results. If these norms are not followed, the credibility of the study will possibly be questioned.

    Four perspectives are used in order to highlight specific aspects on how events and feelings, as a result of an ethnographic study, affect a student and the consequences it can have on the study’s results. These perspectives are; the impact of intersubjectivity, the importance of time, the power of norms and the impact the need of legitimatizing has on studies.

  • 219.
    KONGSHÖJ, MATILDA
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Management.
    LJUNGQVIST, EMILIE
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Management.
    Strategic venture capital in the financial industry: A multiple-case study on autonomy and its implications2016Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The previously stable financial industry has rapidly been threatened by the digital transformation. One strategic tool used by incumbent banks facing this new and changing environment is strategic venture capital investments in the closely related field of financial technologies (FinTech). This research studies strategic venture capital in terms of the organisational design of VC activities; more specifically, the degree of autonomy of the VC’s investment process. The study investigates the concept of VC autonomy and qualitatively analyses the implications of the chosen level of autonomy.

    An abductive approach is used, performing empirical data collection on four case companies  and intertwining the results with an extensive literature study within the field of organisational design and performance. The study generates an extension of the current literature as few previous studies have investigated a VC’s level of autonomy and its implications in qualitative terms.

    The study finds that the degree of autonomy of strategic VCs should be measured on a continuous scale, and proposes such a scale based on two dimensions: the autonomy of the sourcing of possible investments, and the autonomy of investment decision-making. Furthermore, the study reveals a variance in the chosen levels of autonomy of the studied sample, and discusses two possible explanations for this variance; the objectives of the VC activity and the environment the VC operates in.

    Furthermore, the study shows that different degrees of autonomy induce different qualitative opportunities and limitations for VCs aiming to achieve strategic benefit for a capital providing company. A lower degree of autonomy is shown to facilitate for the VC to deliver strategic value, but may limit which investments it can make. Higher autonomy can on the contrary enable more types of investments but limit which knowledge, and thus strategic benefit, the VC can deliver.

    The study concludes that several aspects are of high importance to consider when choosing a VC’s degree of autonomy and contributes with a deeper understanding of the strategic management of VC activities.  

  • 220.
    Korsholm Holmlund, Christopher
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Management.
    Strategiimplementering: Fallet Skanska Sverige, Risk Management2012Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis describes the development and implementation of a strategy in a large construction company in Sweden. It states successful and non successful examples of implementation. The aim of this thesis is that it shall be used for future development of strategies within the company.

    Communication is one essential part of successful implementation. How and why, will be described thoroughly. The thesis will further present how the mid management play an important role for successful implementation, also in what ways it can be done.

    The thesis further describes the importance of involving line management and other future users of tools, procedures or processes for successful implementation. There are various discussions of methods in the thesis. How the methods depend on the time and the dignity of the strategy will be also be discussed.

    Further there will be given recommendations, based upon not only the literature, but the result from the Work Shops that have been analyzed. These recommendations are chronological mentioned and thoroughly described, to make it easier for future teams with their implementation of strategy, tools or procedures.

  • 221.
    KYLÉN, DENNIS
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Management.
    Increasing Structural Alignmentof Project Portfolios: Restructuring of a project portfolio2015Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The strategic importance of projects is increasing among many organizations today. An increasing number of projects often introduce management challenges such as lack in project coordination and difficulties in selecting project aligned with strategy. In this master thesis it has been studied how structural alignment of project portfolio management can be increased. Specifically, the project portfolio management of Skanska ITN has been studied. Skanska ITN delivers IT services to Skanska AB which is a construction company. Interviews, observations and study of internal documents have been conducted during 5 months at Skanska ITN to explore how the PPM of Skanska ITN can be structurally aligned with their strategy.

    By structural alignment it is considered how PPM processes for project selection and resource allocation can be aligned with the strategy of a company, and what types of information that are needed for effective PPM decision-making. The main PPM challenges found at Skanska ITN were that project selection was not based on business benefits, that resource allocation is decentralized & not formalized, and that decisions regarding projects are mostly made locally. Project based organizations that have a centralized and formalized project selection and resource allocation can ensure that the mix of projects that contributes the most to strategic objectives are selected and prioritized. Three types of information are required to enable accurate and effective decision-making at portfolio level: business benefits & strategic contribution of projects; an overview of personal resource capacity, demand & allocation; and up to date information about projects’ statuses. By continuously communicating this information to relevant stakeholders it is ensured that PPM decisions can be based on the value creation of the total portfolio in regard to strategic objectives.

  • 222.
    LARSEN, ALEXANDER
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Management.
    LINDQUIST, PONTUS
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Management.
    A performance measurement framework for R&D activitiesIncreasing transparency of R&D value contribution2016Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    To measure the performance of research and development organizations has long been a difficult task and still is partly due to the complex nature of its processes and activities, but also since the outcome in many cases can be seen first after many years. Also, the outcome is dependent on efforts from several other business functions within an organization. There has been a shift in how organizations view R&D, from being technology-push centered, where R&D had full responsibility of all innovations, to collaborating with innovation across functions within a company. Historically, R&D has been considered to be impossible to manage and control, but as the development has taken place R&D is now aligned with an organization’s business strategy. There is a vast amount of literature on performance measurement systems with focus on R&D to access, however, the focus of that research has been on evaluating performance of an entire R&D department or a specific project and not as much can be found on how to evaluate R&D related activities, which is what this thesis centers on. The research in this thesis has been done by conducting a case study at Sandvik Materials Technology’s R&D department in Sandviken, Sweden. Three case study objects have been studied within the case study and these objects are the OCTG project, non-destructive testing and hydraulic & instrumentation tubing. The case study consisted of interviews with employees at various functions within the company, an extensive literature review as well as a review of internal documentation.

