kth.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
2345678 201 - 250 of 1939
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 201.
    Brandt, Daniel
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Markanvisningar som verktyg för hållbar stadsplanering2017Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 202.
    Brandt, Elvira
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Feministisk stadsplanering, mer än bara jämställdhet: En kvalitativ studie om praktiserandet av diskursen2019Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Through the ages, women have been neglected in urban planning because of structural discrimination. Both planning theory and practice have been characterized by masculinity and gender norms. A trend that, according to the theory, can be reversed by integrating the feminist perspective into the planning practice. A postmodern perspective permeated with intersectionality will identify the underlying unequal structures and, through inclusive urban planning, generate equal urban environments. Thus, the feminist perspective is believed to call into question the urban planning, beyond the powers of equitable urban planning. Although the postmodern feminist perspective includes more aspects than sex and gender, such as ethnicity, class and age, the term feminism is here used in the context of the groups of women and men. The division is relevant as urban planning, based on the interviews, has proven to be based on statistics broken down by gender and research based on the knowledge that planning that is based on a woman's experiences benefits everyone in society. However, the intersectional perspective contributes to the knowledge that both women and men consist of sub-groups that are of relevance to the planning. Although interest in feminist theory has increased in the field of architectural research over the past few decades, theorists within the discourse of feminist urban planning can’t recall that the discourse has been implemented. A finding that, in this study, is considered strange considering that the goal of Sweden's urban planning is to achieve gender mainstreaming throughout the whole planning process. As the feminist perspective on urban planning is process-oriented, it is considered to raise awareness of social injustice and change urban planning from scratch. Judith Butler’s (n.d. Swedish u.å.) theory about sex being social constructed is here interpreted as gender being created from people's actions and that an action is influenced by the physical environment, which in turn is influenced by the urban planning. Thus, urban planning can influence the creation of gender and what appears female and male. It has been shown that urban planning that is based on women and their everyday perspective favours all social groups and makes planning more equal. That the professional planners possess knowledge, guidelines and tools of how to implement the feminist perspective into practice is a pre-condition of the planning’s success. The qualitative methods that form the basis of this study are document analysis and semi-structured interviews. The study has shown that both the literature and the planning profession identify a lack of a clear definition of the feminist urban planning discourse, but the professionals see no point to coin one since a definition doesn’t facilitate the practice of the discourse. However, the professionals demand clearer guidelines and tools for the practical work. Based on the document analysis and the semi-structured interviews, it appears that the practice of feminist urban planning should be based on locally adapted tools that are inspired by general guidelines. Both theory and empiricism indicate that feminist urban planning that has an intersectional perspective and starts from a citizens’ perspective generates equality in spatial planning. The result also shows that the planning profession needs a humanistic awareness-raising campaign in order to be able to incorporate the needs of the citizens into the urban planning.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 203.
    Brandt, Elvira
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Hellberg, Vincent
    Hur kan cirkulär ekonomi bidra till social hållbarhet på stadsdelsnivå?: How can circular economy contribute to social sustainability on a district level?2017Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Title: How can circular economy contribute to social sustainability on a district level?

    Social sustainability is an idea that is key in further developing sustainability programs which highlights the importance of the actions of individuals in society. In the process of determining whether circular economy can contribute to social sustainability on a district level, two important theories were identified; social capital and place-based identity. This was due to the fact that they embody the major aspects that make up social sustainability. The theories will be studied by analyzing literature and an interview to strengthen the facts taken from the studied literature. The thesis concerns the concepts sustainable development, planetary boundaries, Doughnut Economics, regenerative cities and Doughnut Districts that together create a context for the further analysis regarding circular economy, social capital and place-based identity. These theories are the main focus of the study, and will therefore be studied more thoroughly.

    In this thesis, sustainable development is defined as the kind of development that meets the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs. The theory of Doughnut Economics encompasses key limiting factors such as the limited natural resources available and the power of social behaviour, which constitutes the boundaries for human living space. Neighbourhoods developed and shaped by the concept of Doughnut Economics are referred to as Doughnut Districts. Regenerative cities can be described as cities that are in harmony with their surroundings, as well as the ecosystem. Circular economy is an economic model which aims for a circulation of resources while achieving economic growth in combination with a minimal environmental impact. Meanwhile, social capital involves the intricate relationships between individuals in society, which allows the society to function more efficiently. This includes organizations and communities that through establishing norms and utilizing their influence produces positive changes. Place-based identity is characterized by an individual’s cultural and emotional connection to a specific place. The unity and pride of individuals within a certain city can be important indicators for how socially sustainable the aforementioned city is. This is a major root for good social relationships within a district, which in effect make individuals feel more welcome and provides a sense of belonging. Combined with the aspects of circular economy, solutions that strengthens circular resource flows, while allowing communities to be used as sharing networks in purpose of maximizing the use of products are suggested. This would create an environment in which a growing ground for innovation comes naturally. This will be achieved by utilizing an accessible compound system and commercial actors, which includes local creative competences. This provides a local anchoring that leads to positive norms and trust by thrust between habitants and their influence on their local environment.

    The real estate firm Vasakronan is joining forces with Urban Minds to develop a community, Norra Kymlinge, to become a district driven by the aforementioned sustainable principles. This concept can be combined with ideas about the circular economy model. As for the relation between circular economy and social sustainability, the recommendations aim to support the model which constitutes a framework for the district. 

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 204.
    Bratel, Yael
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    SUSTAINABLE LIFESTYLES - AN EXPERIMENT IN LIVING WELL: Northern European examples of sustainable planning2012Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This study examines the concept of sustainable lifestyles. It is concluded that the concept of sustainable lifestyles is derived from the bigger term sustainable development and that the concept sustainable lifestyles exists as an antipode to unsustainable lifestyles. Sustainable lifestyles are still a new concept within the academic field of urban planning and design and some confusion regarding the definition remains.

    Three case studies were made investigating urban planning for sustainable lifestyles. The sites were Houthaven in Amsterdam, Netherlands, Royal Seaport in Stockholm Sweden and Western Harbour in Malmö, Sweden. Urban planning for sustainable lifestyles was explicitly carried out in the Royal Seaport, in the other two cases the concept of sustainability was approached more generally but nonetheless the methods used were quite similar in all three cases.

    How people in the society of today are seen as responsible for e.g. buying ecological food, driving ecological vehicles and living a sustainable lifestyle, are analysed through the approaches of governmentality and biopower. There has been a shift from a centralised governing of sustainability implementations to a decentralised one where the individual responsibility stands in focus.

    There are different views of what a sustainable behaviour and lifestyle could incorporate. According to the technocentric approach, technical solutions to environmental problems are sufficient, but according to the ecocentric approach, behavioural changes are needed in order to obtain sustainability. This has implications for the planning of sustainable lifestyles. In some cases technical solutions are favoured in front of behavioural ones and the other way around. The two tracks of understanding leads to two different pathways of sustainability and a need to recognize and comprehend the differences are crucial in planning for sustainable lifestyles.

    Sustainable behaviour and habits relate to actions, which e.g. minimizes the use of natural resources or incorporates the switch from an unsustainable habit to a sustainable one. Sustainable behaviour is often referred to as pro-environmental behaviour and circles around consumption. There are several ways of replacing unsustainable habits with sustainable ones discussed in this study.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 205.
    Bratt, Theodor
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Diskutera mera?: Om kommunikativa processer i hållbara stadsbyggnadsprojekt.2012Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    With a starting point in the three projects Mitt Gröna Kvarter, Hållbar Stadsutveckling i Kvillebäcken and Kongahälla that all received financial support from Delegationen för Hållbara städer [The Delegation for Sustainable Cities], I have studied what experiences actors in those organizations have from the internal communication. The study also addresses how those involved perceive the impact of the process surrounding the financial support scheme and the impact of the written application on the reception of and work on the proposed measures.

    By asking the question: How do actors in the projects studied perceive the internal communication process? I show how the organization’s structure and their methods of work affect the conditions for a rewarding communicative process. My empirical material has led me to identify five conclusions that are recurring and all have an influential role. I therefore see it as essential; that discussions involves a learning process; that opportunities exist to contribute on equal terms; that the players can agree on common formulations of problems; that the presentation of material is transparent; that the consistency of behaviour and communication prevails.

    Download full text (pdf)
    Diskutera mera
  • 206.
    Brattgård, Nils
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Community Continuity Management: An Exploration of the Energy Production and Use of a Fictional Stockholm Neighbourhood in a Crisis2023Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    In an increasingly interconnected, and electricity-reliant world, households are asked to build up their resilience to crises. Local, distributed electricity production within a microgrid with capability to operate disconnected from the larger grid has been shown to be an effective tool for increasing power system resilience in the past. The energy production of local renewable sources is, however, not sufficient in meeting normal household energy demand.

    This thesis explores whether the forming of communities can be utilised to reduce energy demand and as a result, increase the resiliency of both the community and urban environments.

    The analysis of household energy use and the subsequently developed toolbox provide insights into energy use both under normal societal function and during a crisis. Through living and cooking together as a community, significant energy-efficiency gains were possible, exceeding those reasonably achieved within each individual household. Community was further determined to be important in the planning and development of more resilient combinations of renewable energy, going beyond solar power. When implemented in theoretical scenarios, energy communities at a building and block level could provide sufficient energy for the households’ most immediate needs without major sacrifices of wellness.

    The scheme proposed is argued to require not only monetary investments, but also larger societal shifts. Producing sufficient quantities of electricity within urban environments will mean a large change in how cities are experienced. Public understanding and acceptance for such a change is likely to be necessary. Through the implementation, the role of the municipality would go from action-taking to mostly laying the groundwork for the formation of communities, as well as advising these as they achieve higher household resilience. Most critically, however, there is a need for the broader population to embrace working together in communities.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 207.
    Brattgård, Nils
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Sustainable stormwater management in Stockholm's inner city2021Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Much like other cities Stockholm has traditionally used a technical system for managing stormwater. With time this system has become overburdened and has led to large environmental concerns. To reach water quality goals set by the EU Stockholm needs to decrease pollution released to recipients by 70-80%. 

    Green infrastructure (GI) has increasingly been used as an alternative and addition to technical stormwater systems. Many studies have been conducted on different solutions and their stormwater management performance. The City of Stockholm have done research on numerous solutions to evaluate their performance in the context of Stockholm as well. However, implementation in the inner city is slow, thus this study explores why this is the case, and how Stockholm’s stormwater management goals can be reached.

    Stockholm predominately uses trees planted in plant beds using structural soil, and a combination of constructed wetlands and wet ponds for stormwater management. In new developments there is no real concern, as the GI can be included in planning at an early stage. Including these solutions in existing environments causes issues related to space, both above and below ground, and costs. Therefore, other solutions need to be found. This study explored green roofs, green walls and permeable pavements as possible options. Additionally, it found that finding new space that has previously not been used for GI could be an option. To mitigate financing issues new ways of promoting investment into GI from private property owners could be utilized, but that there also is a mismatch between supposed support for sustainable stormwater management on the political side and funds allocated. Finally, the study recommends that Stockholm takes the technical systems into account and explores what GI measures best work together with it to more effectively decrease pollution.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 208.
    Bretz, Martin
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Låt medborgarna skapa staden: Om tactical urbanism och idéburen stadsförbättring samt medborgarnas rätt till staden2015Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    In the creation of the city man has the opportunity to remake himself and realize his heart's desire. How and for whom the city should be designed for is probably a discussion that will continue until eternity. Throughout history, private ownership and other social forms of domination has controlled urban space, which often has resulted in various forms of protest movements.

     

    Tactical urbanism has in several cities around the world become a popular method for improving the livability in the city; local actors, mainly citizens, have remade their neighbourhood with small-scale improvements. This paper describes what tactical urbanism is, the theory behind the method and the opportunities and consequences it may bring in the urban environment and in the planning of the city. From a Swedish perspective this is explored through a case study of Stockholm's City guidelines for idéburen stadsförbättring.

     

    This study examines the criticism in contemporary urban development, which argue that the neoliberal urbanism creates inequality in society, and the concept of "right to the city" which permeates tactical urbanisms actions, approaches and basic theory. The contribution of this essay is an interlacement of theoris concerning "right to the city" with tactical urbanism practical usage and how tactical urbanism can be developed to better fullfill the needs of the citizens, especially marginalised groups in society. The essay suggests that there is a tendency that tactical urbanism is incorporated into neoliberal urban development and therefore is losing its voice for the weak of society. The case study of Stockholm shows that the idea if a possible consequence of gentrification as a result of idéburen stadsförbättring is lacking. However, the study shows that there is a concern that the methods mainly benefit inner-city residents. Stockholm's guidelines for idéburen stadsförbättring is similar, but does not entirely coincide with what the tactical urbanism in theory stand for. The study shows that there is a need for a coordinator for idéburen stadsförbättring and a deeper understanding of tactical urbanism.

     

    Through history, the city has been, and continues to be a place where spatial structure divides people, it says a lot about our values, and the symbol of man. To promote practices which allow the citizens to remake the city, is a symbol for the ”right to the city”, but time will tell if that is something tactical urbanism and idéburen stadsförbättring can enable. My hope is that this paper will provide an understanding of what tactical urbanism and idéburen stadsförbättring stands for and inspire for further discussion on how and why we build our cities, what impact it has on the public space, and how new urban guidelines are developed and the importance of a guideline is purpose-based and consentient in municipalities, from politicians to the official.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 209.
    Breyer, Merle
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Owning by doing: In Search of the Urban Commons2013Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    In cities we generally distinguish between public and private space. This thesis tackles the distinction between public and private property and searches for the urban commons where property is determined by collective action and thus creates a greater spatial justice. A case study analyzes the Urban Garden Project “Trädgård på spåret” in Stockholm and shows how unconventional arrangements can generate a lively place in the urban fabric. The final discussion interprets the concept of urban commons and contemplates its classification within the planning discipline.

    Download full text (pdf)
    Master Thesis Merle Breyer
  • 210.
    Brisère, Sophie
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Samverkan mot ökad punktlighet: Analys av TTT (Tillsammans för tåg i tid)2021Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The railway in Sweden has problems with punctuality, which creates additional costs forpassengers, operators and the infrastructure, which is a problem since a single actor cannotsolve alone. It is then required that more actors join forces and collaborate and for thisreason the industry has started a collaboration forum called TTT (Together for trains ontime).

    The purpose of this study is to contribute to an increased understanding of roles andresponsibilities in collaboration forum TTT (Tillsammans för tåg i tid). Collaboration isneeded as a single actor cannot solve various problems by themselves. Collaboration is usedbetween organizations to handle different types of problems and processes.Previous research shows that collaboration in the rail traffic is very important, as there aremany complex systems with several actors involved.

    This study examines how collaboration works in practice by examine the collaborationforum TTT, Tillsammans för tåg i tid. This is done partly through a survey and partlythrough a semi-structured interview.Through analysis of the case study TTT, interview, survey and application of the chosentheoretical framework, this study has increased the understanding of how collaborationworks in practice.The results show that collaboration has generally worked well and that it has beenbeneficial working towards improving punctuality

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 211. Broitman, D.
    et al.
    Kourtit, Karima
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    The New Data Revolution in Regional Science: A Tribute to the Late Stan Czamanski2021In: International regional science review, ISSN 0160-0176, E-ISSN 1552-6925, Vol. 44, no 3-4, p. 323-327Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 212.
    Brokking, Christoffer
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Wind power policy and planning - a comparative study of Sweden and the Netherlands2019Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    As the world try to combat the impacts of climate change governments have taken action by implementing a greater emphasis on renewable energy sources. To facilitate this transition to more sustainable energy sources new policies and planning practises are required. This study has focused on how two countries, Sweden and the Netherlands, work with implementing wind power by exploring what policies they have concerning wind power development, how the planning process work in practise and what challenges they face regarding policies and the planning process. The result of this study has shown that the Netherlands has made large efforts in providing policies and are working towards establishing a new regional body responsible for the transition towards renewable energy sources. Sweden on the other hand, has not made the same commitment to policies and is mostly focused on improving the planning process.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 213.
    Brokking, Peter
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Moving with the Times: An Examination of Ten Years of Dutch Transport Planning2001In: Journal of Environmental Policy and Planning, ISSN 1523-908X, E-ISSN 1522-7200, Vol. 3, no 1, p. 31-42Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    When the Dutch government presented the Second Transport Structure Plan (SW-II) in 1988, it pronounced a new view on transport planning that would give equal weight to accessibility and liveability. Mobility control and selective accessibility were central themes, which would benefit both the environment and economy. A few years later, it became evident that most of the core objectives of the SW-II would not be reached. The professional debate on the implementation of Dutch transport planning indicated a number of explanations for the inadequacy of the national policies, mainly related to the institutional context of public planning, and the lack of coordination between the actors involved. In response to the experiences of the SW-II, the proposed new national transport policy announces better cooperation between the actors in the field of transport planning, and replaces sustainable development with sustainable economy.

  • 214.
    Brokking, Peter
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    The Planning of Regional Transportation Systems in Sweden2006In: TRA - Transport Research Arena Europe 2006 - Proceedings Abstracts, Vägverket , 2006Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Improvement of transport infrastructure networks is generally considered to generate increased productivity. This correla­tion is a common argument in Swedish transportation planning that provides a rationale for investments in regional transportation systems. However, due to a num­ber of limitations in the planning and decision-making process, the development of effective transport infrastructure networks at the regional level is hampered.

     

    In this contribution the findings of a research project on Swedish regional transportation plan­ning are presented, which focuses on an analysis of current planning practise. This analysis is based on an evaluation of the recent planning process of the regional transport infrastructure plan for theKalmarregion. Issues that will be addressed are the disintegrated planning of regional transport systems, the lack of strategic planning in Swedish planning practise and the weak connections with other fields of public planning. The presentation concludes with a set of recom­mendations to improve the planning of regional transportation systems in Sweden.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 215.
    Brokking, Peter
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    García, Marisol
    University of Barcelona, Dept of Sociology.
    Vaiou, Dina
    National Technical University of Athens, Dept of Urban and Regional Planning.
    Vicari Haddock, Serena
    Università degli Studi di Milano-Bicocca, Dept of Sociology and Social Research.
    Housing and neighbourhood: basic needs, governance and social innovation2017In: Social Service Disrupted: Changes, Challenges and Policy Implications for Europe in Times of Austerity / [ed] Flavia Martinelli, Anneli Anttonen and Margitta Mätzke, Edward Elgar Publishing, 2017, p. 342-360Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 216.
    Brokking, Peter
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Liedholm Johnson, Eva
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Real Estate and Construction Management, Real Estate Planning and Land Law.
    Paulsson, Jenny
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Real Estate and Construction Management, Real Estate Planning and Land Law.
    Hållbarhet, regelverk och roller från detaljplan till bygglov2017In: Bostad 2.0: En bostadsmarknad för alla / [ed] Maria Hullgren och Mats Wilhelmsson, Stockholm: Kungliga Tekniska högskolan, 2017, p. 147-157Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 217.
    Brokking, Pieter
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Liedholm Johnson, Eva
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Real Estate and Construction Management, Real Estate Planning and Land Law.
    Paulsson, Jenny
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Real Estate and Construction Management, Real Estate Planning and Land Law.
    Hållbarhet, regelverk och roller från detaljplan till bygglov2020Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    För att främja en omställning mot hållbar stadsutveckling har de flesta kommuner formulerat mål för att minska miljöpåverkan, säkerställa en hållbar hushållning med naturresurser och främja social hållbarhet inom kommunen. Det har resulterat i att hållbarhetsfrågor får en allt mer framträdande plats även i detaljplaner. I dagens planeringspraktik förekommer det dock att flera av de ambitioner och åtgärder som diskuterades i planprocessen inte genomförs och att projektet därmed inte bidrar i samma utsträckning till hållbar stadsutveckling som planerat. Det finns flera möjliga förklaringar till detta som bl.a. kan kopplas till regelverket samt till hur arbetet med plan- och bygglovsdokument organiseras inom kommunen och de olika roller och kompetenser som finns inom organisationen. Det övergripande syftet med forskningsprojektet har varit att undersöka möjligheter och hinder i planerings- och markexploateringsprocessen från detaljplan till bygglov för att främja hållbar stadsutveckling, där vi bland annat har studerat hantering och implementering av sociala, ekonomiska och miljömässiga hållbarhetsambitioner i processen, kontinuiteten mellan de olika skedena och hur kompetensbehovet tillgodoses. För att undersöka detta har vi använt en kombination av metoder föratt samla in information och analysera dagens praxis, såsom litteraturstudier med koppling till regelverket och dokumentstudier av t.ex. planbeskrivningar och kvalitetsprogram, samt fallstudier av några aktuella detaljplaner i fyra kommuner med uttalade hållbarhetsambitioner, inklusive intervjuer med representanter från de aktörer som är involverade i projekten. Fallstudierna visar att kommuner på olika sätt arbetar med att stärka hållbarhetsfrågor i planeringen av nya stadsutvecklingsprojekt. Resultaten visar att kommunerna har tagit upp hållbarhet i olika policydokument, även om det finns skillnader i vilka hållbarhetsfrågor som tas upp och i vilken detaljeringsgrad de behandlas. Dessa policydokument är kommunernas agenda för hållbar stads-utveckling, där en del frågor hanteras i detaljplanen, medan andra frågor hanteras i markanvisnings-tävlingar och -avtal där byggaktörer åtar sig att genomföra åtgärder utifrån kommunernas tävlings-kriterier. Gemensamma seminarier eller byggherredialoger främjar innovation och kompetens-utveckling. Processen visar ett intimt samband mellan målsättning, detaljplanering och förhandlingar mellan kommunen och byggaktörerna. Det är dock viktigt att skapa en löpande dialog om genomförandet av hållbarhetsfrågor eftersom projekten ändras och nya personer kommer in som behöver informeras om tidigare diskussioner. När det gäller kompetensbehovet kan vi konstatera att det upplevts som positivt med arbets- och styrgrupper med blandade yrken och utbildningsbakgrund, liksom kontinuitet och en fortsatt process mellan olika skeden. Vi har även noterat att det finns en bredd av olika diskussions- och mötesformer representerade i de undersökta kommunerna, såsom dialog via workshoppar, seminarieserier, tävling och byggherredialog. Kommunerna försöker inkludera många aktörer redan från början av processen när de äger marken för att skapa ett kollektivt lärande. Studien visar på vikten av kommunalt markägande, vilket gör det möjligt för kommuner att ställa krav genom markanvisning. En aktiv markpolitik kan således vara en bra strategi för kommuner med begränsat markägande, liksom en proaktiv kommunal agenda för hållbar stadsutveckling som ger en grund för kravställning i kommande projekt. Slutligen bidrar en tidig dialog mellan kommuner och byggbolag till en diskussion om möjliga innovationer inom hållbar stadsutveckling och engagemang bland partner. Våra studier har visat att hållbarhetsambitioner spelar en viktig roll i detaljplanering i Sverige och hanteras i gränssnittet mellan kommuner och byggaktörer i seminarier, tävlingar och dialoger samt formaliseras i detaljplaner och genomförandeavtal. För att bredda kunskapen bör framtida forskning fokusera på hur hållbarhetshänsyn kan stärkas ytterligare i detaljplanering.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 218.
    Brokking, Pieter
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Liedholm Johnson, Eva
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Real Estate and Construction Management, Real Estate Planning and Land Law.
    Paulsson, Jenny
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Real Estate and Construction Management, Real Estate Planning and Land Law.
    Implementation Strategies for Sustainable Urban Development: Examples from Swedish practice2020In: Methods and Concepts of Land Management: Diversity, Changes and New Approaches / [ed] Erwin Hepperle, Jenny Paulsson, Vida Maliene, Reinfried Mansberger, Armands Auzins, Jolanta Valciukiene, Zurich: vdf Hochschulverlag AG an der ETH Zürich, 2020, 1, p. 223-234Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 219.
    Brokking, Pieter
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Mörtberg, Ulla
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
    Balfors, Berit
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Sustainability Assessment and Management.
    Municipal Practices for Integrated Planning of Nature-Based Solutions in Urban Development in the Stockholm Region2021In: Sustainability, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 13, no 18, article id 10389Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Urban planning is assumed to play an important role in developing nature-based solutions (NBS). To explore how NBS is addressed in urban development, municipal planning practices are analyzed based on three case studies in the Stockholm region of Sweden. Through focus group discussions, interviews and document studies, the planning and implementation of NBS and their intended contribution to regional green infrastructure (GI) and social and ecological qualities are investigated. The results show that the planning and design of urban green spaces engages the local community. Moreover, different conceptual frameworks are used to strengthen an ecological perspective and nurture expected outcomes, in particular ecosystem services and GI. Through competence development and collaborative approaches, the co-creation of innovative solutions for public and private green spaces is promoted. However, institutional conditions, e.g., legal frameworks and landownership shape the planning process and can challenge the ability to enhance social and ecological qualities. An assessment of the planning processes indicates a strong focus on ecosystem services and local GI, while the potential to contribute to regional GI differs widely between cases. The study concludes that a knowledge-driven and integrative planning process can foster the potential of NBS for green and sustainable cities.

  • 220. Broms Wessel, Ola
    et al.
    Tunstöm, MoaÖrebro University.Bradley, KarinKTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Bor vi i samma stad?: Om stadsutveckling, mångfald och rättvisa2005Collection (editor) (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Stadsplanering har blivit en het fråga. I Sverige brottas vi med ökande etnisk och social segregation, innerstäder som blir allt mer exklusiva och museiliknande samtidigt som många förorter åsidosätts. Småstäder avfolkas, industriområden blir till företagsparker eller exklusiva bostadsområden. Trots ambitioner om en ökad miljöhänsyn ökar energianvändning och transporter.

    I Bor vi i samma stad? presenterar forskare, stadsplanerare och arkitekter sina perspektiv på livet i staden. En nyckelfråga är hur en framtida stadsutveckling ska kunna främja både mångfald och social rättvisa – inom såväl som mellan städer.

    I boken görs nedslag i holländska förorter, i byggbolags säljstrategier, i dansk stadsbyggnad och i EU:s retorik om konkurrenskraftiga städer. Vidare diskuteras städernas utglesning, mediebilder av svenska miljonprogramsförorter, vad 1800-talsstadens renässans står för och den nya medelklassens drömmar om stadsliv.

    Download (pdf)
    Bor vi i samma stad flyer
  • 221. Brouwer, A. E.
    et al.
    Westlund, Hans
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Smit, M.
    Perspectives on the dynamics of third spaces2022In: The COVID-19 Pandemic and the Future of Working Spaces, Informa UK Limited , 2022, p. 200-212Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 222.
    Buhr, Katarina
    et al.
    IVL Swedish Environmental Research Institute.
    Isaksson, Karolina
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Hagbert, Pernilla
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Local Interpretations of Degrowth—Actors, Arenas and Attempts to Influence Policy2018In: Sustainability, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 10, no 6, p. 1899-, article id 1899Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    During the last decade, degrowth has developed into a central research theme within sustainability science. A significant proportion of previous works on degrowth has focused on macro-level units of analysis, such as global or national economies. Less is known about local interpretations of degrowth. This study explored interpretations of growth and degrowth in a local setting and attempts to integrate degrowth ideas into local policy. The work was carried out as a qualitative single-case study of the small town of Alingsås, Sweden. The results revealed two different, yet interrelated, local growth discourses in Alingsås: one relating to population growth and one relating to economic growth. Individuals participating in the degrowth discourse tend to have a sustainability-related profession and/or background in civil society. Arenas for local degrowth discussions are few and temporary and, despite some signs of influence, degrowth-related ideas have not had any significant overall impact on local policy and planning. In practice, degrowth-interested individuals tend to adjust their arguments to the mainstream sustainability discourse and turn to arenas beyond the formal municipal organization when discussing transformative ideas about development, progress, and quality of life. Based on these findings, the conditions for a further integration of degrowth into local policy and planning are discussed. Suggested themes for further research are institutional change and the role of local politicians.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 223.
    Bull Sletholt, Kristine
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Berg Henriksen, Maria
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Planning for Sustainable Urban Freight Transport: A Comparative Study of Measures to Reduce Carbon Emissions from Last Mile Transport in Oslo and Stockholm2019Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    There is a need to reduce global carbon emissions in order to limit climate change, especially from the transport sector, as it contributes to a large share of these emissions. This thesis explores carbon emissions from urban freight transport in Oslo, Norway, and Stockholm, Sweden, and the measures and strategies that have been implemented in accordance with the municipalities’ targets. In addition, the involvement of relevant freight transport companies in these issues has been investigated, as well as the challenges and possibilities related to reducing carbon emissions from urban freight transport. Both municipalities have expressed ambitions to adhere to the European Union’s goals of emission reduction. However, based on the observations of this thesis, it is evident that the municipalities have yet to adequately implement impactful measures for urban freight transport, in order to reduce carbon emissions from this sector if they are to achieve their goals. The results show that that Oslo municipality has access to a substantial amount of data and statistics regarding urban freight transport, but is lacking a comprehensive freight plan. Stockholm municipality, on the other hand, has an urban freight transport plan, but is lacking comprehensive data and statistics about urban freight transport. The focus on - and inclusion of - urban freight transport in comprehensive urban planning could be argued to be increasing, but we contend that there is still a need to increase knowledge and understanding regarding emission reduction for urban freight transport across departments and cities, in order to reach a more sustainable future for urban freight transport.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 224.
    Burrieza Galán, Javier
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Participatory cycling planning: challenges and strategies: The cases of Stockholm and Madrid2018Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Cities develop cycling plans as a tool to promote urban sustainable mobility. These plans are usually open to the participation of current cyclists. In some cases, an intense debate among them arises. Part of them defend the integration of cyclists in a calmer urban traffic, while others prefer dedicated cycling infrastructure separated from motor vehicles. This debate is often framed in terms of what would be more valuable for potential cyclists. Taking this blocking debate as motivation, this thesis explores the cycling planning network of stakeholders generated by participatory planning initiatives. Two study cases with different observed intensities of the described debate, Stockholm and Madrid, are analyzed. The project identifies the stakeholders engaged in cycling planning, both from institutions and civil society; makes a characterization of their relations; and studies the claims they make in relation to the interests of potential cyclists. The research is based in snowball sampling, interviews, questionnaires and social media data mining. The resultant networks combine a set of institutions embedded in a multilevel cycling governance landscape with a set of civil society entities, many characterized by organizational informality partly due to the emergence of virtual communities among them. Accordingly,informal channels of participation are very relevant. The analyzed debate produces tensions, but these are transient frictions grounded in two coexistent systems of meaning rather than permanent antagonism. This is consistent with agonist planning theories. In regard of these challenges, two strategic approaches to the design of participatory cycling planning are suggested: disaggregated stakeholder analysis, in order to reach all the diversity of stakeholders; and bigrelational data analysis, in order to have a first approximation to the particularities of any cycling planning network.

    Download full text (pdf)
    Master_Thesis_Javier_Burrieza_Galan
  • 225. Burton, Kerry
    et al.
    Karvonen, Andrew
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Caprotti, Federico
    Department of Geography, University of Exeter, United Kingdom.
    Smart goes green: digitalising environmental agendas in Bristol and Manchester2019In: Inside Smart Cities: Place, Politics and Urban Innovation / [ed] A. Karvonen, F Cugurullo and F. Caprotti, London: Routledge, 2019, p. 117-132Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Bristol and Manchester are at the forefront of the UK smart urbanization agenda, serving as ‘lighthouse’ cities to realise ambitions for city-scale low carbon economies. This chapter uses a comparative approach to the two cities to reveal the similarities in approach as well as the local factors (notably infrastructure and cultural politics) that influence the distinct environmental mobilisations of smart. Bristol has a long history of green innovation and has ambitions to build upon its 2015 designation as European Green Capital to become a leading international ‘smart-green city’. Bristol’s idealised smart-green city is human-centred and able to realise low carbon growth that is equitable for all. Conversely, the Greater Manchester storyline on smart is strongly focused on economic development with environmental protection as a by-product of business innovation. The campuses of two Manchester universities play a central role as testbeds to catalyse a twenty-first century knowledge economy that builds upon the existing economic cornerstones of the city. The Manchester activities have little focus on social equity and inclusion and instead focus on business opportunity as the prime motivation for smart-green urbanisation. The smart-green performances in each city embody particular logics and practices that are at once global in their perspective while simultaneously local in their composition and framing. Bristol and Manchester reveal distinctive pathways of smart urban innovation that are neither top-down nor bottom-up but instead combine principles of IT development with decarbonisation to enhance and extend the existing urban development trajectories of each city.

  • 226.
    Byskén, Nicole
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Stener, Elsa
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Samverkan för en socialt hållbar stadsutveckling: Aktörers upplevelser av planeringsprocessen i stadsutvecklingsprojekt med fokus på social hållbarhet2017Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    It is becoming increasingly common for public and private actors to collaborate in urban development projects to promote sustainable development. The social dimension of the concept of sustainability has recently gained greater acknowledgement in urban planning, where collaboration is seen as an important element in creating socially sustainable areas. This degree project intends to investigate how public and private actors collaborate in urban development projects to promote social sustainability. The purpose of the study is to provide with knowledge about opportunities and challenges with collaboration in the work of creating a socially sustainable urban development. This is investigated in a case study of the ongoing planning process of the project Odde. The plan is to construct approximately 2000 dwellings in the district of Kista, Stockholm. Odde is a pilot project for social sustainability where the City of Stockholm and the developer Skanska and Areim, are collaborating in the process of developing a detailed development plan for the area. The study intends to explore the following research questions: how do actors work with social sustainability in a collaborative process? and; what opportunities and challenges can be identified for collaboration between public and private actors in the work of creating a socially sustainable urban development? The empirical material is based on interviews with actors involved in the project as well as studies of working material from the project Odde.

    The results of the study indicate that working with social sustainability in a collaborative process is considered rewarding but challenging. The two main actors desire to promote social sustainability, and experience that collaboration can assist achieving the holistic approach needed for social sustainability. However, it may be a time-consuming process to reach a shared view of how to collaborate in practice for social sustainability. The study shows that this can be explained by the fact that social sustainability is an abstract concept, and thus difficult to measure. This complicates the division of responsibilities needed to realize the suggested measures. Three themes has been identified in the Odde project that have proven to be important components in creating favourable conditions for finding a collaborative planning process around social sustainability. These are; social sustainability as a process, social sustainability as a goal and finally a common understanding of social sustainability. A great potential can be distinguished in public and private collaboration to promote social sustainability in urban developments. 

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 227.
    Bäcklund, Anna
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Philosophical perspectives on sustainable development with a focus on the urban poor2014Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The study discusses sustainable development related to the urban poor in informal settlements. It includes also a case study of how the Municipality of Taboão da Serra, a city in the periphery area to SaoPaulo, work for upgrading the favelas. It discusses issues such as which strategies for slum upgrading that are used and which philosophical theories the upgrading projects are related to.

    The study is based on literature studies and a two and a half month long field study at the municipal office at Taboão da Serra. During the field studies, a number of interviews and informal conversationswere held. Also visits to favelas and participation observations were made.

    The municipality has many projects aimed at upgrading the favelas. Many measures are about a better infrastructure and physical environment, for example waste management, land regularization andbetter roads. There are also measures both at municipal and national level to promote primary education. The municipality also runs programs to reduce unemployment. The upgrading projects have connectionsto both different kinds of utilitarianism and Rawls theory of justice.

    Download full text (pdf)
    Philosophical perspectives on sustainable development with a focus on the urban poor
  • 228.
    Bäckström, Klara
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Tensions and Synergies Between Tactical Urbanism and Social Sustainability: A Case Study of the Sunset Triangle Plaza2018Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    For the past several years, the term social sustainability has gained a strong foothold within urban studies and has become a pervasive and trendy term that seems to be on everyone’s lips. Public space is widely acknowledged as an important urban feature, often in association with the social sustainability. As cities around the world are experiencing rapid population growth, creating meaningful and enjoyable public spaces is more important than ever.

    The heightened interest in social sustainability, public spaces and placemaking (as a physical manifestation of social sustainability) has led to the emergence of several urban intervention movements, such as Tactical Urbanism. In 2012, for the first time in Los Angeles’ history, this tactic was used to transform a car trafficked street in Silver Lake into a pedestrian friendly public space: the Sunset Triangle Plaza. The aim of this thesis is to, by studying the use and function of the plaza after the conversion, highlight how a broad concept such as social sustainability can be understood from a relatively small-scale public space intervention.

    The case study was conducted during the spring and summer of 2018, using a variety of data sources including interviews and observations of the plaza during February and March 2018. Two interviews were conducted with managers of the businesses directly adjacent to the plaza. Moreover, street surveys were conducted on two different occasions to ask the public about their use and opinions about the plaza. The results from the case study are presented to illustrate the real-life experience of the theories about social sustainability, public space and a discussion regarding “Whose Public Space?”, when applied at a local context. The findings were then further divided into three categories: usage (what type of activities did the installation enable?), users (for whom were they enabled?) and change (indicators of how the site has changed), reflecting the notions of Tactical Urbanism.

    While certain changes have been merely “tactical”, others were more substantial; businesses flourished, traffic safety increased, the space has become a meeting place and therefore, it has now got an identity. Immediate change was evident in the process of the physical change when the plaza was constructed, but what has also followed is a continuous change. Even though the plaza with its painted dots may not look like much, a new space for engagement and interaction has been created, both physically and mentally. In addition, converting a street for the cars into a plaza dedicated to pedestrians is especially symbolic in a city like Los Angeles, where the automobile has been the predominant mean of transport for the last 60 years and instrumental in shaping the city’s layout. However, the case study also showed that it is one thing to launch a Tactical Urbanism initiative and another thing to maintain it and achieve long-term social changes.

    The examined concepts and models to evaluate whether a public space can be considered successful are not always useful. The Sunset Triangle Plaza has certainly changed, but it has implied a continuous change – for better and for worse. Thus, this study also shows that it is evident that the idea of the “organically emerged” city can imply both opportunities and limitations.

    Download full text (pdf)
    Tensions and Synergies Between Tactical Urbanism and Social Sustainability
  • 229.
    Bäckström, Klara
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Tensions and Synergies Between Tactical Urbanism and Social Sustainability: A Case Study of the Sunset Triangle Plaza2018Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    For the past several years, the term ‘social sustainability’ has gained a strong foothold within urban studies and has now become a pervasive and trendy term that seems to be on everyone’s lips. ‘Public space’ is widely acknowledged as an important urban feature, often in association with the term ‘social sustainability’, and as cities around the world are experiencing rapid population growth, creating meaningful and enjoyable public spaces is more important than ever. The heightened interest in social sustainability, public spaces and placemaking as a physical manifestation of social sustainability, has lead to the emergence of several urban intervention movements, such as Tactical Urbanism. In 2012, for the first time in Los Angeles’ history, this approach was used to turn a car trafficked street in Silver Lake into a pedestrian friendly public space: the Sunset Triangle Plaza. The aim of this thesis is to study the use and function of the plaza after this Tactical Urbanism intervention to highlight how a broad concept such as social sustainability can be understood from a relatively small-scale public space intervention.

    The case study was conducted during the spring and summer of 2018, using a variety of data sources including interviews and observations of the plaza during February and March 2018. Two interviews were conducted with managers of businesses directly adjacent to the plaza. Moreover, street surveys were conducted on two different occasions to ask the general public about their use of the plaza. The results illustrate the real life experience of the theories about social sustainability, public space and “whose public space?” when applied to the Sunset Triangle Plaza, and is further divided into three categories: usage (which activities were enabled due to the installation?), users (for whom?) and change (indicators of how the site has changed), reflecting the notions of Tactical Urbanism.

    It became evident that while certain changes have been merely “tactical”, others were more substantial; businesses flourished, traffic safety increased, and the space got an identity and became a meeting place for the community. Immediate change was evident in the process of the actual, physical change when the plaza was constructed, but what has also followed is a constant chain of change. Even though the plaza with its painted dots may not look like much, a new space for engagement and interaction has been created, both physically and mentally. In addition, converting a street for the cars into a plaza dedicated to pedestrians is especially symbolic in Los Angeles, a city where the automobile has been the predominant mean of transport for the last 60 years and instrumental in shaping its city layout. However, the case study also showed that it is one thing to start a Tactical Urbanism initiative and provide fun activities, and another thing to maintain it.

    This study has shown that the examined concepts and the models are not always useful; the space has changed but it is a continuous change – for better and for worse. It is evident that the idea of the “organically emerged” city can be both an opportunity and a difficulty.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 230.
    Börjesson Ballesteros, Silvia
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Exploring Urban Rainwater Harvesting in the city of Madrid applying GIS based MCDA expert tools2022Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Due to climate change, water resources’ scarcity and distribution variability have generated a growing interest in sustainable water management in recent years. In addition, the growing interest in implementing nature-based solutions for urban resilience leads to the development of decentralized water supply systems such as rainwater harvesting systems (RWHS) as a complementary resource to conventional centralized water supply systems. The study is motivated by the climatic risks that the city of Madrid is subject to face in the upcoming years such as pronounced summer droughts and urban heat waves, leading to the reduction of water resources availability. This study aims to use Multi-criteria decision analysis and Geographic Information systems as tools for locating optimal space for the installation of pond harvesting systems (PHS) in Madrid for water recollection for non-potable purposes in the city.

    Attaining this aim, two objectives were set. Firstly, to evaluate and select the most relevant criteria for the installation of PHS and secondly, to generate a map of the most suitable locations for installation of PHS in the city of Madrid through a proposed GIS-MCDA methodology and a complimentary evaluation for each possible solution, to obtain a global vision of the applicability of PHS in Madrid. Through the first objective, several criteria were set for PHS installation, namely: distance to the river, rainfall, slope, soil characteristics, and land use. These criteria were applied to Madrid through a GIS-MCDA methodology, using these two tools’ synergy to obtain a suitability map for PHS installation. Two criteria weightings will be performed to evaluate the model’s robustness by modifying the criteria’ weights resulting in two different suitability scenarios. The discussion will analyze the results obtained considering the two scenarios and propose the most suitable location clusters identified. Finally, the conclusion will reflect the study’s most important findings and open the door to further research on the topic, such as the design, operation infrastructure, drainage logistics distribution, and other modifications in Madrid’s current water management system.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 231.
    Bürgi, Julia
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    The inclusion and exclusion of Somali communities as seen through the publicness of space in Nairobi and Stockholm2018Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The neighborhoods of Eastleigh in Nairobi, Kenya and Rinkeby in Stockholm, Sweden are both home to Somali populations that have burgeoned over the last 25 years. While situated in vastly different urban contexts, the Somali communities in each location have needs related to public space, particularly when considering their status in both places as a minority group that is often marginalized by Kenyan and Swedish societies. By examining the experiences of each of these two communities in public space and the level of publicness they experience, we can see how the Somali community can be made to feel included or excluded within each city. Using Setha Low’s framework of categorical activities that contribute to a flourishing society, the publicness of spaces in each location is investigated. In addition, the study explores the ways in which publicness is under threat in both places through the means of technologies of control. The resistance to such technologies is argued as symbolic of the fight for inclusion within Kenyan and Swedish society.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 232.
    Cai, Zhichang
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Ecology.
    Yin, Ying
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Wennersten, Ronald
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Ecology.
    From Energy Efficiency to Integrated Sustainability in Housing Development in China: A Case study in a hot-summer / cold-winter zone in China2013In: Journal of Housing and the Built Environment, ISSN 1566-4910, E-ISSN 1573-7772, Vol. 28, no 2, p. 329-344Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    China has introduced a series of policies and laws to promote green building since 2000. Energy efficiency is the central issue, partly due to China’s energy structure. As advocated by these policies and laws, more and more green buildings are being built. The overall aim of this paper is to explore a more sustainable framework for green residential buildings, from energy efficiency to integrated sustainability. A critical case study is presented of the Landsea Housing Project in Nanjing, a hot-summer/cold-winter zone. The analysis suggests applying a systematic approach—covering all aspects of green housing development, including technical, economic, social and environmental—in China, arguing that this is a more effective way to meet the sustainability goals.

  • 233. Caldenby, C.
    et al.
    Hagbert, Pernilla
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Wasshede, C.
    The social logic of space: Community and detachment2019In: Contemporary Co-housing in Europe: Towards Sustainable Cities?, Taylor and Francis Inc. , 2019, p. 163-182Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 234.
    Callmer, Åsa
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Making sense of sufficiency: Entries, practices and politics2019Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The affluent groups and societies in the world have made material consumption part of their lifestyle. Today, overconsumption has come to constitute an acute environmental problem, both with regards to the natural resources needed to satisfy our ever-growing wants, and to the mountains of waste it leaves behind.

    Starting from a global justice perspective and from an understanding of sustainability as keeping within the planetary boundaries, this thesis argues that it is urgent that affluent individuals, groups and societies develop a sense of sufficiency, of “good and enough”. Focusing on sufficiency in the area of material consumption, this thesis explores paths that could be taken to strengthen sufficiency as an idea and value within a consumerist society and culture, and aims to answer the overarching question of how an affluent society might orient itself towards sufficiency. Against the background framework of political ecology, relational geography and sustainable consumption literature, sufficiency is framed as a question of responsibility – the responsibility of the affluent individuals, groups and societies in the world to refrain from taking more than their fair share, or, in other words, to withdraw from their excess environmental space.

    Two cases of sufficiency-related practice in Sweden are studied: one of individuals who actively and voluntarily reduce their consumption to only the basics over the period of one year, and one of individuals using the ‘’KonMari Method’’ to declutter their homes. The thesis shows that the difference between these practices in regard to consumption is a question of intentionality: The buy-nothing practitioners intentionally want to stop consuming, whereas the majority of the KonMariers – as a result of their practice – eventually cease to want to consume, despite the absence of this as an original driver. These results point to the importance of looking at different kinds of entry into more sufficient consumption practices, and at the motivations behind them when it comes to policies aimed at reducing material consumption. The findings further serve to create an understanding for how a sense of sufficiency might develop in an affluent context.

    Based on literature discussing a framework for a politics of sufficiency and on interviews with public officials and civil society representatives working with sustainable consumption at different levels in Sweden, this thesis further explores the obstacles to and potential for orienting an affluent society towards sufficiency. Certain potential for a more sufficiency-oriented future is identified, not least in terms of a cultural shift and elements of “sufficiency thinking” among the informants. However, the thesis stresses the importance of rethinking our understanding of limits, being outspoken about what the existence of planetary boundaries implies in terms of limiting resource use and defining clear goals that respect those boundaries and emphasize societal values at the basis of ‘the good life’, such as well-being, health and ecological sustainability.

    Download full text (pdf)
    Making sense of sufficiency_Åsa Callmer
  • 235. Camagni, R.
    et al.
    Cheshire, P.
    De Gaudemar, J. P.
    Hall, P.
    Rodwin, L.
    Snickars, Folke
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Europe's regional-urban futures: Conclusions, inferences and surmises2017In: Industrial Change and Regional Economic Transformation: The Experience of Western Europe, Taylor & Francis, 2017, p. 301-316Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter focuses on two speculative issues: the broad implications for regional and urban areas of the development of the European Community in the context of an internationalizing economy and an informational revolution. An interlocking set of influences is likely to shape national and regional economies as a consequence of the completion of the single European market. Backward areas and old industrial regions, and notably the urban areas, have particular dangers and risks in prospect from the single European market. This may be even more so than for European regions that are outside the European Community competitive environment. A vital role will be played by the rapid integration of the European economy after 1992. The astonishing, and probably least predictable, element for the 1990s will be the totally unexpected transformation of the planned economies of Eastern Europe and the speed and character of their incorporation into the European and global economy.

  • 236.
    Cameron, Samuel Owen
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Activating Vancover's Laneways: Re: Imagining the Downtown Eastsides Under-Utilised Public Spaces2013Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    As a departure point for this thesis project, I retain a duality of presuppositions. The first maintains that the city of Vancouver’s laneways have long existed as under-utilised and under-appreciated, in-between spaces; hidden in plain site (Loukaitou-Sideris 1996), often deteriorating and habitually prevailing in a dilapidated state of disrepair. The second notion asserts that - despite their current materiality - these spaces inherently retain innumerable potentialities for re-imagination and activation.

    Accordingly, much of the discussion is based on the role of spatial imaginaries and their impact on how we both interact with, and are affected by, the physical environment. Principal to the appropriation of this concept is the idea that there exists a two-way process. Essentially, how we imagine a space, generates the conditions upon which we act towards, and consequently, interact with, said space. Counteractively, it also considers the role of the physical environment as a determinant in the emergence of spatial imaginaries.

    The primary aims of this analysis are to better comprehend the processes which have created and continue to influence the physical composition(s) of the laneways, as we both see and experience them today. Once mindful of these processes, the projects resolve is to offer a series of recommendations which can conceivably culminate in both the expeditious and long-term activation of these spaces.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 237.
    Candan, Canan
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    How can urban policies address urban agriculture?: The case of Diyarbakir, Turkey2013Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Urban agriculture, livelihood framework, urban regeneration, planning paradigms, informal settlements, Turkey

    The study aims to investigate the role of planning policies on integrating urban agriculture in Diyarbakir, Turkey. It is conducted through a case study in the city of Diyarbakir where urban poverty is highly concentrated. In the study urban agriculture activities pursued in Sur - the informal settlement area undergoing an urban regeneration project - their characteristics, perspectives and actions of policy makers towards urban agriculture in that area, are explored.

    During the field trip, agriculture was observed as a widespread activity in Sur where various forms of urban agriculture coexist. The study showed that there were several factors for urban agriculture to flourish such as access to resources and individual or cultural motivation. Above all, policies have a major role in enabling its potential. Up until now, agricultural activities in Sur received encouraging, passive or punitive reactions from the municipality based upon its aim, location, product, scale and hygiene. Urban regeneration project can also create concerns about the future of urban farmers there.

    Main challenges in front of urban agriculture in the case of Diyarbakir are its non-recognition by central policies and the reluctance of local authorities to include it in a ‘modern’ image of Diyarbakir. The issue is to make local authorities aware about the use of urban agriculture as an important livelihood method and to integrate it in local planning agenda which is largely dominated by a strong state character and centralized planning mechanism

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 238.
    Cao, Bo
    et al.
    Xidian Univ, Sch Humanities, Xian 710071, Peoples R China.;Shaanxi Coll Commun Technol, Xian 710028, Peoples R China..
    Shahraki, Abdol Aziz
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Planning of Transportation Infrastructure Networks for Sustainable Development with Case Studies in Chabahar2023In: Sustainability, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 15, no 6, article id 5154Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article addresses the problem of increasing transport services that intercontinental corridors demand from the urban infrastructure networks along their routes. Yet, attention has not been paid to the coordination between the transportation potentials of a city infrastructure network located on the path of an intercontinental corridor and the sustainable application of the corridor itself. This article discusses solving this problem by increasing the transportation capacities of the cities on the path of the corridor. With field studies in Chabahar, we observe the situation of its transportation infrastructure network to discover shortcomings and suggest required changes. This paper recommends the necessary changes and improvements in the urban transportation system of Chabahar to have a sustainable intercontinental corridor and an effective urban infrastructure network simultaneously. The research methods used include observation of traffic flow and behavior in travel origins, destinations, and paths in Chabahar. Then, this study builds a mathematical model with a graph technique to calculate the traffic capacities on the nodes and streets and determine places that require changes. Analyses show that 13,420 cars enter just the center of Chabahar city due to the increasing pressure of the Chabahar-Milak corridor. This paper recommends a multi-modal transportation system with an urban public transport network. It also suggests physical and geometric corrections in sight distances and longitudinal curves of streets, sidewalks, and squares. We find urban transportation failures in the city and present a comprehensive transportation plan for its improvement. This model is applicable in all cities on the route of corridors and assists their sustainable function and urban transport system simultaneously.

  • 239. Caragliu, Andrea
    et al.
    Del Bo, Chiara F.
    Kourtit, Karima
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Nijkamp, Peter
    The winner takes it all: forward-looking cities and urban innovation2016In: The annals of regional science, ISSN 0570-1864, E-ISSN 1432-0592, Vol. 56, no 3, p. 617-645Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper offers a new perspective on urban innovation and enters the debate on the contribution of non-material growth-enhancing factors to the socio-economic performance of cities. Because of the often widespread availability of "hard" production factors, most cities increasingly compete for attracting non-material production factors whose role, in light of the more widespread diffusion of physical production factors, may ultimately determine their long-run economic success. Against this background, our paper focuses on a relatively neglected non-material factor, viz. urban risk attitude. In fact, cities offer the competitive and challenging environment where individual characteristics of actors may enjoy their highest returns; risk-loving and innovative individuals may sort in large urban agglomerations. The paper tests whether cities attracting such individuals and, thus, enjoying a more positive and open attitude towards risk, tend to innovate more. The empirical analysis of the paper is based on the most recent (2008/2009) wave of the European Values Study. Micro- data on about 80,000 individuals located in different EU urban areas are used to calculate city-specific attitudes towards risk that go beyond individual characteristics. This city-level risk attitude variable is then used within a knowledge production function approach, as an explanatory variable for urban innovation (patent applications to the European Patent Office) along with more traditional knowledge determinants (human capital and R&D expenditures). Our empirical results show that cities with a more open and positive attitude towards risk ceteris paribus also tend to be more innovative. In addition, we find that, unlike traditional knowledge production factors, this factor faces no decreasing returns. While further research might be beneficial in order to more precisely pinpoint the extent of such effects, our findings appear to be robust and suggest a positive role for the urban attitude towards risky endeavours in explaining urban innovation.

  • 240.
    Carlefalk, Therese
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Cykelplanera: problem, metoder ch tips2011Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 241.
    Carlsbrand, Gustav
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Gestaltningsprogram: -en undersökning om gestaltningsprogrammets inverkan på effektiviteten i detaljplaneprocessen2016Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 242.
    Carlson, Douglas
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Mapping Public Participation in Sweden: An overview of the individual's voice in the planning process2017Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Public participation in Sweden is something that has grown fourth after the democratisation of the planning process in urban and regional planning. The goal was to strengthen the sustainability of the projects while inviting the concerned to directly influence and discuss the needs and solutions that arise during exploitation. Three areas are examined to create an understanding of how public participation looks like today. The representations of these areas are Boverket and SKL for the public sector, Arkus for the research community and PLAN for the professional forums. There is a general consensus on what public participation is today as well as what problems it faces, with some differing aspects. An imbalance in representation of different social groups where some create a stronger voice and influence than others affect the decision-making, based on lacking resources, apathy concerning the subject or project in question or even existing prejudice. This, in combination with what is considered to be insufficient information and difficult communication in general, leads to misunderstandings and a more arduous planning process. Some point to that the legislature needs additional streamlining and centralisation of decision-making structure while others point to greater dialogue outside existing public hearings with a permanent and continuously updated platform outside the legislature. Modernisation of the general means and technology used in the dialogue seem like the next step and further research should be made on this to determine its effect on public participation and its development.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 243.
    Carlson, Douglas
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Out-of-Character: Current and Potential Use of 'Character' in the Development of Swedish Urban Areas2019Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Character is a term used in urban development and research to describe aspects of the built environment ranging from aesthetics and design to place identity and sense of place. This wide range of interpretations has led to a vague understanding that differs depending on the perception of users and actors in urban development. In the face of increasing housing demands and incentives to expand, Swedish urban environment has begun expansion that mirrors that of the Million Programme. To avoid a detached environment, character is investigated and proposed to be used as a tool for municipalities in the development. The focus is on answering what ‘character’ is perceived as by municipal officials involved in the urban development process, how character should be used and lastly how character should be approached when developing existing areas. Based on interviews for a practical understanding, literature for a theoretical understanding and contemporary studies for a contextual understanding, character is found to be perceived as the connection between not only existing buildings but also new ones as well as the users themselves. With emphasis on cohesion, originality, traditionality, diversity among other attributes, the character of an area should act as a binding agent for urban development moving forward. Finally, the approach to character is recommended to be cautious based on its vague nature but be treated as exploratory where a base set of two foundational attributes are to invite discussion to bridge the perceptions between actors.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 244.
    Carlsson, Alice
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Förutsättningar för en platsbaserad barnkonsekvensanalys: Material och utveckling av ny metod i Håbo kommuns planeringsarbete för att möta barnkonventionen2022Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Since the Convention on the Rights of the Child has become Swedish law, higher demands have been placed on municipalities to include children and work for the best interests of children in decisions. From a planning perspective, it has been unclear what it means for the planning process. In order for the Convention on the Rights of the Child to be fulfilled, it is important to separate the concepts of children's perspectives and child perspective, as the first mentioned works to plan with the child and the second mentioned works for the child. This study is based on Håbo municipality and examines the municipality's conditions and challenges to be able to create a new method, a so-called place-based child impact assessment. A method the municipality can use in future planning work to be able to effectively include children. Some of the conclusions and points that should be included in a place-based child impact assessment include; the National Board of Housing, Building and Planning's recommendations for including children, play value factor and the convention on the right of the child.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 245.
    Carreira Chau, Christopher
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    COVID-19 and the Transportation System Response: Lessons for the Post-Pandemic World2020Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The COVID-19 coronavirus disease has unexpectedly changed the way we travel in our cities. With urban transportation remaining an essential service, governments, agencies and organizations are being challenged to develop and implement changes that accommodate for the changing levels of travel demand, the shifts in mode of travel, and the promotion of physical/social distancing to limit the spread of the virus. Travel behaviours of the public have also changed during this time, favouring more physically distant options such as cycling, ridesharing and other new mobility solutions, and the automobile where available, rather than public transportation options.

    What can cities learn from the different response measures during this crisis, and how does the current shift in urban transportation needs help inform future urban transportation planning, promoting more space and potentially shifting to more sustainable and active modes of transportation? Using case studies to outline the various levels of response measures to the transportation system being implemented in select cities in North America, Europe, and Asia, this highlights the varied overall approaches and generates a toolbox of interventions for the urban transportation sector.

    Various cities have implemented measures such as mandatory face coverings and temperature checks on public transport, promoting and providing easier access to bike share and other new mobility programs, adjusting and reallocating space on public roadways to cyclists and pedestrians in an effort to promote physical distancing, among many others. While intended as initial emergency responses, measures from such a toolbox have opportunities to become further developed to long-term programs that can be aimed at shifting attitudes towards urban transportation, encouraging alternate or more active ways of movement, and reallocating space within the public realm for people.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 246.
    Cars, Goran
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Planerings- och beslutsprocesser för regional utveckling2008In: Stadsregioners utvecklingskraft: Trender och nya perspektiv / [ed] Göran Cars, Carl-Johan Engström, Stockholm: KTH Royal Institute of Technology, 2008Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 247.
    Cars, Göran
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Environmental concerns in Swedish Infrastructure Planning2009In: Journal of Nordregio, ISSN 1650-5891, Vol. 9, no 4Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 248.
    Cars, Göran
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Governance and Social Capital as Tool for Neighbourhood Regeneration2009In: Urban Sustainability and Governance / [ed] Arild Holt Jensen & Eric Polloc, New York: Nova Science Publishers Inc. , 2009Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 249.
    Cars, Göran
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Housing Policies, Path Dependencies and Present Challenges2009In: Urban Sustainability and Governance / [ed] Arild Holt Jensen & Eric Polloc, New York: Nova Science Publishers Inc. , 2009Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 250.
    Cars, Göran
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Kultur, Turism och Stadsattraktivitet: Kultur som attraktion och värdeskapare2006Book (Other academic)
2345678 201 - 250 of 1939
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf