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  • 201.
    Berglund, Jennie
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Mikkelsen, Deirdre
    Univ Queensland, Queensland Alliance Agr & Food Innovat, Ctr Nutr & Food Sci, ARC Ctr Excellence Plant Cell Walls, Brisbane, Qld, Australia..
    Flanagan, Bernadine
    Univ Queensland, Queensland Alliance Agr & Food Innovat, Ctr Nutr & Food Sci, ARC Ctr Excellence Plant Cell Walls, Brisbane, Qld, Australia..
    Dhital, Sushil
    Univ Queensland, Queensland Alliance Agr & Food Innovat, Ctr Nutr & Food Sci, ARC Ctr Excellence Plant Cell Walls, Brisbane, Qld, Australia..
    Henriksson, Gunnar
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Lindström, Mikael
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Yakubov, Gleb
    Univ Queensland, Sch Chem Engn, ARC Ctr Excellence Plant Cell Walls, Brisbane, Qld, Australia..
    Gidley, Michael
    Univ Queensland, Queensland Alliance Agr & Food Innovat, Ctr Nutr & Food Sci, ARC Ctr Excellence Plant Cell Walls, Brisbane, Qld, Australia..
    Vilaplana, Francisco
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Glycoscience. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Hydrogels of bacterial cellulose and wood hemicelluloses as a model of plant secondary cell walls2019In: Abstracts of Papers of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0065-7727, Vol. 257Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 202.
    Berglund, Jennie
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Mikkelsen, Deirdre
    University of Queensland, Australia.
    Flanagan, Bernadine M.
    University of Queensland, Australia.
    Dhital, Sushil
    University of Queensland, Australia.
    Henriksson, Gunnar
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Lindström, Mikael
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Yakubov, Gleb E.
    University of Queensland, Australia.
    Gidley, Michael J.
    University of Queensland, Australia.
    Vilaplana, Francisco
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Wood Hemicelluloses Exert Distinct Biomechanical Contributions in Bacterial Cellulose HydrogelsManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 203.
    Berglund, Johan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Health Informatics and Logistics.
    Analys av olika positioneringssystem för Trafikförvaltningens järnvägsbanor2019Independent thesis Basic level (university diploma), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Positioning systems have a vital role in securing safe movement of trains. There are many differenttypes of positioning systems. This thesis is about how axle counters, communications-based traincontrol (CBTC) and different kinds of track circuits operate. It also contains an analysis of AC-trackcircuits and axle counters with RAMS-parameters (Reliability, Availability, Maintenance and Safety)as guide points to make a conclusion of what type of system that best suits for Stockholm PublicTransports railway tracks. Through interviews with experienced persons within the railway industryin Stockholm knowledge of pros and cons of different systems was obtained. A fault tree analyses(FTA) was made for axle counters and track circuits to visualize potentially hazardous situations.Failure statistics were produced to show failure frequency for one track with axle counters and onetrack with track circuits. A clear result was not shown but it can be concluded that sources of failurethat are prone to track circuit systems can be avoided using axle counters. What became evident isthat the management need to standardize to a fewer amount of different positioning systems. Itwould make it easier to find available personnel with the required skills for doing maintenance. Thiswould also have a benefit when securing maintenance supplies.

  • 204.
    Berglund, Lars
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Cellulose-clay synergy effects in multifunctional hybrid composites2017In: International Conference on Nanotechnology for Renewable Materials 2017, TAPPI Press , 2017, p. 233-244Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 205.
    Berglund, Lars
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Burgert, Ingo
    Swiss Fed Inst Technol, Inst Bldg Mat, Stefano Franscini Pl 3, CH-8093 Zurich, Switzerland.;EMPA Swiss Fed Labs Mat Testing & Res, Appl Wood Res Lab, CH-8600 Dubendorf, Switzerland..
    Bioinspired Wood Nanotechnology for Functional Materials2018In: Advanced Materials, ISSN 0935-9648, E-ISSN 1521-4095, Vol. 30, no 19, article id 1704285Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It is a challenging task to realize the vision of hierarchically structured nanomaterials for large-scale applications. Herein, the biomaterial wood as a large-scale biotemplate for functionalization at multiple scales is discussed, to provide an increased property range to this renewable and CO2-storing bioresource, which is available at low cost and in large quantities. The Progress Report reviews the emerging field of functional wood materials in view of the specific features of the structural template and novel nanotechnological approaches for the development of wood-polymer composites and wood-mineral hybrids for advanced property profiles and new functions.

  • 206.
    Berglund, Lars
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Li, Yuanyuan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Fu, Qiliang
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Popov, Sergei
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Materials and Nanophysics.
    Sychugov, Ilya
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Materials and Nanophysics.
    Yang, Min
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Materials and Nanophysics.
    Modification of transparent wood for photonics functions2018In: Abstracts of Papers of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0065-7727, Vol. 255Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 207.
    Berglund, Lars
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Yang, Xuan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Polymer Technology.
    Design of biodegradable cellulosic nanomaterials combining mechanical strength and optical transmittance2018In: Abstract of Papers of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0065-7727, Vol. 256Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 208.
    Berglund, Lars
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH Royal Inst Technol, WWSC, Fibre & Polymer Technol, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Yang, Xuan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH Royal Inst Technol, WWSC, Fibre & Polymer Technol, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Berthold, Fredrik
    RISE Bioecon, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Holocellulose fibers: combining mechanical performance and optical transmittance2019In: Abstracts of Papers of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0065-7727, Vol. 257Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 209.
    Berglund, Martina
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Ergonomics. HELIX Competence Centre and Division of Logistics and Quality Management, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Arman, Oscar
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Ergonomics.
    From Safety I to Safety II: Applying an HTO Perspective on Supervisory Work Within Aviation2019In: 20th Congress of the International Ergonomics Association, IEA 2018, Springer, 2019, Vol. 821, p. 558-565Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In aviation, there is a strong focus on safety to prevent accidents. This paper deals with how supervisory authorities in aviation can apply a Safety II perspective. In particular, the aim is to analyze how the concept of HTO (Humans, Technology, Organization) is related to a possible shift from Safety I to Safety II within supervisory work within aviation. Data for this case study research was collected through semi-structured interviews with inspectors at the civil aviation authority in Sweden. The study showed that the important building stone of proactivity in Safety II could be promoted by the Safety Management System (SMS), the Safety Performance Indicator, and systems for reporting incidents and near-accidents. These systems constituted examples of Technology. Similarly, the Humans consisted of the inspectors, and the Organization included international and national regulations that the inspectors needed to follow during inspections. In the analysis, it was clear that an internal HTO-perspective could be taken. The study indicated that the shift towards Safety II should first be done within the supervisory authority by applying an internal HTO-perspective. This could later be developed to an external HTO-perspective also including the operator organizations.

