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  • 251.
    Magnell, Marie
    et al.
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Geschwind, Lars
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Work Related Learning in Higher Education: Roles and Responsibilities2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Several actors demand an increase in work related learning in higher education. To meet this demand, a project aiming at increasing faculty awareness of work life issues was initiated at two Swedish HEIs. The aim of this paper is to study the organisational capability to integrate work related learning as regards support structures, incentives and responsibilities. To collect data, a questionnaire and case studies were conducted. The results indicate that the support structures are rather limited, academic staff request clear goals, and it is not clear who has the primary responsibility for integrating work related learning into the educational programmes.

  • 252.
    Magnell, Marie
    et al.
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Geschwind, Lars
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Gumaelius, Lena B.
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Kolmos, A. J.
    Faculty approaches to working life issues in engineering curricula2014In: ASEE Annual Conference and Exposition, Conference Proceedings, 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this paper is to identify faculty approaches to working life issues in engineering education. The paper focuses on faculty attitudes towards working life issues and their integration into the curriculum and on activities related to working life introduced to the curriculum. We used a mixed methods approach and performed a survey and interviews at a single faculty research intensive technical university in Sweden. The results show that faculty members are positive towards integrating issues from working life into the curriculum. The findings show no support for the academic drift hypothesis, at least not as regards staff drift. The findings also show that faculty members with more work experience outside academia are more interested in including work related issues in their teaching, while faculty with less work experience are less interested. Faculty rate critical thinking, problem solving, new solutions and technical knowledge as the most important knowledge, skills and competences in the engineering profession. The most common ways to integrate working life issues are to use examples from their own work experience, guest lectures or case studies, while programs with more extensive connections to industry offer more integrated activities, e.g. projects with industry. Programs with more extensive connections to industry also seem to use professional contacts established through research in their teaching.

  • 253.
    Magnell, Marie
    et al.
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning, Organisation and leadership.
    Geschwind, Lars
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning, Organisation and leadership.
    Kolmos, Anette
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Faculty perspectives on the inclusion of work-related learning in engineering curricula2017In: European Journal of Engineering Education, ISSN 0304-3797, E-ISSN 1469-5898, Vol. 42, no 6, p. 1038-1047Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this paper is to identify faculty perspectives on the integration of work-related issues in engineering education. A mixed methods approach was used to explore faculty attitudes towards work-related learning, to describe activities related to working life that have been introduced into the curriculum and to identify factors that faculty see as important if the amount of work-related learning is to increase. The results show that faculty members are positive about integrating work-related issues into the curriculum. Programmes with more extensive connections to industry offer more integrated activities, such as projects with external actors, and use professional contacts established through research in their teaching. In order to increase work-related learning in engineering curricula, faculty request clear goals and pedagogical tools. Other options to increase work-related learning include offering faculty the opportunity to work outside academia.

  • 254.
    Magnell, Marie
    et al.
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Högfeldt, Anna-Karin
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Guide to challenge driven education2015 (ed. 1500)Book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 255.
    Magnell, Marie
    et al.
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Kolmos, Anette
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning. Aalborg University.
    Employability and work-related learning activities in higher education: how strategies differ across academic environments2017In: Tertiary Education and Management, ISSN 1358-3883, E-ISSN 1573-1936, Vol. 23, no 2, p. 103-114Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The focus of this paper is on how academic staff perceive their roles and responsibilities regarding work-related learning, and how they approach and implement workrelated learning activities in curricula across academic environments in higher education. The study is based on case studies, including semi-structured interviews and analyses of course syllabuses in two higher education institutions. The results reveal divergent approaches between environments with limited and extensive work-related learning, and we present four different strategies for including work-related learning in curricula: add-on by someone else, add-on about the profession, integration of teaching and learning activities and integration with additional value. These four strategies represent a very diverse understanding of the role of education, ranging from education for academia to education for work outside academia, and contain various perceptions of the roles, types of work-related learning activities and integration in the ordinary curriculum.

  • 256.
    Magnell, Marie
    et al.
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Söderlind, Johan
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Geschwind, Lars
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Teaching-Research Nexus in Engineering Education2016In: Proceedings of the 12th International CDIO Conference, Turku University of Applied Sciences, Turku, Finland, June 12-16 2016., 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this paper is to study the teaching-research nexus in a research intensive technical university. The research questions are (i) How are the links between research and teaching perceived by faculty?, and (ii) How are the links performed in practice? We use a mixed methods design including a survey, interviews with top management, case studies, and documentary studies of policy documents. The results show that faculty believe in the occurrence of a teaching-research nexus, primarily based on the idea that all faculty members do both research and teaching. Some informants in the study address the need for flexibility in terms of division of tasks. The results also show that faculty learn themselves as a result of teaching. For some, it is more challenging to include research on bachelor level, while some present examples of how it can be done. All informants agree that the teaching-research links are obvious on master level. The low value given in academia to the nexus is identified as one of the preventing factors. Regarding how the links are performed in practice, the results show that beside traditional courses and master theses, other options include project courses, some in cooperation with industry. There seem to be few courses on research methodology, while integrating learning of research processes in other courses seem to be more common. Generally, the research included comes from the department or from the faculty member’s own research. In this study, there are no indications of an academic drift in which engineering education lose the connections to industry; on the contrary, the results indicate reciprocity between links to research and to industry.

  • 257.
    Malmqvist, Johan
    et al.
    Chalmers University of Technology.
    Edström, Kristina
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Lärande.
    Gunnarsson, Svante
    Linköping University.
    Östlund, Sören
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Solid Mechanics (Dept.).
    Use of CDIO Standards in Swedish National Evaluation of Engineering Education Programs2005In: Proceedings of the 1st International CDIO Conference, 2005, p. 134-137Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we report on a large-scale application of the CDIO standards, involving approximately 100 educational programs. The context is the Swedish national evaluation of its “civilingenjör” engineering degree programs made by the Swedish National Agency for Higher Education (Högskoleverket, HSV).

    In the paper, we first briefly describe the CDIO standards focusing on the role as a support for continuous program development. We then present the self-evaluation materials used in the HSV evaluation and account for HSV’s motives for including the CDIO standards evaluation in the self-evaluation package and for the modifications made compared to the original CDIO standards.

    We then discuss the results from a survey and an interview study directed to the program managers that have applied the CDIO standards in the HSV evaluation. The questions in the survey aim to investigate the respondents’ view of the relevance, benefits, limitations and ease of use of the CDIO standards. The questions are aimed both at the overall level – the body of standards – as well as at the level of single standards.

  • 258.
    Malmqvist, Johan
    et al.
    Chalmers University of Technology.
    Östlund, Sören
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Solid Mechanics (Dept.).
    Edström, Kristina
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Lärande.
    Integrated program descriptions: A tool for communicating goals and design of CDIO programs2006In: Proceedings of the 2nd International CDIO Conference, Linköping University Electronic Press, 2006Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The CDIO syllabus provides a generic platform for writing program goal statements. Specifically, intended learning outcomes for personal and professional skills and attitudes such as communication, teamwork and ethics can be stated by combining a topic from the CDIO syllabus with an appropriate cognitive verb that reflects the desired proficiency. However, a complete program goal statement must also include goals for mathematical, scientific and technical knowledge. Moreover, while a “pure” goal statement may be suitable for and support discussions with external stakeholders such as industry leaders who are not involved in the program design as such, deliberations with internal stakeholders such as faculty and students often need to address both the goals for the program and they way in which they are realized – the program design.

    In response to these needs, the paper presents a framework which brings together the goals and the design of the program. This achieved by combining the CDIO syllabus and the CDIO curriculum design tools, in a framework that also includes the statement of program-specific goals for disciplinary knowledge. We call this framework integrated program descriptions. In the paper, the contents of these components and the process of implementing them at Chalmers and KTH are discussed. The KTH case involves the CDIO-based Vehicle Engineering program. The Chalmers application spans about 70 engineering programs, both CDIO-based and non-CDIO-based. Benefits and challenges are discussed.

  • 259.
    Malmqvist, Johan
    et al.
    Chalmers University of Technology.
    Östlund, Sören
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Solid Mechanics (Dept.).
    Edström, Kristina
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Using Integrated Programme Descriptions to Support a CDIO Programme Design Process2006In: World Transactions on Engineering and Technology Education, ISSN 1446-2257, Vol. 5, no 2, p. 259-262Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 260.
    Malmqvist, Johan
    et al.
    Chalmers University of Technology.
    Östlund, Sören
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Solid Mechanics (Dept.).
    Gunnarsson, Svante
    Linköping University.
    Edström, Kristina
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    The Application of CDIO Standards in the Evaluation of Swedish Engineering Degree Programmes2006In: World Transactions on Engineering and Technology Education, ISSN 1446-2257, Vol. 5, no 2, p. 361-364Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 261.
    Manneberg, Otto
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Biomedical and X-ray Physics.
    Rosén, Robert
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Biomedical and X-ray Physics.
    Högfeldt, Anna-Karin
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Manneberg, Göran
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Biomedical and X-ray Physics.
    Edström, Kristina
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    En struktur för ökad funktionell kunskap hos studenten från räkneövningar2008Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    En struktur för räkneövningar med syftet att ge studenten ökade funktionella kunskaper och färdigheter i ämnet presenteras. Strukturen är avsedd att aktivera studenten både innan och under en räkneövning. Genom kamraträttning av frivilliga hemuppgifter frikopplade från bonussystem, student-student-diskussioner samt diskussion i helklass antas studenten uppmuntras till djupare lärstrategier och nå en högre taxonominivå inom ämnet.Strukturen utprovas på två studentgrupper; andraårsstudenter på ett civilingenjörsprogram på KTH, samt förstårsstudenter på optikerutbildningen på Karolinska Institutet som läser optikkurser vid KTH. Utvärdering sker under pågående kurs genom enkäter till alla studenterna samt intervjuer av optikerstudenter, samt efter fullgången kurs genom intervjuer av assistenter och ingenjörsstudenter. Resultaten visar att studenterna ställer sig positiva till det nya systemet och anser att det ger dem en djupare nivå av förståelse, att det skapar en mer transparent bild av rättningsprocessen, samt att det ökar interaktionen mellan studenter och skapar en bättre klassrumsmiljö. Deltagandet är stort bland optikerstudenterna, medan ingenjörsstudenterna anser att de har betydligt svårare att hitta tid till hemuppgifterna.

  • 262. Mannila, L.
    et al.
    Dagiene, V.
    Demo, B.
    Grgurina, N.
    Mirolo, C.
    Rolandsson, Lennart
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning, Teknikdidaktik.
    Settle, A.
    Computational thinking in K-9 education2014In: ITiCSE-WGR 2014 - Working Group Reports of the 2014 Innovation and Technology in Computer Science Education Conference, 2014, p. 1-29Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this report we consider the current status of the coverage of computer science in education at the lowest levels of education in multiple countries. Our focus is on computational thinking (CT), a term meant to encompass a set of concepts and thought processes that aid in formulating problems and their solutions in different fields in a way that could involve computers [130]. The main goal of this report is to help teachers, those involved in teacher education, and decision makers to make informed decisions about how and when CT can be included in their local institutions. We begin by defining CT and then discuss the current state of CT in K-9 education in multiple countries in Europe as well as the United States. Since many students are exposed to CT outside of school, we also discuss the current state of informal educational initiatives in the same set of countries. An important contribution of the report is a survey distributed to K-9 teachers, aiming at revealing to what extent different aspects of CT are already part of teachers' classroom practice and how this is done. The survey data suggest that some teachers are already involved in activities that have strong potential for introducing some aspects of CT. In addition to the examples given by teachers participating in the survey, we present some additional sample activities and lesson plans for working with aspects of CT in different subjects. We also discuss ways in which teacher training can be coordinated as well as the issue of repositories. We conclude with future directions for research in CT at school.

  • 263. McGrath, Cormac
    et al.
    Barman, Linda
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Stenfors-Hayes, Terese
    Roxa, Torgny
    Silen, Charlotte
    Laksov, Klara Bolander
    The Ebb and Flow of Educational Change: Change Agents as Negotiators of Change2016In: Teaching and Learning Inquiry, ISSN 2167-4779, E-ISSN 2167-4787, Vol. 4, no 2Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we are concerned with how change agents go about and experience change implementation in higher education. We identified change agents and interviewed them about how they implement change. Empirical data was analysed using a theoretical framework of change. The findings suggest that change in the university is enacted through a process of negotiation. The findings of this study may offer academic developers, pedagogical leaders, and change agents insight into the complex nature of the change process and inform change agents as to the complex nature and importance of their role.

  • 264. Mellander, Erik
    et al.
    Svärdh, Joakim
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Inquiry-based learning put to test: Long-term effects of the Swedish Science and Technology for Children programManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 265.
    Norström, Per
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning, Teknikdidaktik.
    Technological Experiments in Technology Education2015In: PATT 29: Plurality and complementarity of approaches in design and technology education / [ed] Marjolaine Chatoney, Aix-en-Provence: Service Imprimerie de l'université d'Aix-Marseille , 2015, p. 322-327Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In processes of engineering design and innovation, technological experiments are commonly conducted. The methods used are similar to those in the natural sciences, but the objectives are different. Technological experiments commonly deal with context-dependent problems related to function, rather than the uncovering or falsification of general laws. Furthermore, they often include value-laden concepts such as safety and ergonomics which are not part of the natural sciences. In school, experimentation is largely seen as part of the domain of the natural sciences, and the experimental parts of technological work gets little attention. This study is based on findings from a professional development course for teachers in years 7 to 9 in compulsory school in Sweden (pupils aged 13–16). In the course, the use of experiments in education was one of the major themes. The teachers who partook in the course generally found it difficult to formulate technological problems to be examined using experimental methods. During the course, they were to develop their own technology education experiments. These often turned out to be rather plain activities where the results, rather than the process were the important thing. In this paper, the results from the teachers’ actual attempts to design technological experiments and reasons for why experimentation should get a more prominent position in school are discussed. Experimental work is an essential part of research in engineering design and the technological sciences and should therefore be included in technology education, but without turning it into only applied natural science.

  • 266.
    Norström, Per
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning, Learning in Engineering Sciences.
    The Nature of Pre-University Engineering Education2016In: Pre-University Engineering Education / [ed] Marc J. de Vries, Lena Gumaelius, Inga-Britt Skogh, Rotterdam: Sense Publishers, 2016, 1, p. 27-46Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Engineering has been introduced as a subject area in schools all over the world during the last decades. The purpose and contents vary slightly, but are commonly based on an engineering design process – on methods for systematic problem solving and product development. Skills learnt during this work is thought to be transferable to everyday life, future careers, and other educational areas. Pre-university engineering education should also increase pupils’ interest in technology, science and/or mathematics. Engineering projects in school commonly deal with non-realistic problems, which lead to difficult challenges for teachers and pupils concerning the transfer of skills to contexts outside of school. Great hopes for engineering’s opportunities to improve pupils’ creativity, learning, initiative, collaboration, and autonomy are expressed in curricula, but no conclusive evidence for its effectiveness exists.

  • 267. O'Connor, Adrian
    et al.
    Buckley, Jeffrey
    University of Limerick, Ireland.
    Seery, Niall
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Cleveland-Innes, Martha
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Identifying, developing and grading “soft skills” in higher education: A technological approach2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Identifying, developing and grading soft skills, i.e., transversal cross-curricular competencies, in higher education requires the recognition of key qualities, the capacity to discriminate between these qualities and a mechanism to validly and reliability grade soft skill acquisition. This research proposes a technological infrastructure that acknowledges the importance of self-assessment, peer observation and teacher evaluation when adjudicating on subjective and often personal data. The proposal has the capacity to balance, weight and triangulate the objective and subjective evidence of soft skill acquisition ensuring the validity and reliability of the resultant accreditation. Accreditation of soft skills was in the form of digital badges. Using the proposed technological approach, the identification, development and grading of soft skills can be reviewed, tracked and managed over time to demonstrate competencies with respect to both the context and situation. The technological approach empowers stakeholders as critical partners within the assessment process and supports the ecological validity of their judgements based on the evidence submitted for accreditation. Reliability is strengthened by the triangulation of these judgements. Though more significantly, the technological approach facilitates the capacity to weight stakeholders’ decisions relative to the context and situation.

  • 268.
    Pears, Arnold
    et al.
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning. Uppsala universitet.
    Dagiene, V.
    Jasute, E.
    Baltic and nordic K-12 teacher perspectives on computational thinking and computing2017In: 10th International Conference on Informatics in Schools: Situation, Evolution, and Perspectives, ISSEP 2017, Springer, 2017, Vol. 10696, p. 141-152Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper reports on the results of a study of teacher preparedness and practices in relation to teaching computing and computational thinking at schools in Sweden, Finland and Lithuania. The study was conducted as part of a NordForsk funded project to explore how Computing Education Research in the Universities can help the development of teacher training and K-12 curriculum and teaching practices. The study found that many teachers are already engaged in teaching relevant material in the schools, and that many have good support in their local school environment. However, there are also significant challenges which emerge from the new curricula that have been introduced in Sweden and Finland. To meet these challenges new teacher training programmes will be needed, and we recommend that computational thinking and computing concepts be introduced into the core subject content of teacher education programmes in order to better prepare teachers to meet the educational demands of our increasingly digitalised society.

  • 269. Pekkola, Elias
    et al.
    Stensaker, Bjørn
    Söderlind, Johan
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Krog Lind, Jonas
    Unpacking incentive structures in academia: Structural factors driving motivation of academic staff in Nordic universities2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 270. Pinheiro, Romulo
    et al.
    Aarrevaara, Timo
    Berg, Elisabet
    Geschwind, Lars
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Torjesen, Dag Olav
    Strategic Mergers in the Public Sector: Comparing Universities and Hospitals2015In: Mergers and Acquisitions In Practice / [ed] S. Tarba, R. Cooper & C. Sarala, London: Routledge, 2015Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 271.
    Pinheiro, Romulo
    et al.
    University of Agder.
    Geschwind, Lars
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Aarrevaara, Timo
    University of Lapland.
    Mergers in higher education2016In: European Journal of Higher Education, ISSN 2156-8235, E-ISSN 2156-8243, Vol. 6, no 1, p. 2-6Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this special issue of the European Journal of Higher Education, a number of experienced scholars provide a broad picture of the most recent round of mergers involving higher education institutions in Europe and beyond. In doing so, they address issues pertaining to the different phases described above and from various theoretical perspectives and in the light of particular historical trajectories and institutional conditions. The primary aim is to provide both an empirical account of recent developments as well as an initial foundation for more sophisticated and robust conceptual models used to illuminate on the complex phenomenon surrounding mergers in higher education, and, in turn, critically assess the implications when it comes to change patterns and future directions at the national and supranational (Europe) levels.

  • 272. Pinheiro, Romulo
    et al.
    Geschwind, Lars
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Aarrevaara, Timo
    Nested tensions and interwoven dilemmas in higher education: the view from the Nordic countries2014In: Cambridge Journal of Regions, Economy and Society, ISSN 1752-1378, E-ISSN 1752-1386, Vol. 7, no 2, p. 233-250Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper reflects on the challenges facing European higher education by investigating current dynamics across three national systems: Norway, Sweden and Finland. We identify four sets of tensions permeating current dynamics across the region, and link those to a series of dilemmas facing European universities more broadly. The paper demonstrates that there is a complex interplay between the so-called 'nested tensions' and different types of internal and external pressures. We conclude by providing a set of policy recommendations as well as suggestions for future research inquiries.

  • 273. Pinheiro, Romulo
    et al.
    Geschwind, Lars
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning. Universitety of Agder.
    Hansen, Hanne Foss
    University of Copenhagen.
    Pekkola, Elias
    Tampere University.
    Academic leadership in the Nordic countries: patterns of gender equality2015In: Women's voices in management: identifying innovative and responsible solutions / [ed] Syna, H. & Costea, C., London: Palgrave Macmillan, 2015, 1, p. 15-33-Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 274. Pinheiro, Romulo
    et al.
    Geschwind, Lars
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Pekkola, Elias
    Hansen, Foss Hanne
    PRIMUS INTER PARES?: THE ACADEMIC AGORA SEEN FROM THE TOP (BY WOMEN)2014In: FUTURE OF ENTREPRENEURSHIP, 2014, p. 2206-2206Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 275. Pinheiro, Rómulo
    et al.
    Aarrevaara, Timo
    Berg, Laila
    Geschwind, Lars
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Torjesen, Dag Olav
    Strategic Mergers in the Public Sector: Comparing Universities and Hospitals2017In: Mergers and Acquisitions in Practice / [ed] Tarba, S. Y.; Cooper, C. L.; Sarala, R. M.; Ahammad, M. F., Routledge, 2017, p. 44-68Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 276. Pinheiro, Rómulo
    et al.
    Geschwind, Lars
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Ramirez, Francisco O.
    Vrangbaek, Karsten
    The value in comparing organizational fields and forms2016In: Towards A Comparative Institutionalism: Forms, Dynamics And Logics Across The Organizational Fields Of Health Care And Higher Education / [ed] Pinheiro, R., Geschwind, L., Ramirez, F., Vrangbaek, K., Emerald Group Publishing Limited, 2016, Vol. 45, p. 9-32Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Following the spirit of an earlier volume in the series focusing on ’Comparative Approaches to Organizational Research’, the mandate of the current volume is to provide a comparative account of dynamics across two organizational fields - health care and higher education - and, subsequently, two specific types of organizational forms - hospitals and universities. In so doing, we take a broader perspective encompassing various conceptual and theoretical points of departure emanating from, mostly, the institutional literature in the social sciences (and its various perspectives), but also from public policy and administration literatures - of relevance to scholars and the communities of practice working within either field. In this introductory paper to the volume, we provide a brief overview of developments across the two organizational fields and illuminate on the most important scholarly traditions underpinning the study of both system dynamics as a whole as well as universities and hospitals as organizations and institutions. We conclude by reflecting on the implication of the volume’s key findings in regards to comparative research within organizational studies.

  • 277. Pinheiro, Rómulo
    et al.
    Geschwind, LarsKTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.Ramirez, Francisco O.Vrangbaek, Karsten
    Towards A Comparative Institutionalism: Forms, Dynamics And Logics Across The Organizational Fields Of Health Care And Higher Education2016Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 278.
    Rolandsson, Lennart
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning, Teknikdidaktik.
    Changing Computer Programming Education; The Dinosaur that Survived in School An explorative study about educational issues based on teachers' beliefs and curriculum development in secondary school2013In: 2013 Learning And Teaching In Computing And Engineering (LATICE 2013), IEEE , 2013, p. 220-223Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    According to teachers, the computer programming education dependence on students' logical and analytical abilities (even before the course starts). A majority of teachers also perceive their pedagogy as non-sufficient for students' learning. The paper unravels two types of instruction at upper secondary school; one which emphasizes individual work with programming languages assisted by a teacher, and one which emphasizes students' experiences of learning concepts. Two types of instruction that corresponds to the existence of two groups of teachers during the 1980s; the defenders who perceived learning as based on repeating sequences in a behavioristic manner, and partisans who perceived learning as based on discovery and self-teaching. The paper suggests that instructional design has remained the same, since the beginning of the 1970s, which could be the rationales for the difficulties in learning and teaching computer programming.

  • 279.
    Rolandsson, Lennart
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Changing Computer Programming Education; The Dinosaur that Survived in School: An explorative study of educational issues based on teachers' beliefs and curriculum development in secondary school2012Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    With the intention to contribute to research in computer programming education the thesis depicts the mind-set of teachers and their beliefs in relation to the early enactment of the informatics curriculum in Swedish upper secondary school. Two perspectives are covered in the thesis. Based on original documents and interviews with curriculum developers, the enactment of the informatics/programming curriculum during the 1970s and 1980s is explored (Paper 1). This historical perspective is supplemented with a perspective from the present day where current teaching practice is explored through teachers’ statements (seminars with associated questionnaires) regarding their beliefs about teaching and learning programming (Paper 2).

    The historical data reveals that experimental work within the informatics curriculum was initiated in the mid-1970s. In the early stages of the curriculum development process a contemporary post gymnasium programme in computing was used as a blueprint. The curriculum relied on programming as well as system development, wherefore a question of importance was raised early in the process; should the subject matter of informatics, be taught by ‘regular’ Natural Sciences and Mathematics teachers or by contemporary vocational education teachers in ADP? The question was initially solved using stereotypical examples of how to apply system development, which was later suggested as a replacement for programming activities. The initial incitement to offer informatics education during the 1970s was discovered in the recruitment of a broader group of students within the Natural Science Programme and the perception that it would contribute to the development of students’ ability to think logically and problem solving skills.

    The thesis unravels an instructional dependence among today’s teachers where students’ logical and analytical abilities (even before the courses start) are considered crucial to students’ learning, while teachers question the importance of their pedagogy. Teachers in the study commonly express the belief that their instructions hardly matter to the students’ learning. Instead these teachers perceive learning programming as an individual act. The inquiry also discover two types of instruction; a large group putting emphasis on the syntax of programming languages, and a smaller group putting emphasis on the students’ experiences of learning concepts of computer science (not necessarily to do with syntax), which corresponds with the existence of two groups of teachers during the 1980s; the partisans who perceived learning as based on repeating sequences in a behaviouristic manner, and defenders who perceived learning as based on discovery and self-teaching.

    In summary the inquiry depicts an instructional tradition based on teachers’ beliefs where the historical development of the subject sets the framework for the teaching. Directly and indirectly the historical development and related traditions govern what programming teachers in upper secondary school will/are able to present to their students.

  • 280.
    Rolandsson, Lennart
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Informatics and Programming in Swedish Upper Secondary School: Visions and experimental work during the 1970s and 1980sArticle in journal (Other academic)
  • 281.
    Rolandsson, Lennart
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning, Technical Science Education.
    Programmed or Not: A study about programming teachers’ beliefs and intentions in relation to curriculum2015Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In the intersection of technology, curriculum and intentions, a specific issue of interest is found in the gap between teachers’ intentions and implementations of curriculum. Instead of approaching curriculum and technology as something fait accompli, teachers are considered crucial in the re-discovery of what and how to teach. The thesis depicts the mind-set of teachers and their beliefs in relation to computing curriculum. Three perspectives are covered in the thesis. Based on original documents and interviews with curriculum developers, the enactment of the computing/programming curriculum during the 1970s and 1980s is explored (Paper 1). This historical perspective is supplemented with a perspective from the present day where current teaching practice is explored through teachers’ statements (seminars with associated questionnaires) regarding their beliefs about teaching and learning programming(Paper 2). Finally with a view from a theoretical perspective, teachers’perception of instruction is discussed in relation to a theoretical framework where their intentions in relation to theoretical and practical aspects of knowledge are revealed (Papers 3 & 4). The initial incitement to offer computing education during the 1970s was discovered in the recruitment of a broader group of students within the Natural Science Programme and the perception that it would contribute to the development of students’ ability to think logically and learn problem solving skills. Data concerning teachers’ beliefs about teaching and learning programming unravels an instructional dependence among today’s teachers where students’ logical and analytical abilities (even before the courses start) are considered crucial to students’ learning, while teachers question the importance of their pedagogy. The thesis also discover two types of instruction; a large group putting emphasis on the syntax of programming languages, and a smaller group putting emphasis on the students’ experiences of learning concepts of computer science (not necessarily to do with syntax). In summary the thesis depicts an instructional tradition based on teachers’ beliefs where the historical development of the subject sets the framework for the teaching. Directly and indirectly the historical development and related traditions govern what programming teachers in upper secondary school will/are able to present to their students. From deploying two theoretical approaches, phenomenography and logic of events, upon teacher’s cases it is shown that the intended object of learning (iOoL) is shaped by the teacher’s intentions (e.g., balancing the importance oftheory and practice, using different learning strategies, encouraging learning by trial-and-error and fostering collaboration between students for a deeper understanding). The teachers also present a diverse picture regarding what theoretical knowledge students will reach for.

  • 282.
    Rolandsson, Lennart
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Teachers' Beliefs Regarding Progamming Education2013In: Technology Teachers as Researchers, Sense Publishers, 2013, p. 285-309Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The paper explores the beliefs of today’s programming teachers from the following research question: What beliefs do programming teachers express regarding teaching and learning computer programming in upper secondary school? To answer that question four seminars were offered focusing on upper secondary programming education. At each seminar, a questionnaire designed to elicit teachers’ beliefs about aspects of importance for their instructional design and students learning was given to the teachers/informants.

    The analysis showed four themes in relation to teachers’ beliefs about learning and teaching: 1. Students’ individual connective time, 2. Teachers’ pedagogy, 3. Students’ abilities, 4. Students’ interest and motivation.

    The assessment process is crucial to teachers’ choice of instruction strategies. This is particularly valid in the beginners’ course, where collaboration among students (peer-learning) is often practiced, and where skills essential to working in groups are commonly considered not to be important. In conclusion it could be said that two distinctive instructional patterns exist among teachers; individual support, and instruction for experience of learning.

    A majority of the teachers in the study express a number of expectations concerning their students’ abilities; specific abilities such as logical and analytical thinking are emphasized as important for successful learning, while the ability to work in a group and to communicate is perceived as beneficial but not of any concern during the assessment process. The paper raises the question of whether teachers perceive abilities as fixed and inborn (naïve belief) or something that students could acquire with some effort (sophisticated belief). Findings suggest that a majority of the teachers hold a naïve belief. Findings also show that the teachers in the study focus on the individual, constructivist based learning which indicate that the teachers in the study commonly hold on to relativistic world-views. The concept of pedagogy were also discovered significant as many teachers question the importance of their pedagogy for students' learning.

  • 283.
    Rolandsson, Lennart
    et al.
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning, Teknikdidaktik.
    Skogh, Inga-Britt
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning, Teknikdidaktik.
    Programming in School: Look Back to Move Forward2014In: ACM Transactions on Computing Education, ISSN 1946-6226, E-ISSN 1946-6226, Vol. 14, no 2, p. 12:1-12:25Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article, the development of the Swedish informatics curriculum during the 1970s, 1980s and 1990sis studied and described. The study’s design is inspired by the curriculum theory presented by Lindensj¨oand Lundgren [2000], who suggest using the concept of arenas (the arenas of enactment, transformationand realisation) when discussing curriculum development. Data collection in this study comprises activitiesand actors in the arenas of enactment and transformation. Collected data include contemporary articles,journals, reports, booklets, government documents and archived documents. Findings show that informaticseducation in Sweden evolved from primarily focusing on programming knowledge related to automatic dataprocessing and offered exclusively in vocational education (the 1960s and 1970s) to later (early 1980s) beingintroduced in the upper secondary school curriculum under the heading Datakunskap. The enactment of theinformatics curriculum in 1983 encompassed programming, system development and computing in relationto applied sciences and civics. Mathematics teachers did much of the experimental work. It is shown that thecompetencies of upper secondary school teachers at the time rarely corresponded to the demands of the subject(content knowledge, resources and pedagogical skills). Stereotypical examples were therefore developedto support teachers in instructing about the subject content. When implemented in the theoretical naturalscience-programme, system development/systemisation was transformed into a twofold issue, comprisingvocational attributes and societal aspects of computer programming. The implementation of today’s informaticseducation, including programming in the curriculum, should draw from lessons learned from history.For a successful outcome, this study emphasises the necessity to understand 1) the common incentives forintroducing computer programming in the curriculum, 2) the requirement for teachers’ pedagogical contentknowledge and 3) the stakeholders’ role in the curriculum development process.

  • 284.
    Rolandsson, Lennart
    et al.
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning, Teknikdidaktik.
    Skogh, Inga-Britt
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning, Teknikdidaktik.
    Männikkö Barbutiu, Sirkku
    Stockholm University.
    Bridging a Gap: In search of an analytical tool capturing teachers’ perceptions of their own teachingManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Computing and computers are introduced in school as important examples of technology. Sometimes as a subject matter of their own, and sometimes they are used as tools, but in principle, learning about computers is part of learning about technology. Lately, the subject is being implemented in curricula to explain society’s dependence on programming knowledge and code. However, there are some considerations related to teaching programming, as the questions of what and how to teach highlight different aspects of the learning objective. In phenomenography, intended object of learning (OoL) is suggested to describe the teacher’s perspective on teaching and learning. There is, however, an analytical reduction made in phenomenography, which makes such a construction hard to distinguish in action. To find ways of bridging this reduction and deepen our understanding of teachers’ work, the article discusses the possibility of using von Wright’s theoretical model of logic of events as a complementary analytical tool in search for understanding of the intentions behind such a construction. Two theoretical approaches, phenomenography and logic of events, are deployed upon one teacher’s case to illustrate that the intended OoL is shaped by the teacher’s intentions, such as balancing the importance of theory and practice, using different learning strategies, encouraging learning by trial-and-error and finally fostering collaboration between students for a deeper understanding of the OoL. In conclusion, logic of events interpretations reveals the teacher’s intentions as being complementary to the principles of phenomenography. Understanding of teachers’ intentions contribute to the understanding of the OoL from a teachers’ perspective.

  • 285.
    Rolandsson, Lennart
    et al.
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning, Teknikdidaktik.
    Skogh, Inga-Britt
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning, Teknikdidaktik.
    Männikkö Barbutiu, Sirkku
    Stockholm University.
    Intentions and pedagogical actions: A study of programming teachers’ construction of a learning objectiveManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Teachers focus on one or several objects of learning (OoLs) in parallel. During the process of teaching and learning,students are invited to share the enacted object of learning (eOoL) as teachers shape the intended object of learning(iOoL). A gap is suggested in the steps going from the iOoL to the eOoL because students have differentprerequisites and ambitions. In laboratory work, theory and practice supposedly interplay to enhance students’learning. This study therefore considers that gap and addresses the following question: “What educational intentionsand expectations do programming teachers express when they (in retrospect) describe their teaching during anassignment on a principle from computer science?” Interviews were conducted with five teachers from differentsites (secondary and tertiary levels). A second-order perspective was used to unravel the expected OoL and theteachers’ intentions. The study reveals the existence of other OoLs in interplay with what is expected to be learnt.The teachers reveal a strong opinion regarding practice as a means for learning theory, as three qualitativelydifferent students’ actions will help the teacher to decide students’ theoretical understanding. Further work issuggested to explore the teachers’ reflections about what materialized in the classrooms and thus gain anunderstanding of the gap.

  • 286.
    Rooke, Gunilla
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    In Search for Gender awareness in Technology Education2013Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis consists of two essays and an introduction. The main theme is gender awareness in technology education and the theoretical standpoint is gender theory.

    The first essay examines the subject of technology in compulsory school, scrutinizes the status of gender awareness in technology education and what methods are used to break gender boundaries. By observations, interviews and questionnaire pupils’, teachers’ and school leaders’ apprehensions of technology and technology education are examined. The gender issue is known to everyone, but awareness in strategies and education methods is rather deficient. The already rather invisible subject of technology, lack of qualifications among teachers, material and methods obstructs gender awareness. To make changes the school leader has a key position.

    The second essay considers gender oriental recruitment actions for increasing the number of female students in higher technology education. The actions have been governmental, from the profession and from local schools. By literature studies actions are mapped and organized according to their physical and structural arena. Five arenas have been identified: square, mass, entrance, class room and board room. Actions at public arenas aimed to increase interest and change attitudes dominate. Structural actions, preferably initiated from the government, have been tried, often with good results. These actions challenge the power system at the board room and class room and are therefore met with resistance.

  • 287.
    Rosén, Anders
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Naval Systems.
    Edström, Kristina
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Borglund, Dan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Flight Dynamics.
    Kuttenkeuler, Jakob
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Naval Systems.
    Hallström, Stefan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Lightweight Structures.
    Garme, Karl
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Naval Systems.
    3+2≠5 eller Programmål för ingenjörsutbildningar i ljuset av Bolognareformen2011In: 3:e Utvecklingskonferensen för Sveriges ingenjörsutbildningar, 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 288.
    Rosén, Anders
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering.
    Edström, Kristina
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Borglund, Dan
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning, Organisation and leadership.
    Kuttenkeuler, Jakob
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering.
    Hallström, Stefan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering.
    Garme, Karl
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering.
    Programmål inom den nya utbildningsstrukturen på KTH2010Report (Other academic)
  • 289.
    Ryttberg, Malin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Geschwind, Lars
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Professional support staff at higher education institutions in Sweden: roles and success factors2017In: Tertiary Education and Management, ISSN 1358-3883, E-ISSN 1573-1936, Vol. 23, no 4, p. 334-346Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper aims to analyse and discuss the professional support staff at higher education institutions in Sweden in terms of how they view their roles and what the success factors for them are. The study is based on semi-structured interviews with support staff from the fields of business liaison, internationalisation and strategic research support. The results show that the participants have shaped their own roles and see themselves as back-office staff. This can make it challenging for them to prove their contribution to the academic activities of education and research. Because they neither identify themselves as administrators nor hold academic positions, their ability to build credibility on a personal basis is a central success factor. Aware of being actors in a culture dominated by academic values and norms, they see a more transparent discussion of their roles as a desirable development in the sector.

  • 290.
    Seery, Niall
    et al.
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Delahunty, Thomas
    Canty, Donal
    Buckley, Jeffrey
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Illustrating educational development through ipsative performance in design based education2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 291.
    Skogh, Inga-Britt
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning, Technical Science Education.
    Barns bilder av teknik2007In: Didaktikens forum, ISSN 1652-2583, Vol. årg. 4, no 2, p. 66-70Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 292.
    Skogh, Inga-Britt
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning, Teknikdidaktik.
    Innovative performance: how can it be assessed?2005In: Inspire and Educate / [ed] E W L Norman, David Spendlove and Peter Grover, Sheffield Hallam University , 2005, p. 161-166Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 293.
    Skogh, Inga-Britt
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning, Teknikdidaktik.
    Uppdrag: Teknikmedvetna barn2015In: Fritidshemmet och skolan: Det gemensamma uppdraget / [ed] Ann S. Pihlgren, Studentlitteratur AB, 2015, 1:a, p. 303-321Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Kapitlet Uppdrag: teknikmedvetna barn beskriverhur fritidshem och skola kan samarbeta tematiskt för att utveckla elevers förtsåelse av och kunskap om teknik.Teknikförståelse hos svenska barn är inte så utvecklad och teknikämnet får lätt en undanskymd plats i undervisningen trots dess vikt. Med utgångspunkt i temaområdet Hållbar utveckling ger författaren läsaren teoretiska redskap att förstå vad som är viktigt i teknikundervisningen genom att omsätta teorier i praktik på fritidshemmet och i skolan.

  • 294.
    Skogh, Inga-Britt
    et al.
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, Philosophy.
    De Vries, Marc
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning. Delft University of Technology, Netherlands.
    TUFF and the value of teachers as researchers2013In: Technology Teachers as Researchers: Philosophical and Empirical Technology Education Studies in the Swedish TUFF Research School, Sense Publishers, 2013, p. 1-13Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 295.
    Skogh, Inga-Britt
    et al.
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Gumaelius, Lena
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Technology Teachers as Researchers: The TUFF Experience2012In: Explorations of best practice in Technology, Design & Engineering Education: Volume 2, 2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 296.
    Stenbom, Stefan
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Mattecoach på nätet2010Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Mattecoach på nätet är en satsning där elever på Stockholmsskolor på kvällstid kan få hjälp av lärarstudenter med matematik via direktmeddelandeprogrammet Windows Live Messenger. Stefan Stenbom som är projektledare berättar om projektet och hur de praktiskt arbetar i lärarrollen när de möter ungdomar på MSN.Mattecoach på nätet är en satsning där elever på Stockholmsskolor på kvällstid kan få hjälp av lärarstudenter med matematik via direktmeddelandeprogrammet Windows Live Messenger. Tjänsten är öppen för alla elever från åk 6 till och med gymnasiet och komvux i Stockholm. Syftet med projektet är att bidra till ökad måluppfyllnad i matematik bland Stockholms elever, utveckla den digitala kompetensen bland lärarstudenter och ta fram metoder för lärarhandledning via Internet.Coacherna är alla lärarstudenter på KTH och Stockholms universitet och genomgår en coachutbildning där de får lära sig handledning på nätet. Genom att använda lärarstudenter lär vi oss samtidigt hur en lärares roll på Internet kan se ut, något som vi tror är viktigt inför framtiden. Vi sparar alla konversationer vilka analyseras och sammanställs. Till exempel var under hösten 2009 medelkonversationslängden 26,8 minuter och 23 % av frågorna handlade om algebra. Stefan Stenbom som har byggt upp verksamheten och leder projektet håller presentationen, berättar om projektet och hur de praktiskt arbetar i lärarrollen när de möter ungdomar på MSN.

  • 297.
    Stenbom, Stefan
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Online coaching as a Relationship of Inquiry: Exploring one-to-one online education2015Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In educational development, much focus is put on the use of computers and other digital tools to enhance teaching and learning. One of the most used digital communication forms is one-to-one communication using text, images, and video. One-to-one communication for educational purposes has, however, so far received only modest attention in research.

    The purpose of this thesis is to explore inquiry-based one-to-one online education. An additional purpose is to explore opportunities and limitations with the Community of Inquiry framework, one of the most used models for analysis of online learning, when analyzing one-to-one online education. A particular interest is put on the role of emotions in the analyses. The empirical case used in the thesis is the Math Coach program who employs one-to-one education for k-12 students in mathematics via chat and a shared digital whiteboard.

    The thesis consists of an introduction and four papers. First, in Paper I online coaching is defined, explained, and discussed through a review of previous research and a study of the establishment and operation of the Math Coach program. Secondly, the Community of Inquiry framework is adapted for use in one-to-one settings forming the Relationship of Inquiry framework. Paper II initiates the adaption using a survey study, Paper III evaluates the role of emotions in the framework, and Paper IV consolidates the Relationship of Inquiry framework with a comprehensive description of its components and a transcript coding procedure.

    The findings indicate that inquiry-based one-to-one online education can be explored utilizing Online coaching as a Relationship of Inquiry. Online coaching is theoretically grounded in collaborative constructivism, critical thinking, and proximal development. It is defined as an inquiry-based learning activity where a person gets support on a specific subject matter from a more knowledgeable person using the Internet. The Relationship of Inquiry is a conceptual connection that is built between two persons that engage in a critical discourse in order resolve an educational issue. Central for the framework is the elements of cognitive presence, teaching presence, social presence, and emotional presence. Emotional presence is especially examined and confirmed as a critical interdependent element of the framework.

  • 298.
    Stenbom, Stefan
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Hrastinski, Stefan
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Online Coaching as Teacher Training: Using a Relationship of Inquiry Framework2016In: Optimizing K-12 Education through Online and Blended Learning / [ed] Ostashewski, N.; Cleveland-Innes, M.; Howell, J., Hershey, PA: IGI Global, 2016Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    Using the Internet for educational purposes is now commonly accepted. More challenging is the realizationof this potential, particularly in the K-12 education environment. According to the growing literatureon this topic, using Internet technology during K-12 teacher training will provide more knowledge andskills for teachers wishing to use Internet technology in their own classrooms. In an adaption of theonline Community of Inquiry, a revised framework for one-to-one online teaching was developed. In theRelationship of Inquiry framework, the elements of cognitive, teaching, social, and emotional presenceoutline the educational experience of one student receiving learning support from one teacher. Theframework was tested with pre-service teachers using the Math Coach program which offers help withmathematics just-in-time via instant messaging.

  • 299.
    Stenbom, Stefan
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning, Teknikdidaktik.
    Online learning support using a Relationship of Inquiry framework2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 300.
    Stenbom, Stefan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Benjaminsson, Simon
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Hrastinski, Stefan
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Cleveland-Innes, Martha
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Digital badges for in-service training of online tutors2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this presentation, an application where digital badges are used for continuing training of online tutors is reviewed. First, we present how digital badges are used in a math tutoring service for K–12 students. Then, we discuss benefits and challenges of digital badges for development of in-service online tutors.

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