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  • 201.
    Bronge, M.
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Neurosci, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Asplund Hogelin, K.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Neurosci, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Thomas, O. G.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Neurosci, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Ruhrmann, S.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Neurosci, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Carvalho-Querioz, C.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Neurosci, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Nilsson, O.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Neurosci, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Kaiser, A.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Neurosci, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Holmgren, E.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Neurosci, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Linnerbauer, M.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Neurosci, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Adzemovic, M. Z.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Neurosci, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Zeitelhofer, M.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Neurosci, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Hellström, Cecilia
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Affinity Proteomics.
    Jelcic, I.
    Univ Hosp Zurich, Neuroimmunol & MS Res, Zurich, Switzerland..
    Liu, Hailong
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Polymer Technology.
    Nilsson, Peter
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Affinity Proteomics.
    Hillert, J.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Neurosci, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Brundin, L.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Neurosci, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Fink, K.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Neurosci, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Martin, R.
    Univ Hosp Zurich, Neuroimmunol & MS Res, Zurich, Switzerland..
    Tegel, Hanna
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Protein Technology.
    Gräslund, Torbjörn
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Protein Engineering.
    Al Nimer, F.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Neurosci, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Guerreiro-Cacais, A. O.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Neurosci, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Khademi, M.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Neurosci, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Gafvelin, G.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Neurosci, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Olsson, T.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Neurosci, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Gronlund, H.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Neurosci, Stockholm, Sweden..
    T cell reactivity screening reveals four novel CNS autoantigens in multiple sclerosis2021In: Multiple Sclerosis Journal, ISSN 1352-4585, E-ISSN 1477-0970, Vol. 27, no 2_SUPPL, p. 344-345Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 202.
    Brooke, Robert
    et al.
    Digital Systems, Smart Hardware, Bio- and Organic Electronics, RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Norrköping, Sweden.
    Lay, Makara
    Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics, Linköping University, Norrköping, Sweden;INM- Leibniz Institute for New Materials, Saarbrücken, Germany.
    Jain, Karishma
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Francon, Hugo
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Say, Mehmet Girayhan
    Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics, Linköping University, Norrköping, Sweden.
    Belaineh, Dagmawi
    Digital Systems, Smart Hardware, Bio- and Organic Electronics, RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Norrköping, Sweden.
    Wang, Xin
    Digital Systems, Smart Hardware, Bio- and Organic Electronics, RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Norrköping, Sweden.
    Håkansson, Karl M. O.
    Bioeconomy & Health, RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Engquist, Isak
    Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics, Linköping University, Norrköping, Sweden;Wallenberg Wood Science Center, Linköping University, Norrköping, Sweden.
    Edberg, Jesper
    Digital Systems, Smart Hardware, Bio- and Organic Electronics, RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Norrköping, Sweden.
    Berggren, Magnus
    Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics, Linköping University, Norrköping, Sweden;Wallenberg Wood Science Center, Linköping University, Norrköping, Sweden.
    Nanocellulose and PEDOT:PSS composites and their applications2022In: Polymer Reviews, ISSN 1558-3724, p. 1-41Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The need for achieving sustainable technologies has encouraged research on renewable and biodegradable materials for novel products that are clean, green, and environmentally friendly. Nanocellulose (NC) has many attractive properties such as high mechanical strength and flexibility, large specific surface area, in addition to possessing good wet stability and resistance to tough chemical environments. NC has also been shown to easily integrate with other materials to form composites. By combining it with conductive and electroactive materials, many of the advantageous properties of NC can be transferred to the resulting composites. Conductive polymers, in particular poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene:poly(styrene sulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS), have been successfully combined with cellulose derivatives where suspensions of NC particles and colloids of PEDOT:PSS are made to interact at a molecular level. Alternatively, different polymerization techniques have been used to coat the cellulose fibrils. When processed in liquid form, the resulting mixture can be used as a conductive ink. This review outlines the preparation of NC/PEDOT:PSS composites and their fabrication in the form of electronic nanopapers, filaments, and conductive aerogels. We also discuss the molecular interaction between NC and PEDOT:PSS and the factors that affect the bonding properties. Finally, we address their potential applications in energy storage and harvesting, sensors, actuators, and bioelectronics. 

  • 203.
    Brunova, Alica
    et al.
    Slovak Acad Sci, Inst Phys, Dubravska Cesta 9, Bratislava 84511, Slovakia..
    Vegso, Karol
    Slovak Acad Sci, Inst Phys, Dubravska Cesta 9, Bratislava 84511, Slovakia.;Slovak Acad Sci, Ctr Adv Mat Applicat, Dubravska Cesta 9, Bratislava 84511, Slovakia..
    Nadazdy, Vojtech
    Slovak Acad Sci, Inst Phys, Dubravska Cesta 9, Bratislava 84511, Slovakia.;Slovak Acad Sci, Ctr Adv Mat Applicat, Dubravska Cesta 9, Bratislava 84511, Slovakia..
    Nadazdy, Peter
    Slovak Acad Sci, Inst Phys, Dubravska Cesta 9, Bratislava 84511, Slovakia..
    Subair, Riyas
    Slovak Acad Sci, Inst Phys, Dubravska Cesta 9, Bratislava 84511, Slovakia..
    Jergel, Matej
    Slovak Acad Sci, Inst Phys, Dubravska Cesta 9, Bratislava 84511, Slovakia.;Slovak Acad Sci, Ctr Adv Mat Applicat, Dubravska Cesta 9, Bratislava 84511, Slovakia..
    Majkova, Eva
    Slovak Acad Sci, Inst Phys, Dubravska Cesta 9, Bratislava 84511, Slovakia.;Slovak Acad Sci, Ctr Adv Mat Applicat, Dubravska Cesta 9, Bratislava 84511, Slovakia..
    Pandit, Pallavi
    DESY, D-22607 Hamburg, Germany..
    Roth, Stephan V.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites. DESY, D-22607 Hamburg, Germany..
    Krasnansky, Alexander
    Boston Univ, Dept Phys, 233 Bay State Rd, Boston, MA 02215 USA..
    Hinderhofer, Alexander
    Univ Tubingen, Inst Appl Phys, Morgenstelle 10, D-72076 Tubingen, Germany..
    Schreiber, Frank
    Univ Tubingen, Inst Appl Phys, Morgenstelle 10, D-72076 Tubingen, Germany..
    Tian, Jianjun
    Univ Sci & Technol Beijing, Inst Adv Mat & Technol, Beijing 100083, Peoples R China..
    Siffalovic, Peter
    Slovak Acad Sci, Inst Phys, Dubravska Cesta 9, Bratislava 84511, Slovakia.;Slovak Acad Sci, Ctr Adv Mat Applicat, Dubravska Cesta 9, Bratislava 84511, Slovakia..
    Structural and Trap-State Density Enhancement in Flash Infrared Annealed Perovskite Layers2021In: Advanced Materials Interfaces, ISSN 2196-7350, Vol. 8, no 14, article id 2100355Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Perovskite solar cells are well-known for their high energy conversion efficiency, low-temperature processing, and cost-effective production. Flash infrared annealing (FIRA) of slot-die cast perovskite precursors offers an attractive manufacturing route using high-throughput roll-to-roll technology. Despite the recent progress in FIRA perovskite annealing, the optimal composition of the perovskite precursor is yet to be developed. Here, the effect of methylammonium chloride (MACI) on the perovskite structure and trap-state density as a function ofthe FIRA annealing time is investigated. In situ real-time grazingincidence wide-angle X-ray scattering (GIWAXS) is employed to monitor the perovskite layer formation during FIRA annealing with millisecond temporal resolution. In addition, the density of states in the bandgap is estimated using ex situ energy-resolved electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. Evidence is found that adding 10% MACI into the perovskite precursor solution significantly improves the crystallographic orientation of the perovskite layers while reducing the trap-state density by one order of magnitude. In addition, using time-resolved GIWAXS, the most favorable time window for the FIRA processing of perovskite films with the lowest mosaicity and trap-state density is identified. The results are of general importance for elucidating the appropriate temporal windows in complex and fast-evolving crystallization processes.

  • 204.
    Brusentsev, Yury
    et al.
    Laboratory of Natural Materials Technology, Johan Gadolin Process Chemistry Centre, Åbo Akademi University, Henrikinkatu 2, 20500 Turku, Finland.
    Yang, Peiru
    Turku Bioscience Centre, University of Turku and Åbo Akademi University, Tykistökatu 6, 20520 Turku, Finland; Cell Biology, Faculty of Science and Engineering, Åbo Akademi University, Tykistökatu 6, 20520 Turku, Finland.
    King, Alistair W.T.
    Chemistry Department, University of Helsinki, Yliopistonkatu 3, 00014 Helsinki, Finland.
    Cheng, Fang
    School of Pharmaceutical Sciences (Shenzhen), Shenzhen Campus of Sun Yat-sen University, Shenzhen 518107, China.
    Cortes Ruiz, Maria F.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Eriksson, John E.
    Turku Bioscience Centre, University of Turku and Åbo Akademi University, Tykistökatu 6, 20520 Turku, Finland; Cell Biology, Faculty of Science and Engineering, Åbo Akademi University, Tykistökatu 6, 20520 Turku, Finland.
    Kilpeläinen, Ilkka
    Chemistry Department, University of Helsinki, Yliopistonkatu 3, 00014 Helsinki, Finland.
    Willför, Stefan
    Laboratory of Natural Materials Technology, Johan Gadolin Process Chemistry Centre, Åbo Akademi University, Henrikinkatu 2, 20500 Turku, Finland.
    Xu, Chunlin
    Laboratory of Natural Materials Technology, Johan Gadolin Process Chemistry Centre, Åbo Akademi University, Henrikinkatu 2, 20500 Turku, Finland.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Wang, Xiaoju
    Laboratory of Natural Materials Technology, Johan Gadolin Process Chemistry Centre, Åbo Akademi University, Henrikinkatu 2, 20500 Turku, Finland.
    Photocross-Linkable and Shape-Memory Biomaterial Hydrogel Based on Methacrylated Cellulose Nanofibres2023In: Biomacromolecules, ISSN 1525-7797, E-ISSN 1526-4602, Vol. 24, no 8, p. 3835-3845Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the context of three-dimensional (3D) cell culture and tissue engineering, 3D printing is a powerful tool for customizing in vitro 3D cell culture models that are critical for understanding the cell-matrix and cell-cell interactions. Cellulose nanofibril (CNF) hydrogels are emerging in constructing scaffolds able to imitate tissue in a microenvironment. A direct modification of the methacryloyl (MA) group onto CNF is an appealing approach to synthesize photocross-linkable building blocks in formulating CNF-based bioinks for light-assisted 3D printing; however, it faces the challenge of the low efficiency of heterogenous surface modification. Here, a multistep approach yields CNF methacrylate (CNF-MA) with a decent degree of substitution while maintaining a highly dispersible CNF hydrogel, and CNF-MA is further formulated and copolymerized with monomeric acrylamide (AA) to form a super transparent hydrogel with tuneable mechanical strength (compression modulus, approximately 5-15 kPa). The resulting photocurable hydrogel shows good printability in direct ink writing and good cytocompatibility with HeLa and human dermal fibroblast cell lines. Moreover, the hydrogel reswells in water and expands to all directions to restore its original dimension after being air-dried, with further enhanced mechanical properties, for example, Young’s modulus of a 1.1% CNF-MA/1% PAA hydrogel after reswelling in water increases to 10.3 kPa from 5.5 kPa.