    The result from the case study has been the design of a performance measurement  ramework and its application to the three case study objects, illustrating that it is possible to measure the performance of R&D related activities, thus, enabling a more transparent view of what value R&D contributes with. The framework is created in a way that allows for other organizations with similar settings as the one currently in place at Sandvik Materials Technology to utilize it. Implications from the findings have an impact both from an industrial and research perspective, but also from a sustainability perspective. The industrial implication is that a framework for evaluating and illustrating the performance of a R&D organization on an activity level has been designed. Considering the research aspects, this research contributes to the identified gap in the existing body of knowledge, providing additional knowledge on performance measurement systems on an activity level. From a sustainability perspective the framework enables monitoring and supervising of important processes, which could stimulate employees to undertake necessary actions, potentially leading to reduced negative impact on the environment since a lesser amount of resources and energy is consumed.

  • 223.
    LARSSON, ANNA
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Management.
    TRIFONOVA, KONKORDIYA
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Management.
    Aligning product development with strategy: A Case study at Saab Combat Systems Division2016Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to increase the knowledge of how the existing gap betweenstrategy formulation and strategy implementation can be bridged in a project-­‐based organization.  The reason for this is to contribute with an empirical example of what challenges and obstacles are associated with this gap and how these can be solved.Method: The investigation of the strategy implementation in a project-­‐based organization has been conducted as a case study. To collect the necessary empirical material, three rounds of interviews were held with relevant employees of the case company, such as the Head of Strategy, Head of Product and sales people. The interviews have been complemented by collection of documents and participation in meetings held at the case company.Findings: The findings of the case study have showed that the strategy can be implemented in three ways in a project-­‐based organization: through the organizational structure, through the executed external projects and through the portfolio management. Additionally, the findings have revealed a number of existing problems within strategy implementation. The major challenges found were achieving balance in the Balanced Scorecard, prioritization of both internal and external projects and managing a programme as a project, which were confirmed in the literature.Practical implications: This study has resulted in a description of  how  a  project-­‐based organization implements its strategy. Furthermore, this study highlights the existing challenges within this process, such as achieving balance in the Balanced Scorecard and better prioritizing the internal and external projects.Theoretical implications: This study contributes with increased insight and knowledge of how a project-­‐based organization implements strategy and thus, expands the knowledge of how the gap between strategy formulation and implementation can be decreased. Several problems highlighted in the literature associated with this gap have been verified by this study. In this way, additional theoretical implications are the proposed solutions for how these problems can be solved.

  • 224.
    Larsson, Joel
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Management.
    CHEN, BEICHEN
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Management.
    Sales and Operations planning: Complexities in the S&OP/CLSC interface2015Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Environmental concerns are increasing in today's marketplace as well as the pressure for companies tobe as efficient as possible in order to retain and gain market share. This has led to a need forstandardized processes. A process that has become increasingly more common in companies is thesales and operations planning (S&OP) process which aims to match demand with supply. With theenvironmental concern growing in interest it is becoming more important for companies to reuse aproduct in order to utilize the remaining value of the product. This if often only done if there isfinancial gains from the commitment. This is done in a closed loop supply chain where OriginalEquipment Manufacturers (OEM) takes back and remanufacture, refurbish and repair used products.With a growing interest in closed loop supply chains it is becoming increasingly more important forcompanies to be efficient in this area as well. The focal company of this study is working with theirsales and operations planning process as well as with remanufactured products in order to becomemore efficient with their processes they want to integrate the remanufactured products, in this studycalled R2 products into the already existing S&OP process. The aim of this study was hence toinvestigate what complexities that may arise when remanufactured products are integrated into anS&OP process, i.e. what challenges that would occur when remanufactured products were brought into the S&OP process.

    The case design included semi-structured interviews as the main data source. The results of the studyshowed that complexities may arise in all five steps of the S&OP process. The main findings showedthat the biggest impact of integration would be in the first two stages of the five step process, havingthe most complexities. This study has both academic and managerial implications. In academia thestudy contributes with knowledge in an interface which at the time of this study has been paid verylittle attention in research. This study also provides researchers with a conceptual framework whichcan be tested in other settings and used as a basis for further evaluation of this interface. Themanagerial implications comes from having the possibility by this study to know potential areas thatwill need extra attention before an integration of remanufactured products is conducted. Theframework presented in this study can provide managers with a checklist to follow in the integrationprocess.

  • 225.
    Lashgari, Maryam
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM).
    Sutton-Brady, Catherine
    Univ Sydney, Sch Business, Sydney, NSW, Australia..
    Soilen, Klaus Solberg
    Halmstad Univ, Halmstad, Sweden..
    Ulfvengren, Pernilla
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Management.
    Adoption strategies of social media in B2B firms: a multiple case study approach2018In: The journal of business & industrial marketing, ISSN 0885-8624, E-ISSN 2052-1189, Vol. 33, no 5, p. 730-743Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose The purpose of this study is to clarify business-to-business (B2B) firms' strategies of social media marketing communication. The study aims to explore the factors contributing to the formation and adoption of integration strategies and identify who the B2B firms target. Design/methodology/approach A multiple case study approach is used to compare four multinational corporations and their practices. Face-to-face interviews with key managers, and extensive readings and observations of the firms' websites and social media platforms have been conducted. Findings The study results in a model, illustrating different processes of selection, adoption and integration involved in the development of social media communication strategy for B2B firms. Major factors involved in determining the platform type, and strategies used within different phases and processes are identified. Research limitations/implications As the chosen methodology may limit generalizability, further research is encouraged to test the model within a B2B context especially within small and medium enterprises as only large multinational corporations were investigated in this study. Practical implications The paper provides insight into how B2B marketers can align social media with their firms' goals through the strategic selection of platforms to reach the targeted audience and communicate their message. Originality/value The study uncovers the benefits gained by B2B firms' through interaction with individuals on social media. This is a significant contribution as the value of such interaction was previously undefined and acted as a barrier for adopting social media in some B2B firms.

  • 226.
    Lashgari, Maryam
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM).
    Sutton-Brady, Catherine
    Solberg Søilen, Klaus
    Ulfvengren, Pernilla
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Management.
    Adoption Strategies of Social Media in B2B: A Multiple Case Study ApproachIn: Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The purpose of this study is to clarify business-to-business (B2B) firms’ strategies of social media (SM) marketing communication. Secondly, to explore the factors contributing to the formation of adoption and integration strategies, and identify who the B2B firms target.

