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  • 201.
    El Remaily, Mahmoud Abd El Aleem Ali Ali
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Organic Chemistry. Sohag University, Egypt.
    Naidu, Veluru Ramesh
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Organic Chemistry.
    Ni, Shengjun
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Organic Chemistry.
    Franzén, Johan
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Organic Chemistry.
    Carbocation Catalysis: Oxa-Diels-Alder Reactions of Unactivated Aldehydes and Simple Dienes2015In: European Journal of Organic Chemistry, ISSN 1434-193X, E-ISSN 1099-0690, no 30, p. 6610-6614Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The versatility of the trityl cation (TrBF<inf>4</inf>) as a highly efficient Lewis acid organocatalyst is demonstrated in the oxa-Diels-Alder reaction of various unactivated aromatic and aliphatic aldehydes and simple unactivated dienes, such as isoprene and 2,3-dimethylbutadiene. The transformation proceeds smoothly to give 3,6-dihydropyrane adducts in high to moderate yields with catalyst loadings down to 1.0 mol-% under mild reaction conditions. In contrast to most previously reported strategies, this protocol does not require substrate functional group activation, neither by electron-deficient aldehydes (2-oxo aldehydes) or electron-rich dienes (methoxy or amino-butadiene).

  • 202.
    Elias, Mturi
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Shahzad, Khurram
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Using Multi-criteria Decision Making to Choose Process Representation Format for a Process Repository2010In: BUSINESS INFORMATION SYSTEMS WORKSHOPS / [ed] Abramowicz W; Tolksdorf R; Wecel K, 2010, Vol. 57, p. 19-24Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Reuse of business process models is the act of designing business processes by using existing process models. Reuse of business process models has been considered as a way to reduce the cost of modeling business processes from scratch. In order to support reuse of process models, a critical mass of process models is required which justifies the effort of maintaining a process model repository. While there are several process modeling languages, no single language is widely accepted. So in order to make process models usable, the stored process models must be presented in a language understandable by users. The purpose of this work is to apply multi-criteria decision making to choose process representation format for a process model repository.

  • 203.
    Eliasson, Johan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Cerratto Pargman, Teresa
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Ramberg, Robert
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Embodied Interaction or Context-Aware Computing?: An Integrated Approach to Design2009In: HUMAN-COMPUTER INTERACTION, PT I / [ed] Jacko JA, 2009, Vol. 5610, p. 606-615Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper revisits the notion of context from an interaction design perspective. Since the emergence of the research fields of Computer supported cooperative work and Ubiquitous computing, the notion of context has been discussed from different theoretical approaches and in different research traditions. One of these approaches is Embodied Interaction. This theoretical approach has in particular contributed to (i) challenge the view that user context can be meaningfully represented by a computer system, (ii) discuss the notion of context as interaction through the idea that users are always embodied in their interaction with computer systems. We believe that the particular view on users context that the approach of Embodied Interaction suggests needs to be further elaborated in terms of design. As a contribution we suggest an integrated approach where the interactional view of Embodied Interaction is interrelated with the representational view of Context-aware computing.

  • 204.
    Elnady, Tamer
    et al.
    Ain Shams University.
    Musharrof, M.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Marcus Wallenberg Laboratory MWL.
    Bodén, Hans
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Marcus Wallenberg Laboratory MWL.
    Elhadidi, B.
    Cairo University.
    Validation of an inverse analytical technique to educe liner impedance with grazing flow2006In: Collection of Technical Papers - 12th AIAA/CEAS Aeroacoustics Conference, 2006, Vol. 5, p. 3093-3107Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper is based on a previously developed analytical technique to educe the acoustic impedance of a liner sample, placed inside a rectangular duct in grazing incidence. This technique uses the measurement of complex acoustic pressure at four positions inside the duct, upstream and downstream the lined section, and educing the result using the mode matching method. In the mode matching code, the flow was simplified to be uniform, which is not usually the actual case. This technique was opposed by several doubts regarding the mean flow assumption and the possible pressure discontinuity at the hard-soft and soft-hard steps. It was believed that the pressure field away from this discontinuity is representative of the real case, and the code would be capable to educe the correct liner impedance. In this paper, the code is validated against benchmark data from NASA. First the code was tested to be able to reproduce the pressure field for a given impedance. Second, it was tested to educe the correct impedance for a given pressure distribution. The results of the mode matching code were in excellent agreement with the experimental data. The effect of shear flow was investigated and found out that the differences are quite small for the chosen duct size and frequency of interest. On the other hand, the mode matching formulation was re-written based on the pressure instead of the velocity potential.

  • 205. Eneman, K.
    et al.
    Luts, H.
    Wouters, J.
    Büchler, M.
    Dillier, N.
    Dreschler, W.
    Froehlich, M.
    Grimm, G.
    Hohmann, V.
    Houben, Rolph
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Sound and Image Processing (Closed 130101).
    Leijon, Arne
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Sound and Image Processing (Closed 130101).
    Lombard, A.
    Mauler, D.
    Moonen, M.
    Puder, H.
    Schulte, M.
    Spriet, A.
    Vormann, M.
    Evaluation of signal enhancement algorithms for hearing instruments2008Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the frame of the HearCom1 project five promising signal enhancement algorithms are validated for future use in hearing instrument devices. To assess the algorithm performance solely based on simulation experiments, a number of physical evaluation measures have been proposed that incorporate basic aspects of normal and impaired human hearing. Additionally, each of the algorithms has been implemented on a common real-time hardware/software platform, which facilitates a profound subjective validation of the algorithm performance. Recently, a multicenter study has been set up across five different test centers in Belgium, the Netherlands, Germany and Switzerland to perceptually evaluate the selected signal enhancement approaches with normally hearing and hearing impaired listeners.

  • 206.
    Engelson, Leonid
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Transport and Location Analysis. KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Transport Studies, CTS.
    van Amelsfort, Dirk
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Transport Studies, CTS.
    The role of volume-delay functions in forecast and evaluation of congestion charging schemes, application to Stockholm2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 207. Engstrom, Karin
    et al.
    Wojdacz, Tomasz K.
    Marabita, Francesco
    Ewels, Philip
    Käller, Max
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Vezzi, Francesco
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Prezza, Nicola
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Gruselius, Joel
    Vahter, Marie
    Broberg, Karin
    Transcriptomics and methylomics of CD4-positive T cells in arsenic-exposed women2017In: Archives of Toxicology, ISSN 0340-5761, E-ISSN 1432-0738, Vol. 91, no 5, p. 2067-2078Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Arsenic, a carcinogen with immunotoxic effects, is a common contaminant of drinking water and certain food worldwide. We hypothesized that chronic arsenic exposure alters gene expression, potentially by altering DNA methylation of genes encoding central components of the immune system. We therefore analyzed the transcriptomes (by RNA sequencing) and methylomes (by target-enrichment next-generation sequencing) of primary CD4-positive T cells from matched groups of four women each in the Argentinean Andes, with fivefold differences in urinary arsenic concentrations (median concentrations of urinary arsenic in the lower- and high-arsenic groups: 65 and 276 mu g/l, respectively). Arsenic exposure was associated with genome-wide alterations of gene expression; principal component analysis indicated that the exposure explained 53% of the variance in gene expression among the top variable genes and 19% of 28,351 genes were differentially expressed (false discovery rate < 0.05) between the exposure groups. Key genes regulating the immune system, such as tumor necrosis factor alpha and interferon gamma, as well as genes related to the NF-kappa-beta complex, were significantly downregulated in the high-arsenic group. Arsenic exposure was associated with genome-wide DNA methylation; the high-arsenic group had 3% points higher genome-wide full methylation (> 80% methylation) than the lower-arsenic group. Differentially methylated regions that were hyper-methylated in the high-arsenic group showed enrichment for immune-related gene ontologies that constitute the basic functions of CD4-positive T cells, such as isotype switching and lymphocyte activation and differentiation. In conclusion, chronic arsenic exposure from drinking water was related to changes in the transcriptome and methylome of CD4-positive T cells, both genome wide and in specific genes, supporting the hypothesis that arsenic causes immunotoxicity by interfering with gene expression and regulation.

  • 208.
    Enheten för Publiceringens infrastruktur,
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Department for Library services, Language and ARC, Library, Publication Infrastructure.
    Mandatory fields for other publication types in DiVA: Books, reports etc.2011Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 209.
    Enheten för Publiceringens infrastruktur,
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Department for Library services, Language and ARC, Library, Publication Infrastructure.
    Manual for registering articles in DiVA2011Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 210.
    Enheten för Publiceringens infrastruktur,
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Department for Library services, Language and ARC, Library, Publication Infrastructure.
    Manual for registering conference papers in DiVA2011Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 211.
    Enheten för Publiceringens infrastruktur,
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Department for Library services, Language and ARC, Library, Publication Infrastructure.
    Manual for registering student theses in DiVA (for students)2011Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 212.
    Enheten för Publiceringens infrastruktur,
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Department for Library services, Language and ARC, Library, Publication Infrastructure.
    Manual for importing to DiVA2011Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 213.
    Enheten för Publiceringens infrastruktur,
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Department for Library services, Language and ARC, Library, Publication Infrastructure.
    Manual för att godkänna registrerade examensarbeten i DiVA (för administratörer)2018Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 214.
    Enheten för Publiceringens infrastruktur,
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Department for Library services, Language and ARC, Library, Publication Infrastructure.
    Manual för registrering av artiklar i DiVA2011Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 215.
    Enheten för Publiceringens infrastruktur,
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Department for Library services, Language and ARC, Library, Publication Infrastructure.
    Manual för registrering av avhandlingar i DiVA2010Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 216.
    Enheten för Publiceringens infrastruktur,
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Department for Library services, Language and ARC, Library, Publication Infrastructure.
    Manual för registrering av examensarbeten i DiVA (för adminstratörer)2011Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 217.
    Enheten för Publiceringens infrastruktur,
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Department for Library services, Language and ARC, Library, Publication Infrastructure.
    Manual för registrering av examensarbeten i DiVA (för studenter)2011Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 218.
    Enheten för Publiceringens infrastruktur,
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Department for Library services, Language and ARC, Library, Publication Infrastructure.
    Manual för registrering av konferensbidrag i DiVA2011Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 219.
    Enheten för Publiceringens infrastruktur,
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Department for Library services, Language and ARC, Library, Publication Infrastructure.
    Manual för import till DiVA2011Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 220.
    Enroth, Maria
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Graphic Arts, Media (closed 20111231).
    Developing tools for sustainability management in the graphic arts industry2006Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other scientific)
    Abstract [en]

    The main aim of this thesis is to develop and test industry-specific, applied work procedures and tools for environmental and emerging sustainability work in the graphic arts industry. This includes methods to quantify, follow-up, evaluate, manage, improve and communicate the environmental performance of activities in the graphic arts supply chain and printed products.

    In order to achieve the aims of the thesis, a selection of work areas were chosen as the basis for developing the industry-specific work procedures and tools. The selected work areas are the following: environmental management (being a part of sustainability management), environmental and sustainability strategies, environmental indicators and design for environment (DfE).

    The research presented in this thesis was based on survey research methods, case studies and multi-company studies. Within the framework of these methods, quantitative and qualitative techniques for data gathering were used. The companies included in the studies were selected according to their willingness, interest and motivation to participate and develop their environmental or sustainability work.

    The most significant results of the research presented in this thesis regarding the selected work areas are the following:

    • An evaluation of early certified environmental management systems (EMSs) in Sweden identified four areas as priorities in making the EMSs more efficient. Two of them, viz. improvement in the follow-up of environmental work, and the linking of EMSs to product design, were developed for the graphic arts industry. The remaining two areas were clarifying the identification process and assessment of environmental aspects, and streamlining and co-ordinating different management systems.

    • An established and successfully tested working method for formulating and realising corporate sustainability strategies in the graphic arts industry.

    • Industry-specific environmental indicator models for the graphic arts industry with defined methods for standardised inventorying and calculations. These models have been tested, used and approved of by the industry itself.

    • Collected and compiled data for the developed environmental indicator models. Data have been collected from quite a large number of companies (10-20 companies for each of the printing techniques covered, i.e. coldset offset, heatset offset and gravure) over a period of several years.

    • The use of the industry-specific environmental indicator models was developed and illustrated.

    • A described and recommended work procedure for DfE in graphic arts companies including industry-specific tools for applying DfE to printed products, in the form of a manual and a checklist. The checklist was designed so that it can serve as a simple tool for the environmental assessment of printed products. The tools were tested by graphic arts companies.

  • 221.
    Enroth, Maria
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Graphic Arts, Media (closed 20111231).
    Johansson, Martin
    Environmental data on gravure and offset printing2006In: Acta Graphica, ISSN 0353-4707, E-ISSN 1848-3828, Vol. 18, no 1-4, p. 1-10Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents environmental data relating to gravure and offset printing. It focuses on theprinting steps in the production chain of publication printed products. The other steps in the life-cycleof printed products have also been studied but they are not the subjects of this paper.The study is based on case studies, where almost twenty gravure printers and ten offset printers fromaround Europe and the United States have been involved.The general, significant environmental aspects of publication printed products have been identified as thefollowing; use of paper, use of energy, consumption (loss) of volatile organic compounds (VOC), includingtoluene, hazardous waste and environmental management. Transport has also been identified as asignificant environmental aspect for printed products but, to a great extent, its magnitude depends on theparticular product. The data collected from printers in different parts of the world were compared toenvironmental data provided by offset printers in Sweden, which were mainly taken from coldset printers.This paper presents significant environmental data for a fairly large number of companies representing aconsiderable part of the printing capacity, not only in Europe but also worldwide. These data canprovide guidance for both printers and buyers of printed products working to achieve continualimprovements and striving towards more environmentally adapted printed products. To some extent,the data can also be used as reference values, since there are few compilations of data providing ageneral coverage of printers in different parts of the world.

  • 222.
    Eriksson, A.
    et al.
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, Philosophy.
    Grill, Kalle
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, Philosophy.
    Who owns my avatar?: Rights in virtual property2005In: Proceedings of DiGRA 2005 Conference: Changing Views - Worlds in Play, 2005Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents a framework for discussing issues of ownership in connection to virtual worlds. We explore how divergent interests in virtual property can be mediated by applying a constructivist perspective to the concept ownership. The simple solutions offered today entail that a contract between the game producer and the gamer gives the game developer exclusive rights to all virtual property. This appears to be unsatisfactory. A number of legitimate interests on part of both producers and gamers may be readily distinguished. More complex distributions of rights would allow many of these interests to be consistently respected.

  • 223.
    Eriksson, Anders
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Structural Mechanics.
    Månsson, JohanKTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Structural Mechanics.Tibert, GunnarKTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Structural Mechanics.
    NSCM-17: Proceedings of the 17th Nordic Seminar on Computational Mechanics2004Conference proceedings (editor) (Refereed)
  • 224.
    Eriksson, Cecilia
    et al.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics (closed 20130101).
    Schwenk, Jochen M.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics (closed 20130101).
    Sjöberg, Anna
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Hober, Sophia
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics (closed 20130101).
    Affibody molecule-mediated depletion of HSA and IgG using different buffer compositions: a 15 min protocol for parallel processing of 1-48 samples2010In: Biotechnology and applied biochemistry, ISSN 0885-4513, E-ISSN 1470-8744, Vol. 56, p. 49-57Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    High-abundant plasma proteins pose a challenge in a large number of proteomics-based technologies. Depletion of these high-abundant proteins has proven to be a fruitful strategy to circumvent masking of lower-abundant proteins that could serve as valuable biomarker candidates. However, current strategies often do not meet the throughput requirements of large-scale proteomic studies. In the present paper, a flexible and parallelized method for the depletion of high-abundant proteins is described, allowing the removal of the two most abundant proteins from 48 blood-derived samples in less than 15 min using Affibody molecules as affinity ligands. A sample-processing platform like this should be suitable for a number of proteomics technologies; its flexibility in buffer composition allows for different types of downstream applications.

  • 225.
    Eriksson, Johan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics.
    Experimental and numerical studies of nonsmooth mechanical systems: applications of dimension estimation2005Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other scientific)
  • 226.
    Eriksson, LE
    et al.
    KTH.
    Enlund, Nils
    KTH.
    The peer-to-peer dilemma2004In: EADOPTION AND THE KNOWLEDGE ECONOMY: ISSUES, APPLICATIONS, CASE STUDIES, PTS 1 AND 2: ISSUES, APPLICATIONS, CASE STUDIES, PTS 1 AND 2, AMSTERDAM: I O S PRESS , 2004, Vol. 1, p. 327-334Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Few technological innovations have caused as much controversy as Peer-to-Peer (P2P) file-sharing applications. Consumers have embraced it en masse, with the download figures breaking all time records for Internet application software. Content owners and some politicians have vehemently criticised the technology and its users, claiming that it merely offers a refined way of stealing intellectual property from creators. The paradox is that P2P both supports and conflicts with many of the policy regimes and goals related to the development of a knowledge-based society, Via studies of interactivity in different sectors (music file sharing, self-publishing and games), the paper focuses on the need to constantly reappraise policies, laws and principles if the long-term benefits of the Information Society are to be realised.

  • 227.
    Eriksson, Magnus
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Soil and Rock Mechanics.
    Hur tar vi vara på injekteringsforskningens resultat?2005Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 228.
    Eriksson, Magnus
    et al.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Biochemistry (closed 20130101).
    Boyer, Antoine
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    Sinigoi, Loris
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Biochemistry (closed 20130101).
    Johansson, Mats
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    Malmström, Eva
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    Hult, Karl
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Biochemistry (closed 20130101).
    Trey, Stacy
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    Martinelle, Mats
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Biochemistry (closed 20130101).
    One-Pot Enzymatic Route to Tetraallyl Ether Functional Oligoesters: Synthesis, UV Curing, and Characterization2010In: Journal of Polymer Science Part A: Polymer Chemistry, ISSN 0887-624X, E-ISSN 1099-0518, Vol. 48, no 23, p. 5289-5297Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An enzymatic one-pot route in bulk was used to synthesize tetraallyl ether (tAE) functional oligomers based on divinyl adipate, 1,4-butanediol and trimethylolpropane diallyl ether. By using lipase B from Candida antarctica as catalyst and varying the stoichiometric ratio of monomers, it was possible to reach targeted molecular weights (from 1300 to 3300 g mol(-1)) of allyl-ether functional polyesters. The enzyme catalyzed reaction reached completion (>98% conversion based on all monomers) within 24 h at 60 degrees C, under reduced pressure (72 mbar) resulting in similar to 90% yield after filtration. The tAE-functional oligoesters were photopolymerized, without any purification other than removal of the enzyme by filtration, with thiol functional monomers (dithiol, tetrathiol) in a 1: 1 ratio thiol-ene reaction. The photo-initiator, 2,2-dimethoxy-2-phenylacetophenone, was used to improve the rate of reaction under UV light. High conversions (96-99% within detection limits) were found for all thiol-ene films as determined by FT-Raman spectroscopy. The tAE-functional oligoesters were characterized by NMR, MALDI, and SEC. The UV-cured homopolymerized films and the thiol-ene films properties were characterized utilizing DSC and DMTA.

  • 229.
    Eriksson, Magnus
    et al.
    KTH.
    Fransson, Åsa
    Emmelin, Ann
    KTH.
    Grouting trials in hard jointed rock-investigation, design and execution2005In: Proceedings of the 16th International Conference on Soil Mechanics and Geotechnical Engineering, Vols 1-5: Geotechnology In Harmony With The Global Environment, 2005, p. 2247-2251Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Grouting trials were performed in crystalline rock at a depth of 450 m during construction of a 70-metre long tunnel. Hydrogeological investigations were undertaken stepwise, resulting in a successive updating of the rock description, followed by grouting design, and prognoses. The application of this coupled methodology for rock characterisation and design meant that, (a) general systematic pre-grouting could be avoided thanks to having detailed rock characterisation, and (b) an early assessment could be made about the most suitable grouting methodology. The initial description of rock, based on data obtained from a core borehole, was used to prepare a base design, and two grouting fans were anticipated. Even though further investigations resulted in design changes along a section of the tunnel, a combination of inflow measurements and pressure build-up tests gave a sound basis from which to choose the appropriate grout, and prepare for encountering more extreme conditions. Based on inflow measurements, the seating effect for Fans I and 2 was approximately 99.9 and 95 per cent respectively.

  • 230.
    Eriksson, Magnus
    et al.
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Civil and Architectural Engineering.
    Friedrich, M
    Vorschulze, C
    Variations in the rheology and penetrability of cement-based grouts: an experimental study2004In: Cement and Concrete Research, ISSN 0008-8846, E-ISSN 1873-3948, Vol. 34, no 7, p. 1111-1119Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To ascertain the most suitable grouting mixture to use in a specific project or to facilitate making predictions about grouting outcomes, laboratory tests are usually carried out to determine the properties of the particular grout. This paper presents a number of measurements of grout properties relating to the rheology and penetrability of fresh cement-based grout. The main purpose of this study is to investigate and describe variations that can be detected when measurements of these grout parameters are carried out repeatedly. Furthermore, a number of additional factors that can also influence these grout properties have been identified and examined. This study has shown that grout properties do vary and should therefore not to be regarded as uniform. The rheology-related properties of grout have been found to vary more than the penetrability-related parameters. Furthermore, it was found that the water-cement (w/c) ratio, the cement condition, and the mixing equipment could significantly influence the grout properties investigated in this study. Based on these experimental findings, it is therefore recommended that repeated testing be carried out on a specific grout mixture in preference to relying on the results of a single test.

  • 231.
    Eriksson, Magnus
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Soil and Rock Mechanics.
    Stille, Håkan
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Soil and Rock Mechanics.
    Cementinjektering i hårt berg2005Book (Refereed)
  • 232.
    Eriksson, Margareta
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Inorganic Chemistry (closed 20110630).
    Östensson, Rasmus
    Kloo, Lars
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Inorganic Chemistry (closed 20110630).
    Bacteriological study of an aqueous solution with ozone and SDS or SDSperoxide2005In: Applied and Environmental Microbiology, ISSN 0099-2240, E-ISSN 1098-5336Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 233.
    Eriksson, O.
    et al.
    KTH. Uppsala University, Sweden .
    Mikkelsen, R.
    Hansen, K. S.
    Nilsson, K.
    KTH. Uppsala University, Sweden .
    Ivanell, Stefan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Stability, Transition and Control. Uppsala University, Sweden .
    Analysis of long distance wakes of Horns Rev I using actuator disc approach2014In: Journal of Physics, Conference Series, ISSN 1742-6588, E-ISSN 1742-6596, Vol. 555, no 1, article id 012032Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The wake recovery behind the Horns Rev wind farm is analysed to investigate the applicability of Large Eddy Simulations (LES) in combination with an actuator disc method (ACD) for farm to farm interaction studies. Periodic boundary conditions on the lateral boundaries are used to model the wind farm (as infinitely wide), using only two columns of turbines. The meteorological conditions of the site are taken into account by introducing wind shear and pre-generated synthetic turbulence to the simulation domain using body forces. Simulations are carried out to study the power production and the velocity deficit in the farm wake. The results are compared to the actual power production as well as to wind measurements at 2 km and 6 km behind the wind farm. The simulated power production inside the farm shows an overall good correlation with the real production, but is slightly overpredicted in the most downstream rows. The simulations overpredict the wake recovery, namely the wind velocity, at long distances behind the farm. Further studies are needed before the presented method can be applied for the simulation of long distance wakes. Suggested parameters to be studied are the development of the turbulence downstream in the domain and the impact of the grid resolution.

  • 234. Eriksson, O.
    et al.
    Nilsson, K.
    KTH.
    Breton, S-P
    Ivanell, Stefan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Stability, Transition and Control. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Large-eddy simulations of wind farm production and long distance wakes2015In: WAKE CONFERENCE 2015, 2015, Vol. 625, article id 012022Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The future development of offshore wind power will include many wind farms built in the same areas. It is known that wind farms produce long distance wakes, which means that we will see more occasions of farm to farm interaction, namely one wind farm operating in the wake of another wind farm. This study investigates how to perform accurate power predictions on large wind farms and how to assess the long distance wakes generated by these farms. The focus of this paper is the production's and wake's sensitivity to the extension of the grid as well as the turbulence when using Large-eddy simulations (LES) with pregenerated Mann turbulence. The aim is to determine an optimal grid which minimizes blockage effects and ensures constant resolution in the entire wake region at the lowest computational cost. The simulations are first performed in the absence of wind turbines in order to assess how the atmospheric turbulence and wind profile are evolving downstream (up to 12,000 m behind the position where the turbulence is imposed). In the second step, 10 turbines are added in the domain (using an actuator disc method) and their production is analyzed alongside the mean velocities in the domain. The blockage effects are tested using grids with different vertical extents. An equidistant region is used in order to ensure high resolution in the wake region. The importance of covering the entire wake structure inside the equidistant region is analyzed by decreasing the size of this region. In this step, the importance of the lateral size of the Mann turbulence box is also analyzed. In the results it can be seen that the flow is acceptably preserved through the empty domain if a larger turbulence box is used. The relative production is increased (due to blockage effects) for the last turbines using a smaller vertical domain, increased for a lower or narrower equidistant region (due to the smearing of the wake in the stretched area) and decreased when using a smaller turbulence box (due to decreased inmixing) The long distance wake behind the row is most impacted by the use of a smaller turbulence box, while the other simulation setups have less influence on these results. In summary, the results show the importance of having relatively large extensions of the domain, large extensions of the equidistant region and especially large extensions of the turbulence box.

  • 235.
    Eriksson, Stefan
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Production Systems.
    Visual replenishment methods in manufacturing industry and suggestion for a decision tool2013Licentiate thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In almost all supply chains, materials need to be stored or buffered, implying that manufacturing companies need effective replenishment methods. However, this is challenging, since companies must balance inventory costs and customer service in complex and different situations. Therefore, it is important to choose replenishment methods carefully. One well-known and widespread method is Material Requirements Planning (MRP). But the method has problems, such as regarding volume flexibility. There are other methods, but the literature lacks case studies and detailed descriptions and analysis of them, especially for visually oriented methods. Therefore, it is important to explore different methods for materials supply.

    The purpose of this study is to analyze the application of visually oriented replenishment methods in manufacturing industry and further to design a tentative decision tool for selecting methods. The research aims to provide some answers to three key questions.

    The first research question concerns general factors that are important for evaluating how effective replenishment methods are. From the literature review, different factors emerged such as product characteristics (fit in the Kraljic matrix, volume issues, size, etc.); information, trust, and geographical proximity between supplier and customer; and different logistics goals (delivery service elements, tied-up capital, use of resources, inventory accuracy). It is also import to include the basic principles methods are related to. The factors were summarized in an analysis model, which is structured with three main areas (planning environment/conditions, basic principles, and effects). The model is used to analyze four case studies.

    The  second research  question focuses  on  the  characteristics for  visually orientedreplenishment methods. Examples of characteristics are: easy to understand and operate, offers uncomplicated flows, substantially applicable for noncritical and leverage parts with high yearly requirement and fairly even consumption, provides potential for  reduced  errors  in  stores/flows, potential for  providing high  delivery service and low levels of tied-up capital and resource utilization.

    The third research question focuses on what a tentative decision tool for selecting replenishment methods might look like, based on the factors that emerged from the other research questions and studies by others. In order to achieve an efficient materials supply, companies need to consider these factors when selecting replenishment methods. The decision tool consists of different steps, considering aspects of the planning environment/conditions in relation to the product and the supplier. The importance of the companies’ goals/motives for materials supply must also be assessed. The output from the decision tool is appropriate replenishment methods.

  • 236.
    Eriksson, Thomas
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics.
    Kroon, Martin
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics.
    Holzapfel, Gerhard A.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics.
    Influence of Medial Collagen Organization and Axial In Situ Stretch on Saccular Cerebral Aneurysm Growth2009In: Journal of Biomechanical Engineering, ISSN 0148-0731, E-ISSN 1528-8951, Vol. 131, no 10Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A model for saccular cerebral aneurysm growth, proposed by Kroon and Holzapfel (2007, "A Model for Saccular Cerebral Aneurysm Growth in a Human Middle Cerebral Artery," J. Theor. Biol., 247, pp. 775-787; 2008, "Modeling of Saccular Aneurysm Growth in a Human Middle Cerebral Artery," ASME J. Biomech. Eng., 130, p. 051012), is further investigated. A human middle cerebral artery is modeled as a two-layer cylinder where the layers correspond to the media and the adventitia. The immediate loss of media in the location of the aneurysm is taken to be responsible for the initiation of the aneurysm growth. The aneurysm is regarded as a development of the adventitia, which is composed of several distinct layers of collagen fibers perfectly aligned in specified directions. The collagen fibers are the only load-bearing constituent in the aneurysm wall; their production and degradation depend on the stretch of the wall and are responsible for the aneurysm growth. The anisotropy of the surrounding media was modeled using the strain-energy function proposed by Holzapfel et al. (2000, "A New Constitutive Framework for Arterial Wall Mechanics and a Comparative Study of Material Models," J. Elast., 61, pp. 1-48), which is valid for an elastic material with two families of fibers. It was shown that the inclusion of fibers in the media reduced the maximum principal Cauchy stress and the maximum shear stress in the aneurysm wall. The thickness increase in the aneurysm wall due to material growth was also decreased. Varying the fiber angle in the media from a circumferential direction to a deviation of 10 deg from the circumferential direction did, however, only show a little effect. Altering the axial in situ stretch of the artery had a much larger effect in terms of the steady-state shape of the aneurysm and the resulting stresses in the aneurysm wall. The peak values of the maximum principal stress and the thickness increase both became significantly higher for larger axial stretches. [DOI: 10.1115/1.3200911]

  • 237.
    Eriksson, Ulrika
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Impact of autocrine factors on physiology and productivity in Trichoplusia ni serum-free cultures2005Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other scientific)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to increase the understanding of the mechanisms regulating cell proliferation and recombinant protein production in serum-free cultures of Trichoplusia ni (T. ni) insect cells.

    Conditioned medium (CM) was shown to contain both stimulatory and inhibitory factors (CM factors) influencing cell growth. Metalloproteinase (MP) activity was the major factor responsible for the growth stimulating effect of CM as shown by using the specific MP inhibitor DL-thiorphan. MPs may exist in several different molecular mass forms due to autoproteolysis. Although the main band of the MP was determined to be around 48 kDa, precursor forms above 48 kDa as well as autocatalytic degradation products below the main band could be observed. It is not clear whether all forms of the MP or just the main band is involved in the growth regulation. Further, a proteinase inhibitor could be identified in the inhibitory fraction. Thus, we speculate that the proteinase inhibitor may be part of an autocrine system regulating cell proliferation.

    Analysis of the cell cycle phase distribution revealed a high proportion of cells in the G1 (80-90 %) and a low proportion of cells in the S and G2/M phases (10-20 %) during the whole culture, indicating that S and G2/M are short relative to G1. After inoculation, a drastic decrease in the S phase population together with a simultaneous increase of cells in G1 and G2/M could be observed as a lagphase on the growth curve and this may be interpreted as a temporary replication stop. When the cells were released from the initial arrest, the S phase population gradually increased again. This was initiated earlier in CM-supplemented cultures, and agrees with the earlier increase in cell concentration. Thus, these data suggests a correlation between CM factors and the cell cycle dynamics.

    In cultures supplied with CM, a clear positive effect on specific productivity was observed, with a 30 % increase in per cell productivity. The specific productivity was also maintained at a high level much longer time than in fresh-medium cultures. The positive effect observed after 20 h coincided with the time a stimulatory effect on cell growth first was seen. Thus, the productivity may be determined by the proliferation potential of the culture. A consequence of this would be that the secreted MP indirectly affects productivity.

    Finally, the yeast extract from Express Five SFM contains factors up to 35 kDa which are essential for T. ni cell growth. The optimal concentration was determined to be 2.5-fold that in normal medium, while higher concentrations were inhibitory. However although vital, they were not solely responsible for the growth-enhancing effect, as some other, more general, component present in yeast extract was needed for proliferation as well.

  • 238.
    Eriksson, Ulrika
    et al.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Bioprocess Technology (closed 20130101).
    Hassel, Jenny
    Lüllau, Elke
    Häggström, Lena
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Bioprocess Technology (closed 20130101).
    Metalloproteinase activity is the sole factor responsible for the growth-promoting effect of conditioned medium in Trichoplusia ni insect cell cultures2005In: Journal of Biotechnology, ISSN 0168-1656, E-ISSN 1873-4863, Vol. 119, no 1, p. 76-86Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Conditioned medium (CM) taken from a serum-free culture of Trichoplusia ni (BTI-Tn-5B 1-4, High Five) cells on days 2 and 3, shortened the lagphase and increased the maximum cell density when added to T ni cultures with low-inoculum cell density. Gel filtration fractions of CM, eluting at around 45 kDa, stimulated cell proliferation even better than CM. A protein in the gel filtration fraction was identified by N-terminal amino acid sequencing as a proteinase, related to a snake venom metalloproteinase. Casein zymography showed, multiple metalloproteinase bands between 48 and 25 kDa, as well as precursor forms above 48 kDa. Metalloproteinase bands below the main band at 48 kDa were autocatalytic degradation products. Metalloproteinase activity was the sole factor responsible for the growth stimulating effect of CM as shown by using the specific metalloproteinase inhibitor DL-thiorphan. Metalloproteinases have recently been shown to release growth factors from sequestering extracellular proteins. We propose that the metalloproteinase is involved in autocrine regulation of T ni proliferation in serum-free media. In addition, a gel filtration fraction of CM, eluting at about 10 kDa, inhibited cell growth. Apart from a lysozyme precursor protein and a cyclophilin-like protein, a kazal-type proteinase inhibitor could be identified in this fraction.

  • 239.
    Eriksson, Ulrika
    et al.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Bioprocess Technology (closed 20130101).
    Häggström, Lena
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Bioprocess Technology (closed 20130101).
    Identification of autocrine factors influencing proliferation in serum-free cultures of Trichoplusia ni cells2005In: Animal Cell Technology Meets Genomics / [ed] Godia, F; Fussenegger, M, 2005, p. 133-135Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study is to understand how proliferation of Trichoplusia ni cells is regulated in serum-free cultures. The hypothesis is that T ni (Hi5) cells produce extracellular factors, which influence growth and productivity. To study this, the effect of conditioned medium (CM) on cell growth was investigated. Addition of 10 - 20% CM shortened the lag phase and increased the maximum cell density. CM was further concentrated and fractionated on a gel filtration column. Fractions which either inhibit or stimulate proliferation have been identified. These results suggest that extracellular protein factors are involved in regulation of proliferation.

  • 240.
    Eriksson, Ulrika
    et al.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Bioprocess Technology (closed 20130101).
    Häggström, Lena
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Bioprocess Technology (closed 20130101).
    Yeast extract from express five serum-free medium contains factors at about 35 kDa, essential for growth of Trichoplusia ni insect cells2005In: Biotechnology letters, ISSN 0141-5492, E-ISSN 1573-6776, Vol. 27, no 20, p. 1623-1627Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The yeast extract (of unknown origin) present in the commercially available serum-free medium 'Express Five' contains factors ('yeast extract factors') up to 35 kDa which are essential for growth of Trichoplusia ni insect cells. A yeast extract brand lacking these components could not support growth of T. ni cells. However, cell proliferation was restored by adding chromatographic fractions containing the yeast extract factors. The yeast extract factors were not solely responsible for the growth enhancing effect of yeast extract but some other components, which seem to be generally present in yeast extracts, are also required for T. ni proliferation.

  • 241.
    Ernkvist, Mirko
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology.
    Svensk dataspelsutveckling, 1960–1995: Transkript av ett vittnesseminarium vid Tekniska museet i Stockholm den 12 december 20072008Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

     The witness seminar ”Svensk dataspelsutveckling, 1960–1995” was held at Tekniska museet [the National Museum of Science and Technology] in Stockholm on December 12, 2007 and was led by Mirko Ernkvist. The participants were Swedes that had been involved in the development of computer games during this period. The development process of several pioneering computer games were discussed from the perspective of the developers themselves. These games included: a demonstration game on the Saab manufactured computer D2 (1960–61), Stugan (1978), Space Action (1983), Fairlight (1985), Time Zero (1985), several games by Team17 (1990–) and Backpacker (1995). Computer game development efforts were initiated early in the Swedish history of computing, even by international comparisons. The first known Swedish game with moving graphics was a demonstration game for D2 displayed on an oscilloscope from the early 1960s. When computers became more widespread among Swedish universities, game development efforts soon followed. The first Swedish adventure game, “Stugan” was released in 1978 on the computers at Stockholm Datacentral, QZ. Subsequently, the introduction of home computers in Sweden in the early 1980s enabled more widespread Swedish game development efforts. Many Swedish game developers from this time were self-learned, but several were also involved in some of the computer groups that emerged during this time. These groups cracked, compressed, modified and traded computer games and created demos. The cracker and demo culture of the 1980s provided an environment of learning, socialization, and competition for many Swedish game developers. England that had a more established computer game industry during the 1980s provided opportunities for some of the Swedish game developers. The game “Fairlight” by a Swedish developer was published by an English game company and another Swedish game developer was one of the founders of the English game company Team17. Other Swedish game development projects discussed such as “Space Action”, “Time Zero” and “Backpacker” had Swedish companies as publishers.

  • 242.
    Ezcurra, Ines
    et al.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Glycoscience.
    Johansson, Camilla
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Glycoscience.
    Tamizhselvan, Prashanth
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Glycoscience.
    Winzell, Anders
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Glycoscience.
    Aspeborg, Henrik
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Glycoscience.
    An AC-type element mediates transactivation of secondary cell wall carbohydrate-active enzymes by PttMYB021, the Populus MYB46 orthologue2011In: BMC Proceedings, ISSN 1753-6561, E-ISSN 1753-6561, Vol. 5Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 243.
    Facciole, L.
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics.
    Orlandi, P.
    Alfredsson, P. Henrik
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics.
    Swirling jets issued from fully developed rotating pipe flow: Experiments and numerics2005Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) and experimental data are used to study a rotating jet flow. A non-confined swirling jet is generated by a fully developed rotating turbulent pipe flow. Previous experiments have demonstrated the presence of a counter-rotating core appearing approximatively 6 diameters downstream the pipe outlet. The mean azimuthal velocity component changes its sign in the central part of the jet starting to move in the opposite direction with respect to the rotation imposed by the rotation of the pipe. The present paper introduces new investigations intended to analyse the jet flow in the proximity of this phenomenon.

  • 244. Facian, Amparo
    et al.
    Nilsson, Anders
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Vehicle Engineering.
    Feng, Leping
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Vehicle Engineering.
    Nilsson, Eva
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Vehicle Engineering.
    Propagation of structure-borne sound in silencers used in power plants2004In: The 11th International Congress on Sound and Vibration, 2004, p. 1069-1076Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 245.
    Fagerberg, Linn
    et al.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics (closed 20130101).
    Sandler, Charlotte
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Skogs, Marie
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Hjelmare, Martin
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Jonasson, Kalle
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics (closed 20130101).
    Wiking, Mikaela
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Åbergh, Annica
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics (closed 20130101).
    Uhlén, Mathias
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics (closed 20130101). KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Lundberg, Emma
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Mapping the subcellular protein distribution in three human cell lines2011In: Journal of Proteome Research, ISSN 1535-3893, E-ISSN 1535-3907, Vol. 10, no 8, p. 3766-3777Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The subcellular locations of proteins are closely related to their function and constitute an essential aspect for understanding the complex machinery of living cells. A systematic effort has been initiated to map the protein distribution in three functionally different cell lines with the aim to provide a subcellular localization index for at least one representative protein from all human protein-encoding genes. Here, we present the results of over 4,000 proteins mapped to 16 subcellular compartments. The results indicate a ubiquitous protein expression with a majority of the proteins found in all three cell lines and a large portion localized to two or more compartments. The inter-relationships between the subcellular compartments are visualized in a protein-compartment network based on all detected proteins. Hierarchical clustering was performed to determine how closely related the organelles are in terms of protein constituents and compare the proteins detected in each cell type. Our results show distinct organelle proteomes, well conserved across the cell types, and demonstrate that biochemically similar organelles are grouped together.

  • 246.
    Fagerberg, Petra
    et al.
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Ståhl, Anna
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Höök, Kristina
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    eMoto: emotionally engaging interaction2004In: Personal and Ubiquitous Computing, ISSN 1617-4909, E-ISSN 1617-4917, Vol. 8, no 5, p. 377-381Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 247.
    Falk, Johan
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Signals, Sensors and Systems.
    An electronic warfare perspective on time difference of arrival estimation subject to radio receiver imperfections2004Licentiate thesis, monograph (Other scientific)
    Abstract [en]

    In order to ensure secure communication in digital military radio systems, multiple methods are used to protect the transmission from being intercepted by enemy electronic warfare systems. An intercepted transmission can be used to estimate several parameters of the transmitted signal such as its origin (position or direction) and of course the transmitted message itself. The methods used in traditional electronic warfare direction-finding systems have in general poor performance against wideband low power signals while the considered correlation-based time-difference of arrival (TDOA) methods show promising results.

    The output from a TDOA-based direction-finding system using two spatially separated receivers is the TDOA for the signal between the receiving sensors which uniquely describes a hyperbolic curve and the emitter is located somewhere along this curve. In order to measure a TDOA between two digital radio receivers both receiver systems must have the same time and frequency references to avoid degradation due to reference imperfections. However, in some cases, the receivers are separated up to 1000 km and can not share a common reference. This is solved by using a reference module at each of the receiver sites and high accuracy is achieved using the NAVSTAR-GPS system but, still, small differences between the outputs of the different reference modules occurs which degrades the performance of the system.

    In a practical electronic warfare system there is a number of factors that degrade the performance of the system, such as non-ideal antennas, analog receiver filter differences, and the analog to digital converter errors. In this thesis we concentrate on the problems which arises from imperfections in the reference modules, such as time and frequency errors.

  • 248.
    Fan, Ke
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry.
    Li, Fusheng
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry.
    Wang, Lei
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry.
    Daniel, Quentin
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry.
    Gabrielsson, Erik
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry.
    Sun, Licheng
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry. Dalian University of Technology (DUT), China.
    Pt-free tandem molecular photoelectrochemical cells for water splitting driven by visible light2014In: Physical Chemistry, Chemical Physics - PCCP, ISSN 1463-9076, E-ISSN 1463-9084, Vol. 16, no 46, p. 25234-25240Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Photoelectrochemical (PEC) cells using molecular catalysts to split water into hydrogen and oxygen have been investigated intensively during the past years. However, the high-cost of Pt counter electrodes and instability of molecular PEC cells hinder the practical applications. We describe in this article a Pt-free tandem molecular PEC cell, for the first time, employing molecular ruthenium- and cobalt-catalysts with strong dipicolinic acid anchoring groups on the respective photoanode and photocathode for total water splitting. The Pt-free tandem molecular PEC cell showed an effective and steady photocurrent density of ca. 25 mu A cm(-2) for water splitting driven by visible light without external bias. This study indicates that tandem molecular PEC cells can provide great potential to the Pt-free devices for light driven total water splitting.

  • 249.
    Farhadi, Hamed
    et al.
    Chalmers University of Technology.
    Wang, Chao
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES). Tongji University.
    Skoglund, Mikael
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Communication Theory. KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Centres, ACCESS Linnaeus Centre.
    Fixed-rate Transmission over Fading Interference Channels Using Point-to-Point Gaussian Codes2015In: IEEE Transactions on Communications, ISSN 0090-6778, E-ISSN 1558-0857, Vol. 63, no 10, p. 3633-3644Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper investigates transmission schemes for fixed-rate communications over a Rayleigh block-fading interference channel. There are two source-destination pairs where each source, in the presence of a short-term power constraint, intends to communicate with its dedicated destination at a fixed data rate. It encodes its messages using a point-to-point Gaussian codebook. The two users' transmissions can be conducted orthogonally or non-orthogonally. In the latter case, each destination performs either direct decoding by treating the interference as noise, or successive interference cancellation (SIC) to recover its desired message. For each scheme, we seek solutions of a power control problem to efficiently assign power to the sources such that the codewords can be successfully decoded at destinations. However, because of the random nature of fading, the power control problem for some channel realizations may not have any feasible solution and the transmission will be in outage. Thus, for each transmission scheme, we first compute a lower bound and an upper bound on the outage probability. Next, we use these results to find an outer bound and an inner bound on the epsilon-outage achievable rate region, i.e., the rate region in which the outage probability is below a certain value epsilon

  • 250.
    Fernàndez, ÈT. I.
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering.
    Nilsson, Anders
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Marcus Wallenberg Laboratory MWL.
    Tyre air cavity influence on tyre-road noise2005Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Road traffic noise is nowadays a major environmental pollutant. In the near future traffic noise will increase even further, especially due to the expected increase of heavy traffic. Noise radiated from tyres of the vehicles is a dominating source. The acoustic field inside the tyre has previously been modelled. The first acoustic mode for a standard stationary passenger car tyre is at 225 Hz. The tyre becomes stiffer at these tyre air cavity resonances and radiates comparatively high tonal noise to the exterior at this frequency range. In order to reduce this tonal noise at low frequencies a set of new modified wheels are developed implementing some sound absorbing material inside the tyre. Preliminary sound intensity measurements have been carried out on a static tyre. The influence of the tyre air cavity resonances on the radiated noise is reduced adding sound absorbing material inside the tyre.

2345678 201 - 250 of 915
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