  • 205.
    Brännström, Sara
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    Exploring bio-based monomers for UV-curable polymer networks2019Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Increased environmental awareness and concern has led to a high demand for sustainable, bio-based materials. Consequently, there is a need for research and development of new bio-based polymeric materials that can be synthesized via routes eliminating excessively toxic reactants and by-products. The work presented in this thesis has focused on the utilization of catalysis, mainly enzymatic, and photopolymerization in order to create efficient synthesis of polymeric networks from bio-based monomers.Polyesters from bio-based monomers have been polymerized in bulk and thereafter crosslinked by UV initiation to yield polymer networks with tunable properties. The synthesis was also studied more in detail by varying the different types of catalysts and comparing their effect on the polymer products. Polyesters are a promising class of polymers that can be made from bio-based resources due to the wide range of available bio-based carboxylic acids and alcohols that can be combined to yield many polymers with different properties. However, the synthesis of polyesters is rather time-consuming in order to reach high conversions.As a more efficient alternative, short chain esters monomers and oligomers that have vinyl ether (VE) functionalities were developed. These VE-esters can be synthesized partly from bio-based resources, such as acids, fatty acids and diols, and their synthesis is efficient with enzymatic catalysis. The VE functionality provides a reactive group which can be polymerized rapidly with cationic polymerization. In general, the vinyl ether-esters can be synthesized in less than one hour and crosslinked within a few minutes, which is significantly faster than traditional polyester-synthesis and crosslinking. The enzymatic synthesis of vinyl ether esters also provided a method for developing monomers with orthogonal functionality which was explored by developing functionalizable materials with a variety of macromolecular architectures.

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  • 206.
    Brännström, Sara
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Finnveden, Maja
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Industrial Biotechnology.
    Johansson, Mats
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Martinelle, Mats
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Industrial Biotechnology.
    Malmström, Eva
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Itaconate based polyesters: Selectivity and performance of esterification catalysts2018In: European Polymer Journal, ISSN 0014-3057, E-ISSN 1873-1945, Vol. 103, p. 370-377Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The performance of different esterification catalysts was studied for the use in synthesis of renewable polyesters from dimethyl itaconate (DMI), dimethyl succinate (DMS) and 1,4-butanediol (BD). Itaconic acid and derivatives such as DMI are interesting monomers because of their multiple functionalities and previous work has shown great potential. However, the multiple functionalities also pose challenges to avoid side reactions such as thermally initiated, premature, radical crosslinking and/or isomerization of the 1,1-disubstituted unsaturation. Additionally, the two carboxylic acids have inherently different reactivity. One key factor to control reactions with IA is to understand the performance of different catalysts. In this study, six esterification catalysts were investigated; immobilized Candida antarctica lipase B (CalB), titanium(IV)butoxide (Ti(OBu)4), p-toluenesulfonic acid (pTSA), sulfuric acid (H2SO4), 1,8-diazabicycloundec-7-ene (DBU), and 1,5,7-triazabicyclodec-5-ene (TBD). CalB and Ti(OBu)4 were selected for further characterization with appreciable differences in catalytic activity and selectivity towards DMI. CalB was the most effective catalysts and was applied at 60 °C while Ti(OBu)4 required 160 °C for a reasonable reaction rate. CalB was selective towards DMS and the non-conjugated side of DMI, resulting in polyesters with itaconate-residues mainly located at the chain ends, while Ti(OBu)4 showed low selectivity, resulting in polyesters with more randomly incorporated itaconate units. Thermal analysis of the polyesters showed that the CalB-catalyzed polyesters were semi-crystalline, whereas the Ti(OBu)4-catalyzed polyesters were amorphous, affirming the difference in monomer sequence. The polyester resins were crosslinked by UV-initiated free radical polymerization and the material properties were evaluated and showed that the crosslinked materials had similar material properties. The films from the polyester resins catalyzed by CalB were furthermore completely free from discoloration whereas the film made from the polyester resins catalyzed with Ti(OBu)4 had a yellow color, caused by the catalyst. Thus, it has been shown that CalB can be used to attain sustainable unsaturated polyesters resins for coating applications, exhibiting equally good properties as resins obtained from traditional metal-catalysis.

  • 207.
    Brännström, Sara
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Finnveden, Maja
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Industrial Biotechnology.
    Razza, Nicolo
    Politecn Torino, Dept Appl Sci & Technol, Corso Duca Abruzzi 24, I-10129 Turin, Italy..
    Martinelle, Mats
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Industrial Biotechnology.
    Malmström, Eva
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Sangermano, Marco
    Politecn Torino, Dept Appl Sci & Technol, Corso Duca Abruzzi 24, I-10129 Turin, Italy..
    Johansson, Mats
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Tailoring Thermo-Mechanical Properties of Cationically UV-Cured Systems by a Rational Design of Vinyl Ether Ester Oligomers using Enzyme Catalysis2018In: Macromolecular Chemistry and Physics, ISSN 1022-1352, E-ISSN 1521-3935, Vol. 219, no 21, article id 1800335Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is a demand for new sustainable polymeric materials. Vinyl ethers are, in this context, attractive oligomers since they polymerize fast, are non-toxic, and can be polymerized under ambient conditions. The availability of vinyl ether oligomers is, however, currently limited due to difficulties in synthesizing them without using tedious synthesis routes. This work presents the synthesis of a series of vinyl ether ester oligomers using enzyme catalysis under solvent-free conditions and the subsequent photoinduced cationic polymerization to form polymer thermosets with T(g)s ranging from -10 to 100 degrees C. The whole process is very efficient as the synthesis takes less than 1 h with no need for purification and the crosslinking is complete within 2 min.

  • 208.
    Brännström, Sara
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    Johansson, Mats
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    Malmström, Eva
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    Enzymatically Synthesized Vinyl Ether-Disulfide Monomer Enablingan Orthogonal Combination of Free Radical and Cationic Chemistry toward Sustainable Functional Networks2019In: Biomacromolecules, ISSN 1525-7797, E-ISSN 1526-4602, Vol. 20, no 3, p. 1308-1316, article id 10.1021/acs.biomac.8b01710Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This work demonstrates a versatile and environmentally friendly route for the development of new orthogonal monomers that can be used for postfunctionalizable polymer networks. A monomer containing both vinyl ether (VE) and cyclic disulfide moieties was synthesized via enzyme catalysis under benign reaction conditions. The bifunctional monomer could be polymerized to form macromolecues with differing architectures by the use of either cationic or radical photo polymerization. When cationic polymerization was performed, a linear polymer was obtained with pendant disulfide units in the side chain, whereas in the presence of radical initiator, the VE reacted with the disulfide to yield a branched structure. The monomer was thereafter used to design networks that could be postfunctionalized; the monomer was cross-linked with cationic initiation together with a difunctional VE oligomer and after cross-linking the unreacted disulfides were coupled to RhodamineVE by radical UV-initiation.

  • 209.
    Buchmann, Sebastian
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Intelligent systems, Micro and Nanosystems.
    Enrico, Alessandro
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Intelligent systems, Micro and Nanosystems.
    Holzreuter, Muriel Alexandra
    Reid, Michael S.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Zeglio, Erica
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Intelligent systems, Micro and Nanosystems.
    Niklaus, Frank
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Intelligent systems, Micro and Nanosystems.
    Stemme, Göran
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Intelligent systems, Micro and Nanosystems.
    Herland, Anna
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Intelligent systems, Micro and Nanosystems.
    Defined neuronal-astrocytic interactions enabled with a 3D printed platformManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 210.
    Buchmann, Sebastian
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Nano Biotechnology.
    Enrico, Alessandro
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Intelligent systems, Micro and Nanosystems.
    Holzreuter, Muriel Alexandra
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Intelligent systems, Micro and Nanosystems.
    Reid, Michael S.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Zeglio, Erica
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Nano Biotechnology.
    Niklaus, Frank
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Intelligent systems, Micro and Nanosystems.
    Stemme, Göran
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Intelligent systems, Micro and Nanosystems.
    Herland, Anna
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Nano Biotechnology.
    Probabilistic cell seeding and non-autofluorescent 3D-printed structures as scalable approach for multi-level co-culture modeling2023In: Materials Today Bio, ISSN 2590-0064, Vol. 21, p. 100706-100706, article id 100706Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To model complex biological tissue in vitro, a specific layout for the position and numbers of each cell type isnecessary. Establishing such a layout requires manual cell placement in three dimensions (3D) with micrometricprecision, which is complicated and time-consuming. Moreover, 3D printed materials used in compartmentalizedmicrofluidic models are opaque or autofluorescent, hindering parallel optical readout and forcing serial charac-terization methods, such as patch-clamp probing. To address these limitations, we introduce a multi-level co-culture model realized using a parallel cell seeding strategy of human neurons and astrocytes on 3D structuresprinted with a commercially available non-autofluorescent resin at micrometer resolution. Using a two-stepstrategy based on probabilistic cell seeding, we demonstrate a human neuronal monoculture that forms net-works on the 3D printed structure and can establish cell-projection contacts with an astrocytic-neuronal co-cultureseeded on the glass substrate. The transparent and non-autofluorescent printed platform allows fluorescence-based immunocytochemistry and calcium imaging. This approach provides facile multi-level compartmentaliza-tion of different cell types and routes for pre-designed cell projection contacts, instrumental in studying complextissue, such as the human brain.

  • 211.
    Buchmann, Sebastian
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Nano Biotechnology. AIMES – Center for the Advancement of Integrated Medical and Engineering Sciences at Karolinska Institutet and KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden/ Department of Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Stoop, Pepijn
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Nano Biotechnology. AIMES – Center for the Advancement of Integrated Medical and Engineering Sciences at Karolinska Institutet and KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden/ Department of Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Roekevisch, Kim
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Nano Biotechnology. AIMES – Center for the Advancement of Integrated Medical and Engineering Sciences at Karolinska Institutet and KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden/ Department of Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Jain, Saumey
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Nano Biotechnology. KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Intelligent systems, Micro and Nanosystems.
    Kroon, Renee
    Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics, Linköping University, Norrköping, Sweden.
    Müller, Christian
    Department of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Hamedi, Mahiar
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Zeglio, Erica
    AIMES – Center for the Advancement of Integrated Medical and Engineering Sciences at Karolinska Institutet and KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden/ Department of Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden/ Wallenberg Initiative Materials Science for Sustainability, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Herland, Anna
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Nano Biotechnology. AIMES – Center for the Advancement of Integrated Medical and Engineering Sciences at Karolinska Institutet and KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden/ Department of Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    In situ functionalization of polar polythiophene based organic electrochemical transistor to interface in vitro modelsManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 212.
    Budnyak, Tetyana
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Aminzadeh, Selda
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Pylypchuk, Ievgen
    Department of Molecular Sciences, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences (SLU), Allmas alle 5, SE-750 07 Uppsala, Swede.
    Riazanova, Anastasiia
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Tertykh, Valentin
    Chuiko Institute of Surface Chemistry, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, 17 General Naumov Str., 03164 Kyiv, Ukraine.
    Lindström, Mikael
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Sevastyanova, Olena
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Peculiarities of synthesis and properties of lignin-silica nanocomposites prepared by sol-gel method2018In: Nanomaterials, E-ISSN 2079-4991, Vol. 8, no 11, p. 1-18, article id 950Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The development of advanced hybrid materials based on polymers from biorenewable sources and mineral nanoparticles is currently of high importance. In this paper, we applied softwood kraft lignins for the synthesis of lignin/SiO2 nanostructured composites. We described the peculiarities of composites formation in the sol-gel process through the incorporation of the lignin into a silica network during the hydrolysis of tetraethoxysilane (TEOS). The initial activation of lignins was achieved by means of a Mannich reaction with 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES). In the study, we present a detailed investigation of the physicochemical characteristics of initial kraft lignins and modified lignins on each step of the synthesis. Thus, 2D-NMR, P-31-NMR, size-exclusion chromatography (SEC) and dynamic light scattering (DLS) were applied to analyze the characteristics of pristine lignins and lignins in dioxan:water solutions. X-Ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) were used to confirm the formation of the lignin-silica network and characterize the surface and bulk structures of the obtained hybrids. Termogravimetric analysis (TGA) in nitrogen and air atmosphere were applied to a detailed investigation of the thermal properties of pristine lignins and lignins on each step of modification. SEM confirmed the nanostructure of the obtained composites. As was demonstrated, the activation of lignin is crucial for the sol-gel formation of a silica network in order to create novel hybrid materials from lignins and alkoxysilanes (e.g., TEOS). It was concluded that the structure of the lignin had an impact on its reactivity during the activation reaction, and consequently affected the properties of the final hybrid materials.

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    Peculiarities of Synthesis and Properties of Lignin–Silica Nanocomposites Prepared by Sol-Gel Method
  • 213.
    Budnyak, Tetyana M.
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology. Natl Acad Sci Ukraine, Chuiko Inst Surface Chem, 17 Gen Naumov Str, UA-03164 Kiev, Ukraine..
    Aminzadeh, Selda
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Pylypchuk, Ievgen V.
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci SLU, Dept Mol Sci, Allmas Alle 5, SE-75007 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Sternik, Dariusz
    Marie Curie Sklodowska Univ, 2 M Curie Sklodowska Sq, PL-20031 Lublin, Poland..
    Tertykh, Valentin A.
    Natl Acad Sci Ukraine, Chuiko Inst Surface Chem, 17 Gen Naumov Str, UA-03164 Kiev, Ukraine..
    Lindström, Mikael E.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Sevastyanova, Olena
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Methylene Blue dye sorption by hybrid materials from technical lignins2018In: Journal of Environmental Chemical Engineering, E-ISSN 2213-3437, Vol. 6, no 4, p. 4997-5007Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    New hybrid sorbents were synthesized from technical lignins and silica and were applied for the removal of Methylene Blue dye (MB) from aqueous solution. Kraft softwood lignins from LignoBoost (LBL) and CleanFlowBlack (CFBL) processes were used to understand the influence of molecular weight and functionality of initial lignins on the properties of the final hybrids. The synthesized materials were applied as adsorbents for the removal of MB from aqueous solutions. The effects of parameters such as contact time, initial concentration of dye and initial pH on the adsorption capacity were evaluated. The hybrids exhibited higher adsorption capacity than the initial macromolecules of lignin with respect to MB. The hybrid based on CFBL exhibited an adsorption capacity of 60 mg/g; this value was 30% higher than the capacity of the hybrid based on LBL, which was 41.6 mg/g. Lignin hybrid materials extract 80-99% of the dye in a pH range from 3 to 10. The equilibrium and kinetic characteristics of MB uptake by the hybrids followed the Langmuir isotherm model and pseudosecond-order model, rather than the Freundlich and Temkin models, the pseudo-first-order or the intraparticle diffusion model. The attachment of the dye to the hybrid surface was confirmed via FE-SEM and FTIR spectroscopy. The mechanism for MB adsorption was proposed. Due to the high values of regeneration efficiency of the surface of both lignin-silica hybrid materials in 0.1 M HCl (up to 75%) and ethanol (99%), they could be applied as effective sorbents in industrial wastewater treatment processes.

  • 214.
    Budnyak, Tetyana M.
    et al.
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Mat & Environm Chem, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Modersitzki, Sina
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Mat & Environm Chem, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Pylypchuk, Ievgen
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Wood Chemistry and Pulp Technology.
    Piatek, Jedrzej
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Mat & Environm Chem, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Jaworski, Aleksander
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Mat & Environm Chem, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Sevastyanova, Olena
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Lindström, Mikael
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Slabon, Adam
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Mat & Environm Chem, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Tailored Hydrophobic/Hydrophilic Lignin Coatings on Mesoporous Silica for Sustainable Cobalt(II) Recycling2020In: ACS Sustainable Chemistry and Engineering, E-ISSN 2168-0485, Vol. 8, no 43, p. 16262-16273Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Lignin is a renewable biopolymer, and its chemical functionalization renders it a prospective material for a plethora of applications. Within this respect, we present a method for lignin immobilization on the surface of mesoporous silica. Two types of lignins were used to prove the feasibility of the fabrication of either hydrophilic or hydrophobic biocoatings on silica. The procedure permits to immobilize 17 mg of lignosulfonate (LS) or 37 mg of kraft lignin (KL) per gram of silica. The bioinorganic composites display a synergistic effect in the adsorption of cobalt(II) ions from aqueous solutions because the adsorption efficiency outperforms the individual constituents. These results demonstrate that thin lignin overlayers, exhibiting polymer concentrations of 0.07 mg.m(-2) for LS-SiO2, and 0.14 mg.m(-2) for KL-SiO2, provide new functionality in comparison to bulk lignin and metal oxides. According to the Langmuir isotherm model, the adsorption capacity toward aqua complexes of Co(II) was found to be 75 and 59 mg.g(-1) for the LS- or KL-coated silica, respectively. The kinetic study revealed that lignin-SiO2 composites gained the features of inorganic sorbents because 1-1.5 h was sufficient for effective cobalt extraction. The adsorption on the bioinorganic composites proceeds with the pseudo-second-order kinetics model. The adsorption of Co(II) ions was confirmed by means of solid-state H-1 magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR spectroscopy. The simplicity of the synthesis, low-cost and abundancy of substrates, high capacity, and fast kinetics make such lignin-coated silica a promising material for cobalt recovery.

  • 215.
    Budnyak, Tetyana M.
    et al.
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Mat & Environm Chem, Svante Arrhenius Vag 16C, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Onwumere, Joy
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Mat & Environm Chem, Svante Arrhenius Vag 16C, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Pylypchuk, Ievgen, V
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Wood Chemistry and Pulp Technology.
    Jaworski, Aleksander
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Mat & Environm Chem, Svante Arrhenius Vag 16C, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Chen, Jianhong
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Mat & Environm Chem, Svante Arrhenius Vag 16C, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Rokicinska, Anna
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Mat & Environm Chem, Svante Arrhenius Vag 16C, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Lindström, Mikael
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Kustrowski, Piotr
    Jagiellonian Univ, Fac Chem, Gronostajowa 2, PL-30387 Krakow, Poland..
    Sevastyanova, Olena
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology. Jagiellonian Univ, Fac Chem, Gronostajowa 2, PL-30387 Krakow, Poland..
    Slabon, Adam
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Mat & Environm Chem, Svante Arrhenius Vag 16C, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden..
    LignoPhot: Conversion of hydrolysis lignin into the photoactive hybrid lignin/Bi4O5Br2/BiOBr composite for simultaneous dyes oxidation and Co2+ and Ni2+ recycling2021In: Chemosphere, ISSN 0045-6535, E-ISSN 1879-1298, Vol. 279, article id 130538Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Valorization of lignin is still an open question and lignin has therefore remained an underutilized biomaterial. This situation is even more pronounced for hydrolysis lignin, which is characterized by a highly condensed and excessively cross-linked structure. We demonstrate the synthesis of photoactive lignin/Bi4O5Br2/BiOBr bio-inorganic composites consisting of a lignin substrate that is coated by semiconducting nanosheets. The XPS analysis reveals that growing these nanosheets on lignin instead on cellulose prevents the formation of Bi5+ ions at the surface region, yielding thus a modified hetero-junction Bi4O5Br2/BiOBr. The material contains 18.9% of Bi4O5Br2/BiOBr and is effective for the photocatalytic degradation of cationic methylene blue (MB) and zwitterionic rhodamine B (RhB) dyes under light irradiation. Lignin/Bi4O5Br2/BiOBr decreases the dye concentration from 80 mg L-1 to 12.3 mg L-1 for RhB (85%) and from 80 mg L-1 to 4.4 mg L-1 for MB (95%). Complementary to the dye degradation, the lignin as a main component of the composite, was found to be efficient and rapid biosorbent for nickel, lead, and cobalt ions. The low cost, stability and ability to simultaneously photo-oxidize organic dyes and adsorb metal ions, make the photoactive lignin/Bi4O5Br2/BiOBr composite a prospective material for textile wastewaters remediation and metal ions recycling.

  • 216.
    Budnyak, Tetyana M.
    et al.
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Mat & Environm Chem, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Piatek, Jeddrzej
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Mat & Environm Chem, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Pylypchuk, Ievgen, V
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Wood Chemistry and Pulp Technology.
    Klimpel, Matthias
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Mat & Environm Chem, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Sevastyanova, Olena
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Lindström, Mikael
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Gun'ko, Volodymyr M.
    Natl Acad Sci Ukraine, Chuiko Inst Surface Chem, UA-03164 Kiev, Ukraine..
    Slabon, Adam
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Mat & Environm Chem, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Membrane-Filtered Kraft Lignin-Silica Hybrids as Bio-Based Sorbents for Cobalt(II) Ion Recycling2020In: ACS Omega, E-ISSN 2470-1343, Vol. 5, no 19, p. 10847-10856Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Efficient and sustainable recycling of cobalt(II) is of increasing importance to support technological development in energy storage and electric vehicle industries. A composite material based on membrane-filtered lignin deposited on nanoporous silica microparticles was found to be an effective and sustainable sorbent for cobalt(II) removal. This bio-based sorbent exhibited a high sorption capacity, fast kinetics toward cobalt(II) adsorption, and good reusability. The adsorption capacity was 18 mg Co(II) per gram of dry adsorbent at room temperature (22 degrees C) at near-neutral pH, three times higher than that of the summarized capacity of lignin or silica starting materials. The kinetics study showed that 90 min is sufficient for effective cobalt(II) extraction by the composite sorbent. The pseudo-second-order kinetics and Freundlich isotherm models fitted well with experimentally obtained data and confirmed heterogeneity of adsorption sites. The promising potential of the lignin-silica composites for industrial applications in the cobalt recovering process was confirmed by high values of desorption in mildly acidic solutions.

  • 217.
    Budnyak, Tetyana M.
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Wood Chemistry and Pulp Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry, Stockholm University, Svante Arrhenius väg 16 C, Stockholm, 106 91, Sweden.
    Pylypchuk, Ievgen, V
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Wood Chemistry and Pulp Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Lindström, Mikael
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Wood Chemistry and Pulp Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Sevastyanova, Olena
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Wood Chemistry and Pulp Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Electrostatic Deposition of the Oxidized Kraft Lignin onto the Surface of Aminosilicas: Thermal and Structural Characteristics of Hybrid Materials2019In: ACS Omega, E-ISSN 2470-1343, Vol. 4, no 27, p. 22530-22539Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In recent years, functional polymeric compounds have been widely used to modify the silica surface, which allows one to obtain the corresponding organomineral composites for broad application prospects. In this case, lignin-a cross-linked polyphenolic macromolecule-is of great interest according to its valuable properties and possible surplus as a by-product of pulp and paper industry and various biorefinery processes. Hybrid materials based on kraft softwood lignin and silica were obtained via the electrostatic attraction of oxidized lignin to the aminosilica surface with different porosities, which were prepared by the amination of the commercial silica gel with an average pore diameter of 6 nm, and the silica prepared in the lab with the oxidized kraft lignin and lignin-silica samples with an average pore diameter of 38 nm was investigated by physicochemical methods: two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), P-31 NMR, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis in nitrogen and air atmosphere, scanning electron microscopy, and adsorption methods. After oxidation, the content of carboxylic groups almost doubled in the oxidized lignin, compared to that in the native one (0.74 mmol/g against 0.44 mmol/g, respectively). The lignin content was deposited onto the surface of aminosilica, depending on the porosity of the silica material and on the content of amino groups on its surface, giving lignin-aminosilica with 20% higher lignin content than the lignin-aminosilica gel. Both types of lignin-silica composites demonstrate a high sorptive capacity toward crystal violet dye. The suggested approach is an easy and low-cost way of synthesis of lignin-silica composites with unique properties. Such composites have a great potential for use as adsorbents in wastewater treatment processes.

  • 218.
    Bukovský, Marek
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Flexible and recyclable electronics made from nanoreinforced silk2020Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    As the research area of wearable electronics is still relatively new, material science with this focus opens plenty of unexplored fields. That is why a study characterizing the unexplored composite system of silk fibroin and MXene (Silk/MXene) was conducted. These two biocompatible materials are complementary with regard to the requirements for wearable electronics materials. Silk fibroin dispose an ionic conductivity and solid flexibility, while MXene brings mechanical strength and significant increase of electrical conductivity. The reinforced hydrogel materials were studied at two concentrations of fillers, 1% and 5% and compared to pristine silk fibroin. All three materials were studied from the point of view of their structure, mechanical properties, behaviour in aqueous environment, biodegradability and electrical conductivity, both static and dynamic. Nanocomposite systems of silk fibroin and MXene have shown a potential for being used in the intended application area, as Silk/MXene 5% film displays good stability, conductivity with high andstable Gauge factor.

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  • 219.
    Bulut, Yusuf
    et al.
    Deutsch Elektronen Synchrotron DESY, Notkestr 85, D-22607 Hamburg, Germany.;Tech Univ Munich, Sch Nat Sci, Dept Phys, Chair Funct Mat, James Franck Str 1, D-85748 Garching, Germany..
    Sochor, Benedikt
    Deutsch Elektronen Synchrotron DESY, Notkestr 85, D-22607 Hamburg, Germany..
    Harder, Constantin
    Deutsch Elektronen Synchrotron DESY, Notkestr 85, D-22607 Hamburg, Germany.;Tech Univ Munich, Sch Nat Sci, Dept Phys, Chair Funct Mat, James Franck Str 1, D-85748 Garching, Germany..
    Reck, Kristian
    Christian Albrechts Univ Kiel, Dept Mat Sci, Chair Multicomponent Mat, Fac Engn, Kaiserstr 2, D-24143 Kiel, Germany..
    Drewes, Jonas
    Christian Albrechts Univ Kiel, Dept Mat Sci, Chair Multicomponent Mat, Fac Engn, Kaiserstr 2, D-24143 Kiel, Germany..
    Xu, Zhuijun
    Tech Univ Munich, Sch Nat Sci, Dept Phys, Chair Funct Mat, James Franck Str 1, D-85748 Garching, Germany..
    Jiang, Xiongzhuo
    Tech Univ Munich, Sch Nat Sci, Dept Phys, Chair Funct Mat, James Franck Str 1, D-85748 Garching, Germany..
    Meinhardt, Alexander
    Ctr X Ray & Nano Sci CXNS, Deutsch Elektronen Synchtrotron DESY, Notkestr 85, D-22607 Hamburg, Germany.;Univ Hamburg, Dept Phys, Notkestr 9-11, D-22607 Hamburg, Germany..
    Jeromin, Arno
    Ctr X Ray & Nano Sci CXNS, Deutsch Elektronen Synchtrotron DESY, Notkestr 85, D-22607 Hamburg, Germany..
    Kohantorabi, Mona
    Deutsch Elektronen Synchrotron DESY, Notkestr 85, D-22607 Hamburg, Germany.;Ctr X Ray & Nano Sci CXNS, Deutsch Elektronen Synchtrotron DESY, Notkestr 85, D-22607 Hamburg, Germany..
    Noei, Heshmat
    Deutsch Elektronen Synchrotron DESY, Notkestr 85, D-22607 Hamburg, Germany.;Ctr X Ray & Nano Sci CXNS, Deutsch Elektronen Synchtrotron DESY, Notkestr 85, D-22607 Hamburg, Germany..
    Keller, Thomas F.
    Ctr X Ray & Nano Sci CXNS, Deutsch Elektronen Synchtrotron DESY, Notkestr 85, D-22607 Hamburg, Germany.;Univ Hamburg, Dept Phys, Notkestr 9-11, D-22607 Hamburg, Germany..
    Strunskus, Thomas
    Christian Albrechts Univ Kiel, Dept Mat Sci, Chair Multicomponent Mat, Fac Engn, Kaiserstr 2, D-24143 Kiel, Germany..
    Faupel, Franz
    Christian Albrechts Univ Kiel, Dept Mat Sci, Chair Multicomponent Mat, Fac Engn, Kaiserstr 2, D-24143 Kiel, Germany..
    Mueller-Buschbaum, Peter
    Tech Univ Munich, Sch Nat Sci, Dept Phys, Chair Funct Mat, James Franck Str 1, D-85748 Garching, Germany.;Tech Univ Munich, Heinz Maier Leibnitz Zentrum MLZ, Lichtenbergerstr 1, D-85748 Garching, Germany..
    Roth, Stephan V.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology. Deutsch Elektronen Synchrotron DESY, Notkestr 85, D-22607 Hamburg, Germany.
    Diblock copolymer pattern protection by silver cluster reinforcement2023In: Nanoscale, ISSN 2040-3364, E-ISSN 2040-3372, Vol. 15, no 38, p. 15768-15774Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Pattern fabrication by self-assembly of diblock copolymers is of significant interest due to the simplicity in fabricating complex structures. In particular, polystyrene-block-poly-4-vinylpyridine (PS-b-P4VP) is a fascinating base material as it forms an ordered micellar structure on silicon surfaces. In this work, silver (Ag) is applied using direct current magnetron sputter deposition and high-power impulse magnetron sputter deposition on an ordered micellar PS-b-P4VP layer. The fabricated hybrid materials are structurally analyzed by field emission scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and grazing incidence small angle X-ray scattering. When applying simple aqueous posttreatment, the pattern is stable and reinforced by Ag clusters, making micellar PS-b-P4VP ordered layers ideal candidates for lithography. The pristine micellar pattern of the diblock copolymer PS-b-P4VP degrades upon drying of a water droplet, which can be stabilized and inhibited upon deposition of silver clusters.

  • 220.
    Butchosa, Nuria
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Glycoscience.
    Leijon, Felicia
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Glycoscience.
    Bulone, Vincent
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Glycoscience.
    Zhou, Qi
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Glycoscience. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Stronger cellulose microfibril network structure through the expression of cellulose-binding modules in plant primary cell walls2019In: Cellulose, ISSN 0969-0239, E-ISSN 1572-882X, Vol. 26, no 5, p. 3083-3094Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cellulose-binding modules (CBMs) are non-catalytic domains typically occurring in glycoside hydrolases. Their specific interaction with diverse polysaccharides assists hydrolysis by the catalytic subunits. In this work, we have exploited the interactions between a CBM from family 3 (CBM3) and cell wall polysaccharides to alter the structure and mechanical properties of cellulose microfibrils from BY-2 tobacco cell suspension cultures. A CBM3 from Clostridium thermocellum was overexpressed in the cells using Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. Water suspensions of cellulose microfibrils were prepared by the removal of the non-cellulosic components of the primary cell walls, followed by mild disintegration using sonication. The morphology of the microfibrils was characterized by transmission electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy. These cellulose microfibrils were further hydrolyzed with 64wt% sulfuric acid to produce cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs). The average length of CNCs prepared from the CBM3-transformed cells was 201nm, higher than that from the wild-type cells (122nm). In addition, the mechanical properties and deformation mechanism of nanopapers prepared from suspensions of cellulose microfibrils were investigated. The nanopapers obtained from the CBM3-transformed cells exhibited enhanced tensile strength and work of fracture, 40% and 128% higher than those prepared from wild-type tobacco cells, respectively. [GRAPHICS] .

  • 221.
    Butina, Karen
    et al.
    AIMES – Center for the Advancement of Integrated Medical and Engineering Sciences at Karolinska Institutet and KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, SE-171 77, Sweden; Department of Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, SE-171 77, Sweden.
    Filipović, Filip
    AIMES – Center for the Advancement of Integrated Medical and Engineering Sciences at Karolinska Institutet and KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, SE-171 77, Sweden; Department of Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, SE-171 77, Sweden.
    Richter-Dahlfors, Agneta
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology. AIMES – Center for the Advancement of Integrated Medical and Engineering Sciences at Karolinska Institutet and KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, SE-171 77, Sweden; Department of Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, SE-171 77, Sweden.
    Parlak, Onur
    AIMES – Center for the Advancement of Integrated Medical and Engineering Sciences at Karolinska Institutet and KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, SE-171 77, Sweden; Dermatology and Venereology Unit, Department of Medicine, Solna, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, SE-171 76, Sweden.
    An Organic Electrochemical Transistor to Monitor Salmonella Growth in Real-Time2021In: Advanced Materials Interfaces, ISSN 2196-7350, Vol. 8, no 18, p. 2100961-, article id 2100961Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Organic electrochemical transistors (OECTs) are used in research and diagnostic applications due to their facile manufacture, scalability, and biocompatibility. In these devices, the source–drain current upon gate voltage application depends on ion concentration in the electrolyte. This study investigates whether an OECT can be employed to monitor bacterial growth since it is known that the concentration of charged species increases in bacterial cultures during growth. A poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):polystyrene sulfonate-based single-well OECT, compatible with long-term incubation of bacterial cultures, is fabricated. It is shown that the growth of Salmonella alters the transfer characteristics of the device and demonstrates how it can be applied to monitor growth in real-time by recording the source–drain current at gate voltage +0.5 V. The signal can also be measured in filtrates of bacterial cultures, devoid of bacterial cells. This suggests that the signal originates from charged metabolic products. Bacterial biofilm formation does not alter the device response. This proof-of-principle study presents OECT recordings as an alternative to optical methods, allowing bacterial growth to be monitored in transparent and opaque media alike. By measuring metabolic products rather than bacterial cell multiplication, insight into the stationary phase and other nondividing states may be obtained in the future.

  • 222.
    Buyuktas, Duygu
    et al.
    Department of Food Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Izmir Institute of Technology, 35430, Gülbahçe Köyü, Urla, Izmir, Turkey; DeFENS, Department of Food, Environmental and Nutritional Sciences, Food Packaging Lab., University of Milan, via Celoria 2 – I, 20133, Milan, Italy.
    Ghaani, Masoud
    Univ Milan, Dept Food Environm & Nutr Sci, Food Packaging Lab, DeFENS, Via Celoria 2-I, I-20133 Milan, Italy..
    Rovera, Cesare
    Univ Milan, Dept Food Environm & Nutr Sci, Food Packaging Lab, DeFENS, Via Celoria 2-I, I-20133 Milan, Italy..
    Carullo, Daniele
    Univ Milan, Dept Food Environm & Nutr Sci, Food Packaging Lab, DeFENS, Via Celoria 2-I, I-20133 Milan, Italy..
    Olsson, Richard
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Polymeric Materials.
    Korel, Figen
    Izmir Inst Technol, Fac Engn, Dept Food Engn, TR-35430 Izmir, Turkiye..
    Farris, Stefano
    Univ Milan, Dept Food Environm & Nutr Sci, Food Packaging Lab, DeFENS, Via Celoria 2-I, I-20133 Milan, Italy.;Univ Milan, INSTM, Natl Consortium Mat Sci & Technol, Local Unit, via Celoria 2-I, I-20133 Milan, Italy..
    A screen-printed electrode modified with gold nanoparticles/ cellulose nanocrystals for electrochemical detection of 4,4'-methylene diphenyl diamine2023In: Heliyon, E-ISSN 2405-8440, Vol. 9, no 4, article id e15327Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Developing simple, cost-effective, easy-to-use, and reliable analytical devices if of utmost importance for the food industry for rapid in-line checks of their products that must comply with the provisions set by the current legislation. The purpose of this study was to develop a new electrochemical sensor for the food packaging sector. More specifically, we propose a screen -printed electrode (SPE) modified with cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) and gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) for the quantification of 4,4'-methylene diphenyl diamine (MDA), which is one of the most important PAAs that can transfer from food packaging materials into food stuffs. The electrochemical performance of the proposed sensor (AuNPs/CNCs/SPE) in the presence of 4,4'- MDA was evaluated using cyclic voltammetry (CV). The modified AuNPs/CNCs/SPE showed the highest sensitivity for 4,4'-MDA detection, with a peak current of 9.81 mu A compared with 7.08 mu A for the bare SPE. The highest sensitivity for 4,4'-MDA oxidation was observed at pH = 7, whereas the detection limit was found at 57 nM and the current response of 4,4'-MDA rose linearly as its concentration increased from 0.12 mu M to 100 mu M. Experiments using real packaging materials revealed that employing nanoparticles dramatically improved both the sensitivity and the selectivity of the sensor, which can be thus considered as a new analytical tool for quick, simple, and accurate measurement of 4,4 '-MDA during converting operations.

  • 223.
    Buyuktas, Duygu
    et al.
    Izmir Inst Technol, Fac Engn, Dept Food Engn, TR-35430 Izmir, Turkey..
    Ghaani, Masoud
    Univ Milan, Food Packaging Lab, Dept Food Environm & Nutr Sci, DeFENS, Via Celoria 2-I, I-20133 Milan, Italy..
    Rovera, Cesare
    Univ Milan, Food Packaging Lab, Dept Food Environm & Nutr Sci, DeFENS, Via Celoria 2-I, I-20133 Milan, Italy..
    Olsson, Richard T.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Polymeric Materials.
    Korel, Figen
    Izmir Inst Technol, Fac Engn, Dept Food Engn, TR-35430 Izmir, Turkey..
    Farris, Stefano
    Univ Milan, Food Packaging Lab, Dept Food Environm & Nutr Sci, DeFENS, Via Celoria 2-I, I-20133 Milan, Italy.;Univ Milan, Local Unit, Natl Consortium Mat Sci & Technol, INSTM, Via Celoria 2-I, I-20133 Milan, Italy..
    Development of a nano-modified glassy carbon electrode for the determination of 2,6-diaminotoluene (TDA)2021In: FOOD PACKAGING AND SHELF LIFE, ISSN 2214-2894, Vol. 29, article id 100714Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The objective of this study was to improve the overall performance of a glassy carbon electrode (GCE) for the detection of 2,6-diaminotoluene (TDA), a possibly carcinogenic primary aromatic amines (PAAs) that poses a serious risk for the consumer' health because they can transfer from multilayer food packages including adhesives based on aromatic polyurethane (PU) systems, to the food. The modification of the electrode surface was made by means of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and mesopomus carbon nanoparticles (MCNs). The MWCNTs-MCNs/GCE allowed achieving the best performance in terms of sensitivity, as revealed by cyclic voltammetry - CV, with an oxidation peak of 20.95 mu A over 0.079 mu A of the bare GCE. The pH of the medium influenced the oxidation of 2,6-TDA, with highest sensitivity at pH similar to 7. Amperometry experiments led to an estimated detection limit of 0.129 mu M, and three linear ranges were obtained for 2,6-TDA: 0.53-11.37 mu M, 11.37-229.36 mu M, and 229.36-2326.60 mu M. Chronoamperometry experiments combined with Cottrell's theory allowed estimating a diffusion coefficient of 2,6-TDA of 1.34 x 10(-4) cm(2) s(-1). The number of electrons (n similar to 1) involved in the catalytic oxidation of 2,6-TDA was determined according to the Lavimn's theory. Real sample tests demonstrated that the modification of the sensor using nanoparticls allowed to obtain a highly sensitive and selective sensor, which can possibly used as an alternative analytical device for the rapid, easy, and reliable determination of 2,6-TDA.

  • 224.
    Bäckström, Eva
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Polymer Technology.
    Designed from Recycled: Microwave-Assisted Upcycling of Plastic Waste2021Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Mismanagement of plastic waste is of great concern. To reach a more sustainable society, methodologies to handle materials in a more circular way needs to be developed. The work presented in this thesis focused on the development of chemical recycling routes for common plastic materials and demonstration of further utilization of the obtained chemicals in material applications. Methods to chemically recycle model waste consisting of low-density polyethylene (LDPE), high-density polyethylene (HDPE), polyethylene terephthalate (PET) and polyamide (PA) /polypropylene (PP) carpet by microwave-assisted reactions were developed. Well defined carboxylic acids were produced by microwave-assisted oxidative recycling of LDPE and HDPE waste using aqueous nitric acid as reaction media. The mixed dicarboxylic acids, obtained from HDPE recycling, were further reacted to produce plasticizers with crotonate end-groups. The synthesized plasticizers were evaluated for their ability to plasticize polylactide (PLA) by blending or grafting onto the PLA backbone. PLA was also plasticized by blending with terephthalamides obtained from microwave-assisted aminolysis of PET. Both methods of plasticization improved the flexibility of PLA. Terephthalamides with terminal unsaturated groups were also produced by aminolysis of PET and utilized as reactants to manufacture plastic films by a radical thiol-ene reaction. A microwave-assisted hydrothermal process in aqueous hydrochloric acid (HCl) was utilized to selectively hydrolyse the PA part of a PA/PP carpet to monomeric products leaving the PP part relatively intact. The retained PP could be directly mixed with virgin PP by extrusion and hot-pressed to films. Films with 25 wt% recycled content showed no deterioration of thermal and mechanical properties compared to 100% virgin PP. The demonstrated approaches for microwave-assisted chemical recycling of plastic waste and further usage of the products show great promise for development of more circular plastic waste streams. 

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    sammanfattning
  • 225.
    Bäckström, Eva
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Odelius, Karin
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Hakkarainen, Minna
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Polymer Technology.
    Designed from Recycled: Turning Polyethylene Waste to Covalently Attached Polylactide Plasticizers2019In: ACS Sustainable Chemistry and Engineering, E-ISSN 2168-0485, Vol. 7, no 12, p. 11004-11013Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    High-density polyethylene (HDPE) waste was successfully feedstock recycled, and the obtained chemicals were utilized for synthesis of plasticizers for polylactide (PLA). First, an effective route to recycle HDPE through a microwave-assisted hydrothermal process was established. This process led to selective degradation of HDPE to a few well-defined chemicals, namely, succinic, glutaric, and adipic acid. A model plasticizer was synthesized from the same composition of dicarboxylic acids, 1,4-butanediol, and crotonic acid. The function of crotonic acid was to produce oligomers with crotonate end groups for coupling the plasticizer to PLA main chain. The plasticizer was then blended with or coupled to PLA by a reactive extrusion process. Adding the plasticizer to PLA decreased the T-g and increased the strain at break, thus reducing the brittleness of the films. The addition of 20% (w/w) grafted plasticizer increased the strain at break of PLA from 6 to 156% and decreased the T-g by 15 degrees C compared with neat PLA. Finally, to verify the concept, a plasticizer was also synthesized from the dicarboxylic acid product mixture obtained from the feedstock recycling of HDPE. The recycled grafted plasticizer increased the strain at break of PLA to 142% and reduced the T-g by 10 degrees C. A promising route for designing from recycled feedstock, turning HDPE waste to PLA plasticizers, was thus demonstrated.

  • 226.
    Bäckström, Eva
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Polymer Technology.
    Odelius, Karin
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Polymer Technology.
    Hakkarainen, Minna
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Polymer Technology.
    Microwave Assisted Selective Hydrolysis of Polyamides from Multicomponent Carpet Waste2021In: Global Challenges, E-ISSN 2056-6646Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 227.
    Bäckström, Eva
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Polymer Technology.
    Odelius, Karin
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Polymer Technology.
    Hakkarainen, Minna
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Polymer Technology.
    Ultrafast microwave assisted recycling of PET to a family of functional precursors and materials2021In: European Polymer Journal, ISSN 0014-3057, E-ISSN 1873-1945, Vol. 151, no 110441Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 228.
    Bäckström, Eva
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Polymer Technology.
    Odelius, Karin
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Polymer Technology.
    Hakkarainen, Minna
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Polymer Technology.
    Ultrafast microwave assisted recycling of PET to library of functional materialsManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 229.
    Bäckström, Marie
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    The effect of environment on refining efficiency of kraft pulps2020Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Although the pulp and paper mill processes have been operational for long time there is still a need to understand the unit operations in paper making and how they interact with the ingoing pulp material. This is crucial in order to fully utilize the potential of the wood as well as of the unit operations. In order to do that it is vital to have an understanding about the produced pulp fibres, how they are constructed and how they respond to different conditions of their environment.

    The aim of this work has been to clarify how the environment influences the refining efficiency of kraft pulps in terms of energy requirement and paper property development. The main hypothesis has been that the swelling of the fibres, due to their inherited polyelectrolytic gel nature, will not only affect the fibre as such but also the strength and properties of the fibre flocs that are mechanically treated between bars in the refiner and in this way affect the refining efficiency.

    The main focus has been to study how the chemical environment, in particular the initial fibre swelling, affects the refining efficiency. Therefore, the influence of counter-ions to the charged groups, the number of charged groups, electrolyte concentration, pH and rheological behaviour was studied. Additionally, the importance of fibre flocculation for the refining efficiency was investigated by chemical means, i.e. to chemically flocculate and deflocculate a fibre suspension just before entering the refiner and evaluate the refining efficiency. An investigation to clarify the importance of refining homogeneity was also performed. The work was performed both on a laboratory scale and in pilot scale using industrial refiners to ensure the validity of the results.

    The importance of the counter-ions to the charged groups on refining was demonstrated. When the counter-ions was sodium the refinability, defined as the required energy input to reach a certain WRV or tensile index, was reduced by up to 50%. The more energy-efficient refining of pulps in the Na+-form may be explained as a co-operation between a higher osmotic pressure in the fibre wall and the mechanical stress applied during refining, so called “electrostatic repulsion-assisted refining”. When mechanical forces are applied on the fibre and the fibre wall, the electrostatic repulsion forces due to the ionization act as an additional aid to increase the swelling, and this in turn helps to delaminate the fibre wall. This “electrostatic repulsion-assisted refining” also resulted in another type of external fibrillation of the fibres than that produced for the reference pulp in calcium form. The fibrils were very short and tiny. The improved refining efficiency could not be attributed to any rheological effect such as floc strength or floc size.

    The number of charges correlated to refinabiliy of the pulp material, but there has to be a balance between the number of charges and ultrastructure of the pulp fibre. If too many charges were introduced, the internal ultrastructure was eventually damaged, and no property development was obtained in the refining.

    The importance of refining heterogeneity on paper properties was investigated by mixing less refined or unrefined pulps and highly refined pulps in different proportions giving a wide distribution on energy input to individual fibres, as well giving swelling distribution curves. The mechanical properties of the produced paper were surprisingly alike, and the influence of the extreme inhomogeneity was rather small. In a pilot paper machine trial, clear effects due to heterogeneous refining was only observed when 50% of the stock fed to the paper machine was unrefined. This implies that the mills can have large freedom in refining strategies without any significant negative impact on the tensile strength properties at a given density. 

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    Marie Bäckström
  • 230.
    Bäckström, Marie
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology. 640204-6962.
    Hammar, Lars-Åke
    Htun, Myat
    Beatability and runnability studies of ion-exchanged unbleached kraft pulps on a pilot scale2009In: Nordic Pulp & Paper Research Journal, ISSN 0283-2631, E-ISSN 2000-0669, Vol. 24, no 1, p. 94-100Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It has earlier been shown that the counter-ion to the charged groups in the fibre has a significant effect on the beatability of fibres, but large-scale investigations of this effect are scarce in the literature. The objectives of the present study were therefore to develop a technique to ion-exchange large quantities of industrial pulp into the Na(+)-form using complexing agents and to study the effect of industrial-scale refining on pulp fibres in the Na(+)-form and how the fibres respond to industrial-like papermaking.The results show that ion-exchange can indeed be conducted on a pilot-scale using complexing agents such as DTPA. The study further indicates that an energy reduction of 50% at a given WRV or tensile index may be achieved if the fibres are converted to Na(+)-form prior to pilot-scale refining. By applying these techniques in full-scale production, it should thus be possible to save significant amount of energy, especially in the case of papers made from unbleached pulp that usually demands a higher degree of beating to achieve sufficient strength.

  • 231.
    Cadet, Frederic
    et al.
    Univ Paris City, Inserm UMR S1134, Lab Excellence LABEX GR, DSIMB, Paris, France.;Univ Reunion, Paris, France.;PEACCEL, Artificial Intelligence Dept, Paris, France..
    Saavedra, Emma
    Inst Nacl Cardiol Ignacio Chavez, Dept Biochem, Mexico City, Mexico..
    Syrén, Per-Olof
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Gontero, Brigitte
    Aix Marseille Univ, CNRS, UMR7281 Bioenerget & Ingn Prot, Marseille, France..
    Editorial: Machine learning, epistasis, and protein engineering: From sequence-structure-function relationships to regulation of metabolic pathways2022In: Frontiers in Molecular Biosciences, E-ISSN 2296-889X, Vol. 9, article id 1098289Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 232. Cao, W.
    et al.
    Yin, S.
    Bitsch, M.
    Liang, S.
    Plank, M.
    Opel, M.
    Scheel, M. A.
    Gallei, M.
    Janka, O.
    Schwartzkopf, M.
    Roth, Stephan V.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites. Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Notkestraße 85, Hamburg, 22607, Germany..
    Müller-Buschbaum, P.
    In Situ Study of FePt Nanoparticles-Induced Morphology Development during Printing of Magnetic Hybrid Diblock Copolymer Films2022In: Advanced Functional Materials, ISSN 1616-301X, E-ISSN 1616-3028, Vol. 32, no 4, p. 2107667-, article id 2107667Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The development of magnetic hybrid films containing diblock copolymers (DBCs) and magnetic nanoparticles (NPs) by printing is a highly promising method for scalable and low-cost fabrication. During printing, the drying and arrangement kinetics of the DBC and magnetic NPs play an important role in the film formation concerning morphology and magnetic properties. In this study, the morphology evolution of ultrahigh molecular weight DBC polystyrene-block-poly(methyl methacrylate) and magnetic iron platinum (FePt) NPs is investigated with grazing-incidence small-angle X-ray scattering (GISAXS) in situ during printing. For comparison, a pure DBC film is printed without FePt NPs under the same conditions. The GISAXS data suggest that the addition of NPs accelerates the solvent evaporation, leading to a faster film formation of the hybrid film compared to the pure film. As the solvent is almost evaporated, a metastable state is observed in both films. Compared with the pure film, such a metastable state continues longer during the printing process of the hybrid film because of the presence of FePt NPs, which inhibits the reorganization of the DBC chains. Moreover, investigations of the field-dependent magnetization and temperature-dependent susceptibility indicate that the printed hybrid film is superparamagnetic, which makes this film class promising for magnetic sensors.

  • 233.
    Cao, Wei
    et al.
    Tech Univ Munich, Lehrstuhl Funkt Mat, Phys Dept, D-85748 Garching, Germany..
    Xia, Senlin
    Tech Univ Munich, Lehrstuhl Funkt Mat, Phys Dept, D-85748 Garching, Germany..
    Jiang, Xinyu
    Tech Univ Munich, Lehrstuhl Funkt Mat, Phys Dept, D-85748 Garching, Germany..
    Appold, Michael
    Tech Univ Darmstadt, Ernst Berl Inst Tech & Macromol Chem, D-64287 Darmstadt, Germany..
    Opel, Matthias
    Bayer Akad Wissensch, Walther Meissner Inst, D-85748 Garching, Germany..
    Plank, Martina
    Tech Univ Darmstadt, Ernst Berl Inst Tech & Macromol Chem, D-64287 Darmstadt, Germany..
    Schaffrinna, Roy
    Tech Univ Munich, Lehrstuhl Funkt Mat, Phys Dept, D-85748 Garching, Germany..
    Kreuzer, Lucas P.
    Tech Univ Munich, Lehrstuhl Funkt Mat, Phys Dept, D-85748 Garching, Germany..
    Yin, Shanshan
    Tech Univ Munich, Lehrstuhl Funkt Mat, Phys Dept, D-85748 Garching, Germany..
    Gallei, Markus
    Saarland Univ, Chair Polymer Chem, D-66123 Saarbrucken, Germany..
    Schwartzkopf, Matthias
    Deutsch Elektronen Synchrotron DESY, D-22607 Hamburg, Germany..
    Roth, Stephan V.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Mueller-Buschbaurn, Peter
    Tech Univ Munich, Lehrstuhl Funkt Mat, Phys Dept, D-85748 Garching, Germany.;Tech Univ Munich, Heinz Maier Leibnitz Zentrum MLZ, D-85748 Garching, Germany..
    Self-Assembly of Large Magnetic Nanoparticles in Ultrahigh Molecular Weight Linear Diblock Copolymer Films2020In: ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces, ISSN 1944-8244, E-ISSN 1944-8252, Vol. 12, no 6, p. 7557-7564Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The development of diblock copolymer (DBC) nanocomposite films containing magnetic nanoparticles (NPs) with diameters (D) over 20 nm is a challenging task. To host large iron oxide NPs (Fe3O4, D = 27 +/- 0.6 nm), an ultrahigh molecular weight (UHMW) linear DBC polystyrene-block-poly(methyl methacrylate) (PS-b-PMMA) is used as a template in the present work. Due to hydrogen bonding between the carboxylic acid ligands of the NPs and the ester groups in PMMA, the NPs show an affinity to the PMMA block. The localization of the NPs inside the DBC is investigated as a function of the NP concentration. At low NP concentrations, NPs are located preferentially at the interface between PS and PMMA domains to minimize the interfacial tension caused by the strong segregation strength of the UHMW DBC. At high NP concentrations (>= 10 wt %), chain-like NP aggregates (a head-to-tail orientation) are observed in the PMMA domains, resulting in a change of the morphology from sphere to ellipsoid for part of the PMMA domains. Magnetic properties of the hybrid films are probed via superconducting quantum interference device magnetometry. All hybrid films show ferrimagnetism and are promising for potential applications in magnetic data storage.

  • 234. Cao, Wei
    et al.
    Yin, Shanshan
    Plank, Martina
    Chumakov, Andrei
    Opel, Matthias
    Chen, Wei
    Kreuzer, Lucas P.
    Heger, Julian E.
    Gallei, Markus
    Brett, Calvin J.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Schwartzkopf, Matthias
    Eliseev, Artem A.
    Anokhin, Evgeny O.
    Trusov, Lev A.
    Roth, Stephan V.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites.
    Mueller-Buschbaum, Peter
    Spray-Deposited Anisotropic Ferromagnetic Hybrid Polymer Films of PS-b-PMMA and Strontium Hexaferrite Magnetic Nanoplatelets2021In: ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces, ISSN 1944-8244, E-ISSN 1944-8252, Vol. 13, no 1, p. 1592-1602Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Spray deposition is a scalable and cost-effective technique for the fabrication of magnetic hybrid films containing diblock copolymers (DBCs) and magnetic nanoparticles. However, it is challenging to obtain spray-deposited anisotropic magnetic hybrid films without using external magnetic fields. In the present work, spray deposition is applied to prepare perpendicular anisotropic magnetic hybrid films by controlling the orientation of strontium hexaferrite nanoplatelets inside ultra-high-molecular-weight DBC polystyrene-block-poly(methyl methacrylate) (PS-b-PMMA) films. During spray deposition, the evolution of DBC morphology and the orientation of magnetic nanoplatelets are monitored with in situ grazing-incidence small-angle X-ray scattering (GISAXS). For reference, a pure DBC film without nanoplatelets is deposited with the same conditions. Solvent-controlled magnetic properties of the hybrid film are proven with solvent vapor annealing (SVA) applied to the final deposited magnetic films. Obvious changes in the DBC morphology and nanoplatelet localization are observed during SVA. The superconducting quantum interference device data show that ferromagnetic hybrid polymer films with high coercivity can be achieved via spray deposition. The hybrid films show a perpendicular magnetic anisotropy before SVA, which is strongly weakened after SVA. The spray-deposited hybrid films appear highly promising for potential applications in magnetic data storage and sensors.

  • 235.
    Capezza, Antonio Jose
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Polymeric Materials. SLU.
    Sustainable Biobased Protein Superabsorbents from Agricultural Co-Products2020Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The preparation of sustainable protein superabsorbents from agricultural industry side-streams is reported. Wheat gluten (WG), a co-product from the ethanol/starch industry, was processed into foams with sponge-like behavior and high liquid uptake. The materials were obtained by phase-separation of aqueous WG dispersions followed by ambient drying, or by lyophilization. The use of a natural and non-toxic cross-linker (genipin) resulted in foams with high water swelling properties (~18 g/g in 10 min). The rapid swelling may be of use in bio-based foams in e.g., sanitary pads.

    As an alternative, potato protein concentrate (PPC, side-stream from the starch industry), was functionalized and prepared as particles. The liquid swelling capacity was compared after acylation with five different agents. It is shown that the PPC can be acylated to replicate the chemistry of synthetic superabsorbent polymers (SAP), showing water swelling capacity >10 g/g. The acylation (using EDTAD) of WG suspensions resulted in protein particles with water and saline uptake of 22 and 5 g/g, respectively. Limited network stability was however observed when acylating WG in low-protein suspensions. This was addressed by mixing the acylated protein with genipin, which provided a stable protein network. The process gave functionalized particles with swelling capacity ~40 g/g and ~80 % retention of swelling in centrifuge retention tests.

    The extrusion of WG showed that porous WG with water uptake of 500 % can be produced. Further, the scalability of PPC production was pilot-tested by functionalizing potato fruit juice (PFJ), containing the potato protein in its soluble state before the industrial drying used to obtain PPC. This resulted in water swelling capacities >10 g/g, which was comparable to the PPC-functionalized materials. The results pave the way for future optimization of high-throughput production techniques using protein sources in mass production of sustainable protein-based SAPs.

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    fulltext
  • 236.
    Capezza, Antonio Jose
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Polymeric Materials.
    Bettelli, Mercedes A.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Polymeric Materials.
    Wei, Xin-Feng
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Polymeric Materials.
    Jimenez-Rosado, Mercedes
    Univ Seville, Dept Chem Engn, Seville 41012, Spain..
    Guerrero, Antonio
    Univ Seville, Dept Chem Engn, Seville 41012, Spain..
    Hedenqvist, Mikael S.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Polymeric Materials.
    Biodegradable Fiber-Reinforced Gluten Biocomposites for Replacement of Fossil-Based Plastics2023In: ACS Omega, E-ISSN 2470-1343, Vol. 9, no 1, p. 1341-1351Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Biocomposites based on wheat gluten and reinforced with carbon fibers were produced in line with the strive to replace fossil-based plastics with microplastic-free alternatives with competing mechanical properties. The materials were first extruded/compounded and then successfully injection molded, making the setup adequate for the current industrial processing of composite plastics. Furthermore, the materials were manufactured at very low extrusion and injection temperatures (70 and 140 degrees C, respectively), saving energy compared to the compounding of commodity plastics. The sole addition of 10 vol % fibers increased yield strength and stiffness by a factor of 2-4 with good adhesion to the protein. The biocomposites were also shown to be biodegradable, lixiviating into innocuous molecules for nature, which is the next step in the development of sustainable bioplastics. The results show that an industrial protein coproduct reinforced with strong fibers can be processed using common plastic processing techniques. The enhanced mechanical performance of the reinforced protein-based matrix herein also contributes to research addressing the production of safe materials with properties matching those of traditional fossil-based plastics.

  • 237.
    Capezza, Antonio Jose
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Polymeric Materials.
    Cui, Yuxiao
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Polymeric Materials.
    Numata, Keiji
    Lundman, Malin
    Newson, William
    Olsson, Richard
    Johansson, Eva
    Hedenqvist, Mikael
    High Capacity Functionalized Protein Superabsorbents from an Agricultural Co‐Product: A Cradle‐to‐Cradle Approach2020In: Advanced Sustainable Systems, ISSN 2366-7486Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Synthesis of superabsorbent particles from nontoxic wheat gluten (WG) protein, as an industrial co‐product, is presented. A natural molecular cross‐linker named genipin (a hydrogenated glycoside) is used together with a dianhydride (ethylenediaminetetraacetic EDTAD), to enable the preparation of a material with a network structure capable of swelling up to ≈4000% in water and ≈600% in saline solution. This represents an increase in swelling by over 10 times compared to the already highly absorbing gluten reference material. The carboxylation (using EDTAD) and the cross‐linking of the protein result in a hydrogel with liquid retention capacity as high as 80% of the absorbed water remaining in the WG network on extensive centrifugation, which is higher than that of commercial fossil‐based superabsorbents. The results also show that more polar forms of the reacted genipin are more effectively grafted onto the protein, contributing to the swelling and liquid retention. Microscopy of the materials reveals extensive nanoporosity (300 nm), contributing to rapid capillarity‐driven absorption. The use of proteins from agricultural industries for the fabrication of sustainable protein superabsorbents is herein described as an emerging avenue for the development of the next generation daily‐care products with a minimal environmental impact.

  • 238.
    Capezza, Antonio Jose
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Polymeric Materials.
    Glad, David
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Polymeric Materials.
    Ozeren, Husamettin Deniz
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Polymeric Materials.
    Newson, William R.
    SLU Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Fac Landscape Planning Hort & Crop Prod Sci, Dept Plant Breeding, Sundsvagen 10, S-23053 Alnarp, Sweden..
    Olsson, Richard
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Polymeric Materials.
    Johansson, Eva
    SLU Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Fac Landscape Planning Hort & Crop Prod Sci, Dept Plant Breeding, Sundsvagen 10, S-23053 Alnarp, Sweden..
    Hedenqvist, Mikael S.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Polymeric Materials.
    Novel Sustainable Superabsorbents: A One-Pot Method for Functionalization of Side-Stream Potato Proteins2019In: ACS Sustainable Chemistry and Engineering, E-ISSN 2168-0485, Vol. 7, no 21, p. 17845-17854Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The functionalization of inexpensive potato protein concentrate (PPC) is presented as a simple and easily scalable method to produce bio-based superabsorbent powders. Five nontoxic acylating agents were evaluated at different reaction temperatures for solvent-free acylation of the protein. The best results were obtained for succinic anhydride (SA) and a reaction temperature of 140 degrees C. These conditions resulted in efficient functionalization that provided formation of a useful network, which allowed high uptake of fluids and little material disintegration during the uptake, that is, due to protein hydrolysis during the functionalization. The SA-acylated PPC showed increased water and saline swelling capacities of 600 and 60%, respectively, as compared to untreated PPC. The acylated potato protein also showed a saline liquid holding capacity of approximately 50% after centrifugation at 1230 rpm for 3 min, as well as a significant blood swelling capacity of 530%. This blood swelling represents more than 50% of that of a commercial fossil-based superabsorbent (SAP) used for blood absorption in sanitary health products. The swelling properties of these inexpensive protein-based acylated materials highlight their potential as sustainable SAP materials (from industrial side-streams) in applications such as daily care products that are currently dominated by fossil-based SAPs.

  • 239.
    Capezza, Antonio Jose
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Polymeric Materials.
    Lundman, Malin
    Olsson, Richard T.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Polymeric Materials.
    Newson, William
    Department of Plant Breeding, Faculty of Landscape Planning, Horticulturem and Crop Production Sciences, SLU Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Alnarp 23053, Sweden.
    Hedenqvist, Mikael S.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Polymeric Materials.
    Johansson, Eva
    Department of Plant Breeding, Faculty of Landscape Planning, Horticulturem and Crop Production Sciences, SLU Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Alnarp 23053, Sweden.
    Carboxylated Wheat Gluten Proteins: A Green Solution for Production of Sustainable Superabsorbent Materials2020In: Biomacromolecules, ISSN 1525-7797, E-ISSN 1526-4602, Vol. 21, no 5, p. 1709-1719Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Functionalized wheat gluten (WG) protein particles with the ability to absorb fluids within the superabsorbent range are presented. Ethyleneditetraacetic dianhydride (EDTAD), a nontoxic acylation agent, was used for the functionalization of the WG protein at higher protein content than previously reported and no additional chemical cross-linking. The 150-550 μm protein particles had 50-150 nm nanopores induced by drying. The EDTAD treated WG were able to absorb 22, 5, and 3 times of, respectively, water, saline and blood, per gram of dry material (g/g), corresponding to 1000, 150 and 100% higher values than for the as-received WG powder. The liquid retention capacity after centrifugation revealed that almost 50% of the saline liquid was retained within the protein network, which is similar to that for petroleum-based superabsorbent polymers (SAPs). An advantageous feature of these biobased particulate materials is that the maximum swelling is obtained within the first 10 min of exposure, that is, in contrast to many commercial SAP alternatives. The large swelling in a denaturation agent (6 M urea) solution (about 32 g/g) suggests that the secondary entangled/folded structure of the protein restricts protein network expansion and when disrupted allows the absorption of even higher amounts of liquid. The increased liquid uptake, utilization of inexpensive protein coproducts, easy scalable protocols, and absence of any toxic chemicals make these new WG-based SAP particles an interesting alternative to petroleum-based SAP in, for example, absorbent disposable hygiene products.

  • 240.
    Capezza, Antonio Jose
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Polymeric Materials.
    Muneer, Faraz
    Prade, Thomas
    Newson, William
    Das, Oisik
    Lundman, Malin
    Olsson, Richard
    Hedenqvist, Mikael
    Johansson, Eva
    Revalorization of a protein side-stream: an integrated industrial approach towards non-toxic biodegradable superabsorbentsManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 241.
    Capezza, Antonio Jose
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Polymeric Materials. Plant Breeding Department, SLU Alnarp, Lomma, Sweden.
    Muneer, Faraz
    SLU Alnarp, Plant Breeding Dept, Lomma, Sweden..
    Prade, Thomas
    SLU Alnarp, Biosyst & Technol Dept, Lomma, Sweden..
    Newson, William R.
    SLU Alnarp, Plant Breeding Dept, Lomma, Sweden..
    Das, Oisik
    Luleå Univ Technol, Struct & Fire Engn Div, Dept Civil Environm & Nat Resources Engn, Luleå, Sweden..
    Lundman, Malin
    Essity Hyg & Hlth AB, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Olsson, Richard T.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Polymeric Materials.
    Hedenqvist, Mikael S.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Polymeric Materials.
    Johansson, Eva
    SLU Alnarp, Plant Breeding Dept, Lomma, Sweden..
    Acylation of agricultural protein biomass yields biodegradable superabsorbent plastics2021In: Communications Chemistry, E-ISSN 2399-3669, Vol. 4, no 1, article id 52Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Superabsorbent materials can absorb many times their weight in water, but are commonly derived from petroleum. Here, acylation of coagulated potato protein concentrate or soluble potato protein fruit juice yields an effective, mould-resistant, and biodegradable superabsorbent polymer. Superabsorbent polymers (SAP) are a central component of hygiene and medical products requiring high liquid swelling, but these SAP are commonly derived from petroleum resources. Here, we show that sustainable and biodegradable SAP can be produced by acylation of the agricultural potato protein side-stream (PPC) with a non-toxic dianhydride (EDTAD). Treatment of the PPC yields a material with a water swelling capacity of ca. 2400%, which is ten times greater than the untreated PPC. Acylation was also performed on waste potato fruit juice (PFJ), i.e. before the industrial treatment to precipitate the PPC. The use of PFJ for the acylation implies a saving of 320 000 tons as CO2 in greenhouse gas emissions per year by avoiding the industrial drying of the PFJ to obtain the PPC. The acylated PPC shows biodegradation and resistance to mould growth. The possibilities to produce a biodegradable SAP from the PPC allows for future fabrication of environment-friendly and disposable daily-care products, e.g. diapers and sanitary pads.

  • 242.
    Capezza, Antonio Jose
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Polymeric Materials.
    Newson, William R.
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Dept Plant Breeding, Box 190, SE-23422 Lomma, Sweden..
    Muneer, Faraz
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Dept Plant Breeding, Box 190, SE-23422 Lomma, Sweden..
    Johansson, Eva
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Dept Plant Breeding, Box 190, SE-23422 Lomma, Sweden..
    Cui, Yuxiao
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Polymeric Materials.
    Hedenqvist, Mikael S.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Polymeric Materials.
    Olsson, Richard
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Polymeric Materials.
    Prade, Thomas
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Dept Biosyst & Technol, POB 190, SE-23422 Lomma, Sweden..
    Greenhouse gas emissions of biobased diapers containing chemically modified protein superabsorbents2023In: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 387, article id 135830Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Replacing the current mainly fossil-based, disposable, and non-biodegradable sanitary products with sustainable, functional alternatives is an industry priority. Suggested biobased alternatives require evaluation of their actual impact on greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. We evaluated GHG emissions of biobased baby diapers as the most consumed sanitary product, using a biodegradable functionalized protein superabsorbent polymer (bioSAP) and compared them with currently used fossil-based counterparts. Assessment of the diapers also included estimated GHG emissions from the production of the biobased components, transport, and end-of-life combustion of these items. It was shown that only a few of the biobased diaper alternatives resulted in lower GHG emissions than commercial diapers containing fossil-based materials. At the same time, it was demonstrated that the production of the bioSAP via chemical modification of a protein raw material is the primary GHG contributor, with 78% of the total emissions. Reduction of the GHG contribution of the bioSAP production was achieved via a proposed recycling route of the functionalization agent, reducing the GHG emissions by 13% than if no recycling was carried out. Overall, we demonstrated that reduced and competitive GHG emissions could be achieved in sanitary articles using biobased materials, thereby contributing to a sanitary industry producing disposable products with less environmental pollution while allowing customers to keep their current consumption patterns.

  • 243.
    Capezza, Antonio Jose
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Polymeric Materials.
    Robert, Eva
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Lundman, Malin
    Essity Hyg & Hlth AB, SE-40503 Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Newson, William R.
    SLU Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Dept Plant Breeding, Box 101, SE-23053 Alnarp, Sweden..
    Johansson, Eva
    SLU Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Dept Plant Breeding, Box 101, SE-23053 Alnarp, Sweden..
    Hedenqvist, Mikael S.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Olsson, Richard
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Polymeric Materials.
    Extrusion of Porous Protein-Based Polymers and Their Liquid Absorption Characteristics2020In: Polymers, E-ISSN 2073-4360, Vol. 12, no 2, article id 459Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The production of porous wheat gluten (WG) absorbent materials by means of extrusion processing is presented for the future development of sustainable superabsorbent polymers (SAPs). Different temperatures, formulations, and WG compositions were used to determine a useful protocol that provides the best combination of porosity and water swelling properties. The most optimal formulation was based on 50 wt.% WG in water that was processed at 80 degrees C as a mixture, which provided a porous core structure with a denser outer shell. As a green foaming agent, food-grade sodium bicarbonate was added during the processing, which allowed the formation of a more open porous material. This extruded WG material was able to swell 280% in water and, due to the open-cell structure, 28% with non-polar limonene. The results are paving the way towards production of porous bio macromolecular structures with high polar/non-polar liquid uptake, using extrusion as a solvent free and energy efficient production technique without toxic reagents.

  • 244.
    Capezza, Antonio Jose
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Polymeric Materials. SLU Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Dept Plant Breeding, Sundsvagen 10,POB 101, SE-23053 Alnarp, Sweden.
    Wu, Qiong
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites.
    Newson, William R.
    SLU Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Dept Plant Breeding, Sundsvagen 10,POB 101, SE-23053 Alnarp, Sweden..
    Olsson, Richard
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Polymeric Materials.
    Espuche, Eliane
    Univ Lyon, Univ Lyon1, Ingn Mat Polymeres, UMR CNRS 5223, Batiment Polytech 15,Bd Andre Latarjet, F-69622 Villeurbanne, France..
    Johansson, Eva
    SLU Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Dept Plant Breeding, Sundsvagen 10,POB 101, SE-23053 Alnarp, Sweden..
    Hedenqvist, Mikael S.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Polymeric Materials.
    Superabsorbent and Fully Biobased Protein Foams with a Natural Cross-Linker and Cellulose Nanofibers2019In: ACS Omega, E-ISSN 2470-1343, Vol. 4, no 19, p. 18257-18267Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The development of fully natural wheat gluten foams showing rapid and high uptake of water, sheep blood, and saline solution, while maintaining high mechanical stability in the swollen state, is presented. Genipin was added as a natural and polar cross-linker to increase the polarity of the protein chains, whereas cellulose nanofibers (CNFs) were added as a reinforcement/stiffener of the foams, alone or in combination with the genipin. The presence of only genipin resulted in a foam that absorbed up to 25 g of water per gram of foam and a more than 15 g uptake in only 8 min. In contrast, with CNF alone, it was not possible to maintain the mechanical stability of the foam during the water uptake and the protein foam disintegrated. The combination of CNF and genipin yielded a material with the best mechanical stability of the tested samples. In the latter case, the foam could be compressed repeatedly more than 80% without displaying any structural damage. The results revealed that a strong network had formed between the wheat gluten matrix, genipin, and cellulose in the foam structure. A unique feature of the absorbent/foam, in contrast to commercial superabsorbents, was that it was able to rapidly absorb nonpolar liquids (here, n-heptane) due to the open-cell structure. The capillary-driven absorption due to the open-cell structure, the high liquid absorption in the cell walls, and the mechanical properties (both in dry and swollen states) of these natural foams make them interesting as a sustainable replacement for a range of petroleum-based foam materials, including absorbent hygiene products such as sanitary pads.

  • 245.
    Carlos Alcantara, Jose
    et al.
    Univ Girona, Dept Chem Engn, Polytech Sch, Adv Biomat & Nanotechnol, Girona 17003, Spain..
    Gonzalez, Israel
    Univ Girona, Dept Chem Engn, LEPAMAP Grp, Girona 17003, Spain..
    Merce Pareta, M.
    Polytech Univ Girona, Dept Architecture & Construct, Girona 17003, Spain..
    Vilaseca, Fabiola
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology. Univ Girona, Dept Chem Engn, Polytech Sch, Adv Biomat & Nanotechnol, Girona 17003, Spain.;Chalmers Univ Technol, Dept Ind & Mat Sci, Engn Mat, SE-41296 Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Biocomposites from Rice Straw Nanofibers: Morphology, Thermal and Mechanical Properties2020In: Materials, ISSN 1996-1944, E-ISSN 1996-1944, Vol. 13, no 9, article id 2138Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Agricultural residues are major potential resources for biomass and for material production. In this work, rice straw residues were used to isolate cellulose nanofibers of different degree of oxidation. Firstly, bleached rice fibers were produced from the rice straw residues following chemical extraction and bleaching processes. Oxidation of rice fibers mediated by radical 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine 1-oxyl (TEMPO) at pH 10 was then applied to extract rice cellulose nanofibers, with diameters of 3-11 nm from morphological analysis. The strengthening capacity of rice nanofibers was tested by casting nanocomposite films with poly(vinyl alcohol) polymer. The same formulations with eucalyptus nanofibers were produced as comparison. Their thermal and mechanical performance was evaluated using thermogravimetry, differential scanning calorimetry, dynamic mechanical analysis and tensile testing. The glass transition of nanocomposites was shifted to higher temperatures with respect to the pure polymer by the addition of rice cellulose nanofibers. Rice nanofibers also acted as a nucleating agent for the polymer matrix. More flexible eucalyptus nanofibers did not show these two phenomena on the matrix. Instead, both types of nanofibers gave similar stiffening (as Young's modulus) to the matrix reinforced up to 5 wt.%. The ultimate tensile strength of nanocomposite films revealed significant enhancing capacity for rice nanofibers, although this effect was somehow higher for eucalyptus nanofibers.

  • 246.
    Carmagnola, Irene
    et al.
    Politecn Torino, Dept Mech & Aerosp Engn, Turin, Italy.;Politecnico Torino, PolitoBIOMed Lab, Turin, Italy..
    Tonda-Turo, Chiara
    Politecn Torino, Dept Mech & Aerosp Engn, Turin, Italy.;Politecnico Torino, PolitoBIOMed Lab, Turin, Italy..
    Chiappone, Annalisa
    Politecnico Torino, PolitoBIOMed Lab, Turin, Italy.;Politecn Torino Torino, Dept Appl Sci & Technol, Turin, Italy..
    Melilli, Giuseppe
    Univ Cote dAzur, Inst Chem Nice, Nice, France..
    Ciardelli, Gianluca
    Politecn Torino, Dept Mech & Aerosp Engn, Turin, Italy.;Politecnico Torino, PolitoBIOMed Lab, Turin, Italy.;CNR, Inst Chem & Phys Processes CNR IPCF UOS, Dept Mat & Devices, Pisa, Italy..
    Sangermano, Marco
    Politecnico Torino, PolitoBIOMed Lab, Turin, Italy.;Politecn Torino Torino, Dept Appl Sci & Technol, Turin, Italy..
    Hakkarainen, Minna
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Polymer Technology.
    Photocurable Biopolymers as Tunable Materials for Personalized Scaffold Architecture Through Additive Manufacturing Techniques2022In: Tissue Engineering. Part A, ISSN 1937-3341, E-ISSN 1937-335X, Vol. 28, p. S201-S201Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 247. Carosio, F.
    et al.
    Ghanadpour, Maryam
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Alongi, J
    Wågberg, L
    Layer-by-layer assembled chitosan/phosphporylated nanocellulose as a bio-based and flame protecting nano-exoskeleton on PU foams2018In: Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 248. Carosio, F.
    et al.
    Ghanadpour, Maryam
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Alongi, J.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Layer-by-layer-assembled chitosan/phosphorylated cellulose nanofibrils as a bio-based and flame protecting nano-exoskeleton on PU foams2018In: Carbohydrate Polymers, ISSN 0144-8617, E-ISSN 1879-1344, Vol. 202, p. 479-487Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The layer-by-layer (LbL) assembly of chitosan (CH) and phosphorylated cellulose nanofibrils (P-CNF) is presented as a novel, sustainable and efficient fire protection system for polyurethane foams. The assembly yields a linearly growing coating where P-CNF is the main component and is embedded in a continuous CH matrix. This CH/P-CNF system homogenously coats the complex 3D structure of the foam producing a nano-exoskeleton that displays excellent mechanical properties increasing the modulus of the foam while maintaining its ability of being cyclically deformed. During combustion the CH/P-CNF exoskeleton efficiently prevents foam collapse and suppresses melt dripping while reducing the heat release rate peak by 31% with only 8% of added weight. The coating behavior during combustion is investigated and correlated to the observed performances. Physical and chemical mechanisms are identified and related to the unique composition and structure of the coating imparted by the LbL assembly.

  • 249. Carosio, F.
    et al.
    Medina, Lilian
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Kochumalayil, Joby
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Berglund, Lars
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Green and Fire Resistant Nanocellulose/Hemicellulose/Clay Foams2021In: Advanced Materials Interfaces, ISSN 2196-7350, Vol. 8, no 18, article id 2101111Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Lightweight polymer foams from synthetic polymers are commonly used in a wide-spread spectrum of application fields. Their intrinsic flammability coupled with restrictions on flame retardant chemicals poses a severe threat to safety. Here, fire resistant foams comprising biobased components capable of replacing petroleum-based foams are investigated. Cellulose nanofibers are combined with 2D montmorillonite nanoplatelets and a native xyloglucan hemicellulose binder, using a water-based freeze casting approach. Due to the silicate nanoplatelets, these lightweight foams self-extinguish the flame during flammability tests. The limiting oxygen index is as high as 31.5% and in the same range as the best fire-retardant synthetic foams available. In cone calorimetry, the foams display extremely low combustion rates. Smoke release is near the detection limit of the instrument. In addition, the foams are withstanding the penetration of a flame torch focused on one side of the specimen (T on surface 800 °C) and structural integrity is maintained. At the same time, the unexposed side is insulated, as demonstrated by a through-thickness temperature drop of 680 °C cm−1. The results represent a tremendous opportunity for the development of fire-safe foams combining excellent sustainability with multifunctional performance.

  • 250.
    Carrick, Christopher
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Pettersson, Bert
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Design of cellulose capsules2010In: Abstracts of Papers of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0065-7727, Vol. 239Article in journal (Other academic)
2345678 201 - 250 of 1819
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