  • 210.
    Bergman, Emma
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH).
    Designing Thermal Management Systems For Lithium-Ion Battery Modules Using COMSOL2018Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    In this thesis, a section of a lithium ion battery module, including five cells and an indirect liquid cooling system, was modelled in COMSOL Multiphysics 5.3a. The purpose of this study was to investigate the thermal properties of such a model, including heat generation per cell and temperature distribution. Additionally, the irreversible and reversible heat generation, the cell voltage and the internal resistance were investigated. The study also includes the relation between heat generation and C-­‐rates, and an evaluation of COMSOL Multiphysics 5.3a as a software. It was found that having liquid cooling is beneficial for the thermal management, as the coolant flow helps to transfer away the heat generated within the battery. The results also show that it is important to not go below a set cell voltage at which the cell is considered fully discharged. If a control mechanism to stop the battery is not implemented, the generated heat, and consequently the temperature, increase drastically. COMSOL Multiphysics 5.3a was considered a suitable software for the modelling. For future research it is of interest to expand the model to a full scale module to fully investigate the temperature distribution where more cells are being cooled by the same coolant loop.

  • 211.
    Bergman, Susanna L
    et al.
    Princeton University, Science Division, Yale-NUS College, Singapore.
    Granestrand, Jonas
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering.
    Tang, Yu
    University of Kansas.
    Suárez Paris, Rodrigo
    Scania CV.
    Nilsson, Marita
    Scania CV.
    Feng Tao, Franklin
    University of Kansas.
    Tang, Chunhua
    National University of Singapore.
    Pennycook, Stephen J
    National University of Singapore.
    Pettersson, Lars J
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering.
    Bernasek, Steven L
    Princeton University, Science Division, Yale-NUS College, Singapore.
    In-situ characterization by Near-Ambient Pressure XPS of the catalytically active phase of Pt/Al2O3 during NO and CO oxidation2018In: Applied Catalysis B: Environmental, ISSN 0926-3373, E-ISSN 1873-3883, Vol. 220, p. 506-511Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study concerns near ambient pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (NAP-XPS) studies of a Pt/Al2O3 diesel oxidation catalyst used in exhaust aftertreatment. We apply the technique to an industrial-grade porous catalyst, thus bridging both the pressure and materials gap, and probe the shift in binding energy of Pt 4d under different atmospheres. We observe that oxidizing atmospheres induce a shift in binding energy, corresponding to changes in Pt oxidation state, especially pronounced under an atmosphere of NO and O2. Such changes in Pt oxidation state have previously been linked to dynamic changes in NO oxidation activity.

  • 212. Bergquist, Helen
    et al.
    Rocha, Cristina S. J.
    Álvarez-Asencio, Rubén
    Nguyen, Colleen Ramsey
    Rutland, Mark W.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Smith, C I Edvard
    Good, L.
    Nielsen, Peter Egil
    Zain, Rula
    Structure and Photoactivatable Probes for Nucleic Acids and Kinases2016In: Biochimie, Vol. 128, no 129, p. 133-137Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 213.
    Bergstrand, Jan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Quantum and Biophotonics.
    Liu, Qingyun
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Theoretical Chemistry and Biology.
    Huang, Bingru
    Würth, Christian
    Resch-Genger, Ute
    Zhan, Qiuqiang
    Widengren, Jerker
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Quantum and Biophotonics.
    Ågren, Hans
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Theoretical Chemistry and Biology.
    Liu, Haichun
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Theoretical Chemistry and Biology.
    On the decay time of upconversion luminescence2019In: Nanoscale, ISSN 2040-3364, E-ISSN 2040-3372, Vol. 11, no 11, p. 4959-4969Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study, we systematically investigate the decay characteristics of upconversion luminescence (UCL) under anti-Stokes excitation through numerical simulations based on rate-equation models. We find that a UCL decay profile generally involves contributions from the sensitizer's excited-state lifetime, energy transfer and cross-relaxation processes. It should thus be regarded as the overall temporal response of the whole upconversion system to the excitation function rather than the intrinsic lifetime of the luminescence emitting state. Only under certain conditions, such as when the effective lifetime of the sensitizer's excited state is significantly shorter than that of the UCL emitting state and of the absence of cross-relaxation processes involving the emitting energy level, the UCL decay time approaches the intrinsic lifetime of the emitting state. Subsequently, Stokes excitation is generally preferred in order to accurately quantify the intrinsic lifetime of the emitting state. However, possible cross-relaxation between doped ions at high doping levels can complicate the decay characteristics of the luminescence and even make the Stokes-excitation approach fail. A strong cross-relaxation process can also account for the power dependence of the decay characteristics of UCL.

  • 214.
    Bergström, Aileen
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Neurobiol Care Sci & Soc, Div Occupat Therapy, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Borell, Lena
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Neurobiol Care Sci & Soc, Div Occupat Therapy, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Health Informatics and Logistics.
    Guidetti, Susanne
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Neurobiol Care Sci & Soc, Div Occupat Therapy, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Evaluation of an intervention addressing a reablement programme for older, community-dwelling persons in Sweden (ASSIST 1.0): a protocol for a feasibility study2019In: BMJ Open, ISSN 2044-6055, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 9, no 7, article id e025870Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction Older persons with functional limitations often need assistance from home care staff to thrive and continue to live in their home environments. Reablement, a proactive, preventative approach administered by home care staff, stimulating active engagement of the older person, is often recommended. Even though reablement has a potential to become a new rehabilitation model and has been implemented in different countries in various degrees, there is a lack of knowledge regarding the process of establishing reablement, the theoretical underpinnings and the conditionality and outcomes in different contexts. This knowledge is needed before fullscale recommendations can be made for implementation in specific contexts. Aim This study protocol aims to present a feasibility study of the intervention, ASSIST 1.0, a theory-based reablement programme, which includes coaching of home care staff and digitally based smart products, in a Swedish context. Methods and analysis This feasibility study will evaluate the perceived value and acceptability of ASSIST 1.0 intervention programme regarding fidelity, reach and dose, and potential outcomes by using a pretest and post-test design involving an intervention group and a control group (n=30) of older persons living at home, needing home care services. Qualitative interviews with home care staff delivering ASSIST and the older adults receiving the intervention as well as their significant others will be conducted to explore aspects affecting the intervention. Ethics and dissemination This study has been approved by the regional ethics board. The results of the feasibility study will form the base for refinement of the ASSIST programme and for the subsequent planning of a full-scale randomised controlled trial investigating the effect of the programme on a larger scale. Dissemination will include peer-reviewed publications and presentations at national and international conferences as well as information to involved stakeholders.

  • 215.
    Bergström, Johan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH).
    CFD for mixing efficiency in commercial and industrial advanced air oxidation2018Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Ozone treatment of pollutants in air is a relatively young technology with limited literature available. To the authors knowledge no literature discussing simulations of commercial ozone treatment without UV-lamps in gas phase has been published up to this point.The purpose of this project was to identify issues and propose recommendations related to the distribution of ozone in industrial ducting and the injection of ozone into commercial ducting. The injection rate of the ozone mixture is small relative to the flow of the treated air stream. In such cases ozone is easily swept away and confined to a limited section of the ducts, affecting overall efficiency. The injection inlet and ducting were simulated together in both 2D and 3D environments using COMSOL Multi-physics with CFD, CAD and transport of diluted species modules.Improving mixing in industrial ducting was simple in comparison to the commercial ducting where the flow is complex. For the commercial application simulations showed that the mixing efficiency varies greatly between injection positions. Based on CFD data in the commercial ducting two models for injection point analysis were developed.2D and 3D simulations showed different result for injections inside the main duct, the 3D case could properly simulate rotating flows inside the main duct which makes certain injection points in the main duct more effective that predicted in 2D.This master thesis project was done in cooperation between Royal Institute of Technology and Ozonetech in Sweden.

  • 216.
    Berkowicz, Sharon
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH).
    Dynamic Stark Shaping of Molecular Fate2019Independent thesis Advanced level (professional degree), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The dynamic (ac) Stark effect refers to the energy shifting of electronic states induced by an oscillating electric field. Conveniently, the magnitude of the ac Stark shift scales with the square of the electric field amplitude, i.e. with light intensity. Using this fundamental effect to reshape molecular potentials, and steer the course of chemical reactions, is known as dynamic Stark control. The aim of this study was to investigate the dynamic Stark effect on the photodissociation of molecular oxygen (O2) in the Schumann-Runge continuum, SRC (130–175 nm). Absorption in the SRC leads to dissociation via the so-called B state, yielding O(1D) + O(3P), or the J state, forming O(3P) + O(3P). Both of these dissociative excited states may be well-described in terms of mixed valence and Rydberg state character, in which each of the two states are strongly coupled to a Rydberg state of similar symmetry.

    Due to the mixed character of the B and J states, simulations predict that dynamic Stark shifting of the coupled Rydberg states leads to a dramatic change in dissociation channel branching ratio, as well as a red-shift of the absorption spectrum. This study aimed at experimentally testing this theoretical prediction. A 400-nm femtosecond laser pulse was employed as a combined pump and control field, simultaneously inducing a three-photon transition into the SRC and ac Stark shifting the potentials. A detection scheme to detect the changes in absorption of the B channel with pump pulse intensity was devised and implemented. The chosen detection scheme, in which emission at 762 nm from the O2(b−X) transition is measured, in principle monitors O(1D) from the B channel via an energy transfer reaction.

    The experimental results overall show consistency between simulations and experiment. The measured 762-nm emission exhibited a pump pulse intensity-dependence that likely reflects the dynamic Stark reshaping of the excited state potentials. However, saturation is clearly present in the data, complicating data interpretation. Furthermore, deviations between experiment and simulations are large at high pulse intensities, indicating that O(1D) is additionally generated by absorption into higher excited states. Finally, structured features that deviate from the simulations at low pulse intensities may possibly be assigned to vibrational resonances to high-lying Rydberg states by four-photon absorption. 

  • 217.
    Bernhem, Kristoffer
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Blom, H.
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Applied Physical Chemistry.
    Brismar, Hjalmar
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics.
    Quantification of endogenous and exogenous protein expressions of Na,K-ATPase with super-resolution PALM/STORM imaging2018In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 13, no 4, article id e0195825Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Transient transfection of fluorescent fusion proteins is a key enabling technology in fluorescent microscopy to spatio-temporally map cellular protein distributions. Transient transfection of proteins may however bypass normal regulation of expression, leading to overexpression artefacts like misallocations and excess amounts. In this study we investigate the use of STORM and PALM microscopy to quantitatively monitor endogenous and exogenous protein expression. Through incorporation of an N-terminal hemagglutinin epitope to a mMaple3 fused Na,K-ATPase (α1 isoform), we analyze the spatial and quantitative changes of plasma membrane Na,K-ATPase localization during competitive transient expression. Quantification of plasma membrane protein density revealed a time dependent increase of Na,K-ATPase, but no increase in size of protein clusters. Results show that after 41h transfection, the total plasma membrane density of Na,K-ATPase increased by 63% while the endogenous contribution was reduced by 16%. © 2018 Bernhem et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

  • 218.
    Bernin, Diana
    et al.
    Swedish NMR Ctr, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Bialik, Erik
    Lund Univ, Div Theoret Chem, Lund, Sweden..
    Stenqvist, Bjorn
    Lund Univ, Div Theoret Chem, Lund, Sweden..
    Fang, Yuan
    KTH.
    Ostlund, Asa
    SP Tech Res Inst Sweden, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Furo, Istvan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry.
    Lindman, Bjorn
    Lund Univ, Chem, Lund, Sweden..
    Lund, Mikael
    Lund Univ, Div Theoret Chem, Lund, Sweden..
    On the ionization of cellulose in aqueous alkali2017In: Abstracts of Papers of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0065-7727, Vol. 253Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 219.
    Bessman, Alexander
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering, Applied Electrochemistry.
    Interactions between battery and power electronics in an electric vehicle drivetrain2018Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The electric machine and power electronics in electric and hybrid electric vehicles inevitably cause AC harmonics on the vehicle's DC-link. These harmonics can be partially filtered out by large capacitors, which today are overdimensioned in order to protect the vehicle's battery pack. This is done as a precaution, since it is not known whether ripple-current has any harmful effect on Li-ion  cells.

    We have measured and analyzed the ripple-current present in a hybrid electric bus, and found that a majority of the power was carried by frequencies in the range 100~Hz to 1~kHz. The single most energetic harmonic in this particular vehicle is believed to have been caused  by a misaligned resolver in the motor.

    We have also designed and built an advanced experimental set-up in order to study the effect of ripple-current on Li-ion cells in the lab. The set-up can cycle up to 16 cells simultaneously, with currents of up to 50~A including a superimposed AC signal with a frequency of up to 2~kHz. The cells' temperatures are controlled by means of a climate chamber. The set-up also includes a sophisticated safety system which automatically acts to prevent dangerous situations before they arise.

    Using this set-up we tested whether superimposing AC with a specific frequency improves the charging performance of Li-ion cells. Statistical analysis found no improvement over regular DC cycling, and a physics-based model explains the experimental findings.

    We have also investigated whether ripple-current accelerates the aging of Li-ion cells. Twelve cells were either calendar or cycle  aged for one year, with some cells being exposed to superimposed AC with a frequency of 1~Hz, 100~Hz, or 1~kHz. No effect was observed on any of capacity fade, power fade, or aging mechanism.

    Finally we also tested whether it is possible to heat Li-ion cells from low temperatures using only AC. We propose a method for AC heating of Li-ion cells, and open the discussion for generalizing the technique to larger battery packs.

    In conclusion, ripple-current has negligible effect on Li-ion cells, except for heating them slightly.

  • 220.
    Bessman, Alexander
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering, Applied Electrochemistry.
    Soares, Rudi
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Electromagnetic Engineering.
    Software documentation for current-rippleequipment2018Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 221.
    Bessman, Alexander
    et al.
    KTH.
    Soares, Rúdi
    KTH.
    Wallmark, Oskar
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering.
    Svens, Pontus
    KTH.
    Lindbergh, Göran
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering.
    Aging effects of AC harmonics on lithium-ion cellsManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 222.
    Bessman, Alexander
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering, Applied Electrochemistry.
    Soares, Rúdi
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Electric Power and Energy Systems.
    Wallmark, Oskar
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Electric Power and Energy Systems.
    Svens, Pontus
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering, Applied Electrochemistry.
    Lindbergh, Göran
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering, Applied Electrochemistry.
    Aging effects of AC harmonics on lithium-ion cells2019In: Journal of Energy Storage, E-ISSN 2352-152X, Vol. 21, p. 741-749Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    With the vehicle industry poised to take the step into the era of electric vehicles, concerns have been raised that AC harmonics arising from switching of power electronics and harmonics in electric machinery may damage the battery. In light of this, we have studied the effect of several different frequencies on the aging of 28 Ah commercial NMC/graphite prismatic lithium-ion battery cells. The tested frequencies are 1 Hz, 100 Hz, and 1 kHz, all with a peak amplitude of 21 A. Both the effect on cycled cells and calendar aged cells is tested. The cycled cells are cycled at a rate of 1C:1C, i.e., 28 A during both charging and discharging, with the exception of a period of constant voltage at the end of every charge. After running for one year, the cycled cells have completed approximately 2000 cycles. The cells are characterized periodically to follow how their capacities and power capabilities evolve. After completion of the test about 80% of the initial capacity remained and no increase in resistance was observed. No negative effect on either capacity fade or power fade is observed in this study, and no difference in aging mechanism is detected when using non-invasive electrochemical methods of post mortem investigation.

  • 223. Bełdowski, P.
    et al.
    Weber, P.
    Dédinaité, Andra
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science. RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Box 5607, SE-114 86 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Claesson, Per M.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science. RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Box 5607, SE-114 86 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Gadomski, A.
    Correction: Physical crosslinking of hyaluronic acid in the presence of phospholipids in an aqueous nano-environment (Soft Matter (2018) DOI: 10.1039/c8sm01388h)2018In: Soft Matter, Vol. 14, no 47Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Correction for 'Physical crosslinking of hyaluronic acid in the presence of phospholipids in an aqueous nano-environment' by Piotr Bełdowski et al., Soft Matter, 2018, DOI: 10.1039/c8sm01388h. 

  • 224.
    Bhagavathiachari, Muthuraaman
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Applied Physical Chemistry.
    Elumalai, V.
    Gao, Jiajia
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Centre of Molecular Devices, CMD.
    Kloo, Lars
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Centre of Molecular Devices, CMD.
    Polymer-doped molten salt mixtures as a new concept for electrolyte systems in dye-sensitized solar cells2017In: ACS Omega, ISSN 2470-1343, Vol. 2, no 10, p. 6570-6575Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A conceptually new polymer electrolyte for dye-sensitized solar cells is reported and investigated. The benefits of using this type of electrolyte based on ionic liquid mixtures (ILMs) and room temperature ionic liquids are highlighted. Impedance spectroscopy and transient electron measurements have been used to elucidate the background of the photovoltaic performance. Even though larger recombination losses were noted, the high ion mobility and conductivity induced in the ILMs by the added polymer result in enhanced overall conversion efficiencies.

  • 225.
    Bian, Xiaolei
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering.
    Liu, Longcheng
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering.
    Yan, Jinying
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering.
    A model for state-of-health estimation of lithium ion batteries based on charging profiles2019In: Energy, ISSN 0360-5442, E-ISSN 1873-6785, Vol. 177, p. 57-65Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Using an equivalent circuit model to characterize the constant-current part of a charging/discharging profile, a model is developed to estimate the state-of-health of lithium ion batteries. The model is an incremental capacity analysis-based model, which applies a capacity model to define the dependence of the state of charge on the open circuit voltage as the battery ages. It can be learning-free, with the parameters subject to certain constraints, and is able to give efficient and reliable estimates of the state-of-health for various lithium ion batteries at any aging status. When applied to a fresh LiFePO 4 cell, the state-of-health estimated by this model (learning-unrequired or learning-required)shows a close correspondence to the available measured data, with an absolute difference of 0.31% or 0.12% at most, even for significant temperature fluctuation. In addition, NASA battery datasets are employed to demonstrate the versatility and applicability of the model to different chemistries and cell designs.

  • 226. Bianchi, F.
    et al.
    Agazzi, S.
    Riboni, N.
    Benyahia Erdal, Nejla
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Polymer Technology.
    Hakkarainen, Minna
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Ilag, L. L.
    Anzillotti, L.
    Andreoli, R.
    Marezza, F.
    Moroni, F.
    Cecchi, R.
    Careri, M.
    Novel sample-substrates for the determination of new psychoactive substances in oral fluid by desorption electrospray ionization-high resolution mass spectrometry2019In: Talanta: The International Journal of Pure and Applied Analytical Chemistry, ISSN 0039-9140, E-ISSN 1873-3573, Vol. 202, p. 136-144Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A reliable screening and non invasive method based on the use of microextraction by packed sorbent coupled with desorption electrospray ionization-high resolution mass spectrometry was developed and validated for the detection of new psychoactive substances in oral fluid. The role of different sample substrates in enhancing signal intensity and stability was evaluated by testing the performances of two polylactide-based materials, i.e. non-functionalized and functionalized with carbon nanoparticles, and a silica-based material compared to commercially available polytetrafluorethylene supports. The best results were achieved by using the non-functionalized polylactide substrates to efficiently ionize compounds in positive ionization mode, whereas the silica coating proved to be the best choice for operating in negative ionization mode. LLOQs in the low μg/L, a good precision with CV% always lower than 16% and RR% in the 83(±4)-120(±2)% range, proved the suitability of the developed method for the determination of the analytes in oral fluid. Finally, the method was applied for screening oral fluid samples for the presence of psychoactive substances during private parties, revealing mephedrone in only one sample out of 40 submitted to analysis.

  • 227.
    BINDER, THOMAS
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH).
    Gland Segmentation with Convolutional Neural Networks : Validity of Stroma Segmentation as a General Approach2019Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The analysis of glandular morphology within histopathology images is a crucial step in determining the stage of cancer. Manual annotation is a very laborious task. It is time consuming and suffers from the subjectivity of the specialists that label the glands. One of the aims of computational pathology is developing tools to automate gland segmentation. Such an algorithm would improve the efficiency of cancer diag- nosis. This is a complex task as there is a large variability in glandular morphologies and staining techniques. So far, specialised models have given promising results focusing on only one organ. This work investigated the idea of a cross domain ap- proximation. Unlike parenchymae the stroma tissue that lies between the glands is similar throughout all organs in the body. Creating a model able to precisely seg- ment the stroma would pave the way for a cross organ model. It would be able to segment the tissue and therefore give access to gland morphologies of different organs. To address this issue, we investigated different new and former architec- tures such as the MILD-net which is the currently best performing algorithm of the GlaS challenge. New architectures were created based on the promising U shaped network as well as Xception and the ResNet for feature extraction. These networks were trained on colon histopathology images focusing on glands and on the stroma. The comparision of the different results showed that this initial cross domain ap- proximation goes into the right direction and incites for further developments.

  • 228.
    Bitar, Petra
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH).
    En undersökning av Rönningesjöns miljötillstånd, särskilt när det gäller näringsämnen2018Independent thesis Basic level (professional degree), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Rönningesjön is a 4.5-meter-deep lake situated in a geological default, 25 km north of Stockholm in Täby municipality. It is strongly impacted by roads and the local societies Löttingelund and Gribbylund. To the east of Rönningesjön, a large forested recreation area is found, with the name Skavlöten. The goal of this work is to investigate the impact of nutrients on the lake in 2018. The field work was performed in april 2018. Samples were taken in creeks an in rivers running into the lake, the outlet and in the lake itself. The analyses of the samples were made in a laboratory at The department of Chemistry, KTH.

    In the northern part of the lake, floating wetlands have been installed to improve the water quality. A stream of water is running through the lake from north to south, and finally, out to Hägernäsviken, a part of the Baltic Sea. The water is divided into an upper part (the epilimnion) above 2.5 m depth and a lower part, below 2.5 m depth (hypolimnion). The lake is strongly eutrophiated and the constructed wetland leaks nutrients into the lake. The cleaning of the storm water should be improved.

  • 229.
    Bjering, Beatrice
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH).
    Estimations of 3D velocities from a single camera view in ice hockey2019Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Ice hockey is a contact sport with a high risk of brain injuries such as concussions. This is a serious health concern and there is a need of better understanding of the relationship between the kinematics of the head and concussions. The velocity and the direction of impact are factors that might affect the severity of the concussions. Therefore the understanding of concussions can be improved by extracting velocities from video analysis.

    In this thesis a prototype to extract 3D velocities from one single camera view was developed by using target tracking algorithms and homography. A validation of the method was done where the mean error was estimated to 21.7%. The prototype evaluated 60 cases of tackles where 30 resulted in concussions and the other 30 tackles did not result in concussions. No significant difference in the velocities between the two groups could be found. The mean velocity for the tackles that resulted in concussions were 6.55 m/s for the attacking player and 4.59 m/s for the injured player. The prototype was also compared with velocities extracted through SkillSpector from a previous bachelor thesis. There was a significant difference between the velocities compiled with SkillSpector and the developed prototype in this thesis. A validation of SkillSpector was also made, which showed that it had a mean error of 37.4%.

  • 230.
    Bjervås, Jens
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH).
    Simulation of dry matter loss in biomass storage2019Independent thesis Advanced level (professional degree), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Material degradation and a decrease of fuel quality are common phenomena when storing biomass. A magnitude of 7.8% has been reported to degrade over five months when storing spruce wood chips in the winter in Central Europe. This thesis presents a theoretical study of biomass storage. It includes investigations of bio-chemical, chemical and physical processes that occur during storage of chipped woody biomass. These processes lead to degradation caused by micro-activity, chemical oxidation reactions and physical transformation of water. Micro-activity was modeled with Monod kinetics which are Michaelis-Menten type of expressions. The rate expressions were complemented with dependency functions describing the impact of oxygen, moisture and temperature. The woody biomass was divided into three fractions. These fractions represent how hard different components of the wood are to degrade by microorganisms. Chemical oxidation was modeled as a first order rate expression with respect to the active components of the wood. Two different cases have been simulated during the project. Firstly, an isolated system with an initial oxygen concentration of air was considered. This case displayed a temperature increase of approximately 2˚C and a material degradation less than 1%. The second case considered an isolated system with an endless depot of oxygen. This case resulted in degradation losses around 0.45-0.95% in the temperature range between 65-80˚C during approximately 300 days of storage. The temperature increased slowly due to chemical oxidation.

  • 231.
    Björck, Linnea
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Health Informatics and Logistics.
    Petersen, Johan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Health Informatics and Logistics.
    Höjdmätare för fallskärmshoppning: Metoder för höjdmätning samt framtagning av algoritmer för vald metod2019Independent thesis Basic level (university diploma), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    In skydiving, in addition to a well-functioning parachute system, a good and precise altimeter is needed. Both which are crucial parts of equipment in order to be able to perform a safe jump. Through digitalization and the technological development, there are today interests of developing a digital altimeter with better precision and several functions There are a number of techniques for measuring altitude. Those that are included in this bachelor thesis are GPS, radar and barometers.

    The aim of the thesis was to develop a robust algorithm for measuring height, with the possibility of development. The thesis work would also include risk analysis of selected technology or techniques, as well as suggestions for suitable presentation techniques and system solutions in a larger perspective. The system solutions would be adapted for easy integration of new features. If time allowed it, a prototype would also be developed and tested.

    The method chosen was a digital altimeter because it was best suited for the goals set for the project. To calculate the height with the digital altimeter, the relationship between air pressure and height was used. The result of these calculations showed a sufficiently precise measurement value to be acceptable. Since the accuracy of the measurement value was acceptable, it was decided that no further corrections would be made. The work continued with developing a prototype and testing it. The result was a functioning prototype. Future development opportunities are available within presentation technology, chassis, further corrections of the formula for height measurement and more iterations of hardware.

  • 232.
    Björgvinsdóttir, Linda
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH).
    Reconstruction of Fall Injuries for Children of Different Ages2019Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The idea to use finite element (FE) models to reconstruct accidents for humans is becoming more popular the last years. They represent the human body very accurately and indicate well changes in shape, size and biomechanical properties. FE models are useful when looking at complex factors in the human body in a more systematic way and when the approach is too complicated for conventional setups.

    Positioned child models from PIPER were used in the process and then rotated in LS-PrePost according to impact points and impact velocities from a given literature data where information from witnessed fall accidents of children was given. The simulations were finally run in LS-Dyna and the purpose was to investigate if the resulting brain injuries were similar to the real life data.

    From the literature, the falling distance from lowest point of the body to the ground, the age of the child, gender, type of ground and results from CT scans were all known. To compare the results to the literature data, section cuts of the brain were taken at four locations with different time steps. Biomechanical injury predictors such as brain strain, acceleration, rotational angular acceleration and rotational angular velocity were observed and helped with the comparison.

    In total, 12 cases were reconstructed which ended as 22 simulations. Due to uncertainty regarding the falling height when the children fell from a swing, each swing case had 3 scenarios. Overall the comparison of predicted injury locations from LS-Dyna to real injury locations from CT scans indicated that 7 out of 12 cases compared relatively well. The comparison of a 23-month-old girl to the same case reconsructed with CRABI-18 showed similar outcomes of the angular acceleration and the angular velocity. The linear acceleration and HIC were however much higher with LS-Dyna. Comparison between the swing cases of a 10-, 12- and 13-year-old resulted in similar results for the 12- and 13 year-old girls but the 10 year boy had lower values for all biomechanical parameters except the angular velocity which was a bit higher.

    With more detailed information about real accidents and precise scaling of PIPER child models, reconstruction with LS-Dyna could be useful in the future to design safer playgrounds for children and to obtain injury criterion for children after fall incidents.

  • 233.
    Björk, Sara
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Nano Biotechnology.
    Droplet microfluidics for screening and sorting of microbial cell factories2019Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Cell factories are cells that have been engineered to produce a compound of interest, ranging from biopharmaceuticals to biofuels. With advances in metabolic engineering, the number of cell factory variants to evaluate has increased dramatically, necessitating screening methods with increased throughput. Microfluidic droplets, which can be generated, manipulated and interrogated at very high throughput, are isolated reaction vessels at the single cell scale. Compartmentalization maintains the genotype-phenotype link, making droplet microfluidics suitable for screening of extracellular traits such as secreted products and for screening of microcolonies originating from single cells.

     

    In Paper I, we investigated the impact of droplet microfluidic incubation formats on cell culture conditions and found that syringe and semi open incubation resulted in different metabolic profiles. Controlling culture conditions is key to cell factory screening, as product formation is influenced by the state of the cell.

     

    In Paper II and III, we used droplet microfluidics to perform screening campaigns of interference based cell factory variant libraries. In Paper II, two S. cerevisiae RNAi libraries were screened based on amylase secretion, and from the sorted fraction genes linked to improved protein secretion could be identified. In paper III, we screened a Synecosystis sp. CRISPRi library based on lactate secretion. The library was sorted at different time points after induction, followed by sequencing to reveal genes enriched by droplet sorting.

     

    In Paper IV, we developed a droplet microcolony-based assay for screening intracellular triacylglycerol (TAG) in S. cerevisiae, and showed improved strain separation compared to flow cytometry in a hypothetical sorting scenario. By screening microcolonies compartmentalized in droplets, we combine the throughput of single cell screening methods with the reduced impact of cell-to-cell noise in cell ensemble analysis.

  • 234.
    Björk, Sara
    et al.
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Nano Biotechnology.
    Jönsson, Håkan
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Nano Biotechnology.
    Microfluidics for cell factory and bioprocess development2019In: Current Opinion in Biotechnology, ISSN 0958-1669, E-ISSN 1879-0429, Vol. 55, p. 95-102Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Bioindustry is expanding to an increasing variety of food, chemical and pharmaceutical products, each requiring rapid development of a dedicated cell factory and bioprocess. Microfluidic tools are, together with tools from synthetic biology and metabolic modeling, being employed in cell factory and bioprocess development to speed up development and address new products. Recent examples of microfluidics for bioprocess development range from integrated devices for DNA assembly and transformation, to high throughput screening of cell factory libraries, and micron scale bioreactors for process optimization. These improvements act to improve the biotechnological engineering cycle with tools for building, testing and evaluating cell factories and bioprocesses by increasing throughput, parallelization and automation.

  • 235.
    Björk, Sara M.
    et al.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Nano Biotechnology.
    Sjostrom, Staffan L.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Andersson-Svahn, Helene
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Nano Biotechnology.
    Jönsson, Håkan N.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Nano Biotechnology.
    Metabolite profiling of microfluidic cell culture conditions for droplet based screening2015In: Biomicrofluidics, ISSN 1932-1058, E-ISSN 1932-1058, Vol. 9, no 4, article id 044128Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We investigate the impact of droplet culture conditions on cell metabolic state by determining key metabolite concentrations in S. cerevisiae cultures in different microfluidic droplet culture formats. Control of culture conditions is critical for single cell/clone screening in droplets, such as directed evolution of yeast, as cell metabolic state directly affects production yields from cell factories. Here, we analyze glucose, pyruvate, ethanol, and glycerol, central metabolites in yeast glucose dissimilation to establish culture formats for screening of respiring as well as fermenting yeast. Metabolite profiling provides a more nuanced estimate of cell state compared to proliferation studies alone. We show that the choice of droplet incubation format impacts cell proliferation and metabolite production. The standard syringe incubation of droplets exhibited metabolite profiles similar to oxygen limited cultures, whereas the metabolite profiles of cells cultured in the alternative wide tube droplet incubation format resemble those from aerobic culture. Furthermore, we demonstrate retained droplet stability and size in the new better oxygenated droplet incubation format.

  • 236.
    Björk, Sara
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Nano Biotechnology.
    Schappert, Martin
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Nano Biotechnology.
    Jönsson, Håkan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Nano Biotechnology.
    Droplet microfluidic microcolony analysis of triacylglycerol yields in S. cerevisiae for high throughput screeningManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 237.
    Björk, Sara
    et al.
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Shabestary, Kiyan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Systems Biology.
    Yao, Lun
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Ljungqvist, Emil
    Jönsson, Håkan
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Hudson, Elton P.
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Droplet microfluidic screening of a Synechocystis sp. CRISPRi library based on L-lactate productionManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 238.
    Björlenius, Berndt
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Industrial Biotechnology.
    Pharmaceuticals – improved removal from municipal wastewater and their occurrence in the Baltic Sea2018Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Pharmaceutical residues are found in the environment due to extensive use in human and veterinary medicine. The active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs) have a potential impact in non-target organisms. Municipal wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) are not designed to remove APIs.

    In this thesis, two related matters are addressed 1) evaluation of advanced treatment to remove APIs from municipal wastewater and 2) the prevalence and degradation of APIs in the Baltic Sea.

    A stationary pilot plant with nanofiltration (NF) and a mobile pilot plant with activated carbon and ozonation were designed to study the removal of APIs at four WWTPs. By NF, removal reached 90%, but the retentate needed further treatment. A predictive model of the rejection of APIs by NF was developed based on the variables: polarizability, globularity, ratio hydrophobic to polar water accessible surface and charge. The pilot plants with granular and powdered activated carbon (GAC) and (PAC) removed more than 95% of the APIs. Screening of activated carbon products was essential, because of a broad variation in adsorption capacity. Recirculation of PAC or longer contact time, increased the removal of APIs. Ozonation with 5-7 g/m3 ozone resulted in 87-95% removal of APIs. Elevated activity and transcription of biomarkers indicated presence of xenobiotics in regular effluent. Chemical analysis of APIs, together with analysis of biomarkers, were valuable and showed that GAC-filtration and ozonation can be implemented to remove APIs in WWTPs, with decreased biomarker responses.

    Sampling of the Baltic Sea showed presence of APIs in 41 out of 43 locations. A developed grey box model predicted concentration and half-life of carbamazepine in the Baltic Sea to be 1.8 ng/L and 1300 d respectively.

    In conclusion, APIs were removed to 95% by GAC or PAC treatment. The additional treatment resulted in lower biomarker responses than today and some APIs were shown to be widespread in the aquatic environment.

  • 239.
    Björlenius, Berndt
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Industrial Biotechnology.
    Ripszám, M.
    Haglund, P.
    Lindberg, R. H.
    Tysklind, M.
    Fick, J.
    Pharmaceutical residues are widespread in Baltic Sea coastal and offshore waters – Screening for pharmaceuticals and modelling of environmental concentrations of carbamazepine2018In: Science of the Total Environment, ISSN 0048-9697, E-ISSN 1879-1026, Vol. 633, p. 1496-1509Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The consumption of pharmaceuticals worldwide coupled with modest removal efficiencies of sewage treatment plants have resulted in the presence of pharmaceuticals in aquatic systems globally. In this study, we investigated the environmental concentrations of a selection of 93 pharmaceuticals in 43 locations in the Baltic Sea and Skagerrak. The Baltic Sea is vulnerable to anthropogenic activities due to a long turnover time and a sensitive ecosystem in the brackish water. Thirty-nine of 93 pharmaceuticals were detected in at least one sample, with concentrations ranging between 0.01 and 80 ng/L. One of the pharmaceuticals investigated, the anti-epileptic drug carbamazepine, was widespread in coastal and offshore seawaters (present in 37 of 43 samples). In order to predict concentrations of pharmaceuticals in the sub-basins of the Baltic Sea, a mass balance-based grey box model was set up and the persistent, widely used carbamazepine was selected as the model substance. The model was based on hydrological and meteorological sub-basin characteristics, removal data from smaller watersheds and wastewater treatment plants, and statistics relating to population, consumption and excretion rate of carbamazepine in humans. The grey box model predicted average environmental concentrations of carbamazepine in sub-basins with no significant difference from the measured concentrations, amounting to 0.57-3.2 ng/L depending on sub-basin location. In the Baltic Sea, the removal rate of carbamazepine in seawater was estimated to be 6.2 10(-9) s(-1) based on a calculated half-life time of 3.5 years at 10 degrees C, which demonstrates the long response time of the environment to measures phasing out persistent or slowly degradable substances such as carbamazepine. Sampling, analysis and grey box modelling were all valuable in describing the presence and removal of carbamazepine in the Baltic Sea.

  • 240.
    Björling, Alexander
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH).
    Green Modification of Corn-Based Polysaccharide Substrates Towards Enhanced Compatibilization for Bioplastics2018Independent thesis Basic level (professional degree), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The government is introducing new guidelines and policies regarding the raw materials for commercial plastics. They suggest that the replacement of oil-based plastics is necessary. The replacement shall be bio-based raw materials to achieve a sustainable plastic community. For example, Sweden is supposed to be a fossil-free country by 2030. To be able to achieve these replacements, research of creating bio-based plastics out of different bio-based raw materials is needed. A good example of this type of research is the purpose of the EU project BARBARA.

    The goal of the EU funded project BARBARA is to develop polysaccharide-based engineering bioplastics, that are both sustainable and competitive against other commercial plastics. The BARBARA project involves extraction and chemical modification of bio-based molecules and functional additives from agricultural residues, like corn, as well as their compatibility with commercial bioplastics. The product is later supposed to be used in advanced engineering applications such as automotive and construction.

    The scope of the project in this report was to evaluate esterification methods for four starch grades with different amylose/amylopectin ratios by applying green chemistry to enhance the material properties of starch. The results were evaluated based on the reaction efficiency on the degree of substitution of the hydroxyl groups (DS), the hydrophilicity, the molecular structure and the thermal stability after modification.

    The results from the Fourier-Transform Infrared Spectroscopy showed that the DS increased by longer reaction time for all the starches. The analysis by High Performance Liquid Chromatography showed that the DS increased by the reaction time for the native and waxy starch. The results also suggest that there is an optimum reaction time for the two high amylose starches. The analysis by X-Ray Diffraction showed that the crystallinity of all the starches had decreased after the modification and in some cases might have transitioned into an amorphous structure. The thermogravimetric analysis showed that the starches had become more hydrophobic after modification. The water content in the samples decreased by longer reaction time. The thermogravimetric analysis also showed that the thermal stability had been enhanced after the modification.

  • 241.
    Björling Nordström, Sebastian
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH).
    Pruul Trueman, Eric
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH).
    Incitament för centraliserad hantering av externa serviceavtal2018Independent thesis Basic level (professional degree), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    At the moment there are no guidelines to how external service agreements should be managed and administered at Södersjukhuset. The goal with this report has been to provide Södersjukhuset with supporting arguments to decide if they should centralize the management of service agreements or not. In order to achieve this goal it was essential to: study and get a better understanding of the term centralization, examine the serviceagreements’ to get a greater awareness of their extent and analyze Södersjukhuset to gain a better insight of the organisation as a whole. Service agreements were accumulated throughmeetings with the hospital’s employees and through the software Medusa. Calculations were conducted from the agreements to display Södersjukhuset’s current situation. Themanagement of the hospital’s service agreements was considered decentralized and wasdeemed to convey negative economical factors. A proposed solution for the problem was a centralized structure for managing external service agreements which would help the hospital organize and benefit it economically.

  • 242.
    Bladholm, Viktor
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH).
    Organic Fillers for Solid Rocket Fuel2018Independent thesis Advanced level (professional degree), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Liquid propellant and solid propellant rockets are the most commonly used rockets

    Liquid propellant rockets have the advantage of being manoeuvrable with a high specific performance while they exhibit problems with storage and a complex design. Solid propellant rockets offer simplicity and are storable while they have a large environmental impact and could be difficult to handle. A third type of rocket, hybrid propellant rocket has the potential to combine the simplicity of solid propellant rocket with the manoeuvrability of liquid propellant rockets. While the hybrid propellant rocket offers advantages over liquid propellant and solid propellant rocket it have problems with its fuel which have a low regression rate and low density. Organic fillers were evaluated since they may increase in the regression rate and the density of the solid fuel. 50 organic fillers were assessed with regards to their specific impulse, density, cost and handling properties. The organic fillers with the most promising properties were then experimentally evaluated. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), isothermal weight loss test, compatibility test and differential scanning calorimetry analysis were conducted. The results indicate that hexamine, fluorene, anthracene and 1,4-dicyanobenzene are the most suitable organic fillers of those evaluated..

  • 243.
    Blom, Sofia
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH).
    Comparison of the biodegradability of different intestinal filling agents2018Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The objectives of this project were to study the environmental aspect of some intestinal filling agents used for contrast imaging, after released into the environment. The factor that was investigated was the biodegradability of the agents. The agents were Movprep (main ingredient is PEG), Omnipaque (main ingredient is Iohexol based on Iodine) and a Filling Agent A (protein rich, further called FAA) that currently was during development. The outline of the project included some steps. Movprep and Omnipaque were stated to be stable along human consumption, hence was a step of digestion only carried out for FAA. To add the aspect of solar radiation in the environment, phototransformation experiments were performed. To get a better view of the biodegradability of the agents, the concentration of organic carbon was determined. The environmental issue of exceeded addition of nitrogen compounds was evaluated by analysing the concentration of nitrogen in nitrate. To determine the composition and decomposition, MALDI-TOF MS was carried out. Differences were found between the samples and depending on how long time they were exposed for solar radiation. FAA showed to be rather biodegradable. Movprep was stable, but not as stable as expected. Omnipaque was very stable in elemental concentrations and quite stable in composition, at least for a short time.

  • 244.
    Blomfeldt, Thomas Olof John
    et al.
    KTH.
    Hedenqvist, Mikael S.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Polymeric Materials.
    Johansson, Eva
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Dept Crop Sci, S-23053 Alnarp, Sweden..
    CELL 176-Insulation material made from wheat gluten2008In: Abstract of Papers of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0065-7727, Vol. 235Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 245.
    Blomkvist, Björn
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry.
    Dinér, Peter
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry.
    HBF4 center dot DEE-catalyzed formation of sulfinyl imines: Synthesis and mechanistic studies2018In: Tetrahedron Letters, ISSN 0040-4039, E-ISSN 1359-8562, Vol. 59, no 13, p. 1249-1253Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A mild acid-catalysed method is reported for the formation of sulfinyl imines from tert-butanesulfinamide and aromatic or aliphatic aldehydes using tetrafluoroboric acid diethyletherate (10 mol%) in dichloromethane. Reactions were performed at room temperature and gave the corresponding sulfinyl imines in excellent yield after 2 h. A DFT study was performed and a mechanism for the reaction is postulated. 

  • 246.
    Blomkvist, Björn
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Organic chemistry.
    Dinér, Peter
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Organic chemistry.
    Mild and Rapid Aniline/HBF4 center dot DEE-Catalysed Formation of Sulfinyl Imines2019In: ChemistrySelect, ISSN 2365-6549, Vol. 4, no 25, p. 7431-7436Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The combination of anline and tetrafluoroboric acid diethyl etherate (2.5 mol% and 5 mol%, respectively) significantly accelerates the formation of sulfinyl imines in dichloromethane and isopropylacetate at room temperature compared to previous procedures. A DFT and NMR spectroscopic study shows that the anilinium tetrafluoroborate complex is solvated by sulfinamide molecules in the initial state and that the rate-limiting step of the reaction is the addition of the sulfinamide molecule to the protonated aniline-based imine. In addition, the catalytic system was also utilised in a one-pot, two step reaction, where the in situ formed sulfinyl imine was arylated in a rhodium catalysed reaction with high diastereoselectivity.

  • 247.
    Bodell, Linnéa
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH).
    Investigation of Factors Affecting the Emulsification of Skin Creams2019Independent thesis Basic level (professional degree), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Skin creams are one of Sky Resources key products, they are produced as an oil-in-water(O/W) emulsion. In order to form an emulsion the oil and water needs to be able to mixtogether, for that to happen the oil and water droplets have to be broken up into very smalldroplets (colloids).

    There is a certain quality difference between the products from the research and developmentdepartment and the production department.

    The skin creams have been made through a given recipe, which contains a number of chemicalformulas. Tests have been preformed and the results have been examined. The creams werefirst made in the research and development department’s laboratory and then that small scaleproduction was taken to big scale production in the production department. The results havebeen documented and the parameters that have been examined are speed, temperature and timeto see how they affect the viscosity of the creams.

    A factorial experiment with three factors has been made. The factors are the time the skincream is homogenized, at what speed the cream is homogenized and at what temperature thephases are when the homogenizing is started. That gives a total of 8 creams from thelaboratory level.

    The viscosity of the skin creams have been measured after 10 minutes, 24 hours, 48 hours and1 week to see how it is increasing with time and if it is increasing at all or perhaps decreasing.After 1 week the creams were also studied under a microscope to see how successful theemulsions were with different factors.

    The fourth cream was the only cream from the laboratory that had a successful emulsion andstabilized viscosity. So the factors that are brought from laboratory to production is highhomogenization time, high homogenization speed and low temperature. Two differenthomogenizers were tried in production.

    The factor that affects the viscosity the most seems to be the temperature. After these tests,there is still a difference between the products from the research and development departmentand the production department even with the lower temperatures on the oil and water phases.The second cream from production and cream 4 from the laboratory show the smallest qualitydifference. More tests need to be done in the production department with differenthomogenization speed and time with the lower temperature to establish the result.

  • 248. Bohlin, M.
    et al.
    Rasmuson, Åke Christoffer
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering.
    Application of controlled cooling and seeding in batch crystallization1992In: The Canadian Journal of Chemical Engineering, Vol. 70, no 1, p. 120-126Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 249. Bohlin, M.
    et al.
    Rasmuson, Åke Christoffer
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering.
    Importance of Macromixing in Batch Cooling Crystallization1996In: AIChE Journal, Vol. 42, no 3, p. 691-699Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 250. Bohlin, M.
    et al.
    Rasmuson, Åke Christoffer
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering.
    Modeling of growth rate dispersion in batch cooling crystallization1992In: AIChE Journal, Vol. 38, no 12, p. 1853-1863Article in journal (Refereed)
2345678 201 - 250 of 2487
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