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  • 251. Ryttberg, Malin
    Legitimacy Dynamics of Professional Support Staff at Higher Education InstitutionsIn: Higher Education Policy, ISSN 0952-8733, E-ISSN 1740-3863Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study is to identify the expressions of legitimacy work available to professional support staff at contemporary higher education institutions (HEIs) and how these expressions can be understood as strategies in their work. Academics are the given audience for this legitimacy work. Professional support staff are commonly described as having blurred boundaries in relation to academics and as actors in a third space. The empirical data comprise 19 interviews with three categories of professional support staff at three HEIs of a technical orientation in Sweden. A finding, in relation to the educational and work experience of these support staff, is that techniques and procedures are at their fingertips in legitimacy work. This also touches upon the more intangible aspects of the categories and structures of the support staff that resemble those of academics. However, one of the main conclusions of this study concerns the strength of the expressions of professional and personal legitimacy in their legitimacy work. This conclusion coincides with the view that they are strong actors in a third space, who use their freedom to form their own roles and the pick and choose among alternative means in their strategies to gain and maintain legitimacy.

  • 252. Røed, Knut H.
    et al.
    Kvie, Kjersti S.
    Losey, Robert J.
    Kosintsev, Pavel A.
    Hufthammer, Anne K.
    Dwyer, Mark J.
    Goncharov, Vasiliy
    Klokov, Konstantin B.
    Arzyutov, Dmitry V.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Plekhanov, Andrei
    Anderson, David G.
    Temporal and Structural Genetic Variation in Reindeer (Rangifer Tarandus) Associated with the Pastoral Transition in Northwestern Siberia2020In: Ecology and Evolution, E-ISSN 2045-7758Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 253.
    Salla, Jako
    et al.
    Ministry of Justice - Estonia Criminal Policy Department, Estonian Ministry of Justice, Tallinn, EstoniaDepartment of Sociology, University of Tallinn, Tallinn , Estonia.
    Ceccato, Vania
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment.
    Ahven, Andri
    Ministry of Justice - Estonia.
    Homicide in Estonia2011In: Handbook of European Homicide Research: patterns, explanations, and country studies / [ed] M. Liem and W A Pridemore, New York: Springer, 2011, p. 421-437Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Homicide is a topic of particular interest in Estonia since level of violent deaths is well above the European average. In 2006-2008 the average rate per 100000 population in Estonia was 6.6, in the EU it was second highest rate after Lithuania in these years. At the same time Estonia has experienced a rapid decrease in homicide during last 15 years – the rate of homicide used to be more than four times higher in the middle of 1990s.

    High rate of violent death is not something that has evolved during last decades, it has been a problem through very different state orders and social conditions, including Soviet era from 1940ies to 1980ies. In broadest sense lethal violence in Estonia should be analyzed in relation to alcohol consumption behavior and cultural traditions. Estonia shares drinking patterns with its neighbors Finland and Russia, it also has a remarkable immigrant population whose rates of homicide and violence in general have been and are still higher in comparison to Estonians.

    The problems that arise from heavy drinking are also visible in other areas where unnatural deaths occur: Estonia has lead EU rankings of fire deaths and deaths caused by drowning and traffic accidents.

    Despite high rates of homicide, it has not become a topic of special interest for public in Estonia. Although each week a person or two are being killed on average in recent years, media covers only a few exceptional cases during the year. This has probably contributed to rational criminal policy but has not drawn enough attention to social and economic policy areas such as alcohol policy.

  • 254.
    Salö, Linus
    SEC, Uppsala universitet.
    Invandrarutredningen och 1970-talets språkideologiska omvälvningar: Till frågan om modersmålsundervisningens kunskapssociologi2020Report (Refereed)
  • 255.
    Salö, Linus
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Regimenting academic discourse: Additional-language summaries as an equivocal remedy for  Anglophone scienceManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The dominance of English in scientific production raises issues in relation to certain responsibilities of Swedish universities, linked to the dissemination of knowledge and the development of the Swedish language. In light of this, the current paper deals with Swedish-language summaries (SLSs) in English-language doctoral theses. It treats the SLS as an instrument of language regimentation, deliberately aimed at limiting the near-total dominance of English. Drawing on language policy documents at the national and university level, along with scholarly accounts and interview data, the paper discusses the SLS as conceived by advocates in language policy and planning, university policymakers, and practitioners, that is, active researchers. It is shown that the SLS is aimed at counteracting negative effects pertaining to knowledge outreach as well as register formation. I argue that there is a contradiction between these two aims: on the one hand, an SLS that is simple enough to bridge the gap between science and society is not likely to contribute to expanding advanced registers of Swedish; on the other hand, an SLS that takes seriously the task of expanding Swedish registers will be unintelligible for the wider audience. Yet, it may still serve as a reminder that languages other than English are worthy of consideration and use.

  • 256.
    Salö, Linus
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History, History of Science, Technology and Environment. Stockholm University.
    The Sociolinguistics of Academic Publishing: Language and the Practices of Homo Academicus2017 (ed. 1)Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This book presents a sociolinguistics of academic publishing from an historical and contemporary perspective. Using Swedish academia as a case study, it focuses on publishing practices within history and psychology. The author demonstrates how new regimes of research evaluation and performance-based funding are impinging on university life. His central argument, following the French sociologist Bourdieu, is that the trend towards publishing in English should be understood as a social strategy, developed in response to such transformations. Thought-provoking and challenging, this book will interest students and scholars of sociolinguistics, language planning and language policy, research policy, sociology of science, history and psychology.

  • 257.
    Salö, Linus
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History, History of Science, Technology and Environment. Stockholm University.
    Ganuza, Natalia
    Stockholm University.
    Hedman, Christina
    Stockholm University .
    Karrebæk, Martha
    Mother tongue instruction in Sweden and Denmark: Language policy, cross-field effects, and linguistic exchange rates2018In: Language Policy, ISSN 1568-4555, E-ISSN 1573-1863, Vol. 17, no 4, p. 591-610Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

     This article investigates mother tongue instruction (MTI) in Sweden and Denmark in a historical, comparative perspective, with a view to accounting for key differences in language policy enacted in educational fields. Whereas in Sweden, MTI is offered to linguistic minority children irrespective of their linguistic and ethnic backgrounds, in Denmark the right to state-sponsored MTI has been abolished for children of non-European descent. Moreover, while the policies of both states devalue skills in mother tongues other than the legitimate language of each society, this position is more pronounced in the Danish context. The article explores the two state’s position on MTI, as expressed in policy as well as in discourse produced in the political and academic field of each state. It subscribes to Pierre Bourdieu’s framework, within which state policy is conceived as the product of historical struggle and cross-field effects. The analysis shows that the national differences in MTI exist because of the differing ways in which agents from the academic vis-à-vis the political field have succeeded in imposing their visions in the bureaucratic field from which policies are produced. Ultimately, this circumstance explains why the Swedish discussion on MTI may be characterized as having been academically founded, while the Danish discussion has remained a matter of political consideration. In the latter case, we argue, it is particularly tangible that MTI is a politicized object of struggle, where agents seek to control the exchange rate of linguistic resources and, in effect, the social worth of different speakers.

  • 258.
    Salö, Linus
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Holmes, Luke
    Stockholm University.
    Hanell, Linnea
    The Language Council of Sweden, ISOF.
    Language assets, scientific prestige, and academic power: The efficacy of national linguistic capital in internationalizing career trajectories2022In: Language Matters in Higher Education Contexts: Policy and Practice / [ed] Apelgren, B.M., Eriksson, A.M. & Strömberg Jämsvi, S, Leiden/Boston: Brill , 2022, 1, p. 112-129Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this chapter we examine the value held by national languages, here Swedish, in the scholarly career trajectories in non-Anglophone countries. To this end, we analyse the language policies of Swedish higher education institutions and the narrated perceptions of two international recruits. Adopting Pierre Bourdieu’s distinction between scientific and academic capital, we argue that Swedish language skills constitute a vital asset in processes of accruing power in Sweden’s scientific world. Hence, as we maintain, English is not all that matters, despite internationalization being high on the agenda. 

  • 259.
    Salö, Linus
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Holmes, Luke
    Stockholms universitet.
    Hanell, Linnea
    Språkrådet.
    National languages matter in academic career trajectoriesManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we examine the value held by national languages, here Swedish, in the scholarly career trajectories in non-Anglophone countries. To this end, we analyze the language policies of Swedish higher education institutions and the narrated perceptions of two international recruits. Adopting Pierre Bourdieu’s distinction  between scientific and academic capital, we argue that Swedish language skills constitute a vital asset in  processes of accruing power in Sweden’s scientific world. Hence, as we maintain, English is not all that matters, despite internationalization being high on the agenda.

  • 260. Seifollahi-Aghmiuni, S.
    et al.
    Kalantari, Zahra
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Water and Environmental Engineering. Department of Physical Geography and Bolin Centre for Climate Research, Stockholm University, 106 91, Stockholm, Sweden; Navarino Environmental Observatory, Costa Navarino, 24001, South-west Messenia, Greece.
    Egidi, G.
    Gaburova, L.
    Salvati, L.
    Urbanisation-driven land degradation and socioeconomic challenges in peri-urban areas: Insights from Southern Europe2022In: Ambio, ISSN 0044-7447, E-ISSN 1654-7209, Vol. 51, no 6, p. 1446-1458Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Climate change and landscape transformation have led to rapid expansion of peri-urban areas globally, representing new ‘laboratories’ for the study of human–nature relationships aiming at land degradation management. This paper contributes to the debate on human-driven land degradation processes by highlighting how natural and socioeconomic forces trigger soil depletion and environmental degradation in peri-urban areas. The aim was to classify and synthesise the interactions of urbanisation-driven factors with direct or indirect, on-site or off-site, and short-term or century-scale impacts on land degradation, focussing on Southern Europe as a paradigmatic case to address this issue. Assuming complex and multifaceted interactions among influencing factors, a relevant contribution to land degradation was shown to derive from socioeconomic drivers, the most important of which were population growth and urban sprawl. Viewing peri-urban areas as socio-environmental systems adapting to intense socioeconomic transformations, these factors were identified as forming complex environmental ‘syndromes’ driven by urbanisation. Based on this classification, we suggested three key measures to support future land management in Southern European peri-urban areas.

  • 261.
    Singh, Nandita
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering, Water Management.
    Equitable gender participation in local water governance: An insight into institutional paradoxes2008In: Water resources management, ISSN 0920-4741, E-ISSN 1573-1650, Vol. 22, no 7, p. 925-942Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The participation of local stakeholders in governance of water resources is regarded as inalienable for ensuring efficiency, effectiveness and sustainability. To enhance gender balance in the water governance process, institutions are being designed and executed globally to elicit enhanced participation of women. This paper contends that in the context of local communities, the new institutional framework is divorced from the traditional social institutions that in turn operationalize their resource management systems. Based upon empirical evidence from rural Indian setting, the paper deciphers the paradoxes between the two sets of institutional paradigms and illustrates how these paradoxes at the 'interface' between the local community context and the development strategy lead to problems with effective women's participation. On the basis of the findings, it argues that the institutional paradigm for achieving equitable gender participation in local water governance does not represent a truly 'bottom-up' approach. It further raises the concern that if the institutional paradigm for participation is contradictory to local institutions, then how can the objectives of participation founded thereupon be seen as achievable? The paper proposes the need to design participatory paradigms that are more realistically rooted in community-based institutional frameworks so as to enhance effectiveness of the endeavors.

  • 262.
    Singh, Nandita
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Gender concern in water resources management: Rethinking gender initiatives in India2004Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Gender concern in water resources management is globally seen as instrumental in achieving greater efficiency, effectiveness and equity in the sector. Working within the global framework, in recent years, the state in India has drafted and designed gender-based initiatives in the sector at policy as well as program levels. Most of these concern the water users in local communities, primarily the women. Beginning with a concern for women as ‘beneficiaries’, the state’s initiatives have been expanded to enhance the scope of their participation in the sector as ‘actors’. This is reflected in the initial designing of water supply programs aiming at unburdening women in the task of water procurement, to be succeeded by formulation of new interventions promoting their participation in decision-making within domestic as well as irrigation water management arenas. The paper seeks to analyse the effectiveness of these gender-based initiatives in India, looking for the situational factors influencing the achievement of the underlying goals. It argues that the localised social and cultural context interplay in the process of effective implementation of the interventions. The conceptualisation of the gender, gender needs, gender roles and relationships with respect to water resources management within the local context may not necessarily match the constructions underlying the gender initiatives designed and promoted by the state. Consequently, the paper argues for the need to rethink the content and strategy of these initiatives so that the aspirations of the local community and its members are fulfilled in a way that buffers the state’s interests and efforts.

    Download full text (pdf)
    Gender & WRM in India
  • 263.
    Singh, Nandita
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering, Water Management.
    Indigenous water management systems: Interpreting symbolic dimensions in common property resource regimes2006In: Society & Natural Resources, ISSN 0894-1920, E-ISSN 1521-0723, Vol. 19, no 4, p. 357-366Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Water is a natural resource subject to management in many small-scale societies as common property. A dominant approach to understanding the sustainability of such common property resource (CPR) management regimes is the rational action model, which assumes that their successful governance is achieved through collective action based on a rationally constructed set of working rules. By presenting a holistic study of indigenous water management system in small-scale community setting in India, this article argues that the relationship between water resources and society extends beyond a materialistic mundane relationship, to incorporate a ''symbolic'' orientation. It concludes that rooted in the cosmology of the society, the indigenous water management system represents a mechanism to reinforce the symbolic constructions and also to fulfill water-related needs that cut across material and nonmaterial realms. The outcomes of the article enhance the understanding of management of CPRs, adding an alternate perspective concerning beliefs and values associated with such resources.

  • 264.
    Singh, Nandita
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering, Water Management.
    Total sanitation efforts in India: Problems and prospects2008In: Abstract Volume, World Water Week in Stockholm, August 17–23, 2008: Progress and Prospects on Water:For a Clean and Healthy Worldwith Special Focus on Sanitation, Stockholm: Stockholm International Water Institute, SIWI , 2008, p. 331-332Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 265.
    Singh, Nandita
    KTH, Superseded Departments (pre-2005), Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Traditional water management practices and their implications in contemporary policy context2004In: Proceedings of the Xth International Symposium on Society and Resource Management, Colorado, USA, June, 2004, University of Minnesota , 2004Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In recent times, there has been much concern with designing of new ‘management’ regimes for efficient, effective and sustainable use of water as a natural resource basic to life. The common pool resource (CPR) theory provides a valid conceptual paradigm within which issues related to management of water in local communities may be approached and interpreted. It is recognized that the use of CPRs have been traditionally regulated by local communities without recourse to any centralized coercion. This presentation will seek to understand how water is traditionally managed as a CPR and how can the traditional water management practices be understood within the framework of the existent CPR theory. It will also attempt to explore the implications of the findings concerning traditional water management practices with respect to the new co-management regimes proposed within the contemporary water policy context. The presentation will argue that traditional water management regimes may be interpreted as conforming to the design principles underlying CPR management systems, though not necessarily ‘visible’ as formalized structural forms with independent existence. Further, these systems need to be seen as comprising human and non-human elements, the latter being further constituted in ‘ideational’ and ‘operational’ dimensions. Finally, discussing on the implications of the traditional water management systems within the contemporary policy context, the presentation will argue upon the need to rethink the new water management strategies based upon the concept of co-management by replacing exogenously developed universal designs by ones that are built upon existing traditional templates.

  • 266.
    Singh, Nandita
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Water management traditions in rural India: Valuing the unvalued2004Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Achieving effective and efficient management of water as the key to human survival and development has emerged as an urgent global concern. The realization of the limited availability of water in space and time under conditions of ever-increasing pressures has caused designing of ‘modern’ water management initiatives that are globally manufactured but implementable in local communities, India being no exception. It is perhaps universally assumed that water management, as an integrated system based upon local knowledge & practices, is either ‘non-existent’ or ‘irrational’, ‘narrowly pragmatic’ and ‘in the process of disappearance’. If water is a basic resource necessary for sustaining all human activities, its provision in the desired quantity and quality and at the right time and place through a workable local water management system must be regarded as an omnipresent  phenomenon.

    How is water management traditionally organized in rural Indian localities so that the community’s needs are met through generations? What implications do such systems based in local situated knowledge & practices hold for the global water management context? The paper seeks answers to these questions through an ethnographic study in rural India. It concludes that traditional water management system in rural Indian localities is pragmatic, rational and functional even in contemporary times. As found in central and central-eastern parts of the country, the system may be resolved into human and non-human components, the latter further lying within two different analytical domains, namely, the ‘ideational’ and the ‘operational’. Traditional knowledge informs each of these domains that is translated as practice in day-to-day life. The paper argues that the study of such systems is important not only for the sake of enhancing the understanding of traditional resource management  systems as situated knowledge systems and situated action locales, but also for appreciating their practical value in designing of more workable, socio-culturally viable, community-based solutions to the resource management problems encountered in recent times.

    Download full text (pdf)
    Water management Traditions
  • 267.
    Singh, Nandita
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering, Water Management.
    Women, Society and Water Technologies: Lessons for Bureaucracy2006In: Gender, Technology and Development, ISSN 0971-8524, E-ISSN 0973-0656, Vol. 10, no 3, p. 341-360Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Water technologies are increasingly regarded as pivotal to the process of societal development. One arena of importance is the delivery of water to society through  comprehensive water supply programs that aim at ensuring ‘safe’ water for all. The principal target group in these programs is women, whose development is believed to be promoted through improved water facilities offering them greater convenience, better health and  enhanced socio-economic opportunities. These programs can be seen as having three essential aspects, namely technology, people and institutions. Of these, the responsibilities of designing technologies for supplying water, creating institutional frameworks for their execution and implementing the program at the people’s end for their benefit all lie with development bureaucracies. But the extent to which these bureaucracies can be sensitive to the socio-cultural contexts of the communities and the women for whom the program interventions are designed and implemented remains problematic. This article explores the gender dimensions of the socio-cultural context of water and how this may play a role in the adoption and management of improved water technologies. A perspective on the lessons for planning bureaucracies is offered to make the concerned technologies more efficient, effective and sustainable.

  • 268.
    Singh, Nandita
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering, Water Management.
    Women’s participation in local water governance: Understanding institutional contradictions2006In: Gender, Technology and Development, ISSN 0971-8524, E-ISSN 0973-0656, Vol. 10, no 1, p. 61-76Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The participation of women in local water governance is currently envisaged as necessary for achieving sustainable management of water resources. Towards this end, institutions are being created in many developing countries enabling the participation of local people in the use and management of resources. How effective is the participation of women as  makers and shapers within local water governance institutions—and how does their participation translate into benefits for their communities? How realistic is this participatory strategy in the traditional rural contexts of the developing world? Based on empirical evidence from rural India, where women do not constitute a homogenous group, this article seeks to explore how social and power differences among them thwart the beneficial effects of water governance in communities. The findings underscore the need to develop a holistic understanding of the institutional factors that differentiate among women and the implications of these on mechanisms of water governance put in place at the local level.

  • 269.
    Singh, Nandita
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering, Water Management.
    Jacks, G.
    Bhattacharya, Prosun
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering, Environmental Geochemistry and Ecotechnology.
    Women and community water supply programmes: An analysis from a socio-cultural perspective2005In: Natural resources forum (Print), ISSN 0165-0203, E-ISSN 1477-8947, Vol. 29, no 3, p. 213-223Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Community water supply programmes are seen as instrumental in achieving the goal of 'safe' water for all. Women, a principal target group of these programmes, are to be benefited with greater convenience, enhanced socio-cultural opportunities and better health for themselves and their families, provided through improved water facilities. Water supply programmes largely consist of three essential components, namely: technology, people and institutions. Although such programmes are intended to benefit women members of local communities, scant attention is paid to the impacts of the socio-cultural context of the community on these programmes. This article explores the influence of social and cultural intricacies on the implementation of community water supply programmes, and assesses their effectiveness. The article offers important lessons for the design and implementation of this type of programme. It concludes that the local sociocultural context sets the stage for programme implementation, being a dynamic factor that determines actual access to water sources, more so than mere physical availability, which is often used as a criterion for programme performance. The article stresses the urgent need to integrate socio-cultural factors as a fourth dimension in designing community water supply programmes, and suggests practical measures for enhancing the effectiveness of such programmes.

  • 270.
    Singh, Nandita
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
    Singh, Om Prakash
    Climate change, water and gender: Impact and adaptation in North-Eastern Hills of India2015In: International Social Work, ISSN 0020-8728, E-ISSN 1461-7234, Vol. 58, no 3, p. 375-384Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Water resources in India are projected to face severe climate-induced stress. In the North-Eastern Hill region, where lifestyles are closely connected to nature, this holds great implications for human development. While scientific knowledge regarding climate change and water is growing at global and regional scales, an equally diverse body of knowledge on the human dimensions of the same at local levels is weak. This article attempts to bridge this knowledge gap by presenting micro-level evidence on the gendered impact of increasing water stress and the innovative gendered local adaptive strategies in this region. It urges for the need to re-think on adaptation planning, basing it on local templates for greater sustainability.

  • 271. Siragusa, Laura
    et al.
    Arzyutov, Dmitry V.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Bol’she, chem musor: ustoĭchivye praktiki vtorichnogo ispol’zovanii͡a materialov sredi korennykh narodov na Rossiĭskom Severe: More Than Waste: Sustainable Practices of Re-Use Among Indigenous People in the Russian North2020In: Arkheologii͡a Arktiki / [ed] Vladimir Pitul'ko and Natalia Fedorova, Omsk , 2020, p. 219-240Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 272. Siragusa, Laura
    et al.
    Arzyutov, Dmitry V.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History, History of Science, Technology and Environment. Peter Great Museum Anthropol & Ethnog, Univ Skaya Embankment 3, St Petersburg 199034, Russia.
    Nothing Goes to Waste: Sustainable Practices of Re-Use among Indigenous Groups in the Russian North2020In: Current Opinion in Environmental Sustainability, ISSN 1877-3435, E-ISSN 1877-3443, Vol. 43, p. 41-48Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the last few decades, the literature on waste has soared and taken two main directions. Considering the assumption that waste is a natural category, which we need to ‘dispose of’, the scholarship on waste management and its sustainability offers mainly problem-solving propositions (e.g., the 3Rs proposal—re-cycling, re-using, and reducing—or ‘circular economy’). The social scientific waste studies literature takes a more critical stance from its outset and advances a relational account of waste. We aim to bring those two main research streams into dialogue through a presentation of two case studies among indigenous communities in the Russian North. Not only we disclose the hidden biases of the notion of circular economy and other ‘innovative’ problem-solving practices in the waste management literature, but we also propose to pay more attention to non-hegemonic waste practices amongst communities, which are often overlooked in both the waste management and the social studies of waste literature.

  • 273.
    Skoglund, Annika
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Biopolitics within business risk management2010In: Sentient Creatures - Transforming biopolitics and life matters, 2010Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Animals have with accelerating discussions on climate change come to be presented as sentient creatures to be respected and protected and hence an item for company risk management. How does biopolitics optimize vitality as regards the cow, polar bear and chicken, through a large Swedish utility company? With governmentality theory (Foucault, 1997/2008), this article illustrates how these animals are politicized in the perimeter of carbon capture and storage technology, renewable energy and strategic communication. The mechanisms of business risk management are thus scrutinized regarding their production of links between governing and governed. The analysis shows how the animals are differently intertwined in power relations, which opens up for new possibilities to regulate life.

  • 274.
    Skoglund, Annika
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Börjesson, Mats
    Stockholms Universitet, Institutionen för barn och ungdomsvetenskap.
    ”Juvenocracy” – the politicization of children in climate change2011In: Politics and Popular Culture 4, 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In April 2008, a possibility to ‘save the world at home’ was presented at the back of milk cartoons produced by Arla, purchased across Sweden. Coupled with various stories and tips on how to change the everyday practices of the family, this ambitious objective called upon children to look after their parents in climate change. ‘See through that your parents check the air pressure in the tires of the car’, exemplifies one of the typical statements that turn the relation between breeder and bred around. In this paper we present how children are empowered to exercise their potential power through technologies of responsibilization and various Internet-related technical solutions enhancing self-reflexivity and connectivity by fostering calculative capabilities. We also trace how these power relations have evolved from personnel management and the prohibition of child labour in factories during the 19th and 20th century, to the 1970s Swedish family legislation portraying children as ‘equal individuals’, ending in an ecological system’s networked society. The analysis illustrates how children are politicized in climate change to produce a ‘juvenocratic’ governmental rationality. This governmental rationality is increasingly operationalized through climate change risk politics, but can also be observed in more general biopolitics, as when pre-schoolers are brought to homes for elderly people to sing traditional songs and have common fruit pauses to ‘make the elderly eat more and healthier’ (June, 21st , 2011). While adults are incapacitated to work upon their self without children or the child within themselves, children are predicted to have the ability to foster everyday activities. This discourse produces the child as an authority and relay of expertise with capacity to stabilize the consumption of adults, by providing ethical guidelines intragenerationally, disseminated through what we conceptualize as ‘juvenocracy’.

  • 275.
    Smedberg, Åsa
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Double-loop learning conversations in an online community on overweight2005In: IADIS International Conference on Cognition and Exploratory Learning in Digital Age, 2005, p. 383-386Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The members of online health-communities are growing in number. One type of health-community is the one for people who suffer from overweight, who want to change behavior to lose weight. Learning a new behavior calls for investigating patterns of events, to question the way events are presented, and to create new mental models. This paper presents the results from a study of learning conversations held in an online community on overweight. In the conversations on learning, the most frequently used type of response was the one sympathizing with the ideas and beliefs of the sender, while the least used type of response was the one that rejected the ideas presented by the sender. Furthermore, there were more examples of members who presented counter-ideas in the conversations on obstacles and incentives than in the conversations on personal setbacks.

  • 276.
    Sommerfeldt, Nelson
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Applied Thermodynamics and Refrigeration.
    Muyingo, Henry
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Real Estate and Construction Management, Building and Real Estate Economics.
    Lessons in community owned PV from swedish multi-family housing cooperatives2015In: 31st European Photovoltaic Solar Energy Conference and Exhibition, 2015, p. 2745-2750Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    With increasing population shifts to urban areas and demands for post-war energy efficient renovationsacross Europe, solar photovoltaic (PV) deployment in multi-family housing will play an increasingly important roletowards meeting renewable energy, climate, and sustainability goals. This paper describes the stories of threeSwedish residential cooperatives who have installed large-scale PV systems across multiple buildings on their estates.In all cases, reduced operating costs were the original primary motivator; however unforeseen cost increases, changesin policy, and excess supply in the electricity market have made economic success less likely than originallyexpected. Regardless, the owners consider their projects a success due in part to short term social and long-termenvironmental benefits, which were originally less important and difficult to quantify. We can conclude thatcommunity owned PV offers more than just economic benefits, and Sweden’s unique ownership and managementstructure of residential cooperatives can offer insights towards increased deployment in other nations in Europe.

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  • 277. Stenberg, Una
    et al.
    Cvancarova, Milada
    Ekstedt, Mirjam
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Systems Safety and Management.
    Olsson, Mariann
    Ruland, Cornelia
    Family Caregivers of Cancer Patients: Perceived Burden and Symptoms During the Early Phases of Cancer Treatment2014In: Social work in health care, ISSN 0098-1389, E-ISSN 1541-034X, Vol. 53, no 3, p. 289-309Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigated levels of symptoms, caregiver burden, and changes over time in 278 family caregivers (FC) of cancer patients. FCs experienced high levels of depressive symptoms and sleep disturbance, low levels of fatigue, and low to moderate levels of caregiver burden, yet these symptoms remained relatively stable over time. Being female and not being employed were factors associated with an increased risk of symptoms and caregiver burden. The understanding evolving from this study can enhance social- and health care professionals' awareness of FCs' challenging situation and the potential impact this has on the FCs' ability to provide care to the patient.

  • 278.
    Susilo, Yusak
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Transport and Systems Analysis.
    Liu, C.
    Exploring patterns of timeuse allocation and immobility behaviours in the Bandung Metropolitan Area, Indonesia2017In: Urban Mobilities in the Global South / [ed] Tanu Priya Uteng, Karen Lucas, Informa UK Limited , 2017, p. 111-133Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 279.
    Swyngedouw, Erik
    et al.
    Univ Manchester, Geog, Manchester, Lancs, England..
    Ernstson, Henrik
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History, History of Science, Technology and Environment. University of Manchester, United Kingdom.
    Interrupting the Anthropo-obScene: Immuno-biopolitics and Depoliticizing Ontologies in the Anthropocene2018In: Theory, Culture and Society. Explorations in Critical Social Science, ISSN 0263-2764, E-ISSN 1460-3616, Vol. 35, no 6, p. 3-30Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper argues that the Anthropocene' is a deeply depoliticizing notion. This de-politicization unfolds through the creation of a set of narratives, what we refer to as AnthropoScenes', which broadly share the effect of off-staging certain voices and forms of acting. Our notion of the Anthropo-obScene is our tactic to both attest to and undermine the depoliticizing stories of the Anthropocene'. We first examine how various AnthropoScenes, while internally fractured and heterogeneous, ranging from geo-engineering and earth system science to more-than-human and object-oriented ontologies, place things and beings, human and non-human, within a particular relational straitjacket that does not allow for a remainder or constitutive outside. This risks deepening an immunological biopolitical fantasy that promises adaptive and resilient terraforming, an earth system management of sorts that permits life as we know it to continue for some, while turning into a necropolitics for others. Second, we develop a post-foundational political perspective in relation to our dramatically changing socio-ecological situation. This perspective understands the political in terms of performance and, in an Arendtian manner, re-opens the political as forms of public-acting in common that subtracts from or exceeds what is gestured to hold socio-ecological constellations together. We conclude that what is off-staged and rendered obscene in the AnthropoScenes' carries precisely the possibility of a return of the political.

  • 280.
    Syaush, Nora
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE).
    Chamoun, Lukas
    15 minute city: Revolution in Södertälje?: A study on how the concept of 15 minute city can be applied to Södertälje.2023Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    In a society where everything must be within the vicinity and accessible, people face challenges like climate, segregation and inequality. All people have the right to services such as education, care, work and housing without being prevented by unsustainable urban planning. Sustainable urban planning can define several things, but something all definitions have in common is that they use strategic plans. One such well spoken about is the "15 minute city" which was introduced in 2016 by the urbanist and professor Carlos Moreno. The concept is about an accessible city, in terms of services, education, care, work and more, for residents within a 15 minute walk or bike ride. Attempts to apply the 15 minute city can be seen in several cities around the world and partially in Stockholm, Sweden. An example is in Södertälje, a suburb in Stockholm county, which is characterized by the car centric city. The swedish policy “ Trafik för en attraktiv stad” (TRAST) helps sektion with urban planning and sustainability with focus on traffic. Because of these guidelines and Södertäljes oversight plan over their whole urban area it would be of interest to investigate how well the 15 minute city can be applied in Södertälje and its relation to the district of Ronna.

    The purpose of this study is to examine the potential Södertälje has in becoming a 15 minute city, in regards to the swedish policy document TRAST. In addition, studying whether the strategic plan can complement Södertälje's oversight plan of the entire city. The method that was applied consisted of literature study and case study where literature was gathered, for example, via search engines like Web of Science and Diva Portal. The case study consisted of two site visits, one earlier and one later in the day.

    The result and the analysis indicate that several aspects in Södertäljes oversight planning of their area and TRAST match that of the 15 minute city. Introducing this type of planning in the city requires, for example, that several barriers or the carsdomination in the urban area be remedied or reduced, which can provide opportunities for pedestrians and cyclists. The conclusions drawn from the results are that the introduction of the 15-minute city concept in the urban area, Södertälje, is possible. At last at recommendation to continuation of the study is a case study would consist of a city that has recently applied the 15 minute city and compare the effects of this more concretely.

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  • 281.
    Sörlin, Sverker
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Resource Extraction and Arctic Communities: The New Extractivist Paradigm2022Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    For decades, a post–Cold War narrative heralded a “new Arctic,” with melting ice and snow and accessible resources that would build sustainable communities. Today, large parts of the Arctic are still trapped in the path dependencies of past resource extraction. At the same time, the impetus for green transitions and a “new industrialism” spells opportunities to shift the development model and build new futures for Arctic residents and Indigenous peoples.This book examines the growing Arctic resource dilemma. It explores the “new extractivist paradigm” that posits transitioning the region’s longstanding role of delivering minerals, fossil energy, and marine resources to one providing rare earth elements, renewable power, wilderness tourism, and scientific knowledge about climate change. With chapters from a global, interdisciplinary team of researchers, new opportunities and their implications for Arctic communities and landscapes are discussed, alongside the pressures and uncertainties in a region under geopolitical and environmental stress.

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  • 282.
    Sörlin, Sverker
    KTH, Superseded Departments (pre-2005), History of Science and Technology.
    Tsunamin - en klassfråga: Fattiga har drabbats värst2004In: Dagens nyheter, ISSN 1101-2447, no 2004-12-30Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 283.
    Sörlin, Sverker
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Wisdom of Affect: Emotion, Environment, and the Future of Resource Extraction2021In: Polar Record, ISSN 0032-2474, E-ISSN 1475-3057, Vol. 57, p. 1-9, article id e27Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The “Arctic Uchronotopias” special issue of Polar Record is an important contribution to scholarly reflection on resource extraction. The ideas, perspectives, and empirical cases that we encounter have significance for extractivism wherever it takes place, both inside and outside of the Arctic region. To see extractivism through an Arctic lens is particularly useful since it brings up many of the issues that are often at stake in extraction activities, but not always at the same time: geopolitics, transboundary relations, environmental and climate impacts, cultural and natural heritage, indigenous relations, rights issues, local and regional development, and lives and fates of communities. Above all, these papers bring out the full spectrum of issues and tensions related to ongoing major global shifts, such as the Great Acceleration and Overheating, and those transformations of which resource extraction forms a major part. The research presented in Arctic Uchronotopias demonstrates that affect and emotions have explanatory value in the geopolitics of Arctic resource extraction. It also shows that emotional and cognitive experience and wisdom carry values and properties that conventional Environmental Impact Assessments and other technologies of evaluation and decision-making can capture.

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  • 284.
    Tahvilzadeh, Nazem
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Att göra kaos: Om förortspolitiken som urban styrregim och demokratiskt spel2018In: ARKIV. Tidskrift för samhällsanalys, ISSN 2000-6225, E-ISSN 2000-6217, no 9, p. 103-128Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    I Nazem Tahvilzadeh och Lisa Kings artikel diskuteras orsakerna till den uppståndelse, eller ”kaos” för att använda aktivisternas egna ord, som organisationen Megafonen skapade inom ramen för stadsutvecklingsprojektet Järvalyftet i Husby. Med inspiration från teorier om hur samtycke till ojämlikhet grundläggs på fabriksgolvet utvecklas två begrepp för att synliggöra den politiska ordningen i förorten och dess konkreta aktiviteter: urbana styrregimer och demokratiska spel. Studien visar hur Megafonens avhopp och sedermera kritik av Järvalyftet och förortspolitiken bröt mot den etablerade politiska ordningen i relationerna mellan stat och civilsamhälle i den urbana periferin. Aktivisternas handlingar kom därför att betraktas som ”skandalösa” av delar av det politiska etablissemanget. Megafonen vägrade att spela enligt spelets regler och synliggjorde således ojämlikheterna i förortspolitikens demokratiska spel med medborgarna. Underlaget för studien baseras på processpårande och etnografisk metod som empiriskt återskapar den förortspolitiska satsningen Järvalyftet och dess logiker samt Megafonens roll 2006–2013.

  • 285.
    Tahvilzadeh, Nazem
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Folkbildning i marginaliserade stadsdelar.: Förankrad, invävd och trevande.2019 (ed. 1)Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    numera återfinns mer än hälften av studieförbundens och folkhögskolornas deltagare i eller i anslutning till landets storstäder och större städer. Städernas utmaningar har på så sätt allt mer blivit folkbildningens angelägenhet. I studien Folkbildning i marginaliserade stadsdelar analyseras folkbildningens, framför allt studieförbundens, arbete i landets marginaliserade stadsdelar.

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  • 286.
    Tahvilzadeh, Nazem
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Dahlstedt, Magnus
    Kings, Lisa
    Orten och stadens demokratisering2018In: Manifest: För ett socialt arbete i tiden / [ed] Magnus Dahlstedt, Philip Lalander, Studentlitteratur AB, 2018Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 287.
    Tiftikci Celep, Helin
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Hur Stockholm stad främjar tillgänglighet för personer med funktionshinder i den byggda miljön2023Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    In the early 2000s, Swedish politicians had the goal of making Stockholm the world's most accessible capital by the year 2010. The project was called The accessibility-project. The City of Stockholm then had the task of rebuilding and designing the municipality to make it as accessible as possible for all individuals. This is through, for example, individually remedied obstacles and new guidelines. However, it is not known whether the goal was met or not, as no discussion has been held or a conclusion reached about it. In addition to this, there is a general agreement that renovations have been made and thereby created a city structure that is as accessible as possible. Despite the existing legal requirements and guidelines, as well as the sustainability goals that Sweden has promised to fulfill, it is still being built incorrectly. It's been over 13 years since the accessibility project ended, but they're still building wrong. Why are they still building wrongly? Why are there still a lot of shortcomings, where disabled individuals have not been taken into account in the urban structure? Why don't we continue to build Stockholm as the world's most accessible capital? According to the Discrimination rule, people with impaired mobility and orientation must have as much value and participation in society on equal terms as non-disabled individuals have. They must have the same right to be able to move and orient themselves around society unhindered, as non-disabled individuals can.

    The aim of this study is to get an insight into how Stockholm municipality works with the accessibility issue for disabled individuals in urban and traffic planning; to be able to contribute knowledge about what shortcomings there are and how to improve on them. In order to be able to fulfill the aim, it has been used with qualitative studies through literature and case studies. The case study consists of 6 interviews that took place in the municipality building as well as guidance documents that the municipality has produced as a basis for accessibility adaptation and design of street planning. This study focuses only on the start-up phase of projects. Through the interviews, one gained an insight into how the municipality works with the issue of accessibility for disabled individuals in urban and traffic planning. What obstacles they face during the project phase, as well as how they work to be able to improve their shortcomings.

    The first part of the case study consists of a review and analysis of two different governing documents that Stockholm municipality has produced and using during planning, construction and maintenance at public places. This report focuses on two handbooks that Stockholm municipality has created and uses. Technical handbook for construction, operation and maintenance on public land and Stockholm - a city for all. The Technical manual is not specifically focused on requirements for adaptations for accessibility and free-movement, but contains type drawings and design requirements to be followed. It is a basic manual that sets requirements and guidelines. The second handbook, Stockholm - a city for all, is a handbook that is specifically oriented and designed for accessibility and free-movement on public spaces and ways. The handbook contains solutions and measures of design in outdoor and indoor environments for disabled individuals, but no requirement.

    The results show that there is some lack of knowledge and poor communication between the municipality and the consultants, which leads to the fact that the accessibility-aspect for the disabled is not taken into account at the beginning of the project phase. Another problem is that disabled individuals are a minority group, which means that the interest is not active as compared to the other challenges, such as environmental, sustainable and mobility issues and challenges. It leads to the fact that the projects adapt to the classical norm in the end, due to low interest and need. The governing documents are good as a basis and take into account the force of law, however adjustments are required; both to be able to confirm the importance that it is everyone's responsibility to take the accessibility issue into account and involve disabled individuals in urban and traffic planning.

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  • 288.
    Toma, Charbel
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Tillämpning av principer om kollektiv förmåga i det lokala trygghetsarbetet i Farsta strand2022Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    A case study was conducted to investigate Farsta stadsdelsförvaltning’s practice of applying collective efficacy in the safety practice in Farsta strand in Stockholm County in order to contribute to understanding the concept of collective efficacy, how it relates to safety issues and how it can be practised in Sweden. A study of municipal documents and websites as well as a case study of different local interventions in the area has been conducted. This in order to investigate to what degree these interventions align with theoretical criteria of collective efficacy and the lessons they can teach to other municipal organisations in Sweden. The study found that the interventions seemed to align well with the theory and that different lessons possibly can be learned about adapting the work to local conditions, coordinating interventions with other actors and increasing trust in public institutions. The study also found some potential for development of the interventions such as deepening the practical work, including residents more and diversifying the interventions’ substance. Overall the results should be treated with caution due to limitations in the study’s comprehensiveness.

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  • 289.
    Torre, Ilaria
    et al.
    University of Plymouth.
    White, Laurence
    University of Plymouth.
    Goslin, Jeremy
    University of Plymouth.
    Behavioural mediation of prosodic cues to implicit judgements of trustworthiness2016In: Proceedings of the eighth International Conference on Speech Prosody 2016, ISCA , 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
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  • 290.
    Troje, Daniella
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Real Estate and Construction Management.
    Improving social value through facilities management: Swedish housing companies2023In: Buildings and Cities, E-ISSN 2632-6655, Vol. 4, no 1, p. 749-766Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Housing companies create, maintain and develop an important part of the built environment. Besides their core activity of providing housing, they can increasingly also mitigate societal problems and contribute to social, environmental and financial sustainability. One contribution to sustainability by housing companies is to create meaningful activities for tenants that benefit their employability, skills, careers, and physical and mental wellbeing. These ‘activity interventions’ are used as a vehicle to create social value. However, it is unclear what sort of impact these interventions have, and how they affect housing companies’ financial value. This paper investigates: (1) Swedish housing companies’ initiatives to provide meaningful ‘activity interventions’ for tenants; (2) what value these interventions create; and (3) how social value creation relates to financial value. Observations and interviews (n = 23) with Swedish housing companies are mapped onto a social value creation framework. The findings reveal several types of employment, educational and leisure activities that have been created for tenants, and the areas in which these initiatives create the most social value. Social value creation is often used as risk management to mitigate issues related to criminality, welfare-dependent tenants and decreased property values.

  • 291.
    Tu, Sijing
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Computer Science, Theoretical Computer Science, TCS.
    Neumann, Stefan
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Computer Science, Theoretical Computer Science, TCS.
    A Viral Marketing-Based Model For Opinion Dynamics in Online Social Networks2022In: Proceedings of the ACM Web Conference 2022 WWW'2022, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM) , 2022, p. 1570-1578Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Online social networks provide a medium for citizens to form opinions on different societal issues, and a forum for public discussion. They also expose users to viral content, such as breaking news articles. In this paper, we study the interplay between these two aspects: opinion formation and information cascades in online social networks. We present a new model that allows us to quantify how users change their opinion as they are exposed to viral content. Our model is a combination of the popular Friedkin-Johnsen model for opinion dynamics and the independent cascade model for information propagation. We present algorithms for simulating our model, and we provide approximation algorithms for optimizing certain network indices, such as the sum of user opinions or the disagreement-controversy index; our approach can be used to obtain insights into how much viral content can increase these indices in online social networks. Finally, we evaluate our model on real-world datasets. We show experimentally that marketing campaigns and polarizing contents have vastly different effects on the network: while the former have only limited effect on the polarization in the network, the latter can increase the polarization up to 59% even when only 0.5% of the users start sharing a polarizing content. We believe that this finding sheds some light into the growing segregation in today's online media.

  • 292.
    Tuncer, Sylvaine
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Intelligent systems, Robotics, Perception and Learning, RPL.
    Gillet, Sarah
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Intelligent systems, Robotics, Perception and Learning, RPL.
    Leite, Iolanda
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Intelligent systems, Robotics, Perception and Learning, RPL.
    Robot-Mediated Inclusive Processes in Groups of Children: From Gaze Aversion to Mutual Smiling Gaze2022In: Frontiers in Robotics and AI, E-ISSN 2296-9144, Vol. 9, article id 729146Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Our work is motivated by the idea that social robots can help inclusive processes in groups of children, focusing on the case of children who have newly arrived from a foreign country and their peers at school. Building on an initial study where we tested different robot behaviours and recorded children's interactions mediated by a robot in a game, we present in this paper the findings from a subsequent analysis of the same video data drawing from ethnomethodology and conversation analysis. We describe how this approach differs from predominantly quantitative video analysis in HRI; how mutual gaze appeared as a challenging interactional accomplishment between unacquainted children, and why we focused on this phenomenon. We identify two situations and trajectories in which children make eye contact: asking for or giving instructions, and sharing an emotional reaction. Based on detailed analyses of a selection of extracts in the empirical section, we describe patterns and discuss the links between the different situations and trajectories, and relationship building. Our findings inform HRI and robot design by identifying complex interactional accomplishments between two children, as well as group dynamics which support these interactions. We argue that social robots should be able to perceive such phenomena in order to better support inclusion of outgroup children. Lastly, by explaining how we combined approaches and showing how they build on each other, we also hope to demonstrate the value of interdisciplinary research, and encourage it.

  • 293.
    Uchiyama, Junzo
    et al.
    Mt Fuji World Heritage Research Centre.
    Lindström, Kati
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History, History of Science, Technology and Environment. University of Tartu.
    Idealised Landscapes and Heritage: Past and Future Sustainability in Hida2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The designation of historical heritage occurs on the basis of modern values and ideologies that are supposedly embodied in the cultural landscapes of the nominated area, without considering the actual historical contexts supporting them. This paper discusses the meaning of historical heritage in the modern socio-cultural contexts by presenting results of the GIS analysis of a historical database in the Hida Province (present Gifu Prefecture), as an example, focusing on the observed historical changes from a landscape perspective.

                          While located in deep mountains, Hida villages are often marketed as secluded places, cut off from the Modern world ("the last unexplored area of Japan" according to the UNESCO world heritage nomination documents), with a high level of auto-sufficiency and harmonious relationship with the environment. However, the analyses show that Hida has never been isolated; rather, the inter-regional trading network was the pre-requisite for the formation of this regional landscape throughout history, since it was dependent on gunpowder and silk industry. Originally nominated for its architectural qualities, the Hida villages are increasingly perceived through the prism of ecologically sustainable traditional rice farming. Contrasting historical data with modern discourse analysis, we question the concept of sustainability in imagined past and protected present landscapes.

  • 294.
    Uittenbogaard, Adriaan Cornelis
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Real Estate and Construction Management.
    Ceccato, Vania
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Real Estate and Construction Management, Banking and Finance.
    Space-Time Clusters of crime in Stockholm, Sweden2012In: Review of European Studies, ISSN 1918-7173, E-ISSN 1918-7181, Vol. 4, no 5, p. 148-156Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the study is to detect geographical clustering of offences over time using Kulldorff’s scan test(SaTScan version 9.01; Kulldorff, 2010) and police recorded data over Stockholm city, the capital of Sweden.This technique has a rigorous inference theory for identifying statistically significant clusters. The space–timescan statistics are used in a single retrospective analysis using data from 1st January 2006 to 31st December2009. A four years’ dataset is collapsed into ‘one year’. All space-time dimensions of the data are kept except‘year’. Clusters over the hours of the day, weekday and weekend and by seasons were tested. Total populationbut also day-time and night-time populations were used as reference. Findings show clear distinct patterns ofconcentration for violence (assault and threat) and property crimes (theft, robbery and burglary) over time andspace. Whilst property crimes tend to happen more often in the afternoons in the center and regional commercialcenters in the southern and western parts of Stockholm, violence takes place more often in the night, and isheavily concentrated in large parts of the city center. Weekends are more targeted than weekdays for bothoffences. Regardless of day of the week, the main urban core of the city contains the most likely cluster thatextends to commercial and socially disorganized areas in the west and south Stockholm. Whilst property crimelevels do not show significant differences over the seasons, violent crimes levels do (winter and summer). Themost likely clusters tend to be fairly constant in space over time. The article ends with implications of the resultsfor both research and practice.

  • 295.
    von Oelreich, Jacob
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
    Milestad, Rebecka
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
    Transformations towards resilience within the food system: scaling up two organic food value chains in Sweden2015In: Proceedings of the XXVI Congress. Places of Possibility? Rural Societies in a Neoliberal World / [ed] Sutherland, L.-A. et al., Aberdeen: James Hutton Institute , 2015, p. 201-202Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    One way to build resilience of the food system may be to scale up organic food initiatives. This paper discusses two organic food initiatives in Sweden, exploring challenges and opportunities for a double scaling up of volumes and values. Two different approaches, "reformist" and "progressive", are explored. The paper concludes that the two approaches demand sustaining and building resilience in different ways and at multiple scales.

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  • 296.
    Werner, Inga Britt
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Boendeattityder till miljö- och kretsloppsanpassning: Drivkrafter och motkrafter i olika upplåtelseformer2004Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Swedish political goals on environmental issues are set at a high standard and fulfilling them will affect the everyday life of all residents. Voluntary self-restraint from benefits in housing services is hard to implement. This is an empirical study on actual habits and on stated willingness for pro-environmental practices, related to different forms of tenure.

    Incentives and perceived control are important for predicting actions. Administrative and physical structures are more significant though, as are the households’ resources. Well–off homeowners have many incentives to conserve energy and water. They also have the highest frequency of pro-environmental behaviour. Still they cause the heaviest environmental impact, due to large dwellings and abundant car use. Households in multifamily housing have fewer incentives and lower frequencies of pro-environmental habits, but cause less environmental impact due to generally lower consumption.

    The results are of interest to planning authorities, housing managers and researchers, working with the implementation of pro-environmental behaviour in housing.

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  • 297.
    Werner, Inga Britt
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    How does the planning goal 'urban density' correspond to people's residential choices and everyday life?: A pilot study2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 298.
    Werner, Inga Britt
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    How does the planning goal ’urban density’ correspond to people’s residential choices and everyday life?: Affordances in differing urban densities2008Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The paper presents the basis of a project recently funded by FORMAS, Swedish Research Council for Environment, Agricultural Sciences and Spatial Planning. Although there is consensus among planners and politicians that dense and compact cities are better for the environment than sprawling urban landscapes, much of what is currently being built is characterised by low urban density, ‘sprawl’. Generally researchers agree that ‘sprawl’ in industrialised countries is driven by rising average income and decreasing transport costs. Urban households can afford to demand larger dwelling units as well as daily travel long dis-tances. Individual decisions are aggregated into a force that governs the development towards ’sprawl’. The aim of the project is to analyse how urban environments can offer desired qualities, by studying households’ actual use and valuation of opportunities for work, service, leisure ac-tivities, culture and education within areas of different urban density. The contribution of the study will be a deeper understanding of what urban density means in the daily life of house-holds. The study will employ theories and concepts from planning research and environmental psy-chology. Urban density is a key concept. Range and variety of urban functions are then impor-tant additions to measurement of physical densities. Another key concept is ‘affordance‘. ’Affordance’ is here a quality or asset within a specific environment, which can be perceived and used by an individual for carrying out a certain activity. The main study is a survey covering around 2000 households within the Stockholm area. Four areas will be chosen, and around 500 households in each, admitting control for socio-economic subgroups. Study areas will be selected to illustrate different urban densities and structure, from inner city to garden suburb. The survey will cover blocks of questions con-cerning the most important affordances inherent in the actual environment of the household, such as place of work, shops, schools and social networks. The questions will be constructed to grade perceived, potential, shaped and utilised affordances in their environment. The concept of ’affordance’ will be tested as a tool for structured comparisons between urban areas regarding different aspects of density. The availability of affordances in different urban structures will be described and relationships between density, in all its aspects, and life styles can be tested.

  • 299.
    Werner, Inga Britt
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Kvalitetsutveckling i boendet-Värdeskapande processer, Rapport från tre fallstudier : Rissne i Sundbyberg, Berga i Linköping och Gottsunda i Uppsala2007Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The research on housing quality is comprehensive and broad. Residents’ evaluation of quality is studied within a variety of disciplines. There is a fairly good knowledge on a general level regarding people’s values of housing quality. Safety and security, social relations to neigh-bours, the area’s reputation as well as the design of local environment and dwelling units have been shown to be important aspects of housing quality.

    The overall picture of how to strike the balance between certain levels of quality against input of resources from the housing management is not studied to the same extent. Different actors within housing management may have differing and even conflicting views of quality and efficiency. Short-term economical judgements can increase the risk of sub-optimisations.

    Substantial evidence shows that social capital is critical for increasing security and wellbeing in residential areas. The hypothesis is that the creation of social capital within a housing neighbourhood will raise housing quality and facilitate management.

    The purpose of this study was to analyse the creation of social capital in a housing neighbourhood context, to make the concept applicable in housing management. A complementary aim was to develop indicators for social capital in housing areas, useful for evaluating the effects of different measures. To find out new methods for the development of housing quality, the study applied case studies of housing management, for evaluation of quality efforts. A multi-disciplinary framework was adopted. Theories of social capital and models for value creation processes are the key concept in the project.

    The core of value creation processes is to produce more value at a given input of resources. The basic idea is that value can be created through the supply of goods or services in new ways or in a new form. The customer / consumer is part of the process and will, through this participation, experience a higher quality (Cars, Healey, Madanipour, Magalhães, 2002).

    Several theorists in sociology, for example Bourdieu and Coleman, have interpreted social capital. The starting point for this project is primarily the concept as coined by Robert Putnam: ”Social capital here refers to features of social organization, such as trust, norms, and networks, that can improve the efficiency of society by facilitating coordinated actions.” (Putnam, 1993, p. 167). Social capital is seen a common utility, a form of capital that is not owned by individuals, but is created and growing in interpersonal relations, for example among neighbours in a residential area. Putnam (2000) and Lin (2001) discuss the epithets 'bonding' and 'bridging' in connection with SC. Bonding SC tends to exclude other individuals or groups, while the group that possesses the bonding capital benefits from it. Bridging SC will increase trust in other groups and structures in society and contribute to the identification and mutual cooperation with others. In residential areas SC can be a great asset, but the balance between bonding and bridging SC is critical.

    The study objects were management projects in a number of public housing companies. The criteria for selection of projects for the study were that their purpose should be to improve housing quality and / or trust and norms between companies and residents. There should be enough of accessible information on the measures taken and the projects should be fairly recent so that staff and residents of the company had clear memories of what happened before, during and after the process. The study covered four case studies, from different medium sized Swedish cities. Data were collected through interviews with key actors and residents, questionnaires to residents and document studies.

    The projects were compared regarding how they were designed to achieve their goals, and to what degree they managed to attain those goals. The intention was to find out more about the successes or failures in terms of management measures, regarding the enhancement of participation, security and social capital in the residential areas.

    The four case studies focused on very different types of measures. One project aimed at increasing perceived security in a residential area by introducing a special watchman who would offer protection, assistance and social control. Next project held youth activities for primary school children, to prevent youth delinquency. Sports clubs gave free instruction, the municipality offered venues for free and the school administered the activities in cooperation with the housing company. The third project was the renovation of outdoor environment and common areas like laundry rooms and entrances, in a residential area with social problems, to make the area more attractive. The fourth project was a campaign among tenants to counteract the perception of water as a free resource and in particular reduce the consumption of hot water.

    The results showed that the projects did not fully meet their stated objectives; to the extent it was possible to make such assessments. The companies had not ensured that there was data to verify the compliance to goals before they started their actions. Rather, the projects may be seen as building up experience in the housing management practice.

    The companies themselves have not mentioned the concept of social capital during the planning of the various projects. In practice though, the addressed management problems could be defined as stemming from deficits in social capital. Where the residents did not trust their neighbours there was a lack of bonding capital. If residents saw themselves as victims of circumstances, unable to influence their own situation, the bridging capital was missing.

    Social capital can be built from personal relationships between residents and housing companies and between the residents. With time bonding social capital is built up. This in turn contributes to the fostering of bridging social capital. When the residents see that commitment and work for the common good pays off in different ways, trust in the housing company will grow and in a longer perspective also trust in the surrounding society. To participate in the housing management and take on responsibilities can provide new life opportunities, such as an entrance ticket to the job market.

    The case studies showed that housing quality is a complex concept. It is a 'fresh product' that must be constantly maintained and developed. Various conditions can affect what is perceived as housing quality, and quality must be kept up all the time. To achieve the best quality as perceived by residents, it is a prerequisite that residents are involved to a high degree.

    Reasoning based upon literature and the empirical results suggests that important indicators of social capital in housing areas are related to trust, norms of reciprocity, social control, social networks and civic participation. With regard to if they are manifest on micro, meso or macro level, the indicators will take on different forms, discussed in a forthcoming article.

    The results have been presented at seminars with the housing companies, in teaching undergraduate students at KTH, in a report in Swedish, and in conference papers.

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  • 300.
    Werner, Inga Britt
    KTH, Superseded Departments (pre-2005), Architecture.
    Residents’ Environmentally Friendly Attitudes and Practices: – Motivation and Barriers in Different Forms Types of Tenure2004Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Thise paper presents an empirical study of actual households’ daily habits  and of their stated willingness for to adopt pro-environmental practices, relative to differ-ent forms of tenure. Economic incentives, linked to home-ownership, are shown to be significant in determining actions, as is perceived control. Well–-off homeowners have the highest frequency of pro-environmental behaviour, as measured in the study. Still, they cause the heaviest environmental impact, due to their larger dwellings and abundant car use. Households in multifamily housing have fewer incentives for and lower frequencies of pro-environmental habits, but cause less environmental impact due to their generally lower consumption. The results imply that the selection of target groups and the development of environmental policies need to be discussed assessed in relation to different life  styles and patterns of consumption.

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