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  • 251.
    Almgren, Jan Emil
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Opportunities and Challenges of RoboticProcess Automation (RPA) in the Administration of Education2021Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    As the amount of administrative work are increasing in the education sector, organizations has started to look for alternative solutions to the problem. One such solution might be to use automation within the field of administration in order to free the existing staff from the most burdensome and monotonous tasks. Robotic Process Automation (RPA) is a technology used to automate digital processes and perform tasks that were previously performed by humans. The implementation of RPA has however proven to be resource-intensive and in need of special technical skill in order to be successful. This thesis has aimed to investigate how RPA automation can be managed within a smaller organization in the education sector and how the expectations of the opportunities and challenges of using RPA may change along with the RPA implementation. A smaller organization who needs to use outsourcing in order to carry out an RPA implementation may have limited knowledge of RPA, which means that the expectations for automation can be unattainably high or surprisingly low. Findings from the case study however suggest that once the first robots had been put into production and started to produce value to the organization, the expectations among the staff increased and a majority of them could see new opportunities of using RPA for further automations. These findings therefore suggest that it is important to generate short-term wins in order to reduce possible resistance to change and to move forward in the implementation of RPA. This thesis has also identified several challenges. These are primarily attributable to limited resources, which means that the important work of reviewing and documenting manual processes for automation may be downgraded because of time restraint. Other challenges may consist of limited knowledge of RPA and an unclear ownership of processes when manually performed processes instead are being carried out by robots. By considering and taking advantage of the changed expectations and the opportunities and challenges that have emerged through this study, it is possible to ensure a successful implementation of RPA automation within the administration of education.

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  • 252.
    Almlöf, Erik
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Centres, Integrated Transport Research Lab, ITRL.
    Using vignettes to explore policy tools for a self-driving transport future2023In: Transportation Research Interdisciplinary Perspectives, E-ISSN 2590-1982, Vol. 22, article id 100922Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Researchers struggle to create simple yet nuanced diagrams or short abstracts that are easily comprehendible by non-experts. Research articles may be our primary communication method, but they are generally difficult to understand, making them unsuitable for general communication. This paper investigates a rarely used method in transport research – vignettes – to convey research results and elicit implications for public planners. Historically, these vignettes have been designed using qualitative methods, e.g., the Delphi method or by researchers' review of trends. However, this paper uses two vignettes originating from quantitative results from a simulation model paper (Almlöf et al., 2022), investigating the impacts of self-driving technology. Rewriting the results into two short stories – vignettes – these stories then served as the starting point for semi-structured interviews and a workshop with six public officials in Stockholm, Sweden. The vignettes were used to understand what these results would mean to the participants and how they would combat potential problems connected to sustainability, given the vignettes. Finally, the interviews and the workshop were qualitatively analysed, and policy tools were identified that can steer the transport system towards societal goals. The vignettes were a powerful tool to help the participants envision a future with self-driving transport options and promote critical thinking regarding how each participant would be affected, given such a future. As such, vignettes should be further explored to help researchers investigate abstract subjects which participants may have difficulties understanding.

  • 253.
    Almlöv, Cecilia
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Learning, Learning in Stem.
    Capurchande, Rehana
    Januário, Francisco
    Geschwind, Lars
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Learning, Learning in Stem.
    Trust within capacity building for the development of supervision training2021In: The Future of Doctoral Research / [ed] Anne Lee, Rob Bongaardt, Routledge , 2021, 1, p. 79-91Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter analyses ‘trust’ within a collaboration between Sweden and Mozambique on doctoral supervision training at the Eduardo Mondlane University in Mozambique.

    The case study uses Simmel’s concept of trust as a lens for analysis. Drawing on individual semi-structured interviews with project members from Sweden and Mozambique, in their different roles and responsibilities, we identify a continuum of experiences from distrust and doubt to trust. This case study provides a more nuanced understanding of trust conceptually within a capacity-building context. Furthermore, it presents how trust is built in the development of doctoral supervision training for the future – through faith.

  • 254.
    Almlöv, Cecilia
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Learning, Learning in Stem.
    Grubbström, Ann
    Department of Urban and Rural Development, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
    ‘Challenging from the start’: novice doctoral co-supervisors’ experiences of supervision culture and practice2023In: Higher Education Research and Development, ISSN 0729-4360, E-ISSN 1469-8366, p. 1-15Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is a widespread interest in doctoral supervision, yet novice doctoral co-supervisors’ experiences remain understudied. The aim of this qualitative study is to explore how supervision culture and practice are experienced by novices. This thematic analysis is based on focus groups and in-depth interviews with 23 novice co-supervisors from two Swedish research-intensive universities. The study reveals three dimensions related to the challenging experience of the supervision culture, namely closedness, dependence and competition. Moreover, the analysis proves that co-supervisors’ practices are embedded within the ‘hidden curriculum’, here defined as the unplanned and implicit support outside formal meetings and activities. Novice co-supervisors bridge the gap between main supervisors and doctoral students and make the path to the doctoral degree smoother when engaging in emotional, intellectual, practical and mediation support. This study has practical implications and suggests improvements for co-supervision that would also benefit the doctoral students.

  • 255.
    Almlöv, Cecilia
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Learning.
    Viberg, Henrik
    Sweden2024In: Global Perspectives on Enhancing Doctoral Co-Supervision / [ed] Vijay Kumar, Navé Wald, Singapore: Springer Publishing Company, 2024, 1, p. 113-125Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Swedish law requires all doctoral students to be co-supervised. Individualsseeking to become primary supervisors are required to complete doctoral supervisiontraining programs to ensure they are equipped with necessary competencies to guidedoctoral students. This chapter uses interviews, surveys, and documents to explore cosupervision and the experiences of co-supervisors, providing insights and comparingto global practices. We provide a historical overview of co-supervison in Sweden,covering its development over the past 70 years. We then analyse different types ofsupervision in terms of involvement and formality. Next then describe the contextualsetting by examining supervision guidelines, supervisors’ role expectations, and workallocation. We then explore the definition, application, experience, and regulationof co-supervison in Sweden. Drawing from this analysis, we showcase successfulinstances of co-supervison in Sweden and address the associated challenges. Thischapter offers a thorough examination of co-supervision practices, encompassingtheir historical origins, present implementation, and prospective advancements.

  • 256.
    Almén, Lena
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Centres, Centre for Health and Building, CHB.
    Larsson, Tore J
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Centres, Centre for Health and Building, CHB.
    Possibilities for designers to reduce the risk of work injury in the production phase of a building project2010In: On the Road to Vision Zero?: Construction, 2010Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    (71) Possibilities for designers to reduce the risk of work injury in the production phase of a building project. Lena Almén, Tore J Larsson, (School of Technology and Health, Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), Sweden) Work related injuries and diseases are more frequent among construction workers than the labour market in average. Thus, there is a need of more preventive work during the design and planning phase. Two building projects, both productions of new apartment buildings with a design and construct contractor, were studied. Unsafe conditions were identified by workers and managers at the construction sites. The unsafe conditions were presented to the designers and planners. They were asked to describe the correlated decisions during the design and planning phase; when they were taken, why and by whom.

    Influence from outside the company was related to the clients, the town planning department, laws, a trade association and to the design of building products. The managers at the construction sites did not get any information, from the designers and planners, of what occupational risks there were in any of the projects. The routines for how to identify and handle hazards in the designing and planning phase were not sufficient. Furthermore, the designers explained, that they did not have enough competence in construction methods to be able to foresee occupational consequences at the construction sites when they designed rare constructions. The designers and planners did not follow up occupational risks at any of the construction sites. In order to get a safer working environment at construction sites, the top managers in the building companies need to define the acceptable safety level and put the safety issue on the agenda for all employees in the company, along with quality, costs and time schedule. Safety need to be communicated with those outside the company who have an influence on the working environment, and included in contracts with consultants, subcontractors and suppliers.

  • 257.
    Alquist, Kerstin
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies.
    Klimatanpassning av det svenska vägtransportsystemet: En diskussion om vilka åtgärder som kan vara samhällsekonomiskt lönsamma för att förhindra naturolyckor och deras konsekvenser2012Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
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  • 258. Alshaigy, B.
    et al.
    Krogstie, B. R.
    Peters, Anne-Kathrin
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Learning, Learning in Stem.
    Pollock, I.
    Are We There Yet?: Incorporating Climate Change into CSEd2022In: Annual Conference on Innovation and Technology in Computer Science Education, ITiCSE, Association for Computing Machinery , 2022, p. 664-665Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Climate change is the "biggest threat modern humans have ever faced". The implications of the crisis are imminent and grave. As part of COP26, leaders from all over the world agreed to the Glasgow Climate Pact with the goal of limiting the increased rise of global temperature by 1.5 degrees. With less than 8 years left until the 2030 UN deadline in which the climate effects become irreversible, how do we prepare learners for what might be an inevitable reality? How do we equip computing students with crucial technical, ethical, and leadership skills to mitigate its effect? More importantly, how do people in positions of power, departmental and institutional, be involved? In 2019, we formed an internal working group as part of ITiCSE conference to examine how computing institutions, departments, and faculty members dealt with, if at all, the climate emergency within CS education. Our efforts included conducting a literature review, interviewing CSEd climate experts, leading a world cafe session, and collating and publishing resources from various sources for the benefit of educators interested in incorporating climate change in the curriculum. And yet, there are still struggles reported with adopting these solutions, particularly in light of the global pandemic. This panel will serve as a public forum to express institutional, departmental, and individual challenges associated with tackling the climate crisis and share successful strategies, ideas, and experiences to support the CS community. The discussions will centre over five themes previously identified in the world cafe. 

  • 259.
    Altayy, Fares
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Learning.
    Schmied, Fredrik
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Learning.
    Stimulering av kritiskt tänkande och kollaboration i en programmeringsorienterad fysik- och matematiklaboration: En fallstudie med studenter från programmet Teknisktbasår (KTH)2019Independent thesis Advanced level (professional degree), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This work aims to develop a proposal for educational material in the form of a programming-oriented Physics and Mathematics lab. The target group is mainly students from the second semester in the Technical Preparatory Year program (KTH), but also students of equivalent knowledge level (for example, students in the upper secondary school- natural science program). The lab was designed to create opportunity for students to:1) apply critical thinking, 2) demonstrate collaboration, 3) increase subject understanding. The proposed educational material comprises computational physics, where a non linear differential equation derived from a mathematical pendulum is solved using numerical methods. The exercises in the lab were formulated with critical thinking in mind and pair programming was used as the context for collaboration. In this paper 1) and 2) were investigated in an educational setting with students from the second semester of the Technical Preporatory Year (KTH). The conversations of four student groups were recorded and a content analysis was performed on the transcriptions of the audio recordings. A pattern matching method was used to strengthen the conclusions. Based on the results of the research project, we found that the theoretical proposition that the construction of the laboratory work has contributed to the collaboration and application of critical thinking by the students,has been strengthened.

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  • 260.
    Altayy, Yasmina
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Learning.
    Antoun, Haidi
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Learning.
    Utformning och utvärdering av laborationsmoment för stimulering av datalogiskt tänkande bland gymnasieelever2024Independent thesis Advanced level (professional degree), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This study, which is conducted in collaboration with K-ULF, designs and evaluates a laboratory exercise for high school students enrolled in the programming 1 course (or any similar courses), with a focus on stimulating acquisition of computational thinking concepts. A literature overview was performed to identify a relevant framework for designing the programming laboratory moment. The chosen framework, which is the result of the literature overview, emphasized the application of different steps, including defining computational thinking, identifying related concepts, providing examples of techniques representing these concepts, and conducting evaluation. The study is conducted in the form of a case study, wherein the laboratory was conducted with agroup of 20 students. Two Python tasks, Task A (without chatGPT) and Task B (with chatGPT) were designed to stimulate computational thinking concepts and were solved by the students inpairs. During the laboratory, the students' discussions were audio recorded, and they also provided written explanations of their problem-solving methods. The data, comprising audio recordings and written materials, were analyzed using specific techniques and patterns identified within the framework. The study employed a pattern matching method to draw conclusions based on the analyzed data. The results indicated that students solving Task A demonstrated emergence of all computational thinking concepts (indications). On the other hand, students who worked on task B showed emergence of computational thinking indicators mainly through their recorded audio discussions but not in their written solutions.

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  • 261.
    Althén Bergman, Felix
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Geoinformatics.
    Östblom, Evelina
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Geoinformatics.
    GIS-based crisis communication: A platform for authorities to communicate with the public during wildfire2019Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Today, people are used to having technology as a constant aid. This also sets expectations that information should always be available. This, together with ongoing climate change that has led to more natural disasters, has laid the foundation for the need to change the methodology for how geographical data is collected, compiled and visualized when used for crisis communication. This study explores how authorities, at present, communicate with the public during a crisis and how this can be done in an easier and more comprehensible way, with the help of Geographical Information Systems (GIS). The goal is to present a new way of collecting, compiling and visualizing geographical data in order to communicate, as an authority, with the public during a crisis. This has been done using a case study with focus on wildfires. Therefore, most of the work consisted of the creation of a prototype, CMAP – Crisis Management and Planning, that visualizes fire-related data. The basic work of the prototype consisted of determining what data that exists and is necessary for the information to be complete and easily understood together with how the data is best implemented. The existing data was retrieved online or via a scheduled API request. Eventrelated data, which is often created in connection with the event itself, was given a common structure and an automatic implementation into the prototype using Google Fusion Tables. In the prototype, data was visualized in two interactive map-based sections. These sections focused on providing the user with the information that might be needed if one fears that they are within an affected location or providing the user with general preparatory information in different counties. Finally, a non-map-based section was created that allowed the public to help authorities and each other via crowdsource data. This was collected in a digital form which was then directly visualized in the prototype’s map-based sections. The result of this showed, among other things, that automatic data flows are a good alternative for avoiding manual data handling and thus enabling a more frequent update of the data. Furthermore, it also showed the importance of having a common structure for which data to be included and collected in order to create a communication platform. Finally, by visualizing of dynamic polygon data in an interactive environment a development in crisis communication that can benefit the public’s understanding of the situation is achieved. This thesis is limited to the functionality and layout provided by the Google platform, including Google Earth Engine, Google Forms, Google Fusion Tables etc

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  • 262.
    Altimira, Mireia
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics.
    Casanueva, Carlos
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering.
    RAISING AWARENESS ON DIVERSITY AND EQUALITY IN STEM DEGREES IN HIGHER EDUCATION2017In: INTED2017: 11TH INTERNATIONAL TECHNOLOGY, EDUCATION AND DEVELOPMENT CONFERENCE / [ed] Chova, LG Martinez, AL Torres, IC, IATED-INT ASSOC TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION A& DEVELOPMENT , 2017, p. 1037-1041Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Higher education environments are becoming more and more diverse, regarding both gender and cultural background, which could pose significant challenges for both students and teachers. In order to raise the topic amongst STEM students, a lecture on Diversity has been implemented in the course Research Methodologies for Engineering Mechanics, where different concepts regarding equality have been introduced and unconscious bias have been explained to the students. The lecture was placed in the middle of the course so that students could reflect back on their previous evaluations and enable them to correct their biases in the second half of the course. Feedback of the whole course has also been compared between the 2016 and 2015 editions, where this lecture was not present. The results show that a lecture in Diversity and Equality is especially useful for female students, strongly supporting its inclusion in the course.

  • 263.
    Altoumaimi, Rasha
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Learning.
    Om Ezzine, Abir
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Learning.
    Geometriundervisning med digitala verktyg, årskurs 7 – 9: En studie kring högstadielärares syn på användning av digitala verktyg i geometriundervisning och dess påverkan på elevers lärande2020Independent thesis Advanced level (professional degree), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this thesis is to execute digital tools in mathematics teaching. The study focuses its attention on how teachers choose the type of the digital tools and carry out mathematics teaching, especially in the subject of geometry. As a future teacher, it will be interesting to investigate the teachers’ views concerning the effect of digitizing on their teaching and students’ learning, as well as the teacher's choice of teaching methods and the design of the teaching within that method, will depend on the lessons of geometry where the use of digital technology is the focus in the classroom. The empirical materials were collected through interviews with seven teachers from three different schools. The data were analyzed with a focus on the ways by which teachers employ digital tools to support and work with mathematical content.

    The theoretical frameworks in our study are the SAMR model (SAMR is an acronym that stands for four English concepts Substitution, Augmentation, Modification, and Redefinition) that describes how digital tools are used at different stages in teaching and Drijver's orchestration type to identify different teaching methods and describe their characteristics. The results based on the interviews show that most teachers meet requirements for reaching step three in the SAMR model. The study also shows an overview of different teaching methods in mathematics teaching where digital technology is used. The results also show that the teachers utilize several types of orchestration in the work with the subject of geometry in their teaching. In total, this study shows that teachers use up to five different types of orchestration.

    Generally, all teachers have positive opinions concerning the employment of digital technology in mathematics education, and the utilities of digitization that they spotlight include assisting and supporting students' mathematical knowledge as well as developing their understanding of geometric concepts.

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  • 264.
    Altunsaray, Kismet
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Learning.
    Tekniklärares uppfattningar om undervisning i skiss- och ritteknik inom årskurs 7–9: En fenomenografisk studie2022Independent thesis Advanced level (professional degree), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This degree project investigates teachers’ perceptions of sketch-drawing techniques in secondary schools. This study aims to examine how teachers perceive teaching methods linked to sketch-drawing techniques within technics classes in secondary schools. The purpose of the study is to answer the following questions:1. How do teachers in technic class teach sketch-drawing techniques in secondary schools, grades 7-9? 2. How do the teachers experience and perceive the teaching? To find out which perceptions teachers have about sketch-drawing techniques, five questions were asked to the teachers who teach technics classes in grades 7-9. The purpose of the study was not to analyze teachers´ knowledge rather it was to analyze the technics teachers’ perceptions, descriptions, views, and experiences when they teach different sketch-drawing techniques in secondary classes. Six different technic class teachers who work at different schools were interviewed, and a phenomenographic analysis model was implemented to process the collected data from the interviews. In addition, a qualitative interview is used with the interviewees. According to the teachers' descriptions, most teachers teach sketching and hand drawing, but fewer teachers teach both hand and digital drawing. All the teachers agree that hand and digital drawing must be combined in teaching to achieve the learning outcomes based on the central content for grades 7–9. According to the teachers, it is important to arouse the students' technical interest by letting them use different methods for sketching and drawing techniques. Finally, it also appears that the teachers have common perceptions about the advantages and disadvantages of both techniques. They point out, among other things, whether the students experience similar difficulties in teaching and how this affects the students' learning.

  • 265.
    Alves Ojeda, Lauro Fabiano
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Lapwanich, Ponlawat
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Business Development and Entrepreneurship.
    Viable options of financing a new venture on entrepreneur’s point of view in Brazil and Thailand2011Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 40 credits / 60 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    It is fact that one of the main reasons why a country is considered developed or developing lies on its industry development level. A nation without a well-developed industry does not create jobs enough, thus wealth to keep its population on high standards. It is critical to a nation have its national enterprises boosting employment and developing internal technologies, which is the driving force behind innovation. Thus, small companies pose a tremendous opportunity to allow expansion and development; however one of the main constraints avoiding it is due to the difficulty in providing financial funds to entrepreneurial ventures, which is the main track of this study. This thesis was based in two “newly industrialized countries” (Bozyk) (Brazil and Thailand) by analysing entrepreneurs in terms of how they have got seed funds to start their business, what they think about other options of start-up financing and if they would open a new company, would they choose a different source of funding? Moreover, a comparison between the two countries is assessed showing commonalities and differences between them, demonstrating the most viable seed funding options in the entrepreneur’s perspectiveas the completion of this study.

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    Options of financing startups in Brazil and Thailand - a comparison study
  • 266. Alvizos, Emmanuel
    et al.
    Angelis, Jannis
    Warwick Business School.
    Towards a clarification of the servitization concept2010In: Proceedings of the 17th Annual European Operations Management Association Conference, 2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 267. Alvizos, Emmanuel
    et al.
    Angelis, Jannis
    Warwick Business School.
    What is servitization anyway?2010In: Proceedings of the 21th Annual Production and Operations Management Society Conference, 2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 268. Alymov, Sergei
    et al.
    Anderson, David
    Arzyutov, Dmitry V.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Etnos-Thinking in the Long Twentieth Century2019In: Life Histories of Etnos Theory in Russia and Beyond / [ed] David Anderson, Dmitry Arzyutov, Sergei Alymov, Cambridge: Open Book Publishers, 2019, p. 21-75Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 269.
    Alzate, David
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Business Development and Entrepreneurship.
    Alzate, Marcell
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Business Development and Entrepreneurship.
    CORPORATE ENTREPRENEURSHIP In Colombian Manufacturing Industry2012Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Motivated by the environment of their country, Colombia, the co-authors present in this paper a research and analysis about the Manufacturing Industry (MI) and its relation to the growth of the economy in the different sectors of their country.

    Industrial innovation is key to competitiveness and development of economies; therefore, Corporate Entrepreneurship (CE) is seen by the co-authors as an answer for the Manufacturing Industry in order to keep on bringing value to the society and its related sectors.

    To have an approach to this CE analysis, theoretical framework used in the research is based in the Four Models of CE presented by Wolcott and Lippitz (Wolcott, 2010). Within the paper, it will be introduced the Opportunist, Enable, Advocate and Producer Model as conceived by them.

    No surprises were found when looking to the actual state of the companies in the MI, those with more budgets are the ones that invest more in innovation and the small ones are more conservatives in the topic.

    As part of the response to the research question, the co-authors established the path for the different company types in order for them to have an easy way to build CE.

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    Master_Thesis_Alzates_2012-45
  • 270.
    Amadasun, Opeyemi
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Learning.
    Kunskapskravens värdeord: En studie om hur kunskapskraven i teknik tolkas och tillämpas av tekniklärare på högstadiet2020Independent thesis Advanced level (professional degree), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Assessment and grading are essential to measure and follow up students’ learning. It is an essential part of the teacher’s role to assess and grade student’s demonstrated knowledge. This is expected to be done in relation to the knowledge requirements. The knowledge requirements describe what is considered acceptable knowledge of students’ learning and is characterized by the so-called value words. The knowledge requirements therefore need to be interpreted by the teacher in order for grades to be set based on equity for all students. This study examines teachers’ interpretation of the knowledge requirements and how teachers use their interpretation in assessment. The study intends to answer the following questions:

    How do technology teachers perceive the knowledge requirements and how do they interpret the value words of the knowledge requirements? And how do teachers use their interpretation of the knowledge requirements in assessment and grading? And what difficulties do teachers experience with assessment and grading in the subject of technology?

    To answer the research questions, five technology teachers in upper secondary school were interviewed. A qualitative analysis method called constant comparative method has been used to analyze the data collected from the interviews. This study is limited to the value words of the knowledge requirement which describes the level of student’s reasoning ability. The concerned value words are: ‘‘simple and to some extent’’ informed reasoning for grade E, ‘‘well developed and relatively well’’ informed reasoning for grade C and ‘‘well developed and well’’ informed reasoning for grade A (Skolverket, 2018). The results show that technology teachers feel that the knowledge requirements in technology are difficult to interpret. Despite this, the teachers interpret the value words for grades E and C alike while there were differences in how teachers interpret the value word for grade A. The results also show that science subjects have a great influence on assessment and grading in technology as teachers base their assessment of students’ knowledge on the National Agency for Education’s material for science subjects simply because teachers believe the National Agency for Education’s material in science is clearer and easier to relate to in assessment practice.

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  • 271.
    Amann, Daniel
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Kihlander, Ingrid
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Magnusson, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    DISRUPTIVE INNOVATION IN COMPLEX PRODUCT SYSTEMS (COPS): INFLUENCING CHARACTERISTICS AND CONDITIONSManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Complex product systems (CoPS) tend to get more complex for every new productgeneration, which for some product categories imply cumbersome escalating costs. Forthese products, promises of lowered costs by disruptive innovation certainly areappealing, but frequently deluding. Therefore, this paper aims at exploring specific CoPScharacteristics and conditions influencing companies’ propensity to develop disruptiveproducts, and to derive related managerial implications. This is performed by analysingfour case studies of CoPS product development in four different industrial sectors. Thestudy suggests that specific characteristics and conditions in the CoPS setting influenceproduct development management to aim at incremental improvements of earlier productconcepts, whereby disruptive innovations in reality rarely get a chance. Moreover, it isfound that barriers for disruptive innovation in CoPS classified as tournament goods areconsidered even higher, because this product category generally do not offer anyperformance oversupply.

  • 272.
    Ambaye, Daniel Weldegebriel
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Real Estate and Construction Management, Real Estate Planning and Land Law.
    Land Rights and Expropriation in Ethiopia2013Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This study examines and analyses the expropriation laws and practices in Ethiopia. The objective of the thesis is to analyze and describe the land rights and expropriation laws in Ethiopia and to compare them with the practice in order to determine the fairness of compensation. The study is made against the Ethiopian Constitution and other subsidiary legislations which provide the basic land rights and the nature and details of expropriation.

    The basic argument made in this thesis is that even if the Ethiopian Constitution provides and guarantees common ownership of land (together with the state) to the people, this right has not been fully realized whether in terms of land accessibility, enjoyablity, and payment of fair compensation in the event of expropriation.

    The reasons have to do either with the faulty nature of the laws or with their implementation by public authorities. From the outset, the constitution excludes land as a subject of compensation. For this reason, land is being excluded from the compensation package and hence it has no value for the holder. Urban land holders are denied location value of their property, which they can collect it otherwise during sale, and hence the compensation becomes unfair. Similarly, rural farmers are denied compensation for the complete loss of their farm land. The denial of compensation for the value of the land is categorically in contradiction with the very principle of joint ownership of land by the people and the state.

    There are also other reasons which are related to the law or its practical applicability, such as valuation process which reduces the amount of compensation. There are also property interests which are not included as compensable interests.

    Payment of compensation is one factor for secure property right and hence sustainable development. To ensure fair compensation in the event of compensation, a legal and policy level reform is necessary to address and amend the existing problems. Further, to harmonize the laws and practices is imperative to reduce the amount of injustice existed in today’s expropriation procedure in Ethiopia.

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  • 273.
    Ambell, Christine
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Ecology.
    Xu, Yixuan
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Ecology.
    Waste of Opportunities - A Holistic Study of the Current Situation of Municipal Waste Management in Shandong Province, China2009Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    China’s growth and development have opened the door to a new world. Shandong province’s 90 million inhabitants are entering into a consumption society and the waste stream from households, restaurants and commercials has become a challenge. So far, the waste has mostly been burned in backyards, thrown into rivers, put on open dumps or taken to landfills. The environmental consequence is strong. This study was carried out in Shandong province and presents the current situation of the municipal waste management. The result of the study is organised into social, economical, technical and environmental parameters. It mostly covers the years 2006 to 2010. In the discussion, the strength, weakness, opportunities, and threats to the management are analysed, which gives an overview of the complex situation.

    The final conclusion is that there are a lot of opportunities in developing municipal solid waste management in Shandong province since the work and planning is new and economy is good. Threats are for example a larger waste stream. The municipal waste management has some strengths, such as a lot of projects going on, but also a lot of weakness for instance implementation of the regulations and laws.

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  • 274.
    Amel Zabihi, Ghazal
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Entrepreneurship and innovation.
    Culture and management style:: A study of differences of Chinese and Swedish management style from Swedish perception2013Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study is to find out how the cultural dimensions effects on management style. In more detailed way this research would like to reveal the differences between the Chinese and Swedish management style based on the Swedish employee viewpoint. Hofstede work-related cultural dimensions and Denison model of organizational culture to high-tech multicultural company has been applied. It is concluded that obvious differences exist between Chinese and Swedish management style and culture has influence on management style. However, since the results are limited in the scope of study cannot be generalized but worth to investigate and validate in future research.

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    Master thesis-Ghazal Amel Zabihi
  • 275.
    Amir, Saman
    et al.
    Department of Marketing & Strategy and Center for Sustainability ResearchStockholm School of Economics, Stockholm Sweden.
    Abdullah Asif, Farazee Mohammad
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    Roci, Malvina
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Manufacturing and Metrology Systems. Department of Marketing & Strategy and Center for Sustainability ResearchStockholm School of EconomicsStockholmSweden.
    Towards Circular Economy: Enhanced Decision-Making in Circular Manufacturing Systems2021In: Sustainable Consumption and Production, Volume II: Circular Economy and Beyond / [ed] Ranjula Bali Swain, Susanne Sweet, Palgrave Macmillan, 2021, 1, p. 257-279Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter will present an outlook on the modelling and simulation of circular manufacturing systems. Simulations in the linear context have long been an enabler in making the systems efficient through better design and improved decision-making. Circular aspects of manufacturing systems lead to another level of complexity to be tackled and understood in terms of the performance of the system from an economic, environmental and social perspective. This calls for enhanced understanding through analysis of the interdependencies between business models, product design, supply chains and consumption patterns interactions by modelling the effect of those interactions to provide a sound basis for decision-making. The role of modelling simulation for prediction and improved decision-making in complex situations will be presented and exemplified with case studies where simulation has been used as a tool to enhance decision-making. The chapter finishes by highlighting the potential of modelling and simulation in boosting the transition towards circular systems implementation.

  • 276.
    Ampadu, Ernest
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Learning.
    Amponsah, Samuel
    Thomas, Michael
    Professional development among in-service teachers: motivational factors, pathways and coping strategies2021In: Educational review (Birmingham), ISSN 0013-1911, E-ISSN 1465-3397, ISSN ISSN 0013-1911Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    While research indicates that teachers’ continuing professional development (TCPD) is highly significant for the successful implementation of effective classroom instruction, few research studies to date have explored the role of TCPD in Ghana. This paper aims to map the pathways of TCPD for in-service teachers in Ghana while exploring the motivations and coping strategies of these adult learners. The study employs a cross-sectional survey design in which 45 students enrolled in an MA Education programme were trained to collect data from 352 in-service teachers in 310 schools using a semi-structured questionnaire as the data collection instrument. The data from the study were analysed using both descriptive and inferential statistics. The results from the study show that subject matter, knowledge of curriculum, and assessment knowledge were the three most important factors behind the teachers’ motivation to participate in CPD. Moreover, the analysis of the coping strategies of the in-service teachers suggests that there was little or no institutional support for them. In addition to this, despite the significant role mentorship plays in ensuring effective teaching and learning, the overwhelming majority of the teachers saw mentoring and exchange programmes as one of the least important forms of CPD opportunities available. Recommendations from the study indicate that teachers’ professional autonomy and the disparity between the professional values and skills demanded in 21st-century education cannot be underestimated and that more research is required on how to design CPD programmes that will provide Ghanaian in-service teachers with the creative and innovative skills they require. 

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  • 277.
    Ampadu, Ernest
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Learning, Learning in Stem.
    Chechan, Batoul
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Learning, Learning in Stem.
    Swedish students’ problem-solving perceptions and its implications for teacher training and development2022Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Students’ ability to solve problems that require higher order thinking skills is not just necessary but also a sufficient condition in our quest for training students who have the skills and competencies to compete effectively both at the national and international levels. Achieving SDG4 is underpinned by examining how UNESCO’s sustainable competencies with emphasis on systems thinking, anticipatory, normative, strategic, critical thinking, self-awareness, and integrated problem-solving competencies are integrated or understood within the classroom context. Despite the integration of problem-solving into the Swedish school curriculum, students’ performance in this area has not been as expected. This study, therefore, examines the problem-solving attitudes of Swedish students and its implications for teacher training and development. Using a survey design and the Problem-Solving Attitude Inventory (PSAI) data was collected from 432 (primary, lower and upper secondary) students. Descriptive and inferential (ANOVA) statistics analyses were conducted to examine the problem-solving attitudes among the different grade levels. The results show that two of the constructs (problem-solving tendency, personal control) were statistically significant., F(2, 429)=5.007, p=0.007 and F(2,429)=3.071, p=0.047 respectively. The constructs (problem-solving confidence and avoidance style) did not show any statistically significant difference, F(2, 429) = 1.609, p = 0.201 and F(2, 429) = 0.484, p = 0.616 respectively between school levels. The results show that primary school students ascribed more positively to the items in the four constructs as compared to their lower and upper secondary peers. Personal control was the main contributing construct and had a direct influence on the other constructs. The ANOVA also showed a significant difference between gender and problem-solving attitudes with males ascribing more positively to all the four constructs except personal control. The results provide critical implications for teacher training and development. The conceptual framework shows that there is a need for teacher training programmes to equip teachers on how to change or influence students' self-control characteristics. We suggest the use of contextual and challenging activities to help enhance students’ personal.-control construct.

  • 278.
    Ampadu, Ernest
    et al.
    Department of Teacher Education, School of Education and Leadership, University of Ghana, P.O. Box LG 1181, Accra, Ghana.
    Kwame Butakor, Paul
    Amponsah, Samuel
    Yeboah, Rita
    Exploring the professional identities of pre-service teachers' studying at the University of Ghana2021In: International Journal of Education Economics and Development, ISSN 17595673Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The success of any educational system depends on how it is organised and the extent to which the stakeholders especially teachers accept and own it. The purpose of this study was to investigate pre-service teachers' (N = 58) professional identities using a qualitative approach where teachers were asked to produce a pen portrait of the perceived identities using open-ended questionnaires and drawings. The result from this study shows that the individual teacher's personal characteristics are paramount in shaping his/her personal identity. Teachers in our study generally described themselves as teachers who are working hard to help learners understand themselves and provide effective learning opportunities for students to excel and develop inherent capabilities. It is a great asset to have teachers who see themselves as agents of change rather than custodians of knowledge. It is important to have reflective dialogues with teachers to understand these personal characteristics that shape their identities.

  • 279.
    Ampadu, Ernest
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Learning, Learning in Stem.
    Ottergren, Elin
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Learning.
    From Physical to Hybrid: Listening to Swedish Mathematics Teachers’ Views About Their Teaching and Assessment Practices2023In: Handbook of Research on Redesigning Teaching, Learning, and Assessment in the Digital Era, IGI Global, 2023, p. 87-105Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study explores Swedish mathematics teachers teaching and assessing practices as different hybrid teaching methods were implemented. Data were collected from 51 teachers in the Stockholm region using an open-ended questionnaire. Teachers experienced a developmental leap involving both pedagogical adaptation and the use of technological tools when adapting to hybrid teaching. Quality dialogues, structure and learner autonomy, as well as the integrity of assessment practices were issues of major concern, as most students experienced online and hybrid learning for the first time with limited preparation.

    These adaptation processes led to an increase in transactional distance, which in turn affected students’ autonomy and achievement. The results also show that the reliance on summative assessment became the new normal practice inconsistent with the Swedish way of teaching and assessing student learning. To enjoy the full advantages of hybrid teaching, there is a need to put measures in place to reduce the transactional distance to help improve students’ autonomy and achievement.

  • 280.
    An, Jihyun
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
    Feminist Futures: Futures studies through the lens of feminist epistemologies2017Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This study explores how futures studies could engage with critical feminist perspectives in an intrinsic manner and what feminist futures might mean. The study brings attention to the less discussed subject of epistemological basis in futures studies. Literature study and semi-structured interviews with practitioners and researchers working with feminist approaches in the fields related to futures development was deployed. I’ve analyzed Wendell Bell’s discussion on epistemological foundation of futures studies from feminist epistemological perspective, and have suggested the potential of feminist epistemology of situated knowledges and partial objectivity for futures studies. Based on the findings from the semi-structured interviews, an alternative feminist scenario set in Swedish society in the year of 2050 in the format of a fiction is presented with the aim to provide a detailed and situated narrative of political and daily lives in feminist futures. The feminist futures scenario should not be understood as the singular feminist future suggested for implementation. The intention is to demonstrate how the visionary dimensions of feminist studies could be articulated in various forms of futures studies, and to open up space for rich debates on envisioning feminist futures. 

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  • 281.
    An, Jihyun
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
    Feminist Futures: Futures studies through the lens of feminist epistemologies2017Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This study explores how futures studies could engage with critical feminist perspectives in an intrinsic manner and what feminist futures might mean. The study brings attention to the less discussed subject of epistemological basis in futures studies. Literature study and semi-structured interviews with practitioners and researchers working with feminist approaches in the fields related to futures development was deployed. I’ve analyzed Wendell Bell’s discussion on epistemological foundation of futures studies from feminist epistemological perspective, and have suggested the potential of feminist epistemology of situated knowledges and partial objectivity for futures studies. Based on the findings from the semi-structured interviews, an alternative feminist scenario set in Swedish society in the year of 2050 in the format of a fiction is presented with the aim to provide a detailed and situated narrative of political and daily lives in feminist futures. The feminist futures scenario should not be understood as the singular feminist future suggested for implementation. The intention is to demonstrate how the visionary dimensions of feminist studies could be articulated in various forms of futures studies, and to open up space for rich debates on envisioning feminist futures. 

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    AN_JIHYUN_FEMINIST FUTURES
  • 282.
    Anbratt, Sara
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Ecology.
    Miljörevisionsmanual för byggprojekt2000Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The public awareness concerning environmental issues is increasing, which in turnleads to an increased pressure on the companies to carry out environmentalimprovements. Although there are laws that regulate the activity within the buildingindustry, there is still a need also for the public to make environmental demands, forchanges to take place. It is not enough for companies to fulfil the existingenvironmental regulations. New knowledge within the environmental area increases ina faster rate than any changes in the law. This can be applied to the future proprietorand the entrepreneur. In order for changes to take place and to get a prosperous result,the future proprietor has to make the proper environmental demands and also do thefollow up on the demands.In this paper the environmental work in the building industry have been investigated.Mainly concerning their environmental management system, environmental demands,value systems for tenders, the follow up on the environmental demands and also theexistence of any internal environmental glossary.The purpose with the investigation is to get a description of the environmental situationin the companies. And with this as a background come up with a manual forenvironmental audits. The manual for environmental audits is supposed to be used atenvironmental audits in construction projects, and in order to ask the proper questions,it is necessary to know how far the companies have come with their environmentalwork.By investigating whether the companies have an internal glossary for environmentalwords, and the possibility to get copies of them, have made it possible to put togetherthe different definitions of the environmental words. This in turn makes it possible tocome up with a common environmental glossary for the building industry in the nearfuture. Although this was the intention to do with this thesis there was not enough timeto finish it.To summarise what emerged from the investigation of the environmental situation onbuilding construction companies. Environmental management system, all of theinterviewed companies had a, or was about to bring about an environmentalmanagement system. Few of the companies where certified according to the ISO 14001standard. However a number of the companies have the intention to be certified withinthe near future. Reasons not to be certified, were that the companies regards it to beenough to work according to the ISO 14000 standard. There are so far noenvironmental demands including certification of environmental management systems.Such an environmental demand is difficult to make since there are so far only a fewcertified companies. Most of the companies show their environmental work publicly intheir annual report.What emerged regarding the environmental demands was that most of the companiesstated that they made environmental demands. A number of them take theenvironmental demands into consideration when valuing the tenders. A majorityMiljörevisionsmanual för byggprojekt Sara Anbratt6replied however that the prise still carries most weight when valuing the tenders.Generally speaking the big companies have come furthest, although there areexceptions, concerning incorporation of environmental aspects in tender value systems.The tender value systems are in other respects the area where most resources areneeded in the future. Many of the companies regard it difficult to follow up on theenvironmental demands, they say they haven’t got enough resources to do it. Most ofthe companies nevertheless state that they have some form of follow up. Some of themuses environmental audits and other companies have a final inspection. Some haveboth. Most of the companies that use environmental audits have not yet done it in anylarger extent. There are also en differences between large and small projects. Thefollow up seems to be better in the larger projects. To apply sanctions when theenvironmental demands are not fulfilled seems to be difficult since only half of themhave some form of sanctions, and few of them have applied the sanctions at any time.The investigation of the environmental situation in the companies was necessary inorder to come up with the manual for environmental audits for construction projects.The manual consists of two parts, where the first part contains instructions of how toperform the actual audit. It also contains instructions of how to prepare for the auditand what to do after the visit to the construction plant. The second part consists of thequestions to ask on the actual audit. The questions are arranged in to 13 areas:

    • The construction plant• Building materials• Machines and vehicles

    • Transportation

    • Emissions into air, noise and vibration

    • Chemical products

    • Waste• Water

    • Emergency

    • Personnel

    • Report

    • Supplier

    • Sub-supplier

  • 283. Andersdotter, Amelia
    et al.
    Bylund, Markus
    Ferm, Maria
    Häglund, Kjell
    Jardenberg, Joakim
    de Kaminski, Marcin
    Karlberg, Peter
    Karlgren, Jussi
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Theoretical Computer Science, TCS.
    Larsson, Hanna
    Sundberg, Sam
    Sundin, Mathias
    Godtyckligt regelverk hotar friheten på nätet2013In: Dagens Nyheter, ISSN 1101-2447, no 2013-09-03Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Reglerna som möjliggör stängning av hemsidor på internet präglas av godtycke och otydlighet. Men det behöver inte vara särskilt svårt att skapa ett nytt och rättssäkert regelverk. Här har Sveriges EU-kommissionär Cecilia Malmström en viktig roll. Frågan är om hon tar sitt ansvar, skriver politiker och nätdebattörer.

  • 284. Andersen, T. C. K.
    et al.
    Aagaard, A.
    Magnusson, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Exploring business model innovation in SMEs in a digital context: Organizing search behaviours, experimentation and decision-making2022In: Creativity and Innovation Management, ISSN 0963-1690, E-ISSN 1467-8691, Vol. 31, no 1, p. 19-34Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In today's business environment, digitalization plays a key role in establishing competitive advantage and developing new business models. However, little is known about business model innovation (BMI) processes and practices of small and medium-sized enterprise (SMEs) in their digital venturing. Thus, the aim of this paper is to address this research gap by investigating the process activities of SMEs in effectively building new business models through digitalization. Through a case study of 18 SMEs, document studies and 36 interviews, we explore the BMI processes during the case companies' digital transformation. The research results identify four critical BMI process activities: (1) assessing the environment in search of new opportunities, (2) conveying a sense of urgency, (3) exploring and testing new opportunities through experimentation and (4) handling decision-making with a combination of intuition and data. Finally, our study reveals managerial implications related to data-driven decision-making during BMI, constituting four managerial dilemmas: (1) prognosis and scenario-driven search myopia, (2) timing and sustainability, (3) radical shift from traditional experimentation to data-based methods and (4) using intuition versus data-driven decision-making. 

  • 285. Anderson, David
    et al.
    Alymov, Sergei
    Arzyutov, Dmitry V.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Grounding Etnos Theory: An Introduction2019In: Life Histories of Etnos Theory in Russia and Beyond / [ed] David Anderson, Dmitry Arzyutov, Sergei Alymov, Cambridge: Open Book Publishers, 2019, p. 1-19Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 286. Anderson, David
    et al.
    Arzyutov, Dmitry
    The Construction of the Soviet Ethnography and “The Peoples of Siberia"2016In: History and Anthropology, ISSN 0275-7206, E-ISSN 1477-2612, Vol. 27, no 2, p. 183-209Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The multi-generation book project "The Peoples of Siberia" enabled a group of Leningrad-based scholars to reshape their museum into a Soviet ethnographic community. This article analyses the face-to-face performances, the legalistic stenographic documentation, the collective crafting of a single authoritative style, and a unique temporal frame as an important background to understand a hallmark volume in Siberian studies. The authors argue that the published volume indexes nearly thirty years of scholarly debates as much as it indexes the peoples it represents. The article concludes with a critical discussion of how this volume was translated and received by a Euro-American readership influencing the perception of Siberian peoples internationally. It also links the volume to contemporary post-Soviet publication projects which seem to retrace the same path. The article is based on extensive archival work and references collections recently discovered and which are presented for publication here for the first time.

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  • 287. Anderson, David G.
    et al.
    Arzyutov, Dmitry V.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    The Etnos Archipelago: Sergei M. Shirokogoroff and the Life History of a Controversial Anthropological Concept2019In: Current Anthropology, ISSN 0011-3204, E-ISSN 1537-5382, Vol. 60, no 6, p. 741-773Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The concept of etnos—one of the more controversial anthropological concepts of the Cold War period—is contextualized by looking at its “life history” through the biography of one of its proponents. Sergei Mikhailovich Shirokogoroff was a Russian/Chinese anthropologist whose career transected Eurasia from Paris to Beijing via Saint Petersburg and the Siberian borderlands of the Russian Empire. His transnational biography and active correspondence shaped the unique spatial and intellectual configuration of a concept that became a cornerstone of both Soviet and Chinese ethnography. The theory of etnos turned out to be surprisingly stable, while circulating through various political and intellectual environments ranging from England, Germany, and China to Imperial, Soviet, and modern Russia. This case study presents a history of anthropology wherein networks and conversations originating in the Far East of Eurasia have had unexpected influences on the heartlands of anthropology. 

  • 288. Anderson, David G.
    et al.
    Arzyutov, Dmitry V.KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History, History of Science, Technology and Environment.Alymov, Sergei S.
    Life Histories of Etnos Theory in Russia and Beyond2019Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The idea of etnos came into being over a hundred years ago as a way of understanding the collective identities of people with a common language and shared traditions. In the twentieth century, the concept came to be associated with Soviet state-building, and it fell sharply out of favour. Yet outside the academy, etnos-style arguments not only persist, but are a vibrant part of regional anthropological traditions.Life Histories of Etnos Theory in Russia and Beyond makes a powerful argument for reconsidering the importance of etnos in our understanding of ethnicity and national identity across Eurasia. The collection brings to life a rich archive of previously unpublished letters, fieldnotes, and photographic collections of the theory’s early proponents. Using contemporary fieldwork and case studies, the volume shows how the ideas of these ethnographers continue to impact and shape identities in various regional theatres from Ukraine to the Russian North to the Manchurian steppes of what is now China. Through writing a life history of these collectivist concepts, the contributors to this volume unveil a world where the assumptions of liberal individualism do not hold. In doing so, they demonstrate how notions of belonging are not fleeting but persistent, multi-generational, and bio-social.This collection is essential reading for anyone interested in Russian and Chinese area studies. It will also appeal to historians and students of anthropology and ethnography more generally.

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  • 289.
    ANDERSON, ERIC
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Entrepreneurship and innovation.
    Secmaker–aR&D--‐focusedITsecuritycompany: Investigatingrisksassociatedwithoutsourcingthesalesfunction2013Independent thesis Basic level (university diploma), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The emergence of the personal computer has had huge impact on society. Implications of which have been difficult to foresee. Following the arrival of the Internet, IT security has become an increasingly important aspect of business. If a firm does not take IT security seriously it may cause major financial loss, and reflect poorly on decision makers. To cater to the needs of businesses, and public sector organizations, the IT security industry has grown fast.

    Following this development, Secmaker has emerged as one of the leading IT security companies in Scandinavia. Secmaker AB was founded in 1994 in Stockholm. Their product NetID is a Public Key Infrastructure (PKI) system, which allows information to be exchanged securely in a normally insecure environment, for example the Internet. Today they have grown to a staff of 34, consisting mainly of developers and a handful of sales and   anagement employees.

    Due the nature of the industry Secmaker has taken the strategic decision to outsource the sales force. Previously when Secmaker’s clients consisted mainly of public sector organizations they have dealt with the sales process themselves. This did not prove to work all the time so when moving into the private sector they decided on using sales partners in order to reach new customers. The purpose of this thesis is to investigate and explore the potential risks in outsourcing a sales force. We limited us in investigating the sales process alone. This allowed us to leave the technical aspects of the product to the side, and focus on this phase in which they previously had issues.

    The method used in this thesis is a qualitative, inductive, case study. We have collected data  performing semi-­‐structured interviews with key figures in the industry both within Secmaker, and independent. Further this primary data will be analyzed with respect to our theoretical, secondary, data we have collected through a comprehensive literature study.

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  • 290. Anderson, P. M. L.
    et al.
    Avlonitis, G.
    Ernstson, Henrik
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History, History of Science, Technology and Environment. University of Cape Town.
    Ecological outcomes of civic and expert-led urban greening projects using indigenous plant species in Cape Town, South Africa2014In: Landscape and Urban Planning, ISSN 0169-2046, E-ISSN 1872-6062, Vol. 127, p. 104-113Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Parks and private and public gardens do not exist in isolation, but form part of the urban fabric, contributing to ecological functioning. There is growing interest in how civil society shapes urban ecologies and vegetation patterns. This paper explores the ecological outcomes of a series of indigenous plant greening interventions in Cape Town. The six different sites were sampled: two civic-led intervention sites, one expert-led rehabilitation site, two conservation sites and one abandoned site. These sites are compared in terms of their plant and insect diversity and then discussed in relation to their contingent management arrangements and in relation to conservation and abandoned land. Plant and insect diversity measured at the civic-led greening intervention sites suggest these sites are similar to adjacent conservation sites, while floristic composition differs. The inclusion of a vacant lot with poor species and growth form diversity shows the significant role of intervention in the ecological reformation of urban green space. By emphasizing the ecological outcomes, this study highlights the importance of civil society in linking conservation goals to more broad-based notions of quality of life and the 'good and just city'. Our results indicate that civic-led efforts warrant attention in keeping with those of experts, both in relation to meeting indigenous conservation targets, as well as supporting functional groups and wider ecological processes, with the acknowledged exception of fire. How to integrate such civic-led interventions into urban biodiversity management planning is still an open question.

  • 291.
    Anderson, Pippin
    et al.
    University of Cape Town.
    Charles-Dominique, Tristan
    University of Cape Town.
    Ernstson, Henrik
    Department of Geography, The University of Manchester; African Centre for Cities, University of Cape Town.
    Andersson, Erik
    Stockholm University.
    Goodness, Julie
    Stockholm University.
    Post-apartheid ecologies in the City of Cape Town: An examination of plant functional traits in relation to urban gradients2020In: Landscape and Urban Planning, ISSN 0169-2046, E-ISSN 1872-6062, Vol. 193, p. 1-10, article id 103662Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study we explore species richness and traits across two urban gradients in the City of Cape Town. The first is the natural-urban boundary and the second is a socio-economic gradient informed by historical race-based apartheid planning. Plant species and cover were recorded in 156 plots sampled from conservation areas, private gardens, and public open green space. The socio-economic gradient transitioned from wealthier, predominantly white neighbourhoods to poorer, pre- dominantly black neighbourhoods. The socio-economic gradient was selected to fall within one original vegetation type to ensure a consistent biophysical template. There is a marked shift between the natural and urban plant communities in the City of Cape Town, with little structural affinity. Urban landscapes are dominated by grass, with low diversity compared to natural counterparts. A significant ecological gradient of reduced biodiversity, traits, and in turn functionality, was found across the socio-economic gradient. Wealthier communities benefit from more private green space, more public green space, and a greater plant diversity. Poorer communities have limited green space on all fronts, and lower plant and trait diversity. Plant communities with limited diversity are less resilient and if exposed to environmental perturbation would lose species, and associated ecosystem services faster than a species rich community. These species-poor plant communities mirror historical apartheid planning that is resistant to change. Based on how biodiversity, functionality, and associated ecosystem services and ecosystem stability are linked, the results of this study suggests how significant environmental injustice persists in the City of Cape Town.

  • 292. Andersson, A. E.
    et al.
    Andersson, D. E.
    Daghbashyan, Zara
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Entrepreneurship and innovation.
    Hårsman, Björn
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Entrepreneurship and innovation.
    Location and spatial clustering of artists2014In: Regional Science and Urban Economics, ISSN 0166-0462, E-ISSN 1879-2308, Vol. 47, no 1, p. 128-137Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Surveys of artists' location choices show that they disproportionately reside in large cities. This paper introduces a model that attempts to explain this urban preference. The model includes four factors: access to other artists; access to consumer demand; access to service jobs; and housing affordability. These four factors are combined in a spatial equilibrium model. An equilibrium spatial distribution of artists is derived from the model and is correlated with the actual distribution among Swedish municipalities. Subsequently, the model is used for an econometric estimation of factor effects. The results show that access to other artists and local access to service jobs are important localization factors. Educated labor used as a proxy for consumer demand has a significant effect on artists' location choices.

  • 293. Andersson, Ake E.
    et al.
    Andersson, David Emanuel
    Harsman, Bjorn
    Daghbashyan, Zara
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Complexity, scientific creativity and clustering2015In: Rise of the city: Spatial dynamics in the urban century, Edward Elgar Publishing , 2015, p. 15-32Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 294.
    Andersson, Birger
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Bergholtz, Maria
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Edirisuriya, A.
    Ilayperuma, T.
    Johannesson, Paul
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Grégoire, B.
    Schmitt, M.
    Dubois, E.
    Abels, S.
    Hahn, A.
    Gordijn, J.
    Weigand, H.
    Wangler, B.
    Towards a common ontology for business models2006In: CEUR Workshop Proceedings, 2006Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To create an understanding of enterprises and the ways they do business, a starting point could be to identify the main actors and the values transferred between them. Business models are created in order to make clear who the business actors are in a business case and to make their relations explicit. The relations are formulated in terms of values exchanged between the actors. The purpose of the work reported in this paper is to create a better understanding of business models by identifying basic notions used in such models. It does so by constructing a common ontology based on three established business model ontologies: e3-value, REA, and BMO. By means of a careful analysis of these ontologies a conceptual schema is created that defines the common concepts. An example is worked out that explains how the common ontology should be understood.

  • 295.
    Andersson, Birger
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Bergholtz, Maria
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Edirisuriya, A.
    Ilayperuma, T.
    Johannesson, Paul
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Zdravkovic, Jelena
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Using strategic goal analysis for enhancing value-based business models2007In: BUSITAL 2007 - 2nd International Workshop on Business/IT Alignment and Interoperability, Workshop at the 19th International Conference on Advanced Information Systems Engineering, CAiSE 2007, 2007Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Lately business models have been recognized as a foundation for design of operational business processes. The motivation of a business model can be found in the goals of an enterprise which are made explicit in a goal model. This paper discusses the alignment of business models with goal models and proposes a method for constructing business models based on goal models. The method is based on a template and rules based approach. The outputs are business models that conform to the explicit goals of an enterprise. Main benefits are uniform goal formulations, well founded business model designs, and increased traceability between the models. A case study from the health sector is used to argument the way we ground and apply our proposed method.

  • 296.
    Andersson, Birger
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Bergholtz, Maria
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Edirisuriya, Ananda
    Ilayperuma, T.
    Jayaweera, P.
    Johannesson, Paul
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Zdravkovic, Jelena
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Aligning goal models and business models2008In: CEUR Workshop Proc., 2008, p. 13-16Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper has argued that for an enterprise to be sustainable its operational processes should be aligned to its strategic goals. We have focused on a part of the complex issue of business and IT alignment by addressing the problems of aligning business models with goal models and a method for this was proposed. The method approach offers a number of benefits: clear and uniform goal model formulation, well founded business model design, and traceability between models.

  • 297.
    Andersson, Birger
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV. Department of Computer and Systems Sciences, Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Bergholtz, Maria
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV. Department of Computer and Systems Sciences, Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Grégoire, B.
    Johannesson, Paul
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV. Department of Computer and Systems Sciences, Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Schmitt, M.
    Zdravkovic, Jelena
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV. Department of Computer and Systems Sciences, Stockholm University, Sweden.
    From business to process models: A chaining methodology2006Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we discuss the problem of how to go from a business model to a process model in a systematic way. Business models are economic models used for business analysis, while process models capture low-level business activities and their coordination. We propose a method that starts with a business model where the main actors and their relationships are identified. This forms a basis for design of a final process model. Processes are described in terms of patterns stored in a pattern library.

  • 298.
    Andersson, Birger
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Bider, I.
    Johannesson, Paul
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Perjons, Erik
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Towards a formal definition of goal-oriented business process patterns2005In: Business Process Management Journal, ISSN 1463-7154, E-ISSN 1758-4116, Vol. 11, no 6, p. 650-662Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose - Organizations of today are becoming ever more focused on their business processes. This has resulted in an increasing interest in using best practices for business process re-engineering. Two problems arise in connection to using best practices: how to find a best practice that suits particular purposes, and how to ensure that the process from the best practice has the same nature as the process under re-engineering. The purpose of this paper is to address these issues. Design/methodology/approach - The paper suggests using business process patterns, i.e. relatively high level business process models, for making near formal comparison of business processes. The paper analyzes widespread modeling techniques to find out which of them suits the task of building patterns for comparison. Based on this analysis, the state-flow modeling technique is chosen and first steps towards formal definition of business process patterns based on this technique are suggested. Findings - A pattern is defined based on the notions of state space, goal, as a surface in the state space, and valid movements towards the goal. A thinkable procedure of constructing patterns is demonstrated on two real-life examples. A hypothetical procedure for comparing process is suggested but it still needs to be verified in practice. Originality/value - The originality of the paper is the way the patterns are formulated and the underlying model, the state-flow view of processes, upon which the patterns are founded.

  • 299.
    Andersson, Birger
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Johannesson, Paul
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Zdravkovic, Jelena
    Aligning goals and services through goal and business modelling2009In: Information Systems and E-Business Management, ISSN 1617-9846, E-ISSN 1617-9854, Vol. 7, no 2, p. 143-169Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    E-services are used as the cornerstones for modelling interaction points of cooperating IT systems, within and between enterprises. So far, research and development of e-services have mainly focused on an operational perspective, such as the development of standards for message exchanges and service coordination. However, on a strategic level, the success of e-services depends on their ability to work as a medium for the exchange of business values. In this paper, we present an approach that utilizes goal and business models as the foundation for designing e-services. The approach can be used to ensure that the developed e-services support the desired goals and business values of involved actors. A case study from the Swedish health care sector is used to ground and apply the presented approach.

  • 300.
    Andersson, Caroline
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Planerarens kompetenser2012Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
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