    Design/methodology/approach – A multiple case study approach is utilized to compare four multinational corporations and their practices. Face to face interviews with key managers, as well as extensive readings and observations of the firms’ websites and SM platforms have been conducted. 

    Findings – The study results in a model, illustrating different processes of selection, adoption and integration involved in the development of SM communication strategy for B2B firms. Major factors involved in determining the platform type, and strategies used within different phases and processes are identified.

    Research limitations/implications – Since the chosen methodology may limit generalizability, further research is encouraged to test the model within a B2B context especially within SMEs, as only large multinational corporations were investigated in this study.

    Practical implications – The paper provides insight in to how B2B marketers can align SM with the firm’s goals through the strategic selection of platforms in order to reach the targeted audience and communicate their message.

    Originality/value - The study uncovers the benefits gained by B2B firms’ through interaction with individuals on SM. This is a significant contribution as the value of such interaction was previously undefined and acted as a barrier for adopting SM in some B2B firms.

  • 227.
    LEE, JACKY
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Management.
    DEN KINESISKA MARKNADENS PATENTUTVECKLING FÖR SEPARATORER2015Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The Chinese market is the fastest growing market, which makes it unquestionable one of the most attractive markets in the world today. China has a goal to position itself from cheap low quality product country to innovative products country. Because of this very reason, more and more local Chinese competitor has start to pose as a threat to the company. Therefore, it is important to understand the Chinese market partly because some complication has occurred and partly because it will help the company take the best action in order to increase market shares in the Chinese market. The purpose for this research is to increase the awareness of the understanding of the company’s strength and weakness in the Chinese separator market. As well as understanding the local Chinese customer and what brings them value. The goal is to study how the local Chinese competitor affects the company and how the company shall in the best way possible satisfy the customer. The in-depth knowledge that has been obtained through case studies at the company. The collected research data includes a survey, customer and competitor data from the internal database and finally interviews and seminars with a mix of key people at the company. The empirical contribution from this study can be concluded to four main parts: In the recent event China has lost one of their most important leg of their economic position, which is their cheap labor cost being replaced by other low-cost countries.

    China’s aim is to integrate backwards in the value-chain and go from being a cheap labor nation to an innovative nation and reaching that goal within 5 years by being the country with most patents.

    The Organization shall not risk its own brand by competing in the good-enough market, but shall instead introduce a new external brand to do so. This is a common phenomenon used by many companies.

    Even though the companies are looking for more and more advanced technology they still want more and more user friendly products. The concept the customers are looking for is plug & play without deviations.

    The result from this study contributes to an in-depth knowledge within topics related to competitor and market analysis of the Chinese separator market. The results of this study shall be observed as in its own unique context and generalization shall only be applied to correspondent case.

  • 228.
    LEE, SHELDON
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Management.
    MIGLIORI, LORENZO
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Management.
    Foreign Market Analysis: Development and Application of a new framework on the US New Construction Housing Market2016Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    With the globalization of the marketplace, the increased expansion and availability of the Internet, firms are facing tougher competition in their home markets and are forced to expand geographically. There is, therefore, a growing need for companies to undertake analysis on foreign markets to determine whether to enter them. Many tools have been created to conduct a market analysis but very few have been developed specifically for foreign markets. This study aims, therefore, to increase knowledge around this field by developing a framework to analyze foreign markets, which will ultimately help organizations decide whether to enter them.

    The framework has been applied by conducting a case study on a marketing tool provider for real estate companies, considering entering the US New Construction Housing market. For this purpose, both qualitative and quantitative data have been collected through various methods.

    An investigation of theories related to foreign market analysis resulted in the development of a framework composed of four dimensions: Customers, Competitors, Company and Culture. The application of the framework results in the identification of threats and opportunities related to a company’s decision about expansion in the investigated market. As of the case company, the application of the framework resulted in the identification of opportunities that have been considered offsetting the identified threats, encouraging therefore the company to enter the US New Construction Housing market.

    The findings of this study have implications on three aspects. Firstly, on the managerial side, the study provides a framework for companies willing to expand in new geographical markets. The framework intends to facilitate companies in their decision making processes related to international expansion. Secondly, the study has a sustainable impact on the economic aspect, since it would positively impact companies’ future business expansion decisions. Finally, the study contributes on the academic side by proposing a useful framework to conduct foreign market analysis.

  • 229.
    Lind, Sofie
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Management.
    Kockum, Anna
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Management.
    Reduktion av Ledtider genom Supply Chain Fit: Anpassning av leveranskedjan efter produktvolym och osäkerhet iefterfrågan2013Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Cutting costs and lead-time reduction are crucial aspects that companies need to consider when acting in today's market, as competition and customers' already high demands are increasing. In a supply chain nowadays, suppliers may be seen as an extension of the focal company, making increased involvement and improved supply chain performance possible.

    This study is based on the phenomenon of products with different volume and demand characteristics being mixed in the same supply chains, causing disruptions and prolonged lead-times. Theory suggests that functional products with low demand uncertainty need more efficient supply chains, whereas innovative products with high demand uncertainty need more responsive supply chains. These aspects are in the literature gathered under the  oncept of supply chain fit. Empirical findings show that demand uncertainty also corresponds to volume, where high-volume products indicate low demand uncertainty and low-volume products are characterized by high demand uncertainty. By implementing supply chain fit in the supply chain strategy, lead-times can be reduced and supply chain performance can be improved. Hence, efficient suppliers should deliver high-volume products with low demand uncertainty, where cost-efficiency, high delivery efficiency and waste reduction are important factors to aim for. Furthermore, low-volume products with high demand uncertainty should be supplied by responsive suppliers, which should focus on supply chain collaboration, information sharing and flexibility. Nevertheless, current supply chain fit theory tends to simplify the conditions at companies and ignore more complex supply chains, as found when comparing theoretical and empirical findings. Supply chain complexity, which is caused by e.g. a broad variety of products and large supplier base, is found to implicate further dimensions that need to be discussed regarding the concept of supply chain fit. This may necessitate a deeper analysis in the categorization of products, components and suppliers.

  • 230.
    LINDBLAD, CAROLINE
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Management.
    How modular complex product systems constrain product development efforts: A case study of pavers2016Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigates product development of complex products in a modular environment at the paver manufacturer Dynapac. It is determined how the complexity of a modular product constrains product development.Product development in a modular enviornment is a popular research topic in previous literature. However there is limited literature regarding in what ways the complexity of a modular product constrains product development in form of new product variants demanded by the market. A more comprehensive research within this field is interesting for manufacturing companies producing complex products in a modular environment since it could ease and optimize their product development processes. An efficient product development process is crucial to stay competitive and to be able to serve the market rapidly with qualitative and desired products, which increases the importance of this study.With the aim to address the limitations of the existing literature on product development based from modular complex product systems a case study was conducted. The constraints of developing a new paver model demanded by the market caused by the complexity of the paver design were identified.The findings of the research have both theoretical and managerial implications. The theoretical contribution consists mainly of the identification of a new type of overall constraints in modular complex product systems which I call ‖architectural functional constraints‖. These constraints cause an unexpected chain reaction of affected modules in the product system when a change to one module is made, even if the change ostensibly only should affect the module in question. The results show that the effects of this type of constraints is a constraining factor on product development of new product variants in a modular environment. The effects of the architectural functional constraints constrain product development since they trigger time consuming activities in order to avoid a dysfunctional product, or a product that has a high level of commonality with other product offerings. Further the effects oppose a rapid and cost-efficient product development which is regarded to be two of the main benefits with modularity.The managerial implications include a decision process for new product development projects that can be used when architectural functional constraints are found in a product in order to ensure an economic sustainable development of new product variants. Hence managers can use the decision process as a tool to both make and communicate current and future decisions in a structured way.The study is a starting point for further studies investigating how the complexity of modular products might constrain product development efforts. It is expected that the results of the study can be used by other manufacturing companies operating in a similar context, producing complex product systems in a modular environment.

  • 231.
    LINDBLOM, JOSEFIN
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Management.
    SCHOLANDER, WILHELM
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Management.
    Prestationsmätning förlogistikhantering: Utveckling av ett processpecifiktprestationsmätningssystem2014Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The  focus of  this master thesis  has  been on performance measurement  within logistics  and to develop a performance measurement system (PMS) for the building material supplier Nacka Trä & Byggvaror Sven Gustafsson AB. The thesis sets out from a desire from the management of the company to analyze the distribution activities from a time and cost perspective, in order to evaluate  how  costs  can  be  lowered.  As  a  result  of  the  company’s  diverse  customer  base,  ranging  from consumers to small construction firms and large contractors, Nacka Trä & Byggvaror Sven Gustafsson AB has developed complex material flows with low efficiency regarding the handling and delivery of goods.

    The  purpose  of  the  PMS  is  partly  to  address  existing  problems  at  an  operational  level  of  the distribution operations at Nacka Trä through the development of process specific metrics, giving employees tools to evaluate processes and to work with continuous improvements. During the study, processes has been mapped through a series of interviews, asking employees to describe problems in daily operations and what internal activities that are key to perform well in order to meet customer expectations. The findings have been used to determine which processes and metrics to include in the  PMS.  By  also  developing  strategic  objectives  of  the  business  unit  and  linking  them  to  the operational metrics, the distribution function can be developed towards becoming a competitive tool for the whole company.

    Previous  studies  within  the  area  of  performance  measurement  for  logistic  activities  lack  a performance  measurement  model  for  a  sub-section  of  an  organization,  where  the  aim  is  to strengthen the sub-section’s competitiveness when linking operational metrics to the strategy of the particular  sub-section.  The  case  study  at  Nacka  Trä  gives  opportunity  to  do  this  through  the development of a process specific performance measurement system. The system will serve as a tool for solving problems at an operational at the distributions function, but also develop the function strategically to have it serve as a way of compete for the whole organization.

  • 232.
    LINDER, ERIK
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Management.
    VALLGÅRDA, JOHANNES
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Management.
    Utilisation of a total cost of ownership approach for selection of logistics providers at manufacturing industries in Brazil2014Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    When calculating the cost of a service, the focus is often extensively on the price, and, to a lesser extent, to the related costs. Previous research has introduced the concept of Total Cost of Ownership (TCO), as a comprehensive approach to include all components of the cost, even the qualitative values. The previous studies have although focused more on products than services, and furthermore towards developed markets than developing. This study is a multiple case study at manufacturing companies in São Paulo, Brazil, which aims to examine if the previous literature findings are applicable for the selection and evaluation of logistics providers in Brazil. The results show that TCO is utilisable for services with some minor modifications. The findings also point out that the need for a deviation management system when developing a TCO model is greater in Brazil compared to more developed markets. We conclude that there is no single best way to manage TCO for services. Moreover, there is a set of approaches and models with common components, which are applicable and provide good results.

  • 233. Lindhagen, Maria
    et al.
    Angelis, Jannis
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Management.
    Engwall, Mats
    Managing offerings in engineering PSFs2016In: Proceedings of the Spring Servitisation Conference, Manchester, 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 234.
    LINDQVIST, DICK
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Management.
    Business Process Outsourcing:: Incorporating internal stakeholders in the decision-making2014Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Business process outsourcing is a growing and increasingly important phenomenon as it has the potential to deliver numerous of benefits to companies. While outsourcing has always been about lowering cost, the drivers today are far more ambitious. Companies are now aiming at increased flexibility and obtaining access to skills and expertise. They are also moving on to outsourcing high-end, critical and knowledge-intensive business processes, even core activities. However, too many fail to realize the expected benefits and they are experiencing significant difficulties in evaluating the suitability of processes for outsourcing. Decision frameworks demonstrate limitations related to their applicability and complexity and few have explored the area of  outsourcing knowledge-intensive business processes, providing a service to internal stakeholders in the organization.

