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  • 251.
    Lenman, Sören
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Human - Computer Interaction, MDI.
    Räsänen, Minna
    Thuresson, Björn
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Human - Computer Interaction, MDI.
    User oriented Approach to Building a Video Community in a Distributed Workplace2002In: Proceedings of the Participatory Design Conference, PDC2002, 2002, p. 323-327Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

     In this paper we present experiences from a two-month prestudy on the possible creation of a communication environment (Media Space) between the three different locales of a distributed Call Centre. A spectrum of user-oriented methods was used in the study, and the staff at the Call Centre took part through interviews, discussions, and a workshop. The approach yielded useful information, and the feedback from the user group was very positive. Some pitfalls and risks were identified, such as technology focus, and to come up with solutions rather than to reflect on needs. A useful foundation was laid for the continuation of the project, which includes continued co-operative design work and the establishment of a communication environments in the workplaces.

  • 252.
    Lie, Christer
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Graphic Arts, Media.
    The influence of backpressure on ink drying and dot gain in sheet fed offset printing2004In: ADVANCES IN PRINTING AND MEDIA TECHNOLOGY, VOL XXXIII, Zagreb: ACTA GRAPHICA PUBL , 2004, Vol. 33, p. 245-253Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Preliminary test printing indicated that increasing the impression of the paper against the blanket cylinder in sheet-fed offset printing might lead to a faster ink drying. Therefore in order to verify the results a new test run was carried out based on print trials using a Solna 424 sheet-fed press where the impression was adjusted from low to high values. Three paper grades, gloss coated, silk coated and uncoated grades were printed with two blankets with different hardness. Ink drying was measured as rub-off at time intervals so that drying curves Could be plotted. The ink transfer was measured by using XRF, x-ray fluorescent technology. Print density and dot gain was measured in 100%, 80% and 40% dot area. The results from the drying evaluation disagree with the results from the preliminary test printing, no correlation between drying rate and level of impression was found. The results from the dot gain measurements show that the dot gain is not increased with increased level of impression, it remains on a constant value.

  • 253.
    Lie, Christer
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Graphic Arts, Media.
    Kolseth, Petter
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Aspects of water-induced mottle when printing on coated paper in sheet-fed lithographic offset2007In: ADVANCES IN PRINTING AND MEDIA TECHNOLOGY, VOL XXXIV   / [ed] Enlund N, Lovrecek M, Zagreb: ACTA GRAPHICA PUBL , 2007, Vol. 34, p. 59-67Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Uneven print density, print mottle or mottle, call cause severe print quality problems and is a frequent problem for printers. Print mottle can occur ill sheet-fed offset due to several reasons related to both the paper and its coating and the printing press. The aim of the project was therefore to improve our knowledge of the influence on mottle related to the fountain solution which dampens the paper surface, water induced mottle. Pilot coated papers were produced and printed in a full-scale 4-colour sheet-fed offset printing press. During printing a specially designed test form was used. This must be used together with a blanket which has cut-out areas corresponding to the areas oil the test form. In this way it is possible to create a number of different printing situations oil the same printed paper sheet. The results from the print trials show that fountain solution from the previous printing unit can cause a decreased print density and dot gain. Water induced print mottle is Caused by the fountain solution from the previous printing unit. Back-trap from the following print units Will have a smoothing effect and will decrease the mottle. The results are based oil a hypothesis test at the 5% level. Water induced mottle can be related to both the printing process and the paper. The structure of the paper coating, Uneven porosity distribution, has a high influence oil water induced mottle while the effect of the Surface chemistry is low. The paper with high SB latex content showed the most uneven porosity distribution.

  • 254.
    Lieder, Michael
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Production Systems.
    Rashid, Amir
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Production Systems.
    Towards circular economy implementation: a comprehensive review in context of manufacturing industry2016In: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 115, p. 36-51Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The concept of circular economy (CE) is to an increasing extent treated as a solution to series of challenges such as waste generation, resource scarcity and sustaining economic benefits. However the concept of circularity is not of novel as such. Specific circumstances and motivations have stimulated ideas relevant to circularity in the past through activities such as reuse, remanufacturing or recycling. Main objectives of this work are: to provide a comprehensive review of research efforts encompassing aspects of resources scarcity, waste generation and economic advantages; to explore the CE landscape in the context of these three aspects especially when they are considered simultaneously; based on an idea of a comprehensive CE framework, propose an implementation strategy using top-down and bottom-up approach in a concurrent manner. To fulfill this objective a comprehensive review of state-of-the-art research is carried out to understand different ideas relevant to CE, motivation for the research and context of their recurrence. Main contributions of this paper are a comprehensive CE framework and a practical implementation strategy for a regenerative economy and natural environment. The framework emphasizes on a combined view of three main aspects i.e. environment, resources and economic benefits. It also underlines that joint support of all stakeholders is necessary in order to successfully implement the CE concept at large scale. The proposed framework and implementation strategy also identify new avenues for future research and practice in the field of CE.

  • 255.
    Linde, Peter
    et al.
    Blekinge Inst Technol, Karlskrona, Sweden..
    Eriksson, Jorgen
    Lund Univ, S-22100 Lund, Sweden..
    Kullman, Lars
    Blekinge Inst Technol, Karlskrona, Sweden.;Chalmers, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Fathli, Margareta
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Department for Library services, Language and ARC, Library, Publication Infrastructure.
    Karlsson, Klemens
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Department for Library services, Language and ARC, Library, Publication Infrastructure.
    Sikstrom, Marjatta
    Stockholm Univ, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Skold, Ylva
    Lulea Univ Technol, Lulea, Sweden..
    Tång, Ingela
    Stockholm Univ, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Accessibility and Self Archiving of Conference Articles: A Study on a Selection of Swedish Institutional Repositories2012In: SOCIAL SHAPING OF DIGITAL PUBLISHING: EXPLORING THE INTERPLAY BETWEEN CULTURE AND TECHNOLOGY / [ed] Baptista, AA Linde, P Lavesson, N DeBrito, MA, IOS PRESS , 2012, p. 123-+Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 256.
    Linde, Peter
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology.
    Eriksson, Jörgen
    Lund University.
    Kullman, Lars
    Chalmers University.
    Fathli, Margareta
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Department for Library services, Language and ARC, Publication Infrastructure.
    Karlsson, Klemens
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Department for Library services, Language and ARC, Publication Infrastructure.
    Sikström, Marjatta
    Stockholm University.
    Sköld, Ylva
    Lulea University of Technology.
    Tång, Ingela
    Stockholm University.
    Accessibility and self-archiving of conference articles: A study on a selection of Swedish institutional repositories2011In: Information Services and Use, ISSN 0167-5265, E-ISSN 1875-8789, Vol. 31, no 3-4, p. 259-269Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The main purpose of this project has been to examine the accessibility of refereed conference articles and the OA- and publishing policies of conferences in order to in this way elucidate different aspects concerning self-archiving in Swedish institutional repositories. For this purpose, the project participants have examined a number of conferences and references to conference articles via their institutional repositories during a specific time period and described these from the perspective of a common scheme. The study has showed that the local institutional repositories fill an important role to make conference publications visible. We have found that ca. 50% of the conference papers can be published as postprints in our institutional repositories. We have noticed that ca. 15% or the studied conference articles are not available at all. It is, therefore, of great importance to use local institutional repositories as a publishing channel, not only for primary published material such as dissertations and reports, but also as a source for finding these conference articles "without a home". Between 20-25% of the examined articles were found in some type of OA archive; ca. half of these were found in one of the project participants' own institutional repositories. This indicates that the publishing database of respective higher education institution is an important factor for open accessibility. Ca. 10% of the conferences in the study had an explicit OA policy or expressed such a policy by openly making conference articles accessible on their conference sites. A big problem when it comes to self-archiving of conference articles is the lack of information about OA policy. The landscape of conference publishing is complex and the self-archiving of documents from conferences is very time-consuming. Above all, we would wish a policy resource for conferences similar to the SHERPA/RoMEO. At present, however, there is no other alternative than scrutinizing the conferences' copyright information to the authors and from this attempt to draw conclusions about possible self-archiving. To facilitate the future handling and classification of conference articles in Swedish institutional repositories a number of recommendations are suggested.

  • 257.
    LINDGREN, LINNÉA
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    VALERA, MARTIN
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    Business Intelligence inom Dagstidningsindustrin: Med fokus på organisation, teknologi &  värdeskapande analysområden 2013Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The Swedish newspaper industry is under transformation due to the digitalization and as a result of fierce competition for advertising revenue and constantly changing consumer behavior. The market declination has been thoroughly discussed by academics in the field and is further cemented in the study by expert interviews.

    Business Intelligence, BI, is a well-established set of reporting and analytical platforms, methods and processes for incorporating decision-making based on an analytical foundation. The development within analytics has progressed at a rapid pace over the last decade, and the vast increase of available data has given new opportunities for analysis. Key success factors for implementing BI are not only technology oriented, but includes a variety of organizational and management-related issues. Although market reports indicate that analytical and data-driven decision-making has pronounced potential in creating value in firms across industries, reports of BI-implementation failure is abundant and regularly coupled with lack of anchorage within the business.

    This Master’s thesis investigates how BI can be used within a newspaper company to create value in the disruptive and complex newspaper market, and proposes a framework for how these tools and processes successfully can be incorporated within the firm. A field study was conducted with the intention of exploring the usage of BI within a large, Swedish newspaper firm.

    The conclusion is that BI offers powerful opportunities for value-creation, but requires careful introduction into an industry characterized by a deeply embedded culture of separated departments and decision-making based on intuition. While integrated and qualitative data along with user-friendly BI-tools is fundamental, a majority of the potential pitfalls are related to lack of internal communication, unclear organizational structures and several other organizational factors. Conveying and operationalizing the BI-vision is the prerogative of leaders within the 9

    newspaper firm and requires a comprehensive approach to reach employees across the organization. The actual analytical opportunities are identified as, but not limited to, customer analytics, product development and tailoring services and price strategies based on market feedback and detailed data.

  • 258.
    Lindstrand, Peg
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Centres, Stockholm International Toy Research Center, SITREC.
    Brodin, Jane M.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Centres, Stockholm International Toy Research Center, SITREC.
    Parents and children view ICT2004In: Technology and Disability, ISSN 1055-4181, E-ISSN 1878-643X, Vol. 16, no 3, p. 179-183Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This brief report discusses Information and Communication Technology (ICT), a contemporary phenomenon that can be said to change and affect our life patterns and our opportunities in many situations. A question is what experiences and needs parents and children with disabilities have and how these needs have been created. How do they experience ICT and what role does ICT have in their lives? What is included in the messages contributed by parents and children thus becomes central. The results show that certain skills learned via the computer can lead to social gains, e.g. play and communication with peers. Another result is that new technology can help the child to show his/her skills.

  • 259.
    Lindström, Kati
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Classic and cute: Framing biodiversity in Japan through rural landscapes and mascot charactersManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 260.
    Lindström, Kati
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Classic and cute: Framing biodiversity in Japan through rural landscapes and mascot characters2019In: Popular Communication, ISSN 1540-5702, E-ISSN 1540-5710Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Japan is an active player in international biodiversity politics and has ambitious domestic biodiversity targets. The government considers environmental communication crucial for reaching these. This article analyzes two major frames that state institutions employ for communicating biodiversity: traditional agricultural landscapes called satoyama and embodied mascot characters called yurukyara. Both frames attempt to reach the public by transcending the discursive reality. Employing well-established stylistic devices (court culture, Japanese cute), prestigious metanarratives (Japanese as nature people), and established institutional systems of tourism and governance, the frames have reached huge popularity. Yet awareness surveys indicate that people continue to consider biodiversity a matter of governmental policy rather than individual lifestyle. There has been a clear positive effect on the localities singled out for satoyama campaigns. However, it can be argued that the overall effect of celebratory framing coupled with pleasing aesthetics favors complacency and does not invite new forms of civic mobilization.

  • 261.
    Linse, Charlotta
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Economics and Management (Div.).
    Jerbrant, Anna
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Economics and Management (Div.).
    Knowledge Management through a Collaborative Web-tool2011In: IAMOT 2011 - International Association for Management of Technology: Technology and the Global Challanges: Security, Energy, Water, and the Environment / [ed] Dr. Yasser Hosni, Miami Beach, Florida, 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Knowledge transfer is described as problematic, both in literature and in practice. Ideas, information and knowledge are shared through a multitude of formal and informal channels within the organization. Industrial companies have over time applied different methods for capturing and sharing knowledge within the organization.

    For instance it is very common to use different kinds of IT systems. When doing this, traditional computerized systems often functions as databases or suggestion boxes. As social networking has entered society a new way of sharing ideas and knowledge has emerged. Due to the newness of the social networks the applicability in organizations is still unclear.

    The purpose of this paper is to explore the expectations and goals of implementing a knowledge management web-tool in a company. The research is based on a case study at a mid-sized IT-company. During a time span of six months semi- structured interviews have been conducted with 11 employees. Additionally, participant observations in daily activities have been performed, such as observing internal meetings. Total time spent with the company is more than 25 hours. The study was initiated at the strategic level, in the Quality & Practice Development department, which works in close collaboration with the CEO.

    The findings in the case study so far indicate that their need is two folded; one being communication and the other knowledge diffusion. Therefore one expected result of implementing an IT-system is that reuse of best-practices, ideas, experiences, insights and solutions is enhanced. “The system is really an opportunity for us to both communicate with our customers [...] and document our progress in projects, as well as exchanging experience through a type of in-house wiki.” - CEO

    The paper will end in conclusions concerning how the system increases knowledge management, which in turn enables management of technology.

  • 262.
    Lon, Hansson
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Exploring Concerns and Expectations of Future Smart Systems for Managing Domestic Water Services2018Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    With our growing population, we are facing great challenges when it comes to our water consumption. As Stockholm is growing in both population and size, the city’s provider of drinking water, Stockholm Water and Waste, is looking into approaches like smart systems and persuasive strategies that tries to help citizens use water for domestic purposes in more sustainable ways. Some see these approaches as a natural part of the future of urban development and they have already been implemented at several locations around the globe. However, smart systems and persuasive strategies have seen an upswing in critique lately and it have been argued that they tend to treat householders as something separated from the socio-technical context they live in. As a response to this critique, a wide range of suggestions for future development of smart systems and persuasive strategies have been made. While a lot of these suggestions are based on studies that evaluates already existing systems and tend to focus on how to improve them, they still convey a scenario where these systems are a natural part of our future urban lives. However, little research has been made that tries to understand the citizens’ perspective on these systems before they are implemented. By using a future study approach that includes citizens in reflective and exploratory activities of non-existing future smart systems for managing domestic water services, this study aims at exploring their concerns and expectations of said systems and questions the wants and needs for them begin with. This study reveals that citizens might have great concerns when it comes to questions of privacy and control and how smart systems and persuasive strategies run the risk of problematizing individuals. This study also reveals that citizens might be more interested in negotiating and improving current services and infrastructure than having technology negotiate their everyday lives.

  • 263.
    Lundberg, Jenny
    et al.
    Blekinge Tekniska Högskola, Universitet/Högskola, Ronneby.
    Håkansson, Anne
    Computer and Systems Sciences, Forum 100, Kista.
    Framework for Dynamic Life Critical Situations Using Agents2009In: Multi-Agent System Technologies, Proceedings / [ed] Lars Braubach, Wiebe van der Hoek, Paolo Petta, Alexander Pokahr, Springer Berlin/Heidelberg, 2009, p. 214-219Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we present a framework incorporating a multi-agent system (MAS) that enables aid for international effect-based operation in emergency situations. The outcome is to empower emergency personnel, which can support collaboration between different international services by informing them about the emergency, matching competences and resources of the teams and volunteers. The challenge in emergency contexts is the abbreviations forming an information-carrying structure, which is especially important when abbreviations are exchanged between different services like rescue, military and emergency. We propose a framework, which provides the right information, rescue team, and services at the right place. The MAS can support information dissemination in dynamic situations in context, based on the information extraction and matching of the contents of the underlying ontologies. In the framework the system poses a sensible solution to the international rescue teams' need of a high quality handling of life critical situations.

  • 264. Lv, Z.
    et al.
    Feng, L.
    Li, Haibo
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Feng, S.
    Hand-free motion interaction on google glass2014In: SIGGRAPH Asia 2014 Mobile Graphics and Interactive Applications, SA 2014, 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is an increasing interest in creating wearable device interaction technologies. Novel emerging user interface technologies (e.g. eye-ball tracking, speech recognition, gesture recognition, ECG, EEG and fusion of them) have the potential to significantly affect market share in PC, smartphones, tablets and latest wearable devices such as google glass. As a result, displacing these technologies in devices such as smart phones and wearable devices is challenging. Google glass has many impressive characteristics (i.e. voice actions, head wake up, wink detection), which are human-glass interface (HGI) technologies. Google glass won't meet the 'the occlusion problem' and 'the fat finger problem' any more, which are the problems of direct-touch finger input on touch screen. However, google glass only provides a touchpad that includes haptics with simple 'tapping and sliding your finger' gestures which is a one-dimensional interaction in fact, instead of the traditional two-dimensional interaction based on the complete touch screen of smartphone. The one-dimensional 'swipe the touchpad' interaction with a row of 'Cards' which replace traditional two-dimensional icon menu limits the intuitive and flexibility of HGI. Therefore, there is a growing interest in implementing 3D gesture recognition vision systems in which optical sensors capture real-time video of the user and ubiquitous algorithms are then used to determine what the user's gestures are, without the user having to hold any device. We will demonstrate a hand-free motion interaction application based on computer vision technology on google glass. Presented application allows user to perform touch-less interaction by hand or foot gesture in front of the camera of google glass. Based on the same core ubiquitous gestures recognition algorithm as used in this demonstration, a hybrid wearable smartphone system based on mixed hardware and software has been presented in our previous work [Lv 2013][Lu et al. 2013][Lv et al. 2013], which can support either hand or foot interaction with today' smartphone.

  • 265.
    López Poveda, Anayanci
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Rusu, L.
    Johannesson, P.
    A method for analyzing IT service strategy in municipal governments from nicaragua2010In: 16th Americas Conference on Information Systems 2010, AMCIS 2010, 2010, p. 2966-2978Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The importance of IT strategy is generally accepted, though in practice this may vary from one IT organization to another. The design of a formal IT strategy may be required or not, depending on the environment, but, independently of this, strategic decisions still must be made and therefore strategic practices are performed. In order to make any improvement in strategic practices, awareness of their current state in the IT organization is needed. This paper proposes a method for analyzing IT service strategy in the context of IT organizations in municipal governments; the main issues considered are both people- and organization-related (e.g. internal service providers, prioritized cost-effectiveness, current practices oriented to tactical and operational activities, etc.). This method decomposes the analysis from two different perspectives: strategic practices in use and maturity level of such practices. The method was tested in two municipal governments from Nicaragua.

  • 266. Martinez, M.
    et al.
    Monperrus, Martin
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Theoretical Computer Science, TCS.
    Ultra-large repair search space with automatically mined templates: The cardumen mode of astor2018In: 10th International Symposium on Search-Based Software Engineering, SSBSE 2018, Springer, 2018, Vol. 11036, p. 65-86Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Astor is a program repair library which has different modes. In this paper, we present the Cardumen mode of Astor, a repair approach based mined templates that has an ultra-large search space. We evaluate the capacity of Cardumen to discover test-suite adequate patches (aka plausible patches) over the 356 real bugs from Defects4J [11]. Cardumen finds 8935 patches over 77 bugs of Defects4J. This is the largest number of automatically synthesized patches ever reported, all patches being available in an open-science repository. Moreover, Cardumen identifies 8 unique patches, that are patches for Defects4J bugs that were never repaired in the whole history of program repair.

  • 267. Massaro, D. W.
    et al.
    Cohen, M. M.
    Clark, R.
    Tabain, M.
    Beskow, Jonas
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, Centre for Speech Technology, CTT.
    Animated speech: Research progress and applications2012In: Audiovisual Speech Processing, Cambridge University Press, 2012, p. 309-345Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background This chapter is dedicated to Christian Benoît, who almost single-handedly established visible speech as an important domain of research and application. During and after his residence in our laboratory for the academic year 1991–92, Christian and his endearing partner Elisabeth were an important part of our lives. We shared in their marriage and the births of their two children, as well as in many professional challenges and puzzles. We hope that this book provides a legacy for Christian’s family and friends, and helps maintain a memory of his personal and professional value. The human face presents visual information during speech production that is critically important for effective communication. While the voice alone is usually adequate for communication (and can be turned into an engaging instrument by a skilled storyteller), visual information from movements of the lips, tongue, and jaws enhances intelligibility of the message (as is readily apparent with degraded auditory speech). For individuals with severe or profound hearing loss, understanding visible speech can make the difference between communicating effectively with others or a life of relative isolation. Moreover, speech communication is further enriched by the speaker’s facial expressions, emotions, and gestures (Massaro 1998b, Chapters 6, 7, 8).

  • 268.
    Mattsson, Helena
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, History and Theory of Architecture.
    Real TV: The Transparent Organization2010In: Media Houses: Architecture, Media, and the Production of Centrality / [ed] Staffan Ericson, Kristina Riegert, New York:: Peter Lang Publishing Group, 2010Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In much recent theory, the media are described as ephemeral, ubiquitous, and de-localized. Yet the activity of modern media can be traced to spatial centers that are tangible enoughsome even monumental. This book offers multidisciplinary and historical perspectives on the buildings of some of the worlds major media institutions. Paradoxically, as material and aesthetic manifestations of mediated centers"" of power, they provide sites to the siteless and solidity to the immaterial. The authors analyse the ways that architectural form and organization reflect different eras, media technologies, ideologies, and relations with the public in media houses from New York and Silicon Valley to London, Moscow, and Beijing.

  • 269.
    Mayiwar, Narin
    et al.
    Uppsala university.
    Håkansson, Anne
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Considering Different Learning Styles when Transferring Problem Solving Strategies from Expert to End Users2004In: Knowledge-Based Intelligent Information and Engineering Systems: KES 2004, Wellington, New Zealand, September 20-25, 2004. Proceedings. Part I. / [ed] Mircea Gh. Negoita, ‎Robert J. Howlett, ‎L. C. Jain, Berlin Heidelberg: Springer Berlin/Heidelberg, 2004, p. 253-262Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper discusses the manner in which a knowledge-based system can support different learning styles. There has been along tradition of constructing knowledge-based systems as learning environments to facilitate understanding and tutor subjects.These systems transfer domain knowledge and reasoning strategies to the end users by making the knowledge available. However,the systems are not usually adapted to the individual end user and his or hers way of learning. The systems only use a smallnumber of ways of teaching while end users have many different ways of learning. With this in mind, the knowledge-based systemsneed to be extended to support these different learning styles and facilitate the individual end user’s learning. Our focusin this article will be on the knowledge transfer, which is a process that enables learning to occur. We suggest using visualizationand simulation to support the transfer of problem solving strategies from a domain expert to end users.

  • 270. McDonald, N.
    et al.
    Corrigan, S.
    Ulfvengren, Pernilla
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Baranzini, D.
    Proactive safety performance for aviation operations2014In: 11th International Conference on Engineering Psychology and Cognitive Ergonomics, EPCE 2014, Held as Part of 16th International Conference on Human-Computer Interaction, HCI International 2014, 2014, p. 351-362Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The EU Vision 2020 sets a goal of reducing the air travel accident rate by 80%. Achieving this vision requires innovation and a different approach. PROSPERO (Proactive Safety Performance for Operations) is an EU FP7 project that will provide an advanced systemic methodology for managing the improvement process to help achieve that goal, as well as delivering a way of measuring progress. The overall objectives of PROSPERO are to; (i) Provide a proactive anticipation of complex system risks; (ii) Ensure more effective management of and enhanced learning from situations where risks cannot be designed out of the operation and (iii) Achieve substantial improvement in the elimination of and recovery from human error. This paper reports on the overall PROSPERO concept and high level system requirements as they emerged from the first research phase that focused on identifying industry needs.

  • 271.
    Mejtoft, Thomas
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Graphic Arts, Media (closed 20111231).
    Creation of Customer Value Using Digital Printing in a Dynamic Business Environment2007In: TAGA Journal, ISSN 1748-0337, E-ISSN 1748-0345, Vol. 3, no 3, p. 128-143Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Digital printing is used most successfully with a differentiated strategy that delivers high customer value whenprinting short runs or customized printed matters. This qualitative case study of a customer – supplierrelationship aims to identify and analyze how digital printing can be utilized as a business tool in therelationship between a service provider and a customer in a dynamic business environment.The service provider in this case has strategically changed the focus of the company from a production to aservice company with the focus on customer contact. Even though the service provider had an advantage on themarket, they choose to create disruption since they realized that they could not sustain this advantage forever ontheir dynamic market. This was realized even though it meant cannibalizing on their former core business –printing.The study indicates that a hypercompetitive-like behavior is becoming increasingly important to be able tosurvive in the dynamic and changing printing industry. The industry is today influenced by, and competingwith many companies that are not in-industry. By reengineering their products and services and moving fromthe cost-quality arena to timing and know-how it is possible for the service provider to control the outcome ofthe industry in a more successful manor.This study concludes that digital printing is used successfully when the customer’s main objective is not to printat all. Printed material will probably not disappear in a foreseeable future and therefore digital printing mostcertainly will increase its importance as a production technology. In the strive towards a paperless office, digitalprinting is a natural, convenient and profitable way of producing a non-electronic output is digital printing.

  • 272.
    Mejtoft, Thomas
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Graphic Arts, Media.
    Institutional arrangements and competitive posture: effects of company structures in the commercial printing industry2008Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other scientific)
    Abstract [en]

     The research objective of this dissertation is to investigate the impact of institutional arrangements, with respect to vertical integration and cooperation, on competitive advantages within the commercial printing industry, with specific focus on digital printing. This dissertation comprises six research papers, based on four qualitative case studies and a quantitative survey study, all carried out in Sweden in the years 2004-2008.The results show that vertical integration is a way to achieve competitive advantages in the commercial printing industry and is a widely used strategy in Sweden. Being able to contract full service companies is appreciated by customers to printing houses, especially direct customers, due to their need for a supplier of complete solutions for printed matters. Consequently, a vertically integrated company can provide value added services which makes it possible for customers to minimize their organization regarding production and purchasing of printed matters. Other reasons for vertical integration are the need to ensure fast deliveries to customers and having a steady supply of appropriate jobs. Despite the believed strategic importance by the industry, the results show that the level of vertical integration has no significant impact on profitability. Vertical integration is strategically important for digital printing houses in order to develop their business because digital printing allows for fast deliveries, on-demand printing and variable data printing. Despite the commoditization of printed matter, the findings indicate that the industry, in general, focuses on providing a high service level even though it means having to set higher prices. Furthermore, the results point toward that this strategic positioning is beneficial for digital printing houses because they experience a lower degree of competition and a lower price pressure.Vertical integration can, however create inflexibility due to ownership and employment. The findings suggest that cooperation can be used to achieve fast access to valuable resources, such as production equipment and knowledge, and, hence, increase printing houses’ resource flexibility. Even though internal control of resources is regarded as important to be able to satisfy customers’ needs and produce customers’ orders on time, cooperation with partners can create similar strategic effects. Furthermore, cooperation can give cost and flexibility advantages compared to vertical integration by reducing internal need for production capacity and allowing access to complementary resources. Nevertheless, it is common to combine vertical integration with cooperation to create competitive advantages and make a company more flexible and dynamic toward market changes.

  • 273.
    Mejtoft, Thomas
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Graphic Arts, Media.
    Perceived Satisfaction by Customers in the Digital Printing Value System2006In: 58th Annual Technical Conference of the Technical Association of the Graphic Arts, TAGA 2006, 2006, p. 486-511Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Adding customer value to products and applications is important to be able to successfully compete usingdigital printing. In this study the perceived satisfaction of added value was explored. It was concluded thatdigital printing does not entirely fulfill the demands that customers have on their printed material, but it wasindicated that digital printing will become more important for producing printed material in the future.Among the critical success factors, time, quality, functionality/possibilities, and price, quality was the factorthat customers deemed most important. This was also the factor that they were least satisfied with in relationto their needs. Time was the only factor that the customers where satisfied or more than satisfied with.Based on the assumption that it is not possible to, realistically, have high demands on all critical success factorsand that there has to be some tradeoff between them, the factors have been summarized and compared usingmean-centered values.

  • 274.
    Mejtoft, Thomas
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Graphic Arts, Media.
    Strategies for Successful Digital Printing2006In: Journal of Media Business Studies, ISSN 1652-2354, Vol. 3, no 1, p. 65-86Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Today the printing industry is fragmented and suffers from overcapacity, and printed material is regarded ascommodity products. In this article, corporate strategy owing to the introduction of digital printing technology isstudied. The focus is on companies that made digital printing investments. Differentiation is a strategicapproach that is necessary for digital printing companies to compete successfully. The results show that verticalintegration is a way to ensure appropriate supply to the digital printing unit and to add customer value to theservice. Educating customers is a way to create a market for the value-added products of digital printing.

  • 275.
    Mejtoft, Thomas
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Graphic Arts, Media.
    Nordin, Åsa
    Organized alliances in the printing industry2008In: ADVANCES IN PRINTING AND MEDIA TECHNOLOGY, VOL XXXV / [ed] Enlund N, Lovrecek M, Zagreb: INT ASSOC RES ORG INFOR, MEDIA & GRAPHIC ARTS IND-IARIGAI , 2008, Vol. 35, p. 37-43Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Franchising has been important in many industries for a long time and organized alliances are a current phenomenon in the Printing Industry, and may be all alternative way for smaller privately owned printing houses to be a part of a larger network to handle rapid changes in the market. The objective of this qualitative case study of three Swedish Organized Alliances is to investigate how companies perceive the importance of organized alliances in the Printing Industry. This study concludes that there are many different opinions about the use, impact and importance of organized alliances in the Printing Industry. However, the partner companies believe that they acquire value by being part of an organized alliance. The most important advantages are joint purchasing, access to national agreements, large scale advantages and partly access to a franchise brand. The results indicate that different kinds of organized alliances fit different companies because of the focus of the alliance and the difference in support and commitment from the central organization. Both central organizations and many partner companies deem the franchise brand as important for national recognition. Nevertheless, the combination of the franchise brand and the local company brand is a way for printing houses to strengthen both on the local and national market. The major disadvantage of being part of all organized alliance is the high costs compared to the benefits, which has given many respondents a reason to consider leaving the organized alliances.

  • 276.
    Mejtoft, Thomas
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Graphic Arts, Media.
    Nordin, Åsa
    Digital Printing Center, Mid Sweden University.
    Strategic Alliances in the Digital Printing Industry2007In: 59th Annual Technical Conference on Technical Association of the Graphic Arts, TAGA: Pittsburgh, PA: 18 March 2007 through 21 March 2007, 2007, p. 38-62Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The fast technological development and the convergence of the media industry have made competition in theprinting industry harder and not only in-industry any longer. This puts great pressure on individualcompanies, and in a climate of rapid change, companies need to respond quickly to external forces in order toremain competitive. To accomplish this many different competitive resources and competences need to bemanaged. This can be achieved either directly by ownership or indirectly by cooperation. This qualitative casestudy sets out to investigate how alliances are used in the dynamic business environment of the printingindustry, with a focus on cooperation in connection with digital printing.The primary reason, for the companies’ cooperation was gaining access to resources to enhance customersatisfaction and retain customer contact. This paper illustrates that alliances and cooperations can be used indifferent ways and being part of an alliance can be regarded as successful and something worth nurturing.Even though alliances can provide competitive advantages, this study also indicates that hypercompetitivebehavior, like being to opportunistic, clearly can have drastic negative effects on an alliance.

  • 277.
    Mejtoft, Thomas
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Graphic Arts, Media.
    Viström, Magnus
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Graphic Arts, Media.
    Delivery times and closeness to geographic market: A comparison between digital and conventional printing houses2008In: ADVANCES IN PRINTING AND MEDIA TECHNOLOGY, VOL XXXV   / [ed] Enlund N, Lovrecek M, Zagreb: INT ASSOC RES ORG INFOR, MEDIA & GRAPHIC ARTS IND-IARIGAI , 2008, Vol. 35, p. 45-54Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Having short delivery lead times has been deemed as a major order winner and a way of creating short term competitive advantages. Short delivery lead times are also important when trying to reduce inventory levels. This study of 136 randomly selected Swedish commercial printing houses, investigates the differences between digital printers and conventional printers with respect to the importance of providing short delivery times and having close geographic distances to customers. The study concludes that printing houses, using digital printing, arc active mostly on a regional market, while printing houses using conventional printing are active mainly oil a national market. Further, digital printing contributes to significantly shorter delivery times, which, in general, are deemed important to be kept short. Nevertheless, there are indications of a larger gap, regarding delivery times, between importance and perceived Customer satisfaction among digital printers than among conventional printers.

  • 278.
    Mejtoft, Thomas
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Graphic Arts, Media (closed 20111231).
    Viström, Magnus
    STFI-Packforsk.
    Positioning in the Printing Industry: Differentiation in Terms of Price, Lead Time, Print Quality and Flexibility2007In: Advances in Printing and Media Technology, ISSN 0892-2284, E-ISSN 1942-597X, Vol. 34, p. 327-336Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Differentiation and adding value to the printed product is regarded as important in the low margin, highlycompetitive commercial printing industry of today. However, there exists a trade-off between the service leveland the price the customer has to pay. This quantitative survey study of 136 commercial printing houses setsout to investigate how they are positioning themselves and how they perceive the demand from the customerswith respect to price, lead time, print quality and flexibility.In summary the results presented in this paper propose that the commercial printing houses perceived a demandfrom customers to provide a commodity product with only small differences between price, lead time, qualityand flexibility. However, the results also indicate that the printing houses want to sell a more differentiatedand customer centric product with focus on flexibility and quality. Although positioning seemed to beindependent of printing technology, it was possible to notice that digital printing houses perceived a lower pricepressure from the market. These results suggest that using digital printing to enhance customer value wassuccessful since the digital printing houses felt that their customers did not have as high demands for low pricesas customers to conventional printing houses.

  • 279.
    Mejtoft, Thomas
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Graphic Arts, Media (closed 20111231).
    Viström, Magnus
    STFI-Packforsk.
    Vertical Integration and Profitability: Experiences from the Commercial Printing Industry2008Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This quantitative survey study investigates the degree of vertical integration in the Swedish commercial printing industry and examines the affect of vertical integration on profit. The results show that vertical integration is commonly used both by digital and conventional printing houses. The study concludes that vertical integration is important due to the strategic importance of controlling a large part of the value system. The study indicates that the level of vertical integration has no significant impact on profitability. Nevertheless, one explanation, for the high level of vertical integration, could be the strategic aspect of acquiring possibilities to expand the business.

  • 280.
    Mills, Adam J.
    et al.
    Loyola Univ New Orleans, Mkt, New Orleans, LA 70118 USA..
    Pitt, Christine
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Ferguson, Sarah Lord
    Simon Fraser Univ, Burnaby, BC, Canada..
    The Relationship between Fake News And Advertising Brand Management in the Era Of Programmatic Advertising and Prolific Falsehood2019In: Journal of Advertising Research, ISSN 0021-8499, E-ISSN 1740-1909, Vol. 59, no 1, p. 3-8Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 281.
    Moberg, Åsa
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies (moved 20130630). KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Hedberg, Leif
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies (moved 20130630).
    Henriksson, Greger
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies (moved 20130630). KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Räsänen, Minna
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Human - Computer Interaction, MDI (closed 20111231). KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Westermark, Mary
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Hållbarhetsbedömning av en medierad tjänst - en pilotstudie2008Report (Other academic)
  • 282.
    Moberg, Åsa
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies. School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Henriksson, Greger
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies. School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Räsänen, Minna
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Human - Computer Interaction, MDI. School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Hedberg, Leif
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies.
    Westermark, Mary
    School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Sustainability Assessment of a Mediated Service: a Pilot Study2008In: Electronics Goes Green 2008+: merging technology and sustainable development : Joint International Congress and Exhibition, 2008, p. 443-448Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 283.
    Moberg, Åsa
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies.
    Johansson, Martin
    Lantmännen.
    Finnveden, Göran
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies.
    Jonsson, Alex
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Graphic Arts, Media (closed 20111231).
    Printed and tablet e-paper newspaper from an environmental perspective: a screening life cycle assessment2010In: Environmental impact assessment review, ISSN 0195-9255, E-ISSN 1873-6432, Vol. 30, no 3, p. 177-191Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Viable alternatives to conventional newspapers, such as electronic papers, e-papers or e-readers, are intended to have many of the qualities of paper, such as reading using reflective light, high resolution, 180° viewing angle. It has been suggested that the environmental impact of e-paper can be lower than for printed and internet-based newspapers. However, in order to find the facts of the matter, a thorough life cycle perspective covering raw material acquisition, production, use and disposal should preferably be used to study the environmental performance of the different products. A screening life cycle assessment was performed to describe the potential environmental impacts of two product systems; printed on paper and tablet e-paper newspapers. Results show that the most significant phase of the life cycle for both product systems was the production of substrate or platform. Accordingly, key aspects that may affect the resulting environmental performance of newspaper product systems were for the printed newspaper number of readers per copy and number of pages per issue and for the tablet e-paper newspaper lifetime and multi-use of the device. The printed newspaper in general had a higher energy use, higher emissions of gases contributing to climate change and several other impact categories than the tablet e-paper newspaper. It was concluded that tablet e-paper has the potential to decrease the environmental impact of newspaper consumption. However, further studies regarding the environmental impact of production and waste management of electronic devices and internet use, as well as more comprehensive assessment of toxicological impacts are needed. As the data on the electronic devices becomes more comprehensive this may prove to be a major limitation of electronic newspaper systems. Developers are suggested to strive towards minimisation of toxic and rare substances in production.

  • 284.
    Moradian, Esmiralda
    et al.
    Department of Information Science, Computer Science, Uppsala University.
    Håkansson, Anne
    Department of Information Science, Computer Science, Uppsala University.
    Approach to Solving Security Problems Using Meta-Agents in Multi Agent System2008In: AGENT AND MULTI-AGENT SYSTEMS: TECHNOLOGIES AND APPLICATIONS, PROCEEDINGS / [ed] Ngoc Thanh Nguyen, GeunSik Jo, Robert J. Howlett, Lakhmi C. Jain, Springer Berlin/Heidelberg, 2008, p. 122-131Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we present an approach of integrating meta-agents in Web Services. Web Services requires an appropriate level of security to support business systems to be used by anyone, anywhere, at anytime and any platform. However, the increased use of distributed systems with message passing produces a growing set of security problems. This especially concerns threats and attacks on Web Services consisting of transactions with valuable resources. To prevent possible attacks on Web Services, we propose using meta-agents over software agents in a multi-agent system. The multi-agent system consists of a network of software agents that secure the message passing at the transport and application levels. To avoid attacks on these agents, we use meta-agents to monitor the software agents’ actions and then to direct the software agents’ work. These meta-agents are also used to handle unexpected events in the actions of the software agents.

  • 285.
    Muhoza, Olivier Ufitese
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT).
    Tedre, M.
    Aghaee, N.
    Hansson, H.
    Viewpoints to ICT practices and hindrances from in tanzanian secondary schools and teacher training colleges: Focus on classroom teachers2014In: Proceedings - 2014 International Conference on Teaching and Learning in Computing and Engineering, LATICE 2014, 2014, p. 133-140Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    On the policy level, Tanzania has strongly committed to Information and Communication Technology (ICT) supported education on all levels of education. National policy documents give ICT a high priority in development of the country's educational system. Curricula have been revamped to accommodate for increased role of ICT in the society and education. Also educational institutions have explicated high expectations of ICT in the process of 'massification of education.' Several research studies, however, have showed little change in the classrooms. Surveys and case studies have showed that on the way from policy documents to strategy level and implementation level, something gets missing. The lack of ICT in education is clear in primary and secondary school, which is unsurprising, given that majority of schools also lack electricity and basic facilities, including proper classrooms, tables, and books. This study sets out to investigate, using thematic interviews of secondary school teachers in Tanzania, what processes and support structures do teachers consider to be lacking in terms of ICT supported education. Informants from teacher training colleges were also involved in order to bring out viewpoints from teacher training. The results confirmed a large number of earlier results, divided to six categories: school policy, implementation and administration on the school level, access to ICT, leadership and management, school culture, and teacher training. A number of new factors were also pinpointed: teachers' lack of awareness of government policies and documentation on several levels, lack of pedagogical readiness for e-learning and blended learning, and cultural concerns. Concerning what should come first, there was a chicken-and-egg-problem: it makes little sense to invest in rapidly aging ICT infrastructure and facilities if there is no human capacity to make use of those investments, and it makes little sense to invest in human capacity if there is no technological infrastructure to put quickly aging technical know-how into immediate use.

  • 286. Murdock, V.
    et al.
    Clarke, C. L. A.
    Kamps, J.
    Karlgren, Jussi
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Theoretical Computer Science, TCS. Gavagai.
    Second Workshop on Search and Exploration of X-Rated Information (SEXI'16): WSDM workshop summary2016In: WSDM 2016 - Proceedings of the 9th ACM International Conference on Web Search and Data Mining, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2016, p. 697-698Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Adult content is pervasive on the web, has been a driving factor in the adoption of the Internet medium, and is responsible for a significant fraction of traffic and revenues, yet rarely attracts attention in research. The research questions surrounding adult content access behaviors are unique, and interesting and valuable research in this area can be done ethically. WSDM 2016 features a half day workshop on Search and Exploration of X-Rated Information (SEXI) for information access tasks related to adult content. While the scope of the workshop remains broad, special attention is devoted to the privacy and security issues surrounding adult content by inviting keynote speakers with extensive experience on these topics. The recent release of the personal data belonging to customers of the adult dating site Ashley Madison provides a timely context for the focus on privacy and security.

  • 287. Murdock, Vanessa
    et al.
    Clarke, Charles L A
    Kamps, Jaap
    Karlgren, Jussi
    Search and exploration of X-Rated information (SEXI 2013)2013In: WSDM 2013: Proceedings of the 6th ACM International Conference on Web Search and Data Mining, Association for Computing Machinery , 2013, p. 795-796Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Adult content is pervasive on the Web, has been a driving factor in the adoption of the Internet medium. It is responsible for a significant fraction of traffic and revenues, yet rarely attracts attention in research. We propose that the research questions surrounding adult content access behaviors are unique, and we believe interesting and valuable research in this area can be done ethically. The workshop on Search and Exploration of X-Rated Information (SEXI) addresses these issues for information access tasks related to adult content.

  • 288.
    Mustafa, Jawad
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT).
    Uppnå Prestanda för Beräkningsintensiva Tjänster i SaaS2016Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Enterprise business applications are following a rapid trend to move their solution model from specic organizational users to global access. This creates opportunities for organization to expand geographically with partners and resellers but it also increases simultaneous user requests. These solution models are commonly based on many data-set states and a web applications that perform multiple tasks in its work-ow including compute intensive requests to separate Compute Intensive Services (CIS). This research is based on these solution models and a special type of CIS that build and reuse in-memory cache to reduce response latency. Performance factors like additional simultaneous requests and cache building requests can increase response latency if not enough CIS are available to handle load peaks. Additional compute services can be added to the infrastructure but such solutions increase cost and these additional services are not required all the time. Main goal of this research is to study and design an architecture to achieve cost-e ective performance for solution model of CIS. First, a study have been performed on dedicated servers approach, to nd impact of these performance factors. Next, a prototype Software as a Service (SaaS) architecture has been presented which detects and reduces load peaks created by performance factors. SaaS architecture has been designed by using cloud computing products of Amazon Web Services (AWS). Few supplementary components have been identied and developed during research to overcome shortcomings of standard cloud products. It aims to reduce load peaks with scalability and elasticity. Experiments have been performed on SaaS architecture to and its advantages and limitations for solution model of CIS. An essential part of this research are two solution proposals, which are based on designed SaaS architecture. First solution proposal has been made for multi-tenant architecture because multi-tenancy can help to enhance cost-effective performance. The second solution proposal has been made to achieve low latency response by optimizing usage of in-memory cache. This optimization can help enterprises to change data-set states more often and achieve predictable low latency. It also adds exibility in SaaS architecture to reduce number of required servers.

  • 289.
    Mäkivierikko, Aram
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
    A Needs-Based Approach towards Fostering Long-term Engagement with Energy Feedback among Local Residents2019Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In order to reach the current climate goals, energy consumption needs to decrease in all sectors, including households, which produce 20% of the European emissions. However, it is difficult to increase residents’ engagement in their household electricity consumption as it is an ‘invisible’ form of energy, the monetary incentives are often too small and environmental incentives are not very effective. Building on the idea that an engagement mechanism should be based on user needs, and recent research showing that social influence can be an effective way to affect consumption behaviour, this thesis examines the potential of a neighbourhood-based digital local social network providing feedback on household electricity consumption as an engagement solution. By helping neighbours to know each other better, such a network could meet the basic human need of belonging to a group, while also taking advantage of the social influence between neighbours to increase the effectiveness of the energy feedback provided.

    This thesis sought to: 1) Identify needs of residents that could be served by a local social network and explore whether such a network could provide a beneficial context for energy feedback; 2) identify and evaluate a set of design principles for energy feedback and use them to propose a prototype feedback design suitable for use in a local social network; and 3) design and implement a baseline study for measuring changes in aspects of social and environmental sustainability in a neighbourhood that introduction of a local social network can achieve, such as social cohesion, trust, safety, and energy attitudes and behaviour.

    In order to achieve these objectives, the Research Through Design methodology was used. This resulted in mixed methods research using quantitative (household survey) and qualitative (focus group interviews, stakeholder consultation workshop) methods. The research was conducted in two eco-districts in Stockholm, Sweden: Hammarby Sjöstad and Stockholm Royal Seaport.

    Regarding the first objective, results from the household survey indicated a need for increased interaction between neighbours in Stockholm Royal Seaport, while the focus group discussions revealed local communication needs that a local social network could meet. However, the possibility to use social influence between neighbours in increasing the intention to save energy was shown to be rather weak, possibly because of the current low level of connection between neighbours. Regarding the second objective, a set of design principles was identified using a literature study. They were used to create a design prototype of energy feedback that was presented to potential end-users in a stakeholder consultation workshop and then refined using suggestions given in the workshop. The workshop indicated support for many of the design principles as they were indirectly mentioned in the discussions. The design principle of fair feedback was further explored, suggesting use of typical household consumption as part of a fair comparison metric and when setting reduction goals.

    Regarding the third objective, an evaluation method with baseline survey and follow-up surveys was suggested. The household survey served as a baseline for measuring social and environmental sustainability aspects in a neighbourhood. Further research is needed on the effectiveness of a local social network as an engagement mechanism for energy feedback.

  • 290.
    Mäkivierikko, Aram
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
    Shahrokni, Hossein
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
    Kordas, Olga
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
    Designing energy feedback for a local social network2019In: Energy and Buildings, ISSN 0378-7788, E-ISSN 1872-6178, Vol. 199, p. 88-101Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Engaged households are needed for the future ‘smart grids’ to function, but it is difficult to engage residents in their household electricity consumption. Building on earlier research suggesting that a local social network could provide a suitable context for energy feedback, this paper examines how feedback presented in a social network should be designed in order to be better understood by the residents and encourage long-term engagement. A review of the literature on design principles and cases where they had been implemented identified 24 principles. A prototype feedback design adapted for a local social network was made, based on design principles deemed suitable for the screens designed. End-user feedback on the prototype was collected through a stakeholder consultation workshop. In the workshop dis- cussions, 17 identified principles were mentioned and there was support for 15 of these, one was both supported and contested and two were contested. Based on comments and suggestions from end-users, a revised version of the feedback prototype was made for implementation in a pilot study in Sweden and Portugal.

  • 291.
    Naeve, Ambjörn
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Communicative modelling of cultural transmission and evolution by using abstract holographic cognition2013In: tripleC (cognition, communication, co-operation): Journal for a Global Sustainable Information Society / Unified Theory of Information Research Group, ISSN 1726-670X, E-ISSN 1726-670X, Vol. 11, no 1, p. 46-66Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article presents communicative ways to model the transmission and evolution of the processes and artefacts of a culture as the result of ongoing interactions between its members - both at the tacit and the explicit level. The purpose is not to model the entire cultural process, but to provide semantically rich “conceptual placeholders” for modelling any cultural activity that is considered important enough within a certain context. The general purpose of communicative modelling is to create models that improve the quality of communication between people. In order to capture the subjective aspects of Gregory Bateson’s definition of information as “a difference that makes a difference,” the article introduces a Holographic Cognition Model that uses optical holography as an analogy for human cognition, with the object beam of holography corresponding to the first difference (the situation that the cognitive agent encounters), and the reference beam of holography corresponding to the subjective experiences and biases that the agent brings to the situation, and which makes the second difference (the interference/interpretation pattern) unique for each agent. By combining the HCM with a semantically rich and recursive form of process modelling, based on the SECI-theory of knowledge creation, we arrive at way to model the cultural transmission and evolution process that is consistent with the Unified Theory of Information (the Triple-C model) with its emphasis on intra-, inter- and supra-actions.

  • 292.
    Nagaraj, Sanjay
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Numerical Analysis and Computer Science, NADA.
    The impact of consumer knowledge, information mode and presentation form on advertising effects2007Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other scientific)
    Abstract [en]

    Consumers consistently acquire information on product attributes available to them. In considering the many and varied effects of advertising a very central issue is how these attribute information in an ad is processed, that is, how consumers were able to comprehend and remember what an ad claimed. Researchers also seem to believe that the use of persuasive ads increases recall of attribute information, enhances attitude toward the ad, brand, and positively affects intent to purchase. Such information in marketing communications is often presented either in a vivid or non-vivid form and they are conveyed in either numbers or adjectives. The complexity of numerical information and the fact that they are being used on a frequent basis to make many important decisions makes numerical cognition a challenging and important domain for this research. In this research we draw the reviews and advances in consumer research on comparisons between two types of information in an advertising setting and combining it along with two types of presentation forms. Yet a few empirical investigations of presentation forms, typically vividness and its interaction effects with information mode, have been conducted in a consumer-behavior context. Further to add to this research is the inclusion of consumer knowledge moderates the way such information is processed. Although the effects of vividness in terms of its ability to impart a persuasive communication have yielded mixed results, we extend the scope of vividness research and attempt to examine vividness effects and its interaction with information mode in print ads. Since different consumers use different skills and strategies to evaluate information, it is suggested that individual differences in product knowledge may be an important moderating factor in information processing and final response to product ads.

    In order to address the research issues, a conceptual framework based on the availability valence hypothesis (availability theory) was created. Sixty individual hypotheses were the resulting derivatives from the framework. To test the hypotheses and the conceptual model, a 2x2x2 factorial design was employed and examined responses from 160 students from both arts and computing science program of a major university. Experiments examined the persuasive impact of a new brand containing two forms of presentation and information mode. The conclusions from the study reveal that vividness has an impact on recall and attitudes. The impact on recall and judgment was more pronounced for novices in comparison to experts. The interactions between presentation form and information mode also revealed that the consumer knowledge moderates the way information is processed for recall and subsequent judgment. Experts were able to able to recall attribute information more accurately than novices irrespective of the presentation form and the judgment imparted was based on the information available. All functional properties of the variables in the proposed model had an impact on the effects of advertising during memory and judgment tasks. We also provided a theoretical rationale based on extant literature on the availability model as to which presentation form and information mode may influence the recall and judgment resulting in intent to purchase. The presentation form and information mode highlights the similarities in the benefits offered by an existing base brand. Theoretical and practical implications of the results are discussed as well as the limitations and future directions of this study.

  • 293.
    Nasir, M. Anis U.
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Communication Networks.
    Rahimian, F.
    Girdzijauskas, Sarunas
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Communication Networks.
    Gossip-based partitioning and replication for Online Social Networks2014In: ASONAM 2014 - Proceedings of the 2014 IEEE/ACM International Conference on Advances in Social Networks Analysis and Mining, 2014, p. 33-42Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Online Social Networks (OSNs) have been gaining tremendous growth and popularity in the last decade, as they have been attracting billions of users from all over the world. Such networks generate petabytes of data from the social interactions among their users and create many management and scalability challenges. OSN users share common interests and exhibit strong community structures, which create complex dependability patterns within OSN data, thus, make it difficult to partition and distribute in a data center environment. Existing solutions, such as, distributed databases, key-value stores and auto scaling services use random partitioning to distribute the data across a cluster, which breaks existing dependencies of the OSN data and may generate huge inter-server traffic. Therefore, there is a need for intelligent data allocation strategy that can reduce the network cost for various OSN operations. In this paper, we present a gossip-based partitioning and replication scheme that efficiently splits OSN data and distributes the data across a cluster. We achieve fault tolerance and data locality, for one-hop neighbors, through replication. Our main contribution is a social graph placement strategy that divides the social graph into predefined size partitions and periodically updates the partitions to place socially connected users together. To evaluate our algorithm, we compare it with random partitioning and a state-of-the-art solution SPAR. Results show that our algorithm generates up to four times less replication overhead compared to random partitioning and half the replication overhead compared to SPAR.

  • 294.
    Neiberg, Daniel
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, Centre for Speech Technology, CTT. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Speech Communication and Technology.
    Elenius, Kjell
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, Centre for Speech Technology, CTT. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Speech Communication and Technology.
    Automatic Recognition of Anger in Spontaneous Speech2008In: INTERSPEECH 2008: 9TH ANNUAL CONFERENCE OF THE INTERNATIONAL SPEECH COMMUNICATION ASSOCIATION 2008, BAIXAS: ISCA-INST SPEECH COMMUNICATION ASSOC , 2008, p. 2755-2758Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Automatic detection of real life negative emotions in speech has been evaluated using Linear Discriminant Analysis, LDA, with "classic" emotion features and a classifier based on Gaussian Mixture Models, GMMs. The latter uses Mel-Frequency Cepstral Coefficients, MFCCs, from a filter bank covering the 300-3400 Hz region to capture spectral shape and formants, and another in the 20-600 Hz region to capture prosody. Both classifiers have been tested on an extensive corpus from Swedish voice controlled telephone services. The results indicate that it is possible to detect anger with reasonable accuracy (average recall 83%) in natural speech and that the GMM method performed better than the LDA one.

  • 295.
    Nilsson, Annika E
    et al.
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Christensen, Miyase
    Stockholm University.
    Arctic Geopolitics, Media and Power2019Book (Refereed)
  • 296.
    Norman, Ulf
    et al.
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Department for Library services, Language and ARC, Publication Infrastructure.
    Scheutz, David
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Department for Library services, Language and ARC, Publication Infrastructure.
    Kvalitet, enhetlighet och täckning: granskning av lokala publikationsdatabaser2013Report (Other academic)
  • 297.
    Nyblom, Åsa
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms). School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Making travel sustainable with ICT?: The social practice of travel planning and travel information use in everyday life2014Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Adopting the perspective of the traveller, this thesis examines how travel plans are actually made in the everyday situation and how information is used and drawn on when planning the many, often unremarkable, trips of ordinary urban life. Ethnographical field studies in southern Stockholm, Sweden, employing a practice theory perspective showed that people use a vast mixture of different types of information when planning and making trips. Therefore, the concept of travel information should be defined broadly enough to encompass informal, formal, analogue and digital types of travel information. Then, and only then, is it possible to perceive the interactions between these and see their potential as a change factor for sustainable city travel. In relation to this, situations when travel information was not used, were also identified in the qualitative data and are acknowledged and discussed in the thesis.

    Travel planning is in everyday practice undertaken little by little, squeezed in between other activities of daily life. It is a process more extended in time, space and content than the limited search for information about the best way to get from A to B, assumed and facilitated in many existing travel information services. Travel planning is closely connected to the overall scheduling of activities (planning of life) and thus spans much larger time frames than the single trip. Planning travel also includes consideration of issues such as preparations needed (things to be done before departure/brought on the trip); managing vehicles and equipment in time and space (getting the bicycle/car home again or safely parked); the weather (current and forecast); social relations (the potential of different travel options for relationship building or conflict triggering); social norms (e.g. of 'good parenting' or 'proper behaviour on public transport'); and health issues (wanting exercise or inability to manage stairs/luggage).

    The qualitative data revealed that travel information is sometimes perceived and used as a security blanket, i.e. something to hold on to and give the traveller courage on the trip until they are safe at their destination. It also showed that travel planning, depending on life situation, can be experienced as either a house of cards, i.e. if anything changes the whole house collapses and has to be rebuilt to a different layout, or a prefab building, i.e. the same prefabricated pieces are joined together in more or less the same pattern every time.

    Recent decades have seen rapid growth in ICT services relating to transportation. Different types of travel information services have been proposed as a means to decrease the environmental impacts of transportation through effecting behavioural change. Taking the empirical 4 insights provided by this thesis into travel planning and travel information use in practice, it is clear that travel information services of tomorrow, if connected to other ICT systems in everyday life, could be designed in a way that broadens their horizon of assistance in supporting travel planning processes in everyday life. Although, as this thesis demonstrates, the role and potential of travel information services and ICT in the work of achieving sustainable mobility should be discussed from a perspective critical of overly linear perceptions and instrumental starting points.

  • 298.
    Nyblom, Åsa
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms). School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Eriksson, Elina
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Travel information services and travel planning practice: Changing the horizon of assistanceIn: International Journal of Sustainable Transportation, ISSN 1556-8318, E-ISSN 1556-8334Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Recent decades have seen rapid growth in ICT services relating to transportation. Different types of travel information services have been proposed as a means to decrease the environmental impacts of transportation through behavioural change. However, empirical evidence shows that travel planning is a fragmented, distributed and fluid process that is not as enclosed in time and space or delimited in content, as existing ICT services for travel planning would imply, despite smart and mobile solutions. This paper examines the role of planning and coordination in the travel choices of everyday life and the time horizons and decisions that are part of current travel planning services. It also considers how travel information services of tomorrow, linked with other ICT services, could be designed to stretch the horizon of assistance, in order to better support travel planning processes in everyday life. Finally, it critically discusses the role of travel information services and ICT in the work of achieving more sustainable mobility.

  • 299. Odom, W.
    et al.
    Lindley, Siân
    Pschetz, Larissa
    Tsaknaki, Vasiliki
    Vallgårda, Anna
    Wiberg, Mikael
    Yoo, Daisy
    Time, temporality, and slowness: Future directions for design research2018In: DIS 2018 - Companion Publication of the 2018 Designing Interactive Systems Conference, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2018, p. 383-386Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A diverse set of research and design initiatives related to time, temporality, and slowness has emerged in the DIS and HCI communities. The goals of this workshop are to: 1. bring together researchers to reflect on conceptual, methodological, and practice-based outcomes and issues and 2. to develop an agenda for future research in this growing area.

  • 300. Packmohr, Sven
    et al.
    Mejtoft, Thomas
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Graphic Arts, Media.
    Transaction costs and their influence on institutional arrangements - A comparison between the swedish and the german printing industry2008In: ADVANCES IN PRINTING AND MEDIA TECHNOLOGY, VOL XXXV    / [ed] Enlund N, Lovrecek M, Zagreb: INT ASSOC RES ORG INFOR, MEDIA & GRAPHIC ARTS IND-IARIGAI , 2008, Vol. 35, p. 55-66Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The printing industry is undergoing a lot of structural changes. One way to deal with these changes is by institutional arrangements like hybrid organizations made possible by modern digital communication technologies. The aim of this qualitative case study with four Swedish and four German printing houses is to examine if and how these arrangements are used to lower transaction costs and increase competitive advantages. The results indicate that the companies in this study face the need to integrate for different reasons to increase their competitive advantage. Nevertheless, due to strong competition and to lower their need for investments, the companies in this Study cannot integrate all capacity and resources needed in the production. Due to fear for opportunism, the preferred way is to create cooperation with a few close partners. This suggests that the companies have chosen a hierarchical intuitional arrangement (integration) with a hybrid character (cooperation).

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