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  • 201.
    Hagman, Lars Arne
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Ritzén, Sofia
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Johansson, J.
    The use and implementation of CAD in the Swedish furniture industry2006In:  Forest Products Society 58th Annual Meeting, Bangkok, Thailand, 2004, 2006, Vol. 56, no 1, p. 73-81Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper reports the results of and conclusions drawn from a questionnaire survey concerning the use and implementation of computer-aided design (CAD) in the Swedish furniture industry. The main question areas were how far the Swedish furniture industry has progressed in the use of CAD in product development, and how implementation has been performed. It was regarded as important to find out what impacts implementation has on the usage of CAD and whether companies in the furniture industry think the use of CAD could improve their product development. More than half of all product-developing companies in the Swedish furniture industry are using CAD today, and an increasing number of companies are implementing it. The furniture industry has come rather far in the use of CAD, but it could be better at implementing the systems in a proper manner. This could be related to companies often not planning their implementation; accordingly, they do not examine issues like organizational needs and goals, what the tool might be used for, and the resources required. The study found that the following factors are involved in successful implementation: management support, realistic budgeting, selection of system, and effective, company-specific training. Most CAD users are satisfied with their system and think that it fulfills their needs. Many of the difficulties referred to by respondents can be related to the implementation phase, and they could be avoided. In general, the furniture industry considers that CAD improves their product development work.

  • 202.
    Hamano, Masafumi
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development. The University of Tokyo.
    Arekrans, Johan
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Ölundh Sandström, Gunilla
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Toward Circular Economy Implementation: A Tool for Integrating Circularity Indicators into Portfolio Management2020In: Electronics Goes Green 2020+: The Story of Daisy, Alexa and Greta, 2020Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    One of the barriers for companies to implement circular economy (CE) principles is creating a portfolio of CE projects. Circularity indicators can evaluate circularity for managing products in circularity perspective. However, existing circularity indicators are either lacking a holistic facet of CE or too complicated for practical usage, which could be barriers for practitioners to manage a CE project portfolio. The aim of this study is to develop a highly intelligible CE portfolio management tool to visualize circularity calculated by circularity indicators with holistic criteria. The CE portfolio mapping tool was built through semi-structured interviews with a case company, identifying three main requirements for general CE portfolio management tools and revealing four contributions of the developed tool. This study contributes to integrating practitioner view into the research context of circularity indicators and taking first step toward further research in CE portfolio management.

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  • 203.
    Hansmann, Ralph
    et al.
    ETH Zurich - Swiss Federal Institute ofTechnology.
    Laurenti, Rafael
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development. EPFL Ecole Polytechnique f?ed?erale de Lausanne.
    Tarik, Mehdi
    EPFL Ecole Polytechnique f?ed?erale de Lausanne.
    Binder, Claudia
    EPFL Ecole Polytechnique f?ed?erale de Lausanne.
    Determinants of pro-environmental behavior: A comparison of university students and staff from diverse faculties at a Swiss University2020In: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 268Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the context of an initiative to become a carbon neutral campus, an online survey (N = 1864) of students, scientists, and administrative and technical staff of the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Lausanne (École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne) was conducted to measure pro-environmental behaviors and potentially influential factors. Female gender, age, and position (from bachelor's student, master's student, doctoral student, postdoc/senior scientist to professor) showed a significant positive correlation with positive behaviors as measured by a pro-environmental behavior scale developed for this study. Excluded from the academic position ranking were the members of technical and administrative staff, who displayed the highest level of pro-environmental behavior. Furthermore, the level of pro-environmental behavior was generally higher among members of strongly environmentally-oriented university subsections as compared to other sections. Based on previous research and theories on environmental behavior, such as the theory of planned behavior, a predictive model including psychological, structural, and demographic variables was developed and accounted for 44% of the variance of pro-environmental behavior scores. Among psychological variables, the strongest positive influence was observed for green self-identity. Willingness to sacrifice, perceived behavioral control, subjective norms, and perceived effects were also significantly positively related to positive behavior. Future behavioral decision-making models should consider these variables accordingly. The position of the participants was significantly positively correlated with green self-identity, suggesting positive education and socialization effects, but negatively correlated with perceived behavioral control, pointing to practical constraints coincident with professional seniority.

  • 204.
    He, Lei
    et al.
    Uppsala University.
    Sopjani, Liridona
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Laurenti, Rafael
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    User participation dilemmas in the circular economy: An empirical study of Scandinavia's largest peer-to-peer product sharing platform2021In: Sustainable Production and Consumption, ISSN 2352-5509Article in journal (Refereed)
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  • 205.
    Hedin, Erik
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Machine Design (Div.).
    Rohde-Nielsen, Johan
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Metal Recovery by Electro Winning - A Product Concept2018Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    A concept solution for an electro winning system is developed based on the previous work done by Glenngård (2019). This project is made to answer three questions about a potential concept solution, including what requirements need to be fulfilled, design of a suitable architecture and how to verify certain parameters of the concept. Requirements are formulated mainly based on Glenngård’s parameters; safety, quality requirements, ease of use, ease of manufacturing, ease of assembly, ease of maintenance, cost efficiency and use of standardized components. The concept that is generated is based on a single electrolyte container around which surrounding systems are attached or immersed. The design allows a degree of automatization. A process of use is described, relevant components are explained, and further developments are suggested. A list of suggested tests to be carried out for verification using a prototype is also provided.

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  • 206.
    Helander, Max
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Bergqvist, Robert
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Lund Stetler, Katarina
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Magnusson, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Applying lean in product development - enabler or inhibitor of creativity?2015In: International Journal of Technology Management, ISSN 0267-5730, E-ISSN 1741-5276, Vol. 68, no 1-2, p. 49-69Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Lean has become increasingly popular as a process management approach outside its original application in manufacturing, and it is frequently used as a means to increase efficiency in research and development (R&D) processes. Previous research suggests that lean can be used to increase R&D efficiency, but there is disagreement on whether or not this comes at the expense of creativity. In this article, the effects of lean product development on creativity are studied by means of case studies in the R&D departments of five companies. The empirical observations highlighted a number of important aspects when applying lean in product development. The data suggested that a primary focus of lean in product development was flow, rather than waste reduction, and that significant focus was given to the reduction of disturbances. Another finding was the need for a long-term perspective in R&D to safeguard creativity and that the reduction of slack time following the implementation of lean clearly limited the opportunities to undertake unsanctioned innovation projects, often referred to as 'skunk work'. Finally, the importance of management support and employee training to aid the implementation of lean was emphasised.

  • 207.
    Hemphälä, Jens
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    An Empirical Test of the Importance of Knowledge Exchange for new Service Development in Swedish Pharmacies.2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 208.
    Hemphälä, Jens
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Feedback and Sustainable Competitive Advantage2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 209.
    Hemphälä, Jens
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Feedback for Innovation: Exploring Multiple Modalities2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 210.
    Hemphälä, Jens
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    The Influence of Internal Channels of Communication on Incremental and Radical Innovation in Swedish PharmaciesIn: Creativity and Innovation Management, ISSN 0963-1690, E-ISSN 1467-8691Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 211.
    Hemphälä, Jens
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Lund, Katarina
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Creative climate and continuous improvement: An empirical test of the dimensions in the CCQ2012In: Proceedings of the 13th International CINet conference, 2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 212.
    Hemphälä, Jens
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Magnusson, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Networks for Innovation - But What Networks and What Innovation?2012In: Creativity and Innovation Management, ISSN 0963-1690, E-ISSN 1467-8691, Vol. 21, no 1, p. 3-16Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Innovation is a social and interactive process in which collaboration and exchange of knowledge and information play crucial roles. Two conflicting hypotheses have been raised in previous research: Burt's structural hole hypothesis and the density hypothesis. In brief, the former of these hypotheses builds upon arguments for open network structures in the acquisition of innovation; the latter one builds upon arguments for closed network structures for innovation. To shed some light on this state of confusion, this paper tests these two conflicting hypotheses on two separate measures of innovation in a service industry setting. One innovation measure is more incremental in nature and regards the implementation of employees' ideas. The other innovation measure is more radical in nature and regards new services. Findings suggest that social network measures are, indeed, powerful predictors of innovation and, further, that the impact of these are likely to be radically different depending upon the type and measure of innovation. Consequently, this paper recommends caution when studying the impact of social network measures upon innovation, and that more fine-grained measurements in particular are needed rather than focusing upon inter-relationships of an overly general and superficial nature.

  • 213.
    Hemphälä, Jens
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Magnusson, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Networks for innovation – but what networks and what innovation?2010Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 214.
    Hesselgren, Mia
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Product and Service Design. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC, Green Leap.
    Hasselqvist, Hanna
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC, Green Leap.
    Sopjani, Liridona
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Centres, Integrated Transport Research Lab, ITRL. KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Design strategies for exploring and bridging: Intersections of everyday life and decisionmaking for sustainability2017In: Conference proceedings of the Design Management Academy: Research perspectives on creative intersections / [ed] Erik Bohemia ; Cees de Bont ; Lisbeth Svengren Holm, Glasgow, 2017, Vol. 1, p. 189-205Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Transitions of unsustainable everyday practices into more sustainable ones require new approaches to explore possible futures and encourage change. Trying new practices and experiencing alternative configurations of sociomaterial assemblages can increase reflexivity as well as assist in exploring potential futures. Design can assist in co-creating possible futures and bridging discussions about the preferred strategies to reach them. If sustainability is defined as an on-going process calling for dialogue, there could be potentials for using practice-based design research, and in particular co-design approaches, at the intersections of these dialogues. By analysing methods for reflexivity and collaboration in two design research projects within sustainable mobility, we here suggest design strategies for prototyping change at an individual level and communicating the experiences of such change to people with power to trigger and direct change. This may be particularly useful for addressing sustainability which both requires dealing with complex problems and extensive collaboration. 

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  • 215.
    Hillerström, Hanna
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Troborg, Ulrika
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Kundanpassad LCA för nätverkskameror2010Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The number of surveillance cameras installed for various purposes have increased substantially in society over the past decade. The environmental impacts from network cameras are relatively unknown and their rapid increase in number calls for studying the impacts from a life cycle perspective; from raw material extraction to decommissioning. The project is performed on request by Axis Communications AB (hereby referred to as Axis) with the main purposes to increase Axis's knowledge of the environmental impact from their products and establish a method for conducting simplified life cycle assessments (LCA) on Axis products. A case study LCA is conducted on a network camera developed by Axis; model AXIS Q6032-E PTZ. Concurrently a method for conducting simplified LCAs on other Axis cameras is developed as well as a platform to be used in product development processes to enhance life cycle thinking (LCT). The Eco-indicator 99 Method is used for the environmental impact assessment and for simulations and calculations the software program SimaPro 7.1 is used.The results emphasize the life stages and their particular activities having the largest potential environmental impacts; primarily utilization and the production of electricity. For the scenario where the camera is installed in Europe the manufacturing comes as second, then raw material extraction and processing, followed by transportations. Decommissioning impacts with a negative value, i.e. impacts the environment in a positive way. The alternative scenario (where the camera is transported by air to U.S. and installed there) gives a total higher score and has the transportation category as the second highest regarding the total environmental impact. During the whole lifetime the camera emits 663 kg CO2.The results from using the developed model to conduct simplified LCAs only differ by 0.24% from the results of the case study LCA. The LCA is considered stable based on the performed sensitivity analysis.

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    Customized LCA for Network Cameras
  • 216.
    Hoelzle, Katharina
    et al.
    Univ Potsdam, Potsdam, Germany..
    Boer, Harry
    Aalborg Univ Denmark, Aalborg, Denmark..
    Björk, Jennie
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Crisis management through creativity and innovation: Storytelling, moral organizational creativity, and open innovation as creative means to spark innovation2020In: Creativity and Innovation Management, ISSN 0963-1690, E-ISSN 1467-8691, Vol. 29, no 2, p. 195-197Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 217.
    Holzle, Katharina
    et al.
    Univ Potsdam, Hasso Plattner Inst, Potsdam, Germany..
    Björk, Jennie
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Boer, Harry
    Aalborg Univ, Ctr Ind Prod, Aalborg, Denmark..
    Light at the end of the tunnel2021In: Creativity and Innovation Management, ISSN 0963-1690, E-ISSN 1467-8691, Vol. 30, no 1, p. 3-5Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 218.
    Holzle, Katharina
    et al.
    Univ Potsdam, Potsdam, Germany..
    Björk, Jennie
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Visscher, Klaasjan
    Univ Twente, Enschede, Netherlands..
    Editorial2019In: Creativity and Innovation Management, ISSN 0963-1690, E-ISSN 1467-8691, Vol. 28, no 1, p. 3-4Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 219. Hovmark, S
    et al.
    Norell Bergendahl, Margareta
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Social and psychological aspects of design work related to the use of computer-aided design systems1993In: Behaviour and Information Technology, Vol. Vol 12, no 5, p. 267-275Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 220. Hovmark, S
    et al.
    Norell Bergendahl, Margareta
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    The Effects on Health of Qualified Computer Work: Designers Using CAD systems1994In: International Journal of Human Factors in ManufacturingArticle in journal (Refereed)
  • 221. Hovmark, S
    et al.
    Norell Bergendahl, Margareta
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    The GAPT model: Four approaches to the application of design tools1994In: Journal of engineering design (Print), ISSN 0954-4828, E-ISSN 1466-1837Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 222.
    Hyland, Joanne
    et al.
    rInnovation, Wells, United States.
    Karlsson, Magnus
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Towards a management system standard for innovation2021In: Journal of Innovation Management, E-ISSN 2183-0606, Vol. 9, no 1, p. XI-XIXArticle in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this letter is to provide background and rationale for developing a management system standard to further the profession of innovation management. A systems approach is not new; however, the ISO 56002 Innovation management system - guidance standard is providing a common language and framework for building an innovation capability. The letter describes the innovation management principles and the system elements. We have heard that even having a standard for innovation management is an oxymoron. The publication of ISO 56002 in 2019 has triggered a broader conversation about the merits and drawbacks of a management system standard for innovation work. Some issues have been pointed out by Joe Tidd in his review and critical assessment of the standard (Tidd, 2021). As experts involved in drafting the standard, we can offer informed perspectives of this assessment by focusing on four topics related to context, innovation strategy, adaptable processes and tools, and process versus system approaches. These perspectives are ours alone and do not represent the views of the ISO Working Group. We invite the community to engage in this discussion to evolve our thinking about standardization for innovation management.

  • 223. Hyland, P. W. H.
    et al.
    Boccardelli, P
    Magnusson, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Managerial competencies and organizational capabilities in striving for continuous innovation2003Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 224.
    Högfeldt, Anna-Karin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Malmi, Lauri
    Alto University.
    Jerbrant, Anna
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Kinnunen, Päivi
    Alto University.
    Strömberg, Emma
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Malmqvist, Johan
    Chalmers University of Technology.
    Villadsen, Jørgen
    Technical University of Denmark (DTU).
    Baggerud, Bjørn
    Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU).
    Berglund, Anders
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Munkebo Hussmann, Peter
    Technical University of Denmark (DTU).
    Program leadership from a nordic perspective: Program leaders' power to influence their program2013In: Proceedings of the 9th International CDIO Conference, 2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper a continuation research at five technical universities in Nordic countries (N5T network) in 2012 is presented, wheretheaim was to find out how the program leadersconceived their function, role and mandate, and the work situations between the universitieswere compared. The previous research demonstrated that programleadershave quite different positions, strategies and methods when it comes to monitoring and developing their programs.In this paper, a deeper investigationis carried out ofthe (im-) possibilitiesto make realinfluence on the study courses that constitutesthe respective Engineering study programs. Eightprogram leaders from thefiveN5Tuniversities have been interviewed, and theanalysis of these studies, has culminatedina model for the analysis of program leadership for Engineering educationdevelopment.

  • 225.
    Högfeldt, Anna-Karin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Learning.
    Malmi, Lauri
    Aalto Univ, Dept Comp Sci, Helsinki, Finland.;Aalto Univ, Deans Unit, Sch Business, Helsinki, Finland..
    Kinnunen, Paivi
    Aalto Univ, Dept Comp Sci, Helsinki, Finland.;Aalto Univ, Deans Unit, Sch Business, Helsinki, Finland..
    Jerbrant, Anna
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Management.
    Strömberg, Emma
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Management.
    Berglund, Anders
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Villadsen, Jorgen
    DTU Tech Univ Denmark, Dept Appl Math & Comp Sci, Copenhagen, Denmark..
    Leading the teacher team - balancing between formal and informal power in program leadership2018In: Tertiary Education and Management, ISSN 1358-3883, E-ISSN 1573-1936, Vol. 24, no 1, p. 49-65Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This continuous research within Nordic engineering institutions targets the contexts and possibilities for leadership among engineering education program directors. The IFP-model, developed based on analysis of interviews with program leaders in these institutions, visualizes the program director's informal and formal power. The model is presented as a tool for starting a shared discussion on the complexities of the leadership of engineering program development. The authors liken program development to hunting in teams. Each individual expert in the program is needed, and all experts will need to work and collaborate for the same target. This calls for strategic and long-term thinking of engineering education development. Institutions should support the development of both formal structures as well as informal leadership skills among their program directors, but never fall for the temptation to see the program director as the only actor on the stage.

  • 226. Ishida, Shuichi
    et al.
    Magnusson, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Nagahira, Akio
    Factors influencing Japanese auto suppliers' predictions about the future of new technologies - An exploratory study of electric vehicles2017In: Futures: The journal of policy, planning and futures studies, ISSN 0016-3287, E-ISSN 1873-6378, Vol. 89, p. 38-59Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article investigates the effects of different characteristics of supplier-customer relationships in the Japanese automotive industry, and how these influence predictions about future technologies of a disruptive nature, such as Electric Vehicles (EVs). We conducted a survey of a broad set of suppliers in the Japanese automotive industry and another survey of suppliers registered with Toyota's two supplier associations. The data were used to analyse the influence of particular relationships and practices on information gathering about new technologies, preparations for R&D and production of new components, and predictions about new technologies. The study shows that suppliers' R&D intensity and the usage degree of the drawing-supplied parts system lead to predictions favouring the uptake of new technologies. Moreover, communication between automakers and suppliers and arm's-length relationships simultaneously lead to favourable views on the future of new technologies, especially with regard to EVs. Moreover, we find that Japanese-style cooperative relationships, arm's-length relationships, communication between automakers and suppliers, and communication among suppliers all lead to less favourable views on new technology uptake (in this case, EVs). We discuss the implications of these findings for research and practice, specifically for EVs.

  • 227.
    Janhager, Jenny
    KTH, Superseded Departments (pre-2005), Machine Design. KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Utilization of Scenario Building in the Technical Process2003In: Proceedings of the International Conference on Engineering Design, 2003Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 228.
    Janhager, Jenny
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Abdullah, Maizura Ailin
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Öhrwall Rönnbäck, Anna
    Linköping University.
    Enhancing the prospects for entering emerging markets via business networks2010In: Proceedings of the XXI ISPIM Conference / [ed] Huizingh, Torkkeli, Conn, Bitran, 2010Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Multiple factors affect a company’s ability to enter a foreign market. Despite the challenges faced by SMEs, it is suggested that emerging markets (EM) possess high investment potential, thus should seriously be considered as new markets for Swedish environmental technology companies. Researchers within the field of internationalization activities suggest that psychic distance and experiential learning heavily affect market selection. This paper is based upon a case study of four companies that unite in a joint venture with the purpose of developing and constructing a complete plant in an EM based on a radical technology innovation. Of importance to the network partners is the knowledge shared between them for the purpose of successful commercialization, and also knowledge that enhances the prospects for companies to consider EM for their business.

  • 229.
    Janhager, Jenny
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Hagman, Lars A.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.).
    Exploration of User-Technical Process Scenario Technique in Practice2007In: Proceedings of ICED 2007, the 16th International Conference on Engineering Design, 2007, p. 1-12Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The objective of the research described in this paper is to investigate a scenario technique based on a user-technical process. This means that the scenario is built with the aid of three processes in parallel: the mental activities of the user, the user actions and the technical functions. Four product development teams have tested the technique on products that were under development. The results from the explorations have shown that the technique assists in understanding design problems, prompts discussion within the group, presents no great problems in usage, elicits new thoughts about the design problem and serves a useful purpose in comparing different product concepts with each other.

  • 230.
    Janson, Amelie
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Lindqvist, Caroline
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Working in a Highly Automated Truck - Who, What and Why?2017Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The society is becoming more and more dependent on automated solutions. Automation in the transport and logistic sector is accelerating and highly automated trucks, with level four on the SAE scale, are expected to be commercial in the near future. Although it is a common notion that automation leaves humans idle and hence redundant, history proofs the contrary. Technology has always yielded more jobs than it has replaced, though it has resulted in a bigger need for workers to acquire new skills fast. With the development of highly automated trucks, the driver will have the possibility to shift focus from the road during automated driving and hence being able to do other activities. This thesis work has investigated which activities the truck drivers can perform, to create value for the hauliers. It has also investigated what kind of persons that will fit for the changed work tasks. A theoretical study was made where the changing truck industry and humanautomation interaction overall were investigated. Other professions subject to automation in general, and the aerospace and train industry in particular, were also studied in order to forecast how the automation of trucks can affect the role of the driver. An empirical study was made where ten hauliers, four drivers and two pilots were interviewed. Further, a focus group was conducted with six drivers and a survey was sent out to be answered by drivers. The identified value bringing activities were in brief; administrative work, time-saving activities, activities that enhance the drivers' well-being as well as activities of the drivers' own interests. Further, the insights resulted in four personas of potential future truck drivers, which all had different levels of work experience and worked for road carriers that differed in size, from small family business to large international companies.

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  • 231.
    Jildenhem, Anders
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Utredning av teknisk specifikation2010Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    AbstractScania uses a variety of documents as carriers of information between differentdepartments. One such document is the Technical Specification. TechnicalSpecification incurred during the pre-development phase, called the TechnicalSpecification extract, before the new project and is meant to support the projectmembers with information. The document provides information about what is to beproduced and what is to be replaced. It also arises as a published version and then is abasic document for the organization that shows all the possible selections Scania offer.This documents purpose and its development process is something that has beenquestioned internally at Scania. With the Technical Specification as a starting point, thethesis results in suggestions for improving the document and process.Theoretical studies and empirical studies on Scania presents information that isconsidered necessary to first form an opinion about the work, and increaseunderstanding of results. These studies include the theory of product development,Lean production, requirements management, communications and more specificbackgroundinformation on Scania.The report presents the results obtained from extensive interviews with employees atScania, directly or indirectly work with Technical Specification. The result highlights anumber of development opportunities, such as the introduction of the status ofTechnical Specification. The results concern both the process for the preparation ofTechnical Specifications and development opportunity for the published document.

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    Investigation of Technical Specification
  • 232.
    Johansson,, Anna
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Lundbäck, Linnéa
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Interorganisatorisk samverkan i utvecklingsprojekt inom infrastruktur: Ett arbete kring organisationsstruktur och beslutsfattande2021Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    In large infrastructure projects, there is a risk that things will not go according to plan. This may be due to unforeseen events and may result in exceeding budget and/or time plan. These unforeseen events can be for example a lack of approval to start a construction, or the weather affecting the plans. This report aims to examine the inter-organizational processes in an infrastructure project with a focus on collaboration, decision making and consequences. The report is based on three questions around this. The infrastructure project chosen to study in this report is Program Roslagsbanans Utbyggnad (RBU). The report is based on a literature study and an empirical study. Initially, a literature study was conducted to build up the theoretical frame of reference for the work. Here, the general organizational structure and decision-making processes in infrastructure projects were examined, as well as how to optimize working methods to ensure quality in large projects. Furthermore, a qualitative semi-structured empirical study was conducted with four respondents. Two respondents are employed within the customer organization and two are employed by one of the companies hired as a contractor within the program. The empirical result was then critically compared with the theory. The empirical study shows that the organization is structured so that the Landstingsfullmäktige makes decisions. Under them is a sponsor/a department head. Then there is a program manager and a subsidiary program manager who are individually responsible for some of the projects. All project managers for each individual project respond to them. The sponsor is responsible for all decisions within the program and changes in the budget go back to the board for a new decision. The entrepreneur, whose rights are regulated primarily through contracts with the customer organization, enters the project via procurement only when the implementation phase is to begin. When planning projects such as Program Roslagsbanans Utbyggnad, a risk analysis is performed, which means that all risks are highlighted and based on this, an action plan is made and a so-called riskpeng is set. Riskpeng is a way of calculating for extra costs in advance in case of the work exceeding budget. There are always changes and within Program Roslagsbanans Utbyggnad there are quite small margins as an exceeded time plan can mean large costs and impact on society in general. Both contractor and customer organization see the same risks and have the same goals but they have different views on which the best and most effective way is to reach them. Regarding preparations for events that occur outside the planned project plan, work is largely done preventively, but there are also situations that could not be prepared for. For other types of events thatare not covered by preparatory measures, new decisions are sometimes required along the way. These are made by the project manager who, to the best of its ability, adapts the work and does the best possible according to the conditions the project manager has to work with. With major infrastructure projects such as Program Roslagsbanans Utbyggnad, it significantly simplifies the process if the customer has insight into the work that is performed. 

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  • 233. Johansson, Sara
    et al.
    Kullström, Malin
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Björk, Jennie
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Karlsson, Anna
    Nilsson, Susanne
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Digital production innovation projects – The applicability of managerial controls under high levels of complexity and uncertainty2020In: Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, ISSN 1741-038X, E-ISSN 1758-7786Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The purpose of the present study is to assist academics and practitioners in supporting and managing digital production innovation projects using managerial controls. The focus is on projects that deliver innovations containing new combinations of physical, digital and/or cyber-physical components, developed to be used within a production system. More specifically, this paper aims to explore the applicability of different managerial controls for managing and supporting digital production innovation projects, i.e. projects that are characterized by high levels of complexity and uncertainty. Design/methodology/approach: This is a multiple-case study in which interview data was collected from five digital production innovation projects in two manufacturing firms. The empirical data was used to analyze success factors, challenges and obstacles in different phases of the studied projects, and to connect these to the application of different types of managerial controls. Findings: The findings provide an increased understanding of who to control, what to control and how to control in digital production innovation projects. Research limitations/implications: This paper is focused specifically on the perception of managerial controls in digital production innovation projects and has not explicitly focused on manufacturing companies' intended usage of managerial controls. This paper's focus on manufacturing companies with producing customers and on projects developing solutions for their respective customers' production systems also encourages further studies at other companies undergoing a comparable transition. Given the necessary system perspective on managerial controls that is being highlighted, this paper emphasizes further research needs on how firms can also apply managerial controls to support external collaborations. Practical implications: The results have a number of managerial implications regarding digital production innovation projects. The most prominent findings revealed the importance of giving attention to the managerial controls related to the decision-making process and the involvement from stakeholders outside the organization itself. In particular, it was shown that managerial controls securing a more holistic involvement in the decision-making process should be applied, and that managerial controls suitable for customers and partners need to be developed. Originality/value: The study is among the first studies to focus on the application and perceived effectiveness of managerial controls in digital production innovation projects. The ways in which managerial controls are applied to collaborations with customers and partners and the ways in which action, cultural and personnel controls are combined and aligned to support the corporate decision-making process particularly stand out as essential for manufacturing companies' Industry 4.0 transition.

  • 234.
    Johansson, Sara
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Kullström, Malin
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Björk, Jennie
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Karlsson, Anna
    Sandvik Coromant.
    Nilsson, Susanne
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    The consequences of managerial controls for digital innovation projects2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Digitalization has provided new opportunities for firms in the manufacturing industry but also brought a wide range of new challenges. This paper focuses managerial controls in order to further our understanding in what managers can do in order to manage and support digital innovation projects. More specifically the aim of this paper is to explore the role of managerial controls for digital innovation projects in manufacturing firms. Data has been collected from two manufacturing firms through interviews. The results further our understanding of the consequences of different managerial controls for digital innovation projects. Surprisingly the findings show that digital innovation projects demand more control than regular projects. The results bring a number of managerial implications, 1) there is a need to deliberately use a combination of controls, 2) it is important to use controls also for decision making, both in terms of speed and the ability to make good decisions and 3) there is a need to have controls also for customers and partners

  • 235.
    Johnsson, Stefan
    et al.
    Mälardalen University.
    Malvius, Diana
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Norell Bergendahl, Margareta
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Performance evaluation of complex product development2009In: DS 58-6: Proceedings of ICED 09, the 17th International Conference on Engineering Design, 2009, p. 87-98Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper a conceptual performance evaluation framework is proposed and discussed. The aim of the framework is to present a tool to stakeholders, involved in dynamic complex product development activities, that assists in developing a mutual understanding of performance relevancy. It is argued that a system perspective and the possibility to tailor performance criteria and measures according to contextual circumstances are needed for performance evaluation to improve work in product development. Companies need to consider what metrics that are relevant or applicable to measure or evaluate the product development process in their own business and context. From a performance evaluation perspective, a categorization of activities in product development is made into: Planning, Implementation, and Sales and Delivery. It is argued that the three activity categories have different objectives and need to be evaluated and managed accordingly if the overall development process is to be considered successful. Moreover, each activity category can be modeled using a generic activity model to derive relevant performance criteria, needed for identifying relevant performance indicators. It is argued that this will have implications on how performance, that is, efficiency and effectiveness, in product development is evaluated at a managerial and designer level, since the performance evaluation framework is based on the performed activities. Three different perspectives - integrated, information and learning - are used as basis for the discussion in this paper in order to accomplish an enhanced understanding of the value of the performance evaluation.

  • 236.
    JOTOFT, ALICIA
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    PETERSSON, ISABELLE
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Användarinvolvering i produktutvecklingsprocessen: Metoder och effekter2018Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Syftet med studien var att undersöka möjliga likheter i val av metoder och appliceringstillfälle för användarinvolvering, samt vilka effekter detta kan kopplas till. Studien bygger på kvalitativa semistrukturerade intervjuer hos fyra produktutvecklande företag som i någon mån riktar sig till privatpersoner.

    Studiens teoretiska bakgrund bygger på en litteraturstudie i området användarinvolvering i produktutvecklingsprojekt. Orsaken till litteraturstudien var osäkerhet och luckor i området. Det finns många olika metoder som kan tillämpas på olika sätt och i olika faser vilka medför olika effekter på både projekt och resultat. Då vissa metoder tros medföra kortare utvecklingstider har det blivit en självklarhet för företag att använda någon form av användarinvolvering.

    Genom webbaserad research valdes fyra företag ut, varav tre har en lång industriell bakgrund och det fjärde är ett konsultföretag inom produktutveckling. Två av respondenterna arbetar som experter för användarinvolvering och hoppar in stundvis i företagets olika utvecklingsprojekt. De andra två är projektledare som är djupt insatta i alla utvecklingsprocessens olika steg. Respondenterna är bland de mest insatta inom användarinvolvering inom företagen.

    De fyra respondenterna uttryckte vikten av användarinvolvering men hade samtidigt olika syn på hur det ska implementeras i projekt. Ett företag fokuserar på att testa användarens förståelse, ett fokuserar på undersökning i projektets början, ett intervjuar och testar prototyper och det sista letar efter användarbehov hos andra personer än slutanvändaren. Intervjuer och observationer är de metoder som alla företag använder sig av. Det skiljer sig dock i hur och när under processen de används. En respondent ansåg inte att det finns en universalmetod som passar alla personer och i alla projekt.

    Ett par intressanta områden som togs upp var att det är viktigt att involvera användare i projektets början och att det kan ses som en investering då man kan spara mycket på att göra rätt från start. Respondenterna hade svårt att koppla specifika effekter till användarinvolveringen. Dock togs potentiella samband upp såsom bra korrelation mellan kundnöjdhet och energi nedlagd på användarinvolvering, bra feedback, att det är en bidragande faktor till prisvinnande, bra betyg av testinstitut och att det medför att de uppfyller användarbehoven bättre.

    Slutsatserna från denna studie kan sammanfattas i att det inte finns några standardiserade metoder alla företag använder sig av. Både val av metoder, tillvägagångssätt och appliceringstillfälle skiljer sig i de undersökta företagen. Studien har även lett till insikter om att användarinvolvering med största sannolikhet medför positiva effekter, men att detta är mycket svårt att mäta på grund av många ingående faktorer.

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  • 237.
    Kaffman, Gabriel
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Kaffman, Michael
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Invoice Accuracy Analysis: In the Distribution and Logistics Chain at ERICSSON AB2013Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    A world leading telecommunication company, Ericsson negotiates twice a year with the logistics service providers, regarding prices and lanes connected to the logistics network. The negotiations results in agreements and new prices for the upcoming period. Previous internal studies reveal that Ericsson is being invoiced higher, compared to the agreed prices. The study reveals an overpayment value of 7 - 8 digits annually. Hence, revealing the overpayments detected by the set cost condition in the system. The conducted study will focus on the overpayments that are under the set cost condition in the system. By that, identifying the costs that are not been taken in consideration currently.The mission is to identify upcoming discrepancies, connected to the invoice process. By identifying upcoming discrepancies, the goal is to find the main reason for each detected discrepancy. By that, propose suitable processes for preventing future discrepancies.In order to investigate and conduct the required study, delimitation was made to analyse two major logistics providers. The study includes three targeted countries, which contributed to most discrepancies during 2012. Theories in lean development, process development, supply chain management and EDI vs. manual invoice flow have been studied in detail. By combining a qualitative and quantitative scientific approach, the empirical results have revealed the most upcoming discrepancies, connected to the invoice process.The result from the conducted study has been the main foundation, in order to suggest tangible improvements, connected to the invoice process. A set of seven tangible and cost efficient improvements, within the information flow, work methodology and process flow are presented.1. Productify Logistics Services2. Integration of Pricelists into SAP One3. Platform for Communication4. Stakeholder Clarification5. Andon Solution for Invoice Quality Assurance6. Provide LSP with Ericsson Freight Calculator7. Extended Information into Prime log from LSPThe collection consists of short term proposals that can be implemented immediately and long term proposals for preventive purposes. The proposed improvements are adapted to each involved stakeholder. Recommendation is to implement the proposed improvements, in order to reduce/eliminate the detected discrepancies.

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    Invoice Accuracy Analysis
  • 238. Karlsson, A.
    et al.
    Björk, Jennie
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Establishing and managing a network for continuous innovation: Invoking organizational pressure2017In: Creativity and Innovation Management, ISSN 0963-1690, E-ISSN 1467-8691, Vol. 26, no 2, p. 128-141Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Social networks in organizations have been identified as important both in terms of increasing our understanding of innovation and for organizations to realize innovation outcomes. While previous studies have informed us of the importance of networks for innovation, we know little of how companies intentionally can design and utilize networks to achieve continuous innovation. The aim of this paper is to explore how a network for continuous innovation can be established and managed. A longitudinal case study has been performed using data covering the establishment and subsequent management of a network for supporting continuous innovation, spanning the product management and R&D department of a large multinational company. The results reveal the potential to use intra-organizational networks to invoke organizational pressure conducive for making innovation happen. This pressure is induced by autonomy and self-organizing in the network and consists of reciprocal expectations and demands between the top (management) and the bottom (employees involved in the network) of the organizational hierarchy. Implications for theory and practice are discussed.

  • 239.
    Karlsson, Anna
    et al.
    Sandvik Coromant.
    Björk, Jennie
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Nilsson, Susanne
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    The role of attention for radical innovation: Identifying moves that matter2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although the human problem of managing attention has been identified as a central problem in the management of innovation, limited research has considered how attention is handled by different actors in the various phases of the innovation process. Moreover, more attention and commitment may be needed for radical ideas to succeed, making this type of innovations particularly interesting to study. This study aims to contribute to the literature addressing the development of radical innovations in established companies by focusing on the role of attention for this type of innovations. Based on an in-depth longitudinal case study, this paper provides an account of how attention was handled in such a setting. Interview data was collected from individuals involved in the project at two different points in time–adjacent to the formal start of the development project and close to the launch. Results reveal three attentional streams (‘Providing input & motivation’,‘Propelling the idea forward’and ‘Protecting the idea & individuals’) involving different actors during the innovation process. Along with the finding that managers engage in diverting behavior, and their rationales for doing so, this contributes to theory. Lastly, two of the attentional streams identified highlight an organizational-level paradox connected to radical innovation. A paradox that leaves managers in an ambiguous position.

  • 240. Karlsson, Anna
    et al.
    Lund, Katarina
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development. Scania, Sweden.
    Are you starving your company’s intrapreneurs?2013In: Innovation and entrepreneurship: A study of innovative clusters in California and Sweden, Göteborg: Chalmers , 2013, p. 16-23Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 241. Karlsson, Anna
    et al.
    Lund Stetler, Katarina
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    FREQUENCY VERSUS EFFECT: OBSTACLES TO INNOVATION AND THEIR RELATIONSHIP TO INNOVATION SELF-EFFICACYIn: International Journal of Innovation and Technology Management (IJITM), ISSN 0219-8770Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A vast number of studies analyze the effects of obstacles to innovation but often neglect the operational level in the organizational hierarchies, although this level is known to power innovation. This study explores how the operative level and first-level managers in two large R&D organizations perceive innovation obstacles. Beyond investigating the mere frequency of the obstacle, we also study their effect on employees’ innovation self-efficacy. While time-related obstacles are the most frequently identified ones at both firms, they are not significantly related to a decrease in innovation self-efficacy. Instead we find that obstacles referring to organizational culture, goals and strategies, as well as project portfolio management, are significantly related to lower levels of innovation self-efficacy.

  • 242.
    Karlsson, Britta-Stina
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Svensson, Sofia
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Integration av miljöaspekter i DeLavalsutvecklingsmodell DCS 0152010Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    AbstractDeLaval is a global group producing milking systems and equipment for facilitating thedaily work of dairy farmers. The 1st of January 2009 a new development model,DeLaval Corporate Standard 015 (DCS 015), for developing new products and solutionswas introduced. The purpose of this master thesis was to investigate how environmentalaspects could be implemented in DCS 015 and provide a measurable environmental toolto obtain information regarding what environmental impacts the development processcontributes to.The master thesis was initialized with a theoretical study of the field of sustainabledevelopment and corporate environmental work, which resulted in the frame ofreference in the report. Then, internal interviews were conducted at DeLaval toinvestigate the previous and present corporate environmental work. Simultaneously,external interviews at large, international companies with an environmental profile wereconducted to investigate what DeLaval could learn from other companies. Theknowledge gained from the theoretical study and the conducted interviews worked as afoundation when introducing proposals on how DeLaval could implementenvironmental considerations in DCS 015.The result of the master thesis is that corporate environmental work needs to be acombination of environmental tools and environmental management to be trulysuccessful. Several ideas on how to implement environmental tools in DCS 015 andenvironmental management at DeLaval were presented and three major ideas weredeveloped into more detailed proposals.

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    Integrating environmental aspects in DeLaval Development Model DCS 015
  • 243.
    Karlsson, Magnus
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Magnusson, Mats
    Innovation Management, Group Function Strategy Ericsson, Sweden..
    The Systems Approach to Innovation Management2019In: The Routledge Companion to Innovation Management, Informa UK Limited , 2019, p. 73-90Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The environment in which a company or organization operates today can be characterized by accelerating change, the globalization of markets, the emergence of new technologies and competitors, new regulatory requirements and ever more demanding users and citizens. In this environment, the ability to innovate becomes a key success factor for most organizations. They seek to continuously create and realize value by introducing new or changed products, services, processes, models, methods, etc.

  • 244.
    Karrbom Gustavsson, Tina
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Real Estate and Construction Management, Project Communication.
    Zika-Viktorsson, Annika
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Project Overload2008In: International Journal of Project Management, ISSN 0263-7863, E-ISSN 1873-4634, Vol. 3, p. 4-7Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 245.
    Kihlander, Ingrid
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Concept decision making from a Think Tank perspective2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 246.
    Kihlander, Ingrid
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Exploring a decision-making forum in early product development2011In: Proceedings of the 18th International Conference on Engineering Design (ICED11), Vol. 10: Design Methods and Tools / [ed] Culley, S.J.; Hicks, B.J.; McAloone, T.C.; Howard, T.J. & Dong, A., Copenhagen, 2011, p. 360-369Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Decision making in early phases of product development is of great importance due to the large impact they have on the subsequent project, whilst in the same being heavily characterized by uncertainty. This paper explores decision making in early phases of product development, and reports empirical findings from a case study conducted in an automotive firm. The case study investigated a project meeting officially responsible for deciding the technical content of the product. For example it was found that defining working assumptions and asking questions were used as means to reduce uncertainty in the decision-making process, where three genres of questions were identified: elucidating, self enlightening and argumentative. Further, a number of challenges in managing the decision-making process were identified, specifically for such agenda-based meetings as in the case study which was found to rely on instant interactions between the participants. Project management e.g. instantly had to judge to widen or limit the problem discussed, or whether to continue probing a problem or stop the discussion in order to save the total meeting agenda.

  • 247.
    Kihlander, Ingrid
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Konceptbeslut i produktutveckling: varför är det så svårt och vad kan man göra åt det?2011In: Management of Innovation and Technology, ISSN 1102-5581, no 4, p. 5-6Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    I utvecklingen av komplexa produkter, bestående av flera olika system och teknologier, är det många beslut som ska falla på plats samtidigt för att man ska kunna gå vidare i utvecklingen. I sin forskning har Ingrid Kihlander undersökt de problem som uppstår under konceptbeslutsprocessen och hur de skulle kunna hanteras mer framgångsrikt än vad som är fallet idag.

  • 248.
    Kihlander, Ingrid
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Managing concept decision making in product development practice2011Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Making concept decisions is a crucial activity for product-developing companies since these decisions have high impact on the subsequent development and launch of the product. Consequences of unsuccessful concept decisions can be severe, e.g. missing out on business opportunities or spending money on rework. This thesis investigates concept decision making in product development practice and contributes by enhancing the understanding of what is actually happening, the difficulties experienced in the process, and how to manage and improve concept decision making. Such enhanced understanding should serve as a basis when support methods for concept decision making are developed. In-depth studies have been conducted in a Swedish automotive company, focusing on the technical system level of the product.

    The concept decision process was found to be a web of interconnected activities, embedded in the concept development process, and with several actors on different hierarchical levels. An overarching challenge identified in concept decision making was to achieve compatibility before completeness, meaning that compatibility between product systems must be met before the system solutions are completely developed. In addition, a number of conflicts intrinsic in the process were revealed, pointing to underlying causes of the difficulties in managing concept decision making. These conflicts are omnipresent due to the product and organizational complexity and have to be handled by the product developers in their daily work.

    The thesis identifies key elements for improving an organization’s concept decision making: Create meta-knowledge and awareness regarding what influences the process and the actors in the process since there is a general lack of knowledge regarding one’s own and the organization’s decision-making processes; Ask questions to ensure that aspects, previously neglected, are considered; Provide visualizations to enhance understanding of both process and solutions; Provide vision as guidance in everyday decision making and trade-offs; and Ensure reflections since there is a need for actors in the process to reflect on the own decision-making process.

    In conclusion, a model to improve the concept decision making in practice is proposed. The model includes a set of proposed activities that are designed to address the previously identified challenges, and was developed in collaboration between researchers and practitioners.

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    Kihlander PhD Thesis
  • 249.
    Kihlander, Ingrid
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.).
    Janhager, Jenny
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.).
    Ritzén, Sofia
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Challenges in Concept Decisions in Complex Product Development2008In: Proceedings of 15th International Product Development Management Conference, IPDMC, EIASM, June 29 - July 1, Hamburg, Germany, 2008Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 250.
    Kihlander, Ingrid
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Janhager, Jenny
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Ritzén, Sofia
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    DEPENDENCIES IN CONCEPT DECISIONS IN COMPLEX PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT2008In: 10TH INTERNATIONAL DESIGN CONFERENCE - DESIGN 2008 / [ed] Marjanovic D; Storga M; Pavkovic N; Bojcetic N, 2008, no 48, p. 1159-1166Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The paper presents results from a retrospective case study in the automotive industry with the purpose to identify dependencies in product concept decisions taking into consideration social aspects, decision structures and technology. Interviews and document reviews, such as gate reports and design reviews, formed the empirical base. The company in question has a documented and mandatory product development process with defined instructions, process maps and a basic chain of command. In spite of the operational support, the company still suffers from a certain amount of rework based on incorrect concept decisions. Results from the empirical study show how both formal and informal factors did affect the concept decision in the studied case.

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