    In this study, a case research method was used to address this issue by studying a business unit facing the decision whether or not to outsource a highly knowledge-based business process. An existing theoretical framework was used and enhanced in order to incorporate the effect of outsourcing on the internal stakeholders in the organization. Thus, the company could include this in the calculation and end up with a more inclusive decision, which prevented unanticipated complications in  the  outsourcing engagement. The research has shown that the effect on key stakeholders can influence the success or failure of these outsourcing engagements and should therefore be a determinant in the decision-making. It was  also  found  that  acknowledging  the  effect  of  transferring  knowledge  on  internal stakeholders is more important than the cost-cutting benefit for the success of the outsourcing decision.  Therefore,  it  is  crucial  to  assess  what  the  needs  and  concerns  of  these  key stakeholders are, as well as incorporate them in the evaluation of the business process when making an outsourcing decision.

  • 235.
    LINDSTRÖM WESTMAN, SARA
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Management.
    HYDLING, JOHNNIE
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Management.
    Kitchen, from concept to completion: A process mapping of the communication within thehandling of kitchens when developing apartments2012Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis investigates the conditions and the key factors needed for successful mmunication within processes in the construction industry. The processes within the construction industry are often part of a large project where the project team consists of people from different disciplines and  backgrounds,  causing  large  amounts  of  information  to  flow.  Empirical  data  has  been collected at the construction company JM. The process regarding the handling of kitchens is  studied  in  this  thesis. This process includes   developing   and   specifying   the   kitchens, communication with suppliers and customers and the delivery and inspection of the kitchens. An initial phase was conducted to generate understanding of the organization and the process that kitchens undergo in each housing project. The methods used to obtain the empirical data are observations, a questionnaire and semi-structured interviews. A literature review was conducted parallel to the empirical data collection in order to find relevant theory within the particular field. The  theory  mainly  describes  the  Lean  concept,  communication  within  project  teams  and responsibility mapping.

    This thesis provides the reader with a description of JM and the different work roles that are involved when handling kitchens. According to each work roles description of the handling, five different modules that a kitchen at JM undergoes are presented. This is analyzed together with different problems, causes and consequences that occur during the handling of the kitchens. Patterns, relationships and trends are identified and concluded in six themes. These themes are analyzed and discussed according to the theory that emerged from the literature review and a conclusion that answers the research questions is presented. One part of the conclusion is a number of conditions for effective process communication in the construction industry. The second  part  of  the  conclusion  is  various  key  factors  for  successful  communication  in  the processes  in  the  construction  industry.  These  key  factors  include  the  flow  of  information, informal   and   formal   communication,   control   functions,   responsibility   areas,   common understanding   of   the   goals   and   targets   and   relationships   with   suppliers.   Specific recommendations regarding how JM can start working with improvements in the process of handling kitchens are also presented in the conclusion. The thesis ends with various suggestions for future research and a critical review of the study.

  • 236.
    LINDÉN, ADAM
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Management.
    OLJEMARK, SIMON
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Management.
    Managing Telework: Investigating Possibilities of Telework for Modern Organizations2018Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Telework is a method of work that lets employees work from other places than the central office. With the world becoming more digitized, technology is becoming mobile and people become accessible wherever they are located. There are many benefits with Telework, but also many challenges that need to be taken into consideration. The digital era has led to that employees have changed their perception of how often they need to be at the central office, wishing to be more flexible and attain a better work-life balance. However, the adoption of Telework strategies has not grown as fast as first predicted by the originator, Jack Nilles, which some researchers after him have explained to be due to managerial resistance and lack of technology. This master thesis aims to investigate Telework as a phenomenon and explore how modern organizations can evolve to meet the demands of employees seeking more flexibility, but at the same time deal with challenges that may affect the organization negatively. Through a systematic literature review, we explore the concept of Telework and use previous publications in order to find common themes in research in order to find what may have impacted the decision-making process when organizations decide to implement Telework or not. A complementary literature study has also been used to investigate these themes further, which was followed by conducting empirical data collection through one semi-structured interview and two qualitative surveys. From our findings it can be found that common themes that act as drivers for Telework to be implemented are related to: an employee’s eligibility to reduce their commute, availability of digital infrastructure and ICT based tools and the organization’s possibility to cut cost related to office space. In our findings we have identified factors that organizations discuss before making a decision with regard to the implementation of Telework. Lastly, we see that how well an organization has adapted to a digital working environment does have impact on the adoption of Telework, given that there are many ICT solutions that can cope with the challenges Telework brings.

  • 237.
    Linse, Charlotta
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Management.
    Ambiguity at the heart of design work: Sensing and negotiating ambiguity in knowledge-creation work2017Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Ambiguities have long intrigued design and new product development (NPD) researchers: The fascination seems rooted in an endeavor to understand how design outcomes may be created despite the ambiguous nature of such work. There are several classic contributions on how to categorize, avoid and approach ambiguities. Some of the newer theories have also pointed to benefits arising from temporarily sustaining ambiguity.

    Little research has considered how ambiguities emerge, how ambiguities are sensed by practitioners, and the actions the practitioners take, either to harness or to reduce the generative and transformative power of ambiguity, however.

    This is unfortunate, since ambiguities are at the heart of such knowing-work. If one does not know how to sense the emergence of ambiguities and act to reduce or harness their generative and transformative power, i.e. negotiate ambiguity, the work might become unproductive, confused, uncreative, and might require more energy and attention.

    The purpose of this research is to portray how ambiguities emerge and are negotiated in knowing-work. This is achieved by drawing on two cases of design and NPD work, from practice epistemology.

    The results indicated that the emerging ambiguities changed in the ongoing work, some being reduced, others becoming obsolete or persisting. The results also included five generalized actions to negotiate ambiguity: (1) constructing points of references, (2) mediating between perspectives, (3) anchoring in expertise, (4) disarming future resistance, and (5) creating shared visions.

    This research has concluded that the very essence of design work concerns the emergence and fading away of ambiguity. The actions taken to negotiate ambiguity mediates the emergence of the design outcome. This research makes two contributions: first, it illustrates how ambiguities open up design work by creating a space for action; second, it illustrates how actions to negotiate ambiguity maneuver in this space for action.

  • 238.
    Linse, Charlotta
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Management.
    Managing wicked design commissions2013In: Proceedings of the 19th International Conference on Engineering Design: Design for Harmonies / [ed] Udo Lindemann, Srinivasan Venkataraman, Yong Se Kim, Sang Won Lee, Seoul, Korea, 2013, p. -40Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Design is a core technical and creative activity for innovation. Design consultancy companies make a business out of taking on ill structured development work. Uncertainty is an integral part of this kind of fuzzy front end (FFE) development; the need for information and knowledge is to a large extent unknown and possible difficulties on the way is yet to be encountered.The objective of this paper is to describe how commissioned FFE work may be managed in order to mitigate uncertainty. The basis for the article is a comparative case study at two design consultancy firms. One of the companies have structured and standardized their work process in order to reduce uncertainty about what to do in a commission. Simultaneously, the process functions as a guarantee that they will reach an unknown but acceptable output.The other company initiates their projects by first of all defining product characteristics that are crucial for business success. This product definition then functions as a beacon during the consecutive development; it reduces uncertainty of what output to reach whilst letting the team decide on the unique route for each commission.

  • 239.
    Linse, Charlotta
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Management.
    Striking a Balance: Freedom, autonomy & constraints in development work2013In: Proceedings of the 20th International Product Development Management Conference: Re-enchanting technology, Paris, France, 2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The importance of creativity in organizations whose business idea is to sell creative consultancy services is unquestionable; one such example is design consultancy firms that take on fuzzy front end (FFE) and development commissions. Especially during the FFE of development work objectives are vague, management methods are unstructured and creativity is needed. However, when the work is done as a consultancy service they must manage to be efficient and deliver the fuzzy commission according to time and content constraints. The objective is to describe how creative freedom and autonomy is balanced with constraints. The author concludes that the balancing act is dependent upon how far into the process the team has come. Early on the process activities may be predefined and as such constrained, whilst more room for improvisation and freedom is needed further on. On the other hand the content-related objectives should be vaguely defined initially, subsequently becoming more constrained after the FFE.

  • 240.
    LIU, JIA
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Management.
    Achieving Better Collaboration for IT Offshoring2015Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Along with globalization, offshoring strategy has been attractive to more and more IT companies and regarded as an industry changer as tremendous benefits can be enabled from this strategy. However, considering the potential risks and uncertainties, offshoring can also be risky and even lead to failure or huge loss because of the inefficiency and obstacles in collaboration among offshoring teams. To be able to guarantee better collaboration for IT offshoring, both related theories about offshoring and results from the empirical study have been combined and analyzed.

    As for the methodology applied in the study, a case company Sigma IT & Management is mainly investigated for phenomenon exploration as this company has a long-term IT offshoring strategic partner in Ukraine. Qualitative data is valued greatly in obtaining a deeper knowledge of various opinions and views from the representatives out of the offshoring team. As an exploratory-interpretive study, it primarily uses interviews with text analysis for results generation.

    The conclusion of this study to IT offshoring collaboration is twofold. Firstly from the functional perspective, it fills the shortage of supportive checklist for project managers to guarantee a better offshoring collaboration, as well as the proper methods in evaluating interaction barriers among offshoring teams. Secondly from the individual perspective, this thesis study is concluded with a table of success factors to improve the bi-direction communication and the collaboration efficiency for offshoring teams.

  • 241.
    Liu, Jia
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Management.
    Li, Z.
    Hemani, Ahmed
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Electronic Systems.
    Design of evaluation platform of machine vision for portable wireless terminals2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An evaluation platform for Machine vision algorithm is designed in this paper. The platform is constructed with DM6437 DSP processor and image input-output circuit models. An image process algorithm used for machine vision can be performed on the platform. With DFG model of the algorithm, the algorithm architecture can be built for programming and analyzing expediently. As an example the image segmentation algorithm has been modeled and executed with the platform. The result shows that the platform is useful for algorithm analysis and could be compared with other implementation system as design reference.

  • 242.
    LJUNGNÉ, ANDERS
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Management.
    Group Homes - different players, common perspectives2012Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This  report  presents  the  results  of  a  thesis  where  care  residents  are  studied.  The  aim  of  the  study  was  to  identify   how   different   Swedish   municipalities   are   working   with   this   type   of   housing   from   The   Swedish  Act   (1993:387)   concerning   Support   and   Service   for   Persons   with   Certain   Functional   Impairments   (LSS)  was  introduced  1994.   

    This   work   results   in   a   clarification   of   the   development   of   group   homes.   An   insight   into   the   different  municipalities   work   with   LSS   will   provide   greater   understanding   of   both   local   authorities   and   market  players  to  succeed  in  the  future  development  of  the  business  and  type  of  housing.  It  presents  conclusions  that   can   be   object   of   further   research.   From   today,   new   demands   regarding   group   home   design,   mainly  due  to  new  generations.  A  young  person  that  today  receives  assistance  through  the  LSS  Act  grew  up  in  a  completely   different   way   compared   to   previous   generations   who   often   lived   their   entire   lives   in   an  institution.  This  allows  adjustments  in  activities  and  accommodation  when  new  homes  are  constructed.  

    The    insight    of    this    new    young   generation   and   the    word   independence    are   mostly   important    when  municipalities   identifies   focal   points   for   future   omes.   Today'ʹs   generations   are   much   better   suited   to  independent  lives  than previous  generations  who  largely  lived  their  lives  in  an  institution.   

    The  method  is  semi structured  interviews  were  used  in  order  to  get  close  to reality  and  thus  create  a  good  overview   and   find   problem   areas   where   there   are   opportunities   for   development.   The   purpose   of   the  interviews   is   to   find   out   how   a   number   of   municipalities   with   equal   conditions   for   LSS   are   working   to  develop   the   form   of   housing.   How   prospects   for   future   group   home   looks,   what   makes   a   group   home  better  and  what  demands  new  and  future  generations  place  on  the  living  environment  in  a  group  home.  

    From   the   early   1900s   there   have   been   major   changes   regarding   the   care   of  persons   with   disabilities   and  their   living   environment.   Should   we   also   look   at   the   future   development   of   the   group   homes,   it   is   not   difficult   to   see   that   a  similar   comparison   will   be   made   when   studies   on   LSS   homes'ʹ   development   in   the  future  is  written.  A  big  difference  for  the  care  of  persons  with  disabilities  from  its  beginning  until  today  is  that   there   is   now   a   statutory   support   the   health   care   work   must   be   done   in   the   best   way   possible.  

    Watchword   today   is   participation   and   equality   in   society.   This   historical   retrospect   is   seen   as   necessary or    market    participants    who    either    work    with    or    care    for    example,    real    estate    development    and  management   group  and   assisted   living.   The   last   twenty   years   have   been   very   important   for  people  receiving  assistance  under  LSS  Act  but  much  more  can  be  done  within  the  segment  of  samhällsfastigheter  to  create  better  housing  for  both  staff  and  tenants.  

  • 243.
    LOVÉN, ZEBASTIAN
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Management.
    Nelvig, Daniel
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Management.
    Performance Measurement System makinga product cost model dynamic: A case study on a manufacturing company2014Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    For manufacturing companies it is vital to have models estimating product costs accurately in order to make successful strategic decisions, emphasising competitiveness and profitability.However, estimating product costs is perceived a difficult task. Additionally, product cost models must be improved continuously, adding an extra dimension of complexity. 

    This thesis addresses the challenge of having accurate and updated models estimating  poduct costs using Performance Measurement System (PMS). Consequently, this research aims to advance the understanding of using PMS on a product cost model to make it dynamic, meaning that the model improves continuously and is appropriate for its purpose facilitating the estimation of product costs. A case study on a manufacturing company situated in Sweden producing technical advanced products is conducted, focusing the research on the product cost model used by the case company and how the performance of that model can be measured. In turn, the results together with literature form a base of a discussion about how PMS can be used to make the product cost model dynamic. Data were collected from interviews, observations and internal documents. 

    The empirical findings can be summarized in three suggestions

    creating the right conditions by measuring the performance of the product cost model using a structured approach:

    actively use the PMS by evaluating the performance of the product cost model and act accordingly:and

    reflect over the PMS to ensure the alignment of the PMS with the product cost model strategy and system. 

    The thesis concludes with a twofold conceptual contribution proposing an extension of PMS literature. First, that PMS makes the product cost model dynamic. Second, it is suggested that current PMS literature should be extended to account for scenarios when PMS is used on the product cost model.

  • 244.
    LUNDBERG, CLAES
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Management.
    UHNO, DOUGLAS
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Management.
    Conceptual analysis of Risk Aspects within an InboundSupply Chain2018Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The global supply chain is fundamentally changing to become more complex as the world gets more connected. This causes high pressure on the supply chain to become resilient to a surrounding environment with more risks that affect financial aspects. In order to better understand what measurements and actions that need to be in place when strategizing on inbound supply chain theoretical frameworks needs to be built. To further understand how different risk factors are interlinked within the supply chain, it was decided to make use semi-structured interviews and the methodology called Total Interpretive Structural Modeling (TISM). The method chosen in this work is in accordance with the TISM methodology and is performed as follows: First, an extensive literature and interview process is carried out to identify important risks and how they drive cost. Secondly, utilizing experts knowledge by comparing logical statements against each other to create a hierarchical relationship between risks and cost drivers within the incoming supply chain. Third, Cross-Impact Analysis was utilized to better understand dependency and power and every variable. Finally, a self-explanatory model was developed based on the theoretical relationship between variables. At the same time, a qualitative study was executed. Based on semi-structured interviews with experts in the reas of Logistics & Supply Chain Management. The methodology for analyzing these semi-structured interviews is conducted in accordance with theories on the interpretation of qualitative data: transcribe, encode and index each interview to gain an understanding of the importance of data obtained. This qualitative study is conducted as a check to ensure that the result from the interpretation structure model (TISM) is consistent with reality. All done from a general and conceptual level applicable to the inbound supply chain of a manufacturing organization. The thesis found, by the use of above methodology, that there were 11 different risk factors that directly or indirectly relate to a financial cost driven in the supply chain. The hierarchy of these factors was established through TISM and cross-referenced with the expert opinions within the field of Supply Chain Management and logistics through semistructured interviews. Findings from the thesis conclude that important aspects of an inbound supply chain are (i) the importance of having a conceptual view of the market, strategy and organizational goal; (ii) implement an accurate accounting for materials and products to support transparency; (iii) logistics network and inventory is fairly unimportant in the whole picture; (iv) supplier relations needs to be kept up to standard, even in a seller’s market.

  • 245.
    LUNDBERG, TED
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Management.
    SANDSTRÖM, MATTIAS
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Management.
    VILKA FAKTORER PÅVERKAR FRAMGÅNGEN I CRM-SATSNINGAR2015Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This study is intended to identify which factors that influence the success of initiatives in Customer Relationship Management, usually abbreviated as CRM. In the course of this study we have been in contact with forty-two companies operating in Sweden within eleven different sectors in order to find out how they operate regarding CRM initiatives, particularly initiatives within marketing and promotions.

    Against the data collected during the study it was concluded that the companies working with CRM believed that the CRM initiatives resulted in higher profitability and created more loyal customers. At the same time it was evident that the companies had different views on CRM as a method and its benefits. The majority of the companies could not present any tangible results from CRM-initiatives. It was also revealed that decisions regarding CRM initiatives were based on subjective assessments and without theoretical foundation. Based on the data collected nine factors were identified to affect the success of CRM initiatives. By placing the identified factors in a theoretical context a model could be developed which demonstrates the complexity that needs to be considered when applying CRM.

    Our hope is that the developed model can be used by companies before deciding on new investments in CRM initiatives or when evaluating existing initiatives. Future studies will have to show if this work contributed to a better understanding of CRM initiatives potential and impact.

  • 246.
    LUNDBLAD, HENRIK
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Management.
    MINDELL KIDANU, JONATAN
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Management.
    Customization of IT services: A case study within the area of software asset management services2013Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The problem area investigated in this thesis is customization of IT services. Both customization and standardization of IT services is challenging for IT organizations since customer demand many times is specific and individual (Brocke, Uebernickel, and Brenner, 2010). Modern IT organizations are experiencing increasing pressure towards orientating their service portfolios after specific consumer’s business processes. Therefore, customization of IT services is an up-to-date and interesting topic to investigate.

    The problem area has been addressed through a case study of an IT organization offering professional IT services to external organizations. The case study has focused on examining the degree of customization requirements from the targeted market. Findings from the market analysis have been considered when studying customization possibilities of the current IT service product of the IT organization. The main results show that IT services may be customized by dividing the service product into a core service and associated services. Offering a service product without the division between core and associated services makes it hard to meet the variations in demands from customers in different market segments. The studied IT service product will be easier to customize to various demands with this division.

    The case study conducted within this thesis show that not all IT organizations offering professional IT sereices have the clear division between core services and associate services, as discussed by Nieminen and Auer (1998) and Brocke, Uebernickel, and Brenner (2010) in literature. In general, this division seems to be advisable for professional IT service

     

  • 247.
    LUNDGREN, MATHIAS
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Management.
    Platform Design Based on OperationalData Sharing Strategy: A case study at a Swedish vehicle manufacturer2015Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The technology development and increased integration of IT systems in the vehicle industry has transformed operational data from a necessity only for in-vehicle operations to a critical resource used for extensive service delivery. From the vehicle manufacturers point of view the data is considered to be a valuable resource for both internal and external use. The challenge is to decide how the operational data should be leveraged to increase the competitive advantage.

    Within this thesis a model is developed to provide guidance in the process of developing a strategy regarding sharing operational data with external entities and the subsequent platform design choices. The model mainly relies on the theoretical frameworks of open innovation and co-opetition to produce strategic recommendations based on five identified input factors. The model was evaluated during a case study at a vehicle manufacturer to assess its applicability within the vehicle industry and to validate its functionality. Original data was gathered through interviews at the vehicle manufacturer and a web-based questionnaire distributed to third party providers of fleet management services.

    The conclusion, based on the model, is that it is advantageous to facilitate sharing of operational data to external entities. By opening up the flow of information and providing good access to the vehicles several advantages derived from the theoretical frameworks mentioned above will help increase the competitive advantage within the heavy commercial vehicle manufacturing industry. Despite some minor changes during the development process, and additional changes recommended for future work, the model performed well in the given context.

  • 248.
    Löfdahl, Benjamin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Management.
    Sjödin, Birger
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Management.
    Supplier Selection for High-tech Start-up Companies: A Case Study of a Firefighting Robot2013Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The growing need to source manufacturing activities to original equipment manufacturers has presented a strategic challenge for firms in evaluating and selecting supplier partners for their products. Supplier performance evaluation is a well-researched area within supply chain management. Though several authors have contributed with models for supplier selection, there still exist uncertainties regarding how high-tech start-up firms should capitalize on these models. By conducting a case study at AB Realisator Management Consulting currently developing a new firefighting robot concept called FUMO™, the authors were able to develop a model for supplier selection and test it on a real case scenario. Results indicate that high-tech start-up firms in general should apply the following step-by-step process for selecting suppliers: Align supply chain strategy with product characteristics regarding supply and demand uncertainty, select supplier performance metrics from the comprehensive bank of metrics presented in this thesis related to the supply chain strategy, evaluate suppliers based on the selected performance metrics using the decision making framework Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP). By following the suggested process step by step, incorporating performance metrics to the AHP structure, high-tech start-up firms will be able to find strategically suitable suppliers to manufacture their products.

  • 249. Machado, Carla Gonsalves
    et al.
    de Lima, Edson Pinheiro
    Gouvea da Costa, Sergio Eduardo
    Angelis, Jannis Jan
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Management. Research Institute of Industrial Economy IFN, Sweden.
    Mattioda, Rosana Adami
    Framing maturity based on sustainable operations management principles2017In: International Journal of Production Economics, ISSN 0925-5273, E-ISSN 1873-7579, Vol. 190, p. 3-21Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Business sustainability integration is a complex task and strongly linked to operations management. In fact, sustainability based approaches demand operations management boundaries' expansion, creation and integration of new performance goals into traditional company's performance management system, and new criteria and policies for operations' decision areas development. The challenge is to conduct more sustainable operations through companies' value chain and their operations network. Maturity models have been used in different areas as a process improvement and change management model for complex contexts. In sustainable operations management area, maturity models have been developed for specific purposes, e.g., sustainable production, sustainable supply chain management, corporate social responsibility, and life cycle management. However, there is a lack of models that considers sustainability integration through the evolution of sustainable operations' capabilities in an integrated way. Based on literature review and results from two panel studies conducted with academics and practitioners, this paper proposes a maturity framework for sustainability integration guided by sustainable operations capabilities evolution. The findings pointed out that its is possible to identify an evolutionary path, which goes from an initial approach focused in compliance aspects and firm's value. protection to an innovative approach, based on corporate social responsibility supporting operations' integration in a sustainable system, and long-term values development. The experts' studies identified key processes that need to be prioritized in each level, and also evaluate the adaptation of some elements from Capability Maturity Model Integration (CMMI) to sustainable maturity framework design. The framework represents company's vision regarding its value chain and operations network, and it is indicated for manufacturing companies.

  • 250. Machado, Carla
    et al.
    Pinheiro de Lima, Edson
    Angelis, Jannis
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Management.
    Studying sustainability process implementation through an operations management lens2014In: Proceedings of the European Operations Management Conference, 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
2345678 201 - 250 of 410
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf