Change search
Refine search result
3456789 251 - 300 of 2417
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 251. Breton, Simon-Philippe
    et al.
    Nilsson, Karl
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics.
    Ivanell, Stefan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics.
    Olivares-Espinosa, Hugo
    Masson, Christian
    Dufresne, Louis
    Study of the effect of the presence of downstream turbines on upstream ones and use of a controller in CFD wind turbine simulation models2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 252. Breton, Simon-Philippe
    et al.
    Nilsson, Karl
    Uppsala University Campus Gotland, Wind Energy, Sweden .
    Olivares-Espinosa, Hugo
    Masson, Christian
    Dufresne, Louis
    Ivanell, Stefan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Stability, Transition and Control. Uppsala University Campus Gotland, Wind Energy, Sweden .
    Study of the influence of imposed turbulence on the asymptotic wake deficit in a very long line of wind turbines2014In: Renewable energy, ISSN 0960-1481, E-ISSN 1879-0682, Vol. 70, p. 153-163Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The influence of imposed turbulence on the development of the flow along a long row of wind turbines is studied, in search for an asymptotic wake deficit state. Calculations are performed using EllipSys3D, a CFD code that solves the Navier-Stokes equations in their incompressible form using a finite volume approach. In this code, the Large-Eddy Simulation technique is used for modeling turbulence, and the wind turbine rotors are represented as actuator discs whose loading is determined through the use of tabulated airfoil data by applying the blade-element method. Ten turbines are located along a row and separated from each other by seven rotor diameters, which is representative of the distance used in today's offshore wind farms. Turbulence is pre-generated with the Mann model, with imposed turbulence intensity levels of 4.5% and 8.9%. The aim with this study is to investigate features of the flow that depend solely on imposed turbulence and the presence of wind turbine rotors. For this reason, the turbines are isolated from their environment, and no effect from the presence of the atmospheric boundary layer is modeled, i.e., a non-sheared inflow is used. Analysis of the characteristics of the flow as a function of the position along the row of turbines is performed in terms of standard deviation of the velocity components, turbulence kinetic energy, mean velocity, and power spectra of the axial velocity fluctuations. The mean power production along the row of turbines is also used as an indicator. Calculations are performed below rated power, where a generator torque controller implemented in EllipSys3D renders it possible for the turbines to adapt to the flow conditions in which they operate. The results obtained for the standard deviation of the velocity components, turbulence kinetic energy, power and mean velocity as functions of downstream distance show that an asymptotic wake state seems close to be reached, in the conditions tested, near the end of the 10 turbine row. Significant changes towards this state are seen to happen faster when imposing turbulence in the domain. Power spectra of the axial velocity fluctuations are shown to provide interesting information about the turbulence in the flow, but are found not to be useful in determining if an asymptotic wake state is reached. (C) 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 253.
    Brett, Calvin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Fluid Physics.
    Mittal, Nitesh
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Fluid Physics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Ohm, Wiebke
    DESY, Hamburg, Germany..
    Söderberg, Daniel
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Fluid Physics.
    Roth, Stephan V.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites. DESY, Hamburg, Germany..
    GISAS study of spray deposited metal precursor ink on a cellulose template2019In: Abstracts of Papers of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0065-7727, Vol. 257Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 254.
    Brett, Calvin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Fluid Physics. DESY, Photon Sci, Hamburg, Germany.
    Mittal, Nitesh
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Fluid Physics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Ohm, Wiebke
    DESY, Photon Sci, Hamburg, Germany..
    Söderberg, Daniel
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Fluid Physics.
    Roth, Stephan V.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites. DESY, Photon Sci, Hamburg, Germany..
    In situ self-assembly study in bio-based thin films2018In: Abstract of Papers of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0065-7727, Vol. 255Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 255.
    Brosse, Nicolas
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Solid Mechanics (Dept.). KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Finmo, Carl
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Lundell, Fredrik
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Bagheri, Shervin
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Experimental study of a three-dimensional cylinder–filament system2015In: Experiments in Fluids, ISSN 0723-4864, E-ISSN 1432-1114, Vol. 56, no 6, article id 130Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This experimental study reports on the behavior of a filament attached to the rear of a three-dimensional cylinder. The axis of the cylinder is placed normal to a uniform incoming flow, and the filament is free to move in the cylinder wake. The mean position of the filament is studied as a function of the filament length L. It is found that for long (L/D > 6.5, where D is the cylinder diameter) and short (L/D < 2) filaments, the mean position of the filament tends to align with the incoming flow, whereas for intermediate filament lengths (2 < L/D < 6.5), the filament lies down on the cylinder and tends to align with the cylinder axis. The underlying mechanism of the bifurcations is discussed and related to buckling and inverted-pendulum-like instabilities.

  • 256. Broström, Eva
    et al.
    Örtqvist, Maria
    Haglund-Åkerlind, Yvonne
    Hagelberg, Stefan
    Gutierrez-Farewik, Elena M.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics.
    Trunk and center of mass movements during gait in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis2007In: Human Movement Science, ISSN 0167-9457, E-ISSN 1872-7646, Vol. 26, no 2, p. 296-305Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Motion of the body center of mass (CoM) can often indicate the overall effect of the strategy of forward progression used. In the present study, focus is placed on trunk movements in the sagittal, coronal, and transverse/rotation plane, as well as placement of the CoM, during gait in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). Seventeen children with JIA, all with polyarticular lower extremity involvement were examined before and approximately two weeks after treatment with intra-articular cortico-steroid injections. Movement was recorded with a 6-camera 3D motion analysis system in both the children with JIA and in 21 healthy controls. Trunk and center of mass movements were compared between JIA and controls, and effects of intra-articular cortico-steroid treatment were evaluated. Children with JIA were more posteriorly tilted in the trunk, contrary to the common clinical impression, and had their CoM placed more posterior and off-centred, which may have been a result of pain. With such knowledge, it might be possible to better understand the effects of their pain and involvement, and ultimately to plan a treatment strategy for improving their gait patterns.

  • 257.
    Brouzet, Christophe
    et al.
    KTH.
    Mittal, Nitesh
    KTH.
    Lundell, Fredrik
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics.
    Söderberg, Daniel
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics.
    Characterizing the Orientational and Network Dynamics of Polydisperse Nanofibers at the Nanoscale.Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 258.
    Brouzet, Christophe
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Mittal, Nitesh
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Söderberg, Daniel
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics.
    Lundell, Fredrik
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics.
    Size-Dependent Orientational Dynamics of Brownian Nanorods2018In: ACS Macro Letters, E-ISSN 2161-1653, Vol. 7, no 8, p. 1022-1027Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Successful assembly of suspended nanoscale rod-like particles depends on fundamental phenomena controlling rotational and translational diffusion. Despite the significant developments in fluidic fabrication of nanostructured materials, the ability to quantify the dynamics in processing systems remains challenging. Here we demonstrate an experimental method for characterization of the orientation dynamics of nanorod suspensions in assembly flows using orientation relaxation. This relaxation, measured by birefringence and obtained after rapidly stopping the flow, is deconvoluted with an inverse Laplace transform to extract a length distribution of aligned nanorods. The methodology is illustrated using nanocelluloses as model systems, where the coupling of rotational diffusion coefficients to particle size distributions as well as flow-induced orientation mechanisms are elucidated. 

  • 259.
    Brown, Shelley
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemical Engineering and Technology.
    Mellgren, Niklas
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics.
    Vynnycky, Michael
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics.
    Lindbergh, Göran
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemical Engineering and Technology.
    Impedance as a Tool for Investigating Aging in Lithium-Ion Porous Electrodes: II. Positive Electrode Examination2008In: Journal of the Electrochemical Society, ISSN 0013-4651, E-ISSN 1945-7111, Vol. 155, no 4, p. A320-A338Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    High-power positive LixNi0.8Co0.15Al0.05O2 composite porous electrodes are known to be the main source of impedance increase in batteries based on GEN2 chemistry. The impedance of positive electrodes, both fresh and harvested from coin cells aged in an accelerated EUCAR hybrid electric vehicle lifetime matrix, was measured in a three-electrode setup and the results fitted with a physically based impedance model. A methodology for fitting the impedance data, including an optimization strategy incorporating a global genetic routine, was used to fit either fresh or aged positive electrodes simultaneously at different states of charge down to 0.5 mHz. The fresh electrodes had an exchange current density of approximately 1.0 A m(-2), a solid-phase diffusion coefficient of approximately 1.4 x 10(-1)5 m(2) s(-1), and a log-normal active particle size distribution with a mean radius of 0.25 mu m. Aged electrode impedance results were shown to be highly dependent on both the electrode state of charge and the pressure applied to the electrode surface. An aging scenario incorporating loss of active particles, coupled with an increase both in the local contact resistance between the active material and the conductive carbon and the resistance of a layer on the current collector, was shown to be adequate in describing the measured aged electrode impedance behavior.

  • 260. Brunet, P.
    et al.
    Amberg, Gustav
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Physicochemical Fluid Mechanics.
    Alfredsson, P. Henrik
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Fluid Physics.
    Control of thermocapillary instabilities far from threshold2005In: Physics of fluids, ISSN 1070-6631, E-ISSN 1089-7666, Vol. 17, no 10Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We report experiments on control of thermocapillary instabilities at high temperature differences, in an annular geometry. Previous studies [Phys. Fluids 14, 3039 (2002)] showed that a reasonable control of oscillatory instability could be achieved by optimizing a local heating feedback process. We conducted experiments with a basic flow converging from periphery to center. This constitutes a more unstable configuration than previously, and enables appearance of higher-order instabilities and chaos. Applying successfully local feedback control to the periodic state close to the threshold, we extend the process to higher temperature differences, where nonlinear as well as proportional/derivative control laws are necessary to obtain a significant decrease of the temperature fluctuations. Finally, proportional control allows us to synchronize a chaotic state, to a periodic one.

  • 261.
    Brunet, Philippe
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics.
    Stabilized Kuramoto-Sivashinsky equation: A useful model for secondary instabilities and related dynamics of experimental one-dimensional cellular flows2007In: PHYSICAL REVIEW E, ISSN 1539-3755, Vol. 76, no 1, p. 017204-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We report numerical simulations of one-dimensional cellular solutions of the stabilized Kuramoto-Sivashinsky equation. This equation offers a range of generic behavior in pattern-forming instabilities of moving interfaces, such as a host of secondary instabilities or transition toward disorder. We compare some of these collective behaviors to those observed in experiments. In particular, destabilization scenarios of bifurcated states are studied in a spatially semi-extended situation, which is common in realistic patterns, but has been barely explored so far.

  • 262.
    Brynjell-Rahkola, Mattias
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Stability, Transition and Control.
    Global stability analysis of three-dimensional boundary layer flows2015Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis considers the stability and transition of incompressible boundary layers. In particular, the Falkner–Skan–Cooke boundary layer subject to a cylindrical surface roughness, and the Blasius boundary layer with applied localized suction are investigated. These flows are of great importance within the aviation industry, feature complex transition scenarios, and are strongly three-dimensional in nature. Consequently, no assumptions regarding homogeneity in any of the spatial directions are possible, and the stability of the flow is governed by an extensive three-dimensional eigenvalue problem.

    The stability of these flows is addressed by high-order direct numerical simulations using the spectral element method, in combination with a Krylov subspace projection method. Such techniques target the long-term behavior of the flow and can provide lower limits beyond which transition is unavoidable. The origin of the instabilities, as well as the mechanisms leading to transition in the aforementioned cases are studied and the findings are reported.

    Additionally, a novel method for computing the optimal forcing of a dynamical system is developed. This type of analysis provides valuable information about the frequencies and structures that cause the largest energy amplification in the system. The method is based on the inverse power method, and is discussed in the context of the one-dimensional Ginzburg–Landau equation and a two-dimensional flow case governed by the Navier–Stokes equations.

  • 263.
    Brynjell-Rahkola, Mattias
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Stability, Transition and Control. KTH, Centres, SeRC - Swedish e-Science Research Centre. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Studies on instability and optimal forcing of incompressible flows2017Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis considers the hydrodynamic instability and optimal forcing of a number of incompressible flow cases. In the first part, the instabilities of three problems that are of great interest in energy and aerospace applications are studied, namely a Blasius boundary layer subject to localized wall-suction, a Falkner–Skan–Cooke boundary layer with a localized surface roughness, and a pair of helical vortices. The two boundary layer flows are studied through spectral element simulations and eigenvalue computations, which enable their long-term behavior as well as the mechanisms causing transition to be determined. The emergence of transition in these cases is found to originate from a linear flow instability, but whereas the onset of this instability in the Blasius flow can be associated with a localized region in the vicinity of the suction orifice, the instability in the Falkner–Skan–Cooke flow involves the entire flow field. Due to this difference, the results of the eigenvalue analysis in the former case are found to be robust with respect to numerical parameters and domain size, whereas the results in the latter case exhibit an extreme sensitivity that prevents domain independent critical parameters from being determined. The instability of the two helices is primarily addressed through experiments and analytic theory. It is shown that the well known pairing instability of neighboring vortex filaments is responsible for transition, and careful measurements enable growth rates of the instabilities to be obtained that are in close agreement with theoretical predictions. Using the experimental baseflow data, a successful attempt is subsequently also made to reproduce this experiment numerically.

    In the second part of the thesis, a novel method for computing the optimal forcing of a dynamical system is developed. The method is based on an application of the inverse power method preconditioned by the Laplace preconditioner to the direct and adjoint resolvent operators. The method is analyzed for the Ginzburg–Landau equation and afterwards the Navier–Stokes equations, where it is implemented in the spectral element method and validated on the two-dimensional lid-driven cavity flow and the flow around a cylinder.

  • 264.
    Brynjell-Rahkola, Mattias
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Stability, Transition and Control. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW. KTH, Centres, SeRC - Swedish e-Science Research Centre.
    Barman, Emelie
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Stability, Transition and Control. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW. KTH, Centres, SeRC - Swedish e-Science Research Centre.
    Hanifi, Ardeshir
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Stability, Transition and Control. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW. KTH, Centres, SeRC - Swedish e-Science Research Centre.
    Henningson, Dan S.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Stability, Transition and Control. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW. KTH, Centres, SeRC - Swedish e-Science Research Centre.
    On the stability of a Blasius boundary layer subject to localized suction2017Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In this work the problem of premature transition in boundary layers due to localized suction is revisited. A thorough study involving nonlinear direct numerical simulations, a three-dimensional linear stability analysis, a sensitivity study and a Koopman analysis is presented. The ensemble of these different techniques enables the origins of oversuction to be studied in great detail and provides new insight into the transition process of the flow. The configuration considered consists of an infinite row of widely separated suction pipes that are mounted to the plate at right angles. For the parameter range investigated, the flow inside the pipe is seen to bifurcate at a lower suction ratio than the boundary layer and thus act as an oscillator that forces the external flow over the plate. At low levels of suction, this forcing is not enough to cause transition in the boundary layer, but as the suction level is increased beyond criticality, modes originating from the pipe and extending into the boundary layer are seen to destabilize as well. These modes enable the perturbations forced in the pipe to also amplify in the boundary layer, which leads to a rapid breakdown to turbulence in the wake of the suction hole.

  • 265.
    Brynjell-Rahkola, Mattias
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Stability, Transition and Control.
    Barman, Emelie
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Stability, Transition and Control.
    Peplinski, Adam
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Stability, Transition and Control.
    Hanifi, Ardeshir
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Stability, Transition and Control. Swedish Defence Research Agency, FOI.
    Henningson, Dan S.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Stability, Transition and Control.
    On the stability of flat plate boundary layers subject to localized suction2015Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The stability of the Blasius boundary layer subject to localized suction is revisited. Using tools of global stability analysis, the leading direct and adjoint eigenpairs are determined, and novel insight into the sensitivity and receptivity of the flow is obtained. The problem is addressed through high-order spectral element simulations, which enables the inclusion of a suction pipe into the domain. Due to this, a detailed investigation of the connection between the pipe flow and the boundary layer flow is possible. For all cases investigated, the former always turns out to transition for a lower Reynolds number and suction rate than the latter, and the transition scenario is found to be due to a global instability originating inside a separation bubble at the pipe inlet. Identification of such regions, provides information that is valuable in further development of algorithms for laminar flow control.

  • 266.
    Brynjell-Rahkola, Mattias
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Stability, Transition and Control. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW. KTH, Centres, SeRC - Swedish e-Science Research Centre.
    Henningson, Dan S.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Stability, Transition and Control. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW. KTH, Centres, SeRC - Swedish e-Science Research Centre.
    A note on the numerical realization of helical vortices: application to vortex instability2017Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The need to numerically represent a free vortex system arises frequently in fundamental and applied research. Many possible techniques for realizing this vortex system exist but most tend to prioritize accuracy either inside or outside of the vortex core, which therefore makes them unsuitable to for a stability analysis considering the entire flow field. In this article, a simple method is presented that is shown to yield an accurate representation of the flow inside and outside of the vortex core. The method is readily implemented in any incompressible Navier–Stokes solver using primitive variables and Cartesian coordinates. It can potentially be used to model a wide range of vortices but is here applied to reproduce a recent experiment by Quaranta et al. (2017) considering two helices. A three-dimensional stability analysis is performed and yields an eigenvalue spectrum that features both long- and short-wave instabilities.

  • 267.
    Brynjell-Rahkola, Mattias
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Stability, Transition and Control.
    Schlatter, Philipp
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Stability, Transition and Control. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Fluid Mechanics of Industrial Processes. KTH, Centres, SeRC - Swedish e-Science Research Centre.
    Hanifi, Ardeshir
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW. KTH, Centres, SeRC - Swedish e-Science Research Centre.
    Henningson, Dan S.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Stability, Transition and Control. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Modal analysis of roughness-induced crossflow vortices in a Falkner-Skan-Cooke boundary layer2013In: International Symposium on Turbulence and Shear Flow Phenomena, TSFP 2013, TSFP-8 , 2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A three-dimensional global stability analysis using high-order direct numerical simulations is performed to investigate the effect of surface roughness with Reynolds number (based on roughness height) Rek above and below the critical value for transition, on the eigenmodes of a Falkner-Skan-Cooke boundary layer. The surface roughness is introduced with the immersed boundary method and the eigenvalues and eigenfunctions are solved using an iterative time-stepper method. The study reveals a global instability for the case with higher Reynolds number that causes the flow in the non-linear simulations to break down to turbulence shortly downstream of the roughness. Examination of the unstable linear global modes show that these are the same modes that are observed in experiments immediately before breakdown due to secondary instability, which emphasizes the importance of these modes in transition.

  • 268.
    Brynjell-Rahkola, Mattias
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Stability, Transition and Control.
    Schlatter, Philipp
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics.
    Hanifi, Ardeshir
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics.
    Henningson, Dan Stefan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Stability, Transition and Control.
    Global Stability Analysis of a Roughness Wake in a Falkner-Skan-Cooke Boundary Layer2015In: Procedia IUTAM, Elsevier, 2015, p. 192-200Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A global stability analysis of a Falkner-Skan-Cooke boundary layer with distributed three-dimensional surface roughness is per- formed using high-order direct numerical simulations. Computations have been performed for different sizes of the roughness elements, and a time-stepping method has been used to find the instability modes. The study shows that a critical roughness height beyond which a global instability is excited does exist. Furthermore, the origins of this instability is examined by means of an energy analysis, which reveals the production and dissipation terms responsible for the instability, as well as the region in space where the instability originates.

  • 269.
    Brynjell-Rahkola, Mattias
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Stability, Transition and Control.
    Shahriari, Nima
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Stability, Transition and Control.
    Schlatter, Philipp
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Stability, Transition and Control.
    Hanifi, Ardeshir
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Stability, Transition and Control. Swedish Defence Research Agency, FOI.
    Henningson, Dan S.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Stability, Transition and Control.
    Onset of global instability behind distributed surface roughness in a Falkner–Skan–Cooke boundary layer2015Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    A three-dimensional linear global stability analysis of a Falkner–Skan–Cooke boundary layer with distributed three-dimensional surface roughness is performed. The Falkner–Skan–Cooke boundary layer models the flow over swept airplane wings, and investigation of the critical roughness size for which a global instability emerges is thus of great importance within aeronautical applications. The study considers high-order direct numerical simulations and shows that such a critical roughness height exists for the Falkner–Skan–Cooke boundary layer. The roughness Reynolds number and roughness element aspect ratio for which this happens is comparable to the transition data reported in the literature for two-dimensional boundary layers. This demonstrates the importance of the local flow conditions in the vicinity of the roughness for triggering a global instability, although the resulting breakdown scenario is completely different from that of two-dimensional boundary layers. This breakdown scenario is studied in detail, and a global energy analysis is used to reveal the structures and mechanisms responsible for production and dissipation of perturbation energy.

  • 270.
    Brynjell-Rahkola, Mattias
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW. KTH, Centres, SeRC - Swedish e-Science Research Centre. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics.
    Shahriari, Nima
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW. KTH, Centres, SeRC - Swedish e-Science Research Centre. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics.
    Schlatter, Philipp
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW. KTH, Centres, SeRC - Swedish e-Science Research Centre. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics.
    Hanifi, Ardeshir
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW. KTH, Centres, SeRC - Swedish e-Science Research Centre.
    Henningson, Dan S.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW. KTH, Centres, SeRC - Swedish e-Science Research Centre. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics.
    Stability and sensitivity of a cross-flow-dominated Falkner-Skan-Cooke boundary layer with discrete surface roughness2017In: Journal of Fluid Mechanics, ISSN 0022-1120, E-ISSN 1469-7645, Vol. 826, p. 830-850Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    With the motivation of determining the critical roughness size, a global stability and sensitivity analysis of a three-dimensional Falkner-Skan-Cooke (FSC) boundary layer with a cylindrical surface roughness is performed. The roughness size is chosen such that breakdown to turbulence is initiated by a global version of traditional secondary instabilities of the cross-flow (CF) vortices instead of an immediate flow tripping at the roughness. The resulting global eigenvalue spectra of the systems are found to be very sensitive to numerical parameters and domain size. This sensitivity to numerical parameters is quantified using the epsilon-pseudospectrum, and the dependency on the domain is analysed through an impulse response, structural sensitivity analysis and an energy budget. It is shown that while the frequencies remain relatively unchanged, the growth rates increase with domain size, which originates from the inclusion of stronger CF vortices in the baseflow. This is reflected in a change in the rate of advective energy transport by the baseflow. It is concluded that the onset of global instability in a FSC boundary layer as the roughness height is increased does not correspond to an immediate flow tripping behind the roughness, but occurs for lower roughness heights if sufficiently long domains are considered. However, the great sensitivity results in an inability to accurately pinpoint the exact parameter values for the bifurcation, and the large spatial growth of the disturbances in the long domains eventually becomes larger than can be resolved using finite-precision arithmetic.

  • 271.
    Brynjell-Rahkola, Mattias
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Stability, Transition and Control. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW. KTH, Centres, SeRC - Swedish e-Science Research Centre.
    Shahriari, Nima
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Stability, Transition and Control. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW. KTH, Centres, SeRC - Swedish e-Science Research Centre.
    Schlatter, Philipp
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Stability, Transition and Control. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW. KTH, Centres, SeRC - Swedish e-Science Research Centre.
    Hanifi, Ardeshir
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Stability, Transition and Control. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW. KTH, Centres, SeRC - Swedish e-Science Research Centre. Swedish Defence Research Agency, Sweden.
    Henningson, Dan S.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Stability, Transition and Control. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW. KTH, Centres, SeRC - Swedish e-Science Research Centre.
    Stability and sensitivity of a crossflow-dominated Falkner–Skan–Cooke boundary layer with discrete surface roughness2016In: Journal of Fluid Mechanics, ISSN 0022-1120, E-ISSN 1469-7645Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    With the motivation of determining the critical roughness size, a global stability and sensitivity analysis of a three-dimensional Falkner–Skan–Cooke (FSC) boundary layer with a cylindrical surface roughness is performed. The roughness size is chosen such that breakdown to turbulence is initiated by a global version of traditional secondary instabilities of the crossflow (CF) vortices, instead of an immediate flow tripping at the roughness. The resulting global eigenvalue spectra of the systems are found to be very sensitive to numerical parameters and domain size. This sensitivity to numerical parameters is quantified using the "-pseudospectrum, and the dependency on the domain is analysed through an impulse response and an energy budget. It is shown that the growth rates increase with domain size, which originates from the inclusion of stronger CF vortices in the baseflow. This is reflected in a change in the rate of advective energy transport by the baseflow. It is concluded that the onset of global instability in a FSC boundary layer as the roughness height is increased does not correspond to an immediate flow tripping behind the roughness, but occurs for lower roughness heights if su ciently long domains are considered. However, the great sensitivity results in an inability to accurately pinpoint the exact parameter values for the bifurcation, and the large spatial growth of the disturbances in the long domains eventually becomes larger than what can be resolved using finite precision arithmetics. 

  • 272.
    Brynjell-Rahkola, Mattias
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Stability, Transition and Control. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW. KTH, Centres, SeRC - Swedish e-Science Research Centre.
    Tuckerman, L. S.
    Schlatter, Philipp
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW. KTH, Centres, SeRC - Swedish e-Science Research Centre.
    Henningson, Dan S.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW. KTH, Centres, SeRC - Swedish e-Science Research Centre.
    Computing Optimal Forcing Using Laplace Preconditioning2017In: Communications in Computational Physics, ISSN 1815-2406, E-ISSN 1991-7120, Vol. 22, no 5, p. 1508-1532Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    For problems governed by a non-normal operator, the leading eigenvalue of the operator is of limited interest and a more relevant measure of the stability is obtained by considering the harmonic forcing causing the largest system response. Various methods for determining this so-called optimal forcing exist, but they all suffer from great computational expense and are hence not practical for large-scale problems. In the present paper a new method is presented, which is applicable to problems of arbitrary size. The method does not rely on timestepping, but on the solution of linear systems, in which the inverse Laplacian acts as a preconditioner. By formulating the search for the optimal forcing as an eigenvalue problem based on the resolvent operator, repeated system solves amount to power iterations, in which the dominant eigenvalue is seen to correspond to the energy amplification in a system for a given frequency, and the eigenfunction to the corresponding forcing function. Implementation of the method requires only minor modifications of an existing timestepping code, and is applicable to any partial differential equation containing the Laplacian, such as the Navier-Stokes equations. We discuss the method, first, in the context of the linear Ginzburg-Landau equation and then, the two-dimensional lid-driven cavity flow governed by the Navier-Stokes equations. Most importantly, we demonstrate that for the lid-driven cavity, the optimal forcing can be computed using a factor of up to 500 times fewer operator evaluations than the standard method based on exponential timestepping.

  • 273.
    Brynjell-Rahkola, Mattias
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Stability, Transition and Control.
    Tuckerman, Laurette
    Schlatter, Philipp
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Stability, Transition and Control.
    Henningson, Dan S.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Stability, Transition and Control.
    A method for computing optimal forcing of convectively unstable flows using Laplace preconditioningManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    For problems governed by a non-normal operator, the leading eigenvalue of the operator is of limited interest and a more relevant measure of the stability is obtained by considering the harmonic forcing causing the largest system response. Various methods for determining this so-called optimal forcing exist, but they all suffer from great computational expense and are hence not practical for large-scale problems. In the present paper a new method is presented, which is applicable to problems of arbitrary size. The method does not rely on timestepping, but on the solution of linear systems, in which the inverse Laplacian acts as a preconditioner. By formulating the problem of finding the optimal forcing as an eigenvalue problem based on the resolvent operator, repeated system solves amount to power iterations, in which the dominant eigenvalue is seen to correspond to the energy amplification in a system for a given frequency, and the eigenfunction to the optimal forcing function. Implementation of the method requires only minor modifications of an existing time-stepping code, and is applicable to any partial differential equation containing the Laplacian, such as the Navier-Stokes equations. We discuss it in the context of the linear Ginzburg-Landau equation.

  • 274. Brändle de Motta, J. C.
    et al.
    Costa, Pedro
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics.
    Derksen, J. J.
    Peng, C.
    Wang, L. -P
    Breugem, W. -P
    Estivalezes, J. L.
    Vincent, S.
    Climent, E.
    Fede, P.
    Barbaresco, P.
    Renon, N.
    Assessment of numerical methods for fully resolved simulations of particle-laden turbulent flows2019In: Computers & Fluids, ISSN 0045-7930, E-ISSN 1879-0747, Vol. 179, p. 1-14Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    During the last decade, many approaches for resolved-particle simulation (RPS) have been developed for numerical studies of finite-size particle-laden turbulent flows. In this paper, three RPS approaches are compared for a particle-laden decaying turbulence case. These methods are, the Volume-of-Fluid Lagrangian method, based on the viscosity penalty method (VoF-Lag); a direct forcing Immersed Boundary Method, based on a regularized delta function approach for the fluid/solid coupling (IBM); and the Bounce Back scheme developed for Lattice Boltzmann method (LBM-BB). The physics and the numerical performances of the methods are analyzed. Modulation of turbulence is observed for all the methods, with a faster decay of turbulent kinetic energy compared to the single-phase case. Lagrangian particle statistics, such as the velocity probability density function and the velocity autocorrelation function, show minor differences among the three methods. However, major differences between the codes are observed in the evolution of the particle kinetic energy. These differences are related to the treatment of the initial condition when the particles are inserted in an initially single-phase turbulence. The averaged particle/fluid slip velocity is also analyzed, showing similar behavior as compared to the results referred in the literature. The computational performances of the different methods differ significantly. The VoF-Lag method appears to be computationally most expensive. Indeed, this method is not adapted to turbulent cases. The IBM and LBM-BB implementations show very good scaling.

  • 275.
    Bröchner, Jan
    et al.
    KTH.
    Eriksson, Anders
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Structural Mechanics.
    Lundequist, Jerker
    Byggprjktet som dataförädling: Processaspekter på informationsstrukturer1990Book (Other academic)
  • 276.
    Brüger, Armin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics.
    Gustafsson, B.
    Lötstedt, P.
    Nilsson, J.
    Splitting methods for high order solution of the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations in 3D2005In: International Journal for Numerical Methods in Fluids, ISSN 0271-2091, E-ISSN 1097-0363, Vol. 47, no 10-11, p. 1157-1163Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The incompressible Navier-Stokes equations are discretized in space by a hybrid method and integrated in time by the method of lines. The solution is determined on a staggered curvilinear grid in two space dimensions and by a Fourier expansion in the third dimension. The space derivatives are approximated by a compact finite difference scheme of fourth-order on the grid. The solution is advanced in time by a semi-implicit method. In each time step, systems of linear equations have to be solved for the velocity and the pressure. The iterations are split into one outer iteration and three inner iterations. The accuracy and efficiency of the method are demonstrated in a numerical experiment with rotated Poiseuille flow perturbed by Off-Sommerfeld modes in a channel.

  • 277.
    Burden, Tony
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics.
    Cohen, Ian
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics.
    Dodd, D.
    Karlsson, Gunnar
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Communication Networks. KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Centres, ACCESS Linnaeus Centre.
    Online tutoring2006In: SEFI 2006 - 34th Annual Conference: Engineering Education and Active Students, Uppsala universitet, 2006Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Tutoring has been a central part of the educational system at the long established universities of Cambridge and Oxford in the UK. Previously, at most two students could be tutored in the mathematical sciences, one on each side of the supervisor. Today in the age of computing and Internet, any number of students, in principal, could be supervised at a distance, as each student will be sitting in front of his or her own computer. This paper describes an attempt to carry out tutoring in the subject area of mechanics in small groups and at a distance, i.e. the tutors and the students communicate via an Internet based e-meeting system rather being present in the same physical room. This is used at a KTH (Sweden) mechanics distance course supported with tutoring from AUT (New Zealand) and the reverse tutoring of students at a regular mechanics course at AUT tutored from KTH.

  • 278.
    Byström, Martin G.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics.
    Optimal disturbances in boundary layer flows2007Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other scientific)
  • 279.
    Byström, Martin G.
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics.
    Pralits, Jan O.
    Hanifi, Ardeshir
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Heninngson, Dan S.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Luchini, Paolo
    University of Salerno.
    Optimal Disturbances in Three-dimensional Boundary-Layer Flows2007Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the present paper,  two di!erent approaches tocompute the optimal disturbances in the quasi three-dimensional flows are presented. One of the approachesis based on the Multiple Scales method and the otherone utilises the Parabolised Stability Equations.

  • 280.
    Byström, Martin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics.
    Levin, Ori
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics.
    Henningson, Dan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics.
    Optimal disturbances in suction boundary layers.2007In: European journal of mechanics. B, Fluids, ISSN 0997-7546, E-ISSN 1873-7390, Vol. 26, no 3, p. 330-343Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A well-known optimization procedure is used to find the optimal disturbances in two different suction boundary layers within the spatial framework. The maximum algebraic growth in the asymptotic suction boundary layer is presented and compared to previous temporal results. Furthermore, the spatial approach allows a study of a developing boundary layer in which a region at the leading edge is left free from suction. This new flow, which emulates the base flow of a recent wind-tunnel experiment, is herein denoted a semi-suction boundary layer. It is found that the optimal disturbances for these two suction boundary layers consist of streamwise vortices that develop into streamwise streaks, as previously found for a number of shear flows. It is shown that the maximum energy growth in the semi-suction boundary layer is obtained over the upstream region where no suction is applied. The result indicates that the spanwise scale of the streaks is set in this region, which is in agreement with previous experimental findings.

  • 281.
    Bäbler, Matthäus
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemical Engineering and Technology, Energy Processes.
    Biferale, Luca
    Brandt, Luca
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW. KTH, Centres, SeRC - Swedish e-Science Research Centre.
    Feudel, Ulrike
    Guseva, Ksenia
    Lanotte, Alessandra S.
    Marchioli, Cristian
    Picano, Francesco
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW. KTH, Centres, SeRC - Swedish e-Science Research Centre. University of Padua, Italy.
    Sardina, Gaetano
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW. KTH, Centres, SeRC - Swedish e-Science Research Centre.
    Soldati, Alfredo
    Toschi, Federico
    Numerical simulations of aggregate breakup in bounded and unbounded turbulent flows2015In: Journal of Fluid Mechanics, ISSN 0022-1120, E-ISSN 1469-7645, Vol. 766Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Breakup of small aggregates in fully developed turbulence is studied by means of direct numerical simulations in a series of typical bounded and unbounded flow configurations, such as a turbulent channel flow, a developing boundary layer and homogeneous isotropic turbulence. The simplest criterion for breakup is adopted, whereby aggregate breakup occurs when the local hydrodynamic stress sigma similar to epsilon(1/2), with epsilon being the energy dissipation at the position of the aggregate, overcomes a given threshold sigma(cr), which is characteristic for a given type of aggregate. Results show that the breakup rate decreases with increasing threshold. For small thresholds, it develops a scaling behaviour among the different flows. For high thresholds, the breakup rates show strong differences between the different flow configurations, highlighting the importance of non-universal mean-flow properties. To further assess the effects of flow inhomogeneity and turbulent fluctuations, the results are compared with those obtained in a smooth stochastic flow. Furthermore, we discuss the limitations and applicability of a set of independent proxies.

  • 282.
    Bölke, Alexander
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics.
    Swahn, Lars
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics.
    Att simulera en uthållighetsidrottare2015Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The two most important physiological properties to determine an individuals endurance are maximumoxygen uptake and the anaerobic threshold. These properties can be obtained with a threshold test anda max test, which literature and an interview with an expert in the field showed.

    The properties would then be linked to a Matlab model developed to simulate exhaustion for anindividual on a given track. To achieve this, a threshold test and a max test were performed on twoindividuals to measure the maximum oxygen uptake and the anaerobic threshold. The tests wereperformed in Solna by Aktivitus. Afterwards the max tests were simulated in the Matlab model for thetwo individuals.

    It turned out that the anaerobic threshold is directly linked to the Matlab model which means that youcan put measured values directly into the model while the maximum oxygen uptake need furtherinvestigation.

    The experiments have been performed as part of a project lead by Professor Anders Eriksson fromKTH and his colleagues from Karolinska Institutet and Mittuniversitetet. Technique which is animportant factor in endurance has been overlooked. To obtain better and more accurate results moretests should be performed.

  • 283.
    Cagatay, Daniel
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics.
    Yuan, Haoqian
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics.
    Lifting body design and CFD analysis of a novel long range pentacopter, the TILT LR drone2016Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    In the thesis, a lifting body has been designed aiming to generate lift force for the pentacopter, called TILT LR (Long Range), at higher velocities during flights to improve the aerodynamic performances. The configuration, which is used as the skeleton of the long range drone for up to 75 kilometers flights, is based upon a tilting system allowing the rotors to rotate around their own axis in both pitch and roll angles. This offers the possibility to the TILT LR flying withoutany vertical excess thrust at a proper angle of attack and velocity. This new drone can be directly applied to missions require long flight time or cover long distance, such as Search & Rescue(SAR), power lines and off-shore structures inspection, fire monitoring or surveillance. Several main CAD models have been created during the process of design and presented in the report together with the final design. For each model in the process, CFD simulations have been applied to observe the behaviors of the flows around the surfaces of the body during steady flights, followed by a brief analysis for further modification. A series of simulations with varying velocities and angle of attack have been performed for the final design, analyzing its performances under different air conditions. Flight envelope of the design has been presented also, together with some ideas of possible further studies on the pentacopter.

  • 284. Camarri, S.
    et al.
    Fallenius, Bengt E. G.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Fransson, Jens H. M.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Stability and sensitivity analysis of experimental flow fields measured past a porous cylinder2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 285. Camarri, S.
    et al.
    Fransson, Jens H. M.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Fluid Physics.
    Talamelli, A.
    Numerical investigation of the AFRODITE transition control strategy2014In: Springer Proceedings in Physics, Springer, 2014, p. 65-69Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The experiments carried out within the AFRODITE[2] project are aimed at exploring the effectiveness of properly shaped velocity miniature vortex generators in delaying transition to turbulence in a boundary layer. The present work details the direct numerical simulation setup designed to support and reproduce the AFRODITE experiments and provide results showing that the proposed DNS is in good agreement with the experiments. The results of the DNS also show that even a minimal delay of the transition point results in an overall gain in terms of drag when MVGs are installed on the plate.

  • 286. Camarri, Simone
    et al.
    Fallenius, Bengt E. G.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Fransson, Jens H. M.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Stability analysis of experimental flow fields behind a porous cylinder for the investigation of the large-scale wake vortices2013In: Journal of Fluid Mechanics, ISSN 0022-1120, E-ISSN 1469-7645, Vol. 715, p. 499-536Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    When the linear stability analysis is applied to the time-averaged flow past a circular cylinder after the primary instability of the wake, a nearly marginally stable global mode is predicted with a frequency in time equal to that of the saturated vortex shedding. This behaviour has recently been shown to hold up to Reynolds number Re = 600 by direct numerical simulations. In the present work we verify that the global stability analysis provides reasonable estimation also when applied to experimental velocity fields measured in the wake past a porous circular cylinder at Re similar or equal to 3.5 x 10(3). Different intensities of continuous suction and blowing through the entire surface of the cylinder are considered. The global direct and adjoint stability modes, derived from the experimental data, are used to sort the random instantaneous snapshots of the velocity field in phase. The proposed method is remarkable, sorting the snapshots in phase with respect to the vortex shedding, allowing phase-averaged velocity fields to be extracted from the experimental database. The phase-averaged flow fields are analysed in order to study the effect of the transpiration on the kinematical characteristics of the large-scale wake vortices.

  • 287. Camarri, Simone
    et al.
    Fallenius, Bengt E. G.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Fluid Physics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Fransson, Jens H. M.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Fluid Physics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Stability analysis of experimental flow fields behind aporous cylinder for the investigation of the large-scale wake vorticesReport (Other academic)
  • 288. Camarri, Simone
    et al.
    Trip, Renzo
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Fluid Physics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Fransson, Jens
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Fluid Physics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Investigation of passive control of the wake past a thick plate by stability and sensitivity analysis of experimental dataManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 289.
    Campagne, Antoine
    et al.
    LEGI, Université Grenoble Alpes.
    Alfredsson, Henrik
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics.
    Chassagne, Rémi
    LEGI, Université Grenoble Alpes.
    Micard, Diane
    LMFA, École Centrale de Lyon.
    Mordant, Nicolas
    LEGI, Université Grenoble Alpes.
    Segalini, Antonio
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics.
    Sommeria, Joel
    LEGI, Université Grenoble Alpes.
    Viboud, Samuel
    LEGI, Université Grenoble Alpes.
    Mohanan, Ashwin Vishnu
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics.
    Lindborg, Erik
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics.
    Augier, Pierre
    LEGI, Université Grenoble Alpes.
    First report of the MILESTONE experiment: strongly stratified turbulence and mixing efficiency in the Coriolis platform2016In: VIIIth International Symposium on Stratified Flows (ISSF), 2016, 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Strongly stratified turbulence is a possible interpretation of oceanic and atmospheric mea-surements. However, this regime has never been produced in a laboratory experiment be-cause of the two conditions of very small horizontal Froude number Fh and large buoyancy Reynolds number R which require a verily large experimental facility. We present a new attempt to study strongly stratified turbulence experimentally in the Coriolis platform.The flow is forced by a slow periodic movement of an array of six vertical cylinders of 25 cm diameter with a mesh of 75 cm. Five cameras are used for 3D-2C scanned horizontalparticles image velocimetry (PIV) and stereo 2D vertical PIV. Five density-temperatureprobes are used to measure vertical and horizontal profiles and signals at fixed positions.The first preliminary results indicate that we manage to produce strongly stratified tur-bulence at very small Fh and large R in a laboratory experiment.

  • 290. Candelier, F.
    et al.
    Einarsson, J.
    Lundell, Fredrik
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics.
    Mehlig, B.
    Angilella, J. -R
    Role of inertia for the rotation of a nearly spherical particle in a general linear flow2015In: Physical Review E. Statistical, Nonlinear, and Soft Matter Physics, ISSN 1539-3755, E-ISSN 1550-2376, Vol. 91, no 5, article id 053023Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We analyze the angular dynamics of a neutrally buoyant, nearly spherical particle immersed in a steady general linear flow. The hydrodynamic torque acting on the particle is obtained by means of a reciprocal theorem, a regular perturbation theory exploiting the small eccentricity of the nearly spherical particle, and by assuming that inertial effects are small but finite.

  • 291.
    Canton, Jacopo
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics.
    Approaching zero curvature: modal instability in a bent pipe2018Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Canton et al. [J. Fluid Mech. 792:894–909 (2016)] showed that the flow in a toroidal pipe is linearly unstable for any pipe curvature δ greater than 0.002. The same authors later provided a detailed characterisation of the laminar steady flow, reporting lower limits for the influence of the pipe curvature [Canton et al. Int. J. Heat Fluid Fl. 66:95-107 (2017)]. The objective of the present work is to investigate the behaviour of the linear instability as the curvature of the pipe tends to zero. Results indicate that the toroidal pipe remains linearly unstable for curvatures as low as 10−7. While the critical Reynolds number Re necessary for the instability grows with an approximately algebraic trend below δ = 0.002, the neutral curve also closes in onto the limit of negligible curvature. It therefore appears that there could be values of δ and Re where a linearly unstable toroidal flow could be connected to the linearly stable straight pipe flow.

  • 292.
    Canton, Jacopo
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics.
    Numerical studies on flows with secondary motion2016Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This work is concerned with the study of flow stability and turbulence control - two old but still open problems of fluid mechanics. The topics are distinct and are (currently) approached from different directions and with different strategies. This thesis reflects this diversity in subject with a difference in geometry and, consequently, flow structure: the first problem is approached in the study of the flow in a toroidal pipe, the second one in an attempt to reduce the drag in a turbulent channel flow.

    The flow in a toroidal pipe is chosen as it represents the common asymptotic limit between spatially developing and helical pipes. Furthermore, the torus represents the smallest departure from the canonical straight pipe flow, at least for small curvatures. The interest in this geometry is twofold: it allows us to isolate the effect of the curvature on the flow and to approach straight as well as helical pipes. The analysis features a characterisation of the steady solution as a function of curvature and the Reynolds number. The problem of forcing fluid in the pipe is addressed, and the so-called Dean number is shown to be of little use, except for infinitesimally low curvatures. It is found that the flow is modally unstable and undergoes a Hopf bifurcation that leads to a limit cycle. The bifurcation and the corresponding eigenmodes are studied in detail, providing a complete picture of the instability.

    The second part of the thesis approaches fluid mechanics from a different perspective: the Reynolds number is too high for a deterministic description and the flow is analysed with statistical tools. The objective is to reduce the friction exerted by a turbulent flow on the walls of a channel, and the idea is to employ a control strategy independent of the small, and Reynolds number-dependent, turbulent scales. The method of choice was proposed by Schoppa & Hussain [Phys. Fluids 10:1049-1051 (1998)] and consists in the imposition of streamwise invariant, large-scale vortices. The vortices are re-implemented as a volume force, validated and analysed. Results show that the original method only gave rise to transient drag reduction while the forcing version is capable of sustained drag reduction of up to 18%. An analysis of the method, though, reveals that its effectiveness decreases rapidly as the Reynolds number is increased.

  • 293.
    Canton, Jacopo
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics.
    Of Pipes and Bends2018Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This work is concerned with the transition to turbulence of the flow in bent pipes, but it also includes an analysis of large-scale turbulent structures and their use for flow control.

    The flow in a toroidal pipe is selected as it represents the common asymptotic limit between spatially developing and helical pipes. The study starts with a characterisation of the laminar flow as a function of curvature and the Reynolds number Re, since the so-called Dean number is found to be of little use except for infinitesimally low curvatures. It is found that the flow is modally unstable and undergoes a Hopf bifurcation for any curvature greater than zero. The bifurcation is studied in detail, and an effort to connect this modal instability with the linearly stable straight pipe is also presented.

    This flow is not only modally unstable, but undergoes subcritical transition at low curvatures. This scenario is found to bear similarities to straight pipes, but also fundamental differences such as weaker turbulent structures and the apparent absence of puff splitting. Toroidal pipe flow is peculiar, in that it is one of the few fluid flows presenting both sub- and supercritical transition to turbulence; the critical point where the two scenarios meet is therefore of utmost interest. It is found that a bifurcation cascade and featureless turbulence actually coexist for a range of curvature and Re, and the attractors of the respective structures have a small but finite basin of attraction.

    In 90◦ bent pipes at higher Re large-scale flow structures cause an oscilla- tory motion known as swirl-switching. Three-dimensional proper orthogonal decomposition is used to determine the cause of this phenomenon: a wave-like structure which is generated in the bent section, and is possibly a remnant of a low-Re instability.

    The final part of the thesis has a different objective: to reduce the turbulent frictional drag on the walls of a channel by employing a control strategy independent of Re-dependent turbulent scales, initially proposed by Schoppa & Hussain [Phys. Fluids 10:1049–1051 (1998)]. Results show that the original method only gives rise to transient drag reduction while a revised version is capable of sustained drag reduction of up to 18%. However, the effectiveness of this control decreases rapidly as the Reynolds number is increased, and the only possibility for high-Re applications is to use impractically small actuators.

  • 294.
    Canton, Jacopo
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics.
    The collapse of strong turbulent fronts in bent pipesIn: Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 295.
    Canton, Jacopo
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics.
    Auteri, F.
    Carini, M.
    Linear global stability of two incompressible coaxial jets2017In: Journal of Fluid Mechanics, ISSN 0022-1120, E-ISSN 1469-7645, Vol. 824, p. 886-911Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The linear stability of two incompressible coaxial jets, separated by a thick duct wall, is investigated by means of both a modal and a non-modal approach within a global framework. The attention is focused on the range of unitary velocity ratios for which an alternate vortex shedding from the duct wall is known to dominate the flow. In spite of the inherent convective nature of jet flow instabilities, such behaviour is shown to originate from an unstable global mode of the dynamics linearised around the axisymmetric base flow. The corresponding wavemaker is located in the recirculating-flow region formed behind the duct wall. At the same time, the transient-growth analysis reveals that huge amplifications (up to 20 orders of magnitude) of small flow perturbations at the nozzle exit can occur in the subcritical regime, especially for high ratios between the outer and the inner velocities.

  • 296.
    Canton, Jacopo
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW. KTH, Centres, SeRC - Swedish e-Science Research Centre.
    Schlatter, Philipp
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW. KTH, Centres, SeRC - Swedish e-Science Research Centre. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics.
    Örlü, Ramis
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Fluid Physics. KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Centres, Competence Center for Gas Exchange (CCGEx). KTH, Centres, SeRC - Swedish e-Science Research Centre.
    Linear stability of the flow in a toroidal pipe2015In: 9th International Symposium on Turbulence and Shear Flow Phenomena, TSFP 2015, TSFP-9 , 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    While hydrodynamic stability and transition to turbulence in straight pipes - being one of the most fundamental problems in fluid mechanics - has been studied extensively, the stability of curved pipes has received less attention. In the present work, the first (linear) instability of the canonical flow inside a toroidal pipe is investigated as a first step in the study of the related laminar-turbulent transition process. The impact of the curvature of the pipe, in the range 8 e [0.002,1], on the stability properties of the flow is studied in the framework of linear stability analysis. Results show that the flow is indeed modally unstable for all curvatures investigated and that the wave number corresponding to the critical mode depends on the curvature, as do several other features of this problem. The critical modes are mainly located in the region of the Dean vortices, and are characterised by oscillations which are symmetric or antisymmetric as a function of the curvature. The neutral curve associated with the first bifurcation is the result of a complex interaction between isolated modes and branches composed by several modes characterised by a common structure. This behaviour is in obvious contrast to that of straight pipes, which are linearly stable for all Reynolds numbers.

  • 297.
    Canton, Jacopo
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW. KTH, Centres, SeRC - Swedish e-Science Research Centre.
    Schlatter, Philipp
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW. KTH, Centres, SeRC - Swedish e-Science Research Centre.
    Örlü, Ramis
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Modal instability of the flow in a toroidal pipe2016In: Journal of Fluid Mechanics, ISSN 0022-1120, E-ISSN 1469-7645, Vol. 792, p. 894-909Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The modal instability encountered by the incompressible flow inside a toroidal pipe is studied, for the first time, by means of linear stability analysis and direct numerical simulation (DNS). In addition to the unquestionable aesthetic appeal, the torus represents the smallest departure from the canonical straight pipe flow, at least for low curvatures. The flow is governed by only two parameters: the Reynolds number (Formula presented.) and the curvature of the torus (Formula presented.), i.e. the ratio between pipe radius and torus radius. The absence of additional features, such as torsion in the case of a helical pipe, allows us to isolate the effect that the curvature has on the onset of the instability. Results show that the flow is linearly unstable for all curvatures investigated between 0.002 and unity, and undergoes a Hopf bifurcation at (Formula presented.) of about 4000. The bifurcation is followed by the onset of a periodic regime, characterised by travelling waves with wavelength (Formula presented.) pipe diameters. The neutral curve associated with the instability is traced in parameter space by means of a novel continuation algorithm. Tracking the bifurcation provides a complete description of the modal onset of instability as a function of the two governing parameters, and allows a precise calculation of the critical values of (Formula presented.) and (Formula presented.). Several different modes are found, with differing properties and eigenfunction shapes. Some eigenmodes are observed to belong to groups with a set of common characteristics, deemed ‘families’, while others appear as ‘isolated’. Comparison with nonlinear DNS shows excellent agreement, confirming every aspect of the linear analysis, its accuracy, and proving its significance for the nonlinear flow. Experimental data from the literature are also shown to be in considerable agreement with the present results.

  • 298.
    Canton, Jacopo
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Örlü, Ramis
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Chin, C.
    Hutchins, N.
    Monty, J.
    Schlatter, Philipp
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    On Large-Scale Friction Control in Turbulent Wall Flow in Low Reynolds Number Channels2016In: Flow Turbulence and Combustion, ISSN 1386-6184, E-ISSN 1573-1987, Vol. 97, no 3, p. 811-827Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study reconsiders the control scheme proposed by Schoppa & Hussain (Phys. Fluids 10, 1049–1051 1998), using a new set of numerical simulations. The computations are performed in a turbulent channel at friction Reynolds numbers of 104 (the value employed in the original study) and 180. In particular, the aim is to better characterise the physics of the control as well as to investigate the optimal parameters. The former purpose lead to a re-design of the control strategy: moving from a numerical imposition of the mean flow to the application of a volume force. A comparison between the two is presented. Results show that the original method only gave rise to transient drag reduction. The forcing method, on the other hand, leads to sustained drag reduction, and thus shows the superiority of the forcing approach for all wavelengths investigated. A clear maximum efficiency in drag reduction is reached for the case with a viscous-scaled spanwise wavelength of the vortices of 1200, which yields a drag reduction of 18 %, as compared to the smaller wavelength of 400 suggested as the most efficient vortex in Schoppa & Hussain. Various turbulence statistics are considered, in an effort to elucidate the causes of the drag-reducing effect. For instance, a region of negative production was found, which is quite unusual for developed turbulent channel flow.

  • 299.
    Canton, Jacopo
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW. KTH, Centres, SeRC - Swedish e-Science Research Centre.
    Örlü, Ramis
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Chin, Cheng
    Schlatter, Philipp
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW. KTH, Centres, SeRC - Swedish e-Science Research Centre.
    Reynolds number dependence of large-scale friction control in turbulent channel flow2016In: Physical Review Fluids, E-ISSN 2469-990X, Vol. 1, no 8, article id 081501Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present work investigates the effectiveness of the control strategy introduced by Schoppa and Hussain [Phys. Fluids 10, 1049 (1998)] as a function of Reynolds number (Re). The skin-friction drag reduction method proposed by these authors, consisting of streamwise-invariant, counter-rotating vortices, was analyzed by Canton et al. [Flow, Turbul. Combust. 97, 811 (2016)] in turbulent channel flows for friction Reynolds numbers (Re t) corresponding to the value of the original study (i.e., 104) and 180. For these Re, a slightly modified version of the method proved to be successful and was capable of providing a drag reduction of up to 18%. The present study analyzes the Reynolds number dependence of this drag-reducing strategy by performing two sets of direct numerical simulations (DNS) for Re-tau = 360 and 550. A detailed analysis of the method as a function of the control parameters (amplitude and wavelength) and Re confirms, on the one hand, the effectiveness of the large-scale vortices at low Re and, on the other hand, the decreasing and finally vanishing effectiveness of this method for higher Re. In particular, no drag reduction can be achieved for Re t = 550 for any combination of the parameters controlling the vortices. For low Reynolds numbers, the large-scale vortices are able to affect the near-wall cycle and alter the wall-shear-stress distribution to cause an overall drag reduction effect, in accordance with most control strategies. For higher Re, instead, the present method fails to penetrate the near-wall region and cannot induce the spanwise velocity variation observed in other more established control strategies, which focus on the near-wall cycle. Despite the negative outcome, the present results demonstrate the shortcomings of the control strategy and show that future focus should be on methods that directly target the near-wall region or other suitable alternatives.

  • 300.
    Canton, Jacopo
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Stability, Transition and Control.
    Örlü, Ramis
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Fluid Physics.
    Schlatter, Philipp
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Stability, Transition and Control.
    Characterisation of the steady, laminar incompressible flow in toroidal pipes covering the entire curvature rangeManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
3456789 251 - 300 of 2417
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf