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  • 2951.
    Aittokoski, Timo
    et al.
    Department of Mathematical Information Technology, University of Jyväskylä, Finland.
    Miettinen, Kaisa
    Department of Mathematical Information Technology, University of Jyväskylä, Finland.
    Efficient Evolutionary Method to Approximate the Pareto Optimal Set in Multiobjective Optimization2008In: Proceedings of the International Conference on Engineering Optimization EngOpt 2008, 2008Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Solving real-life engineering problems requires often multiobjective, global and efficient (in terms of ob-jective function evaluations) treatment. In this study, we consider problems of this type by discussingsome drawbacks of the current methods and then introduce a new population based multiobjective op-timization algorithm which produces a dense (not limited to the population size) approximation of thePareto optimal set in a computationally effective manner.

  • 2952.
    Aittokoski, Timo
    et al.
    Department of Mathematical Information Technology, University of Jyväskylä, Finland.
    Äyrämö, Sami
    Department of Mathematical Information Technology, University of Jyväskylä, Finland.
    Miettinen, Kaisa
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mathematics (Dept.), Optimization and Systems Theory.
    Clustering aided approach for decision making in computationally expensive multiobjective optimization2009In: Optimization Methods and Software, ISSN 1055-6788, E-ISSN 1029-4937, Vol. 24, no 2, p. 157-174Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Typically, industrial optimization problems need to be solved in an efficient, multiobjective and global manner, because they are often computationally expensive (as function values are typically based on simulations), they may contain multiple conflicting objectives, and they may have several local optima. Solving such problems may be challenging and time consuming when the aim is to find the most preferred Pareto optimal solution.

    In this study, we propose a method where we use an advanced clustering technique to reveal essential characteristics of the approximation of the Pareto optimal set, which has been generated beforehand. Thus, the decision maker (DM) is involved only after the most time consuming computation is finished. After the initiation phase, a moderate number of cluster prototypes projected to the Pareto optimal set is presented to the DM to be studied. This allows him/her to rapidly gain an overall understanding of the main characteristics of the problem without placing too much cognitive load on the DM. Furthermore, we also suggest some ways of applying our approach to different types of problems and demonstrate it with an example related to internal combustion engine design.

  • 2953. Ai-Xi, Chen
    et al.
    Hong, Wang
    Duan, Sai
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Theoretical Chemistry and Biology.
    Hai-Ming, Zhang
    Xin, Xu
    Li-Feng, Chi
    Potential-Induced Phase Transition of N-Isobutyryl-L-cysteine Monolayers on Au(111) Surfaces2017In: Wuli huaxue xuebao, ISSN 1000-6818, Vol. 33, no 5, p. 1010-1016Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Functional solid substrates modified by self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) have potential applications in biosensors, chromatography, and biocompatible materials. The potential-induced phase transition of N-isobutyryl-L-cysteine (L-NIBC) SAMs on Au(111) surfaces was investigated by in-situ electrochemical scanning tunneling microscopy (EC-STM) in 0.1 mol.L-1 H2SO4 solution. The NIBC SAMs with two distinct structures (alpha phase and beta phase) can be prepared by immersing the Au(111) substrate in pure NIBC aqueous solution and NIBC solution controlled by phosphate buffer at pH 7, respectively. The as-prepared a phase and beta phase of NIBC SAMs show various structural changes under the control of electrochemical potentials of the Au(111) in H2SO4 solution. The a phase NIBC SAMs exhibit structural changes from ordered to disordered structures with potential changes from 0.7 V (vs saturated calomel electrode, SCE) to 0.2 V. However, the beta phase NIBC SAMs undergo structural changes from disordered structures (E < 0.3 V) to y phase (0.4 V < E < 0.5 V) and finally to the beta phase (0.5 V < E < 0.7 V). EC-STM images also indicate that the phase transition from the alpha phase NIBC SAMs to the a phase occurs at positive potential. Combined with density functional theory (DFT) calculations, the phase transition from the beta phase to the a phase is explained by the potential-induced break of bonding interactions between -COO- and the negatively charged gold surfaces.

  • 2954. Aizman, O
    et al.
    Brismar, Hjalmar
    Uhlen, P
    Zettergren, E
    Levey, A I
    Forssberg, H
    Greengard, P
    Aperia, A
    Anatomical and physiological evidence for D-1 and D-2 dopamine receptor colocalization in neostriatal neurons2000In: Nature Neuroscience, ISSN 1097-6256, E-ISSN 1546-1726, Vol. 3, no 3, p. 226-230Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite the importance of dopamine signaling, it remains unknown if the two major subclasses of dopamine receptors exist on the same or distinct populations of neurons. Here we used confocal microscopy to demonstrate that virtually all striatal neurons, both in vitro and in vivo, contained dopamine receptors of both classes. We also provide functional evidence for such colocalization: in essentially all neurons examined, fenoldopam, an agonist of the D-1 subclass of receptors, inhibited both the Na+/K+ pump and tetrodotoxin (TTX)-sensitive sodium channels, and quinpirole, an agonist of the Dr subclass of receptors, activated TTX-sensitive sodium channels. Thus D-1 and D-2 classes of ligands may functionally interact in virtually all dopamine-responsive neurons within the basal ganglia.

  • 2955. Aizman, O.
    et al.
    Uhlen, P.
    Lal, M.
    Brismar, Hjalmar
    Aperia, A.
    Ouabain, a steroid hormone that signals with slow calcium oscillations2001In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, ISSN 0027-8424, E-ISSN 1091-6490, Vol. 98, no 23, p. 13420-13424Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The plant-derived steroid, digoxin, a specific inhibitor of Na,K-ATPase, has been used for centuries in the treatment of heart disease. Recent studies demonstrate the presence of a digoxin analog, ouabain, in mammalian tissue, but its biological role has not been elucidated. Here, we show in renal epithelial cells that ouabain, in doses causing only partial Na,K-ATPase inhibition, acts as a biological inducer of regular, low-frequency intracellular calcium ([Ca2+](i)) oscillations that elicit activation of the transcription factor, NF-KB. Partial inhibition of Na,K-ATPase using low extracellular K+ and depolarization of cells did not have these effects. Incubation of cells in Ca2+-free media, inhibition of voltage-gated calcium channels, inositol triphosphate receptor antagonism, and redistribution of actin to a thick layer adjacent to the plasma membrane abolished [Ca2+](i) oscillations, indicating that they were caused by a concerted action of inositol triphosphate receptors and capacitative calcium entry via plasma membrane channels. Blockade of ouabain-induced [C-a2+](i) oscillations prevented activation of NF-kappaB. The results demonstrate a new mechanism for steroid signaling via plasma membrane receptors and underline a novel role for the steroid hormone, ouabain, as a physiological inducer of [Ca2+](i) oscillations involved in transcriptional regulation in mammalian cells.

  • 2956. Ajalloueian, Fatemeh
    et al.
    Zeiai, Said
    Rojas, Ramiro
    Department of Chemistry, Division of Polymer Chemistry, Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Fossum, Magdalena
    Hilborn, Jöns
    One-Stage Tissue Engineering of Bladder Wall Patches for an Easy-To-Use Approach at the Surgical Table2013In: Tissue Engineering. Part C, Methods, ISSN 1937-3384, E-ISSN 1937-3392, Vol. 19, no 9, p. 688-696Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present a method for producing a cell-scaffold hybrid construct at the bedside. The construct is composed of plastic-compressed collagen together with a poly(e-caprolactone) (PCL)-knitted mesh that yields an integrated, natural-synthetic scaffold. This construct was evaluated by seeding of minced bladder mucosa, followed by proliferation in vitro. High mechanical strength in combination with a biological environment suitable for tissue growth was achieved through the creation of a hybrid construct that showed an increased tensile strength (17.9 +/- 2.6 MPa) when compared to plastic-compressed collagen (0.6 +/- 0.12 MPa). Intimate contact between the collagen and the PCL fabric was required to ensure integrity without delamination of the construct. This contact was achieved by surface alkaline hydrolysis of the PCL, followed by adsorption of poly(vinyl) alcohol. The improvement in hydrophilicity of the PCL-knitted mesh was confirmed through water contact angle measurements, and penetration of the collagen into the mesh was evaluated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Particles of minced bladder mucosa tissue were seeded onto this scaffold, and the proliferation was followed for 6 weeks in vitro. Results obtained from phase contrast microscopy, SEM, and histological staining indicated that cells migrated from the minced tissue particles and reorganized on the scaffold. Cells were viable and proliferative, with morphological features characteristic of urothelial cells. Proliferation reached the point at which a multilayer with a resemblance to stratified urothelium was achieved. This successful method could potentially be used for in vivo applications in reconstructive urology as an engineered autologous tissue transplant without the requirement for in vitro culture before transplantation.

  • 2957.
    Ajami Gale Rashidi, Sam André
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Designing for sustainable grocery shopping: A conceptual design to encourage sustainable shopping2017Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Climate change is one of the biggest issues that the world faces today, and one of the biggest contributors to climate change are groceries. This paper aims at using digital artefacts to create a product or design that will encourage the user to shop more environmentally friendly. To achieve this, I have tried to identify the major hindrances today that grocery shoppers are faced with through the user centered method Contextual Inquiry.  I have then presented the results from the inquiry to students at KTH Royal Institute of Technology during workshops. During these workshops, the students have conceptualized ideas and designs for different solutions. Based on their results, I have created a prototype design that I call the SmartCart. This cart consists of a regular shopping cart with a screen similar to an iPad attached to the handlebars. This screen then delivers easily apprehensible information about different grocery products environmental impact in real time. The design has not been tested in a live environment, but initial testing indicates that a live application could give satisfying results in lowering the sales of grocery products with a high environmental impact, while the design also could simultaneously improve the shopping experience for the customers in the grocery store.

  • 2958.
    Ajami, Sam
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC).
    Maupin, Lucas
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC).
    The effects of video gaming on university grades2014Independent thesis Basic level (university diploma), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    In this 21st century IT-world, the use of video gaming has dramatically grown and taken a firm place in many young peoples’ busy day-to-day schedule. As a result, many are growing worried that video gaming will affect people in a negative way, especially when it comes to students’ academic performance.

     

    This thesis is an investigation of the correlation between games and university grades amongst students.

     

    Our results show that students, who played more, had more problems with their grades than the ones who played less. However, the results also show that gaming itself is not the problem, as the correlation between hours spent gaming and grades, is similar to the correlation between hours spent on other hobbies and grades. In essence, two hours of video gaming affects the grades just as much as two hours of physical exercise.

     

    The conclusion from our research is that it is the time spent on other activities than studying, that affects the grades. Video gaming is however amongst the easiest activities to be engaged in for an extended period of time, and can therefore be indirectly harmful to students’ grades.

  • 2959.
    Ajani, Altinay
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    Karaömer, Ahmed
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    Hur samlar Skanska in information vid kalkylering?2010Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    In today's industrialized society projects are considered as the obvious model for development. The first step in projects where information plays an essential role is in calculations. This is where the projects future is decided. Here it is important to be clear about the information compiled and making sure that the storage of the information is easily accessed for the project members. Without a proper flow of information, the organization will have difficulty adapting to changes and problems that arise. The purpose of this study is to investigate how the calculation is made in theory and in practice to get an understanding of how the flow of information plays its role.The theoretical framework was based on the theories that were found in a search among KTHB databases and Google Scholar. The information flow has been divided into three parts, presentation, transport and storage of information. Also studied are a number of different calculation methods. To obtain a complementary picture of how this is applied in practice, a case study has been conducted at Skanska Sverige AB. This study includes three interview occasions and continuous contact with a purchasing manager at Skanska. The calculation methods that were examined were ABC - calculation, product calculation and production calculation. Later examined were which of these calculation methods is used at Skanska Sweden AB. Calculations are made from the company's information management system and Skanska use a custom developed system, Spik. It was further examined which type of information that has the greatest impact on the modeling of the calculations and which factors that are crucial. The theory studies are compared with the empirical studies through discussion about the flow of informations role in the development of calculations at Skanska. Later discussed are the recommendations on how the information flow could be improved in the development of calculations.

  • 2960. Ajello, M.
    et al.
    Albert, A.
    Allafort, A.
    Baldini, L.
    Barbiellini, G.
    Bastieri, D.
    Bellazzini, R.
    Bissaldi, E.
    Bonamente, E.
    Brandt, T. J.
    Bregeon, J.
    Brigida, M.
    Bruel, P.
    Buehler, R.
    Buson, S.
    Caliandro, G. A.
    Cameron, R. A.
    Caraveo, P. A.
    Cecchi, C.
    Charles, E.
    Chekhtman, A.
    Chiang, J.
    Chiaro, G.
    Ciprini, S.
    Claus, R.
    Cohen-Tanugi, J.
    Cominsky, L. R.
    Conrad, J.
    Cutini, S.
    D'Ammando, F.
    de Palma, F.
    Dermer, C. D.
    Desiante, R.
    Digel, S. W.
    do Couto e Silva, E.
    Drell, P. S.
    Drlica-Wagner, A.
    Favuzzi, C.
    Focke, W. B.
    Franckowiak, A.
    Fukazawa, Y.
    Fusco, P.
    Gargano, F.
    Gasparrini, D.
    Germani, S.
    Giglietto, N.
    Giommi, P.
    Giordano, F.
    Giroletti, M.
    Glanzman, T.
    Godfrey, G.
    Grenier, I. A.
    Grove, J. E.
    Guiriec, S.
    Hadasch, D.
    Hayashida, M.
    Hays, E.
    Horan, D.
    Hou, X.
    Hughes, R. E.
    Inoue, Y.
    Jackson, Miranda S.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics, Particle and Astroparticle Physics.
    Jogler, T.
    Johannesson, G.
    Johnson, A. S.
    Johnson, W. N.
    Kamae, T.
    Knoedlseder, J.
    Kocevski, D.
    Kuss, M.
    Lande, J.
    Larsson, S.
    Latronico, L.
    Longo, F.
    Loparco, F.
    Lott, B.
    Lovellette, M. N.
    Lubrano, P.
    Mayer, M.
    Mazziotta, M. N.
    McEnery, J. E.
    Michelson, P. F.
    Mizuno, T.
    Moiseev, A. A.
    Monte, C.
    Monzani, M. E.
    Morselli, A.
    Moskalenko, I. V.
    Murgia, S.
    Murphy, R.
    Nakamori, T.
    Nemmen, R.
    Nuss, E.
    Ohno, M.
    Ohsugi, T.
    Omodei, N.
    Orienti, M.
    Orlando, E.
    Ormes, J. F.
    Paneque, D.
    Panetta, J. H.
    Perkins, J. S.
    Pesce-Rollins, M.
    Petrosian, V.
    Piron, F.
    Pivato, G.
    Porter, T. A.
    Raino, S.
    Rando, R.
    Razzano, M.
    Reimer, A.
    Reimer, O.
    Roth, M.
    Schulz, A.
    Sgro, C.
    Siskind, E. J.
    Spandre, G.
    Spinelli, P.
    Takahashi, H.
    Thayer, J. G.
    Thayer, J. B.
    Thompson, D. J.
    Tibaldo, L.
    Tinivella, M.
    Tosti, G.
    Troja, E.
    Usher, T. L.
    Vandenbroucke, J.
    Vasileiou, V.
    Vianello, G.
    Vitale, V.
    Werner, M.
    Winer, B. L.
    Wood, D. L.
    Wood, K. S.
    Yang, Z.
    Impulsive and long duration high-energy gamma-ray emission from the very bright 2012 march 7 solar flares2014In: Astrophysical Journal, ISSN 0004-637X, E-ISSN 1538-4357, Vol. 789, no 1, p. 20-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) detected gamma-rays up to 4 GeV from two bright X-class solar flares on 2012 March 7, showing both an impulsive and temporally extended emission phases. The gamma-rays appear to originate from the same active region as the X-rays associated with these flares. The >100 MeV gamma-ray flux decreases monotonically during the first hour (impulsive phase) followed by a slower decrease for the next 20 hr. A power law with a high-energy exponential cutoff can adequately describe the photon spectrum. Assuming that the gamma rays result from the decay of pions produced by accelerated protons and ions with a power-law spectrum, we find that the index of that spectrum is similar to 3, with minor variations during the impulsive phase. During the extended phase the photon spectrum softens monotonically, requiring the proton index varying from similar to 4 to >5. The >30 MeV proton flux observed by the GOES satellites also shows a flux decrease and spectral softening, but with a harder spectrum (index similar to 2-3). Based on these observations, we explore the relative merits of prompt or continuous acceleration scenarios, hadronic or leptonic emission processes, and acceleration at the solar corona or by the fast coronal mass ejections. We conclude that the most likely scenario is continuous acceleration of protons in the solar corona that penetrate the lower solar atmosphere and produce pions that decay into gamma rays. However, acceleration in the downstream of the shock cannot be definitely ruled out.

  • 2961. Ajello, M.
    et al.
    Albert, A.
    Atwood, W. B.
    Barbiellini, G.
    Bastieri, D.
    Bechtol, K.
    Bellazzini, R.
    Bissaldi, E.
    Blandford, R. D.
    Bloom, E. D.
    Bonino, R.
    Bottacini, E.
    Brandt, T. J.
    Bregeon, J.
    Bruel, P.
    Buehler, R.
    Buson, S.
    Caliandro, G. A.
    Cameron, R. A.
    Caputo, R.
    Caragiulo, M.
    Carave, P. A.
    Cecchi, C.
    Chekhtman, A.
    Chiang, J.
    Chiaro, G.
    Ciprini, S.
    Cohen-Tanugi, J.
    Cominsky, L. R.
    Conrad, J.
    Cutini, S.
    D'Ammando, F.
    de Angelis, A.
    de Palma, F.
    Desiante, R.
    Di Venere, L.
    Drell, P. S.
    Favuzzi, C.
    Ferrara, E. C.
    Fusco, P.
    Gargano, F.
    Gasparrini, D.
    Giglietto, N.
    Giommi, P.
    Giordano, F.
    Giroletti, M.
    Glanzman, T.
    Godfrey, G.
    Gomez-Vargas, G. A.
    Grenier, I. A.
    Guiriec, S.
    Gustafsson, M.
    Harding, A. K.
    Hewitt, J. W.
    Hill, A. B.
    Horan, D.
    Jogler, T.
    Johannesson, G.
    Johnson, A. S.
    Kamae, T.
    Karwin, C.
    Knoedlseder, J.
    Kuss, M.
    Larsson, Stefan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics, Particle and Astroparticle Physics.
    Latronico, L.
    Li, J.
    Li, L.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics, Particle and Astroparticle Physics.
    Longo, F.
    Loparco, F.
    Lovellette, M. N.
    Lubrano, P.
    Magill, J.
    Maldera, S.
    Malyshev, D.
    Manfreda, A.
    Mayer, M.
    Mazziotta, M. N.
    Michelson, P. F.
    Mitthumsiri, W.
    Mizuno, T.
    Moiseev, A. A.
    Monzani, M. E.
    Morselli, A.
    Moskalenko, I. V.
    Murgia, S.
    Nuss, E.
    Ohno, M.
    Ohsugi, T.
    Omodei, N.
    Orlando, E.
    Ormes, J. F.
    Paneque, D.
    Pesce-Rollins, M.
    Piron, F.
    Pivato, G.
    Porter, T. A.
    Raino, S.
    Rando, R.
    Razzano, M.
    Reimer, A.
    Reimer, O.
    Ritz, S.
    Sanchez-Conde, M.
    Parkinson, P. M. Saz
    Sgro, C.
    Siskind, E. J.
    Smith, D. A.
    Spada, F.
    Spandre, G.
    Spinelli, P.
    Suson, D. J.
    Tajima, H.
    Takahashi, H.
    Thayer, J. B.
    Torres, D. F.
    Tosti, G.
    Troja, E.
    Uchiyama, Y.
    Vianello, G.
    Winer, B. L.
    Wood, K. S.
    Zaharijas, G.
    Zimmer, S.
    FERMI-LAT OBSERVATIONS OF HIGH-ENERGY gamma-RAY EMISSION TOWARD THE GALACTIC CENTER2016In: Astrophysical Journal, ISSN 0004-637X, E-ISSN 1538-4357, Vol. 819, no 1, article id 44Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) has provided the most detailed view to date of the emission toward the Galactic center (GC) in high-energy gamma-rays. This paper describes the analysis of data taken during the first 62 months of the mission in the energy range 1-100 GeV from a 15 degrees x 15 degrees region about the direction of the GC. Specialized interstellar emission models (IEMs) are constructed to enable the separation of the.-ray emissions produced by cosmic ray particles interacting with the interstellar gas and radiation fields in the Milky Way into that from the inner similar to 1 kpc surrounding the GC, and that from the rest of the Galaxy. A catalog of point sources for the 15 degrees x 15 degrees region is self-consistently constructed using these IEMs: the First Fermi-LAT Inner Galaxy Point Source Catalog (1FIG). The spatial locations, fluxes, and spectral properties of the 1FIG sources are presented, and compared with gamma-ray point sources over the same region taken from existing catalogs. After subtracting the interstellar emission and point-source contributions a residual is found. If templates that peak toward the GC are used to model the positive residual the agreement with the data improves, but none of the additional templates tried account for all of its spatial structure. The spectrum of the positive residual modeled with these templates has a strong dependence on the choice of IEM.

  • 2962.
    Ajello, M.
    et al.
    Clemson Univ, Dept Phys & Astron, Kinard Lab Phys, Clemson, SC 29634 USA..
    Allafort, A.
    Stanford Univ, WW Hansen Expt Phys Lab, Kavli Inst Particle Astrophys & Cosmol, Dept Phys, Stanford, CA 94305 USA.;Stanford Univ, SLAC Natl Accelerator Lab, Stanford, CA 94305 USA.;Ist Nazl Fis Nucl, Sez Torino, I-10125 Turin, Italy.;Univ Torino, Dipartimento Fis, I-10125 Turin, Italy.;Univ Calif Santa Cruz, Dept Astron & Astrophys, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 USA..
    Axelsson, Magnus
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics. Tokyo Metropolitan Univ, Dept Phys, Minami Osawa 1-1, Hachioji, Tokyo 1920397, Japan..
    Baldini, L.
    Univ Pisa, I-56127 Pisa, Italy.;Ist Nazl Fis Nucl, Sez Pisa, I-56127 Pisa, Italy..
    Barbiellini, G.
    Ist Nazl Fis Nucl, Sez Trieste, I-34127 Trieste, Italy.;Univ Trieste, Dipartimento Fis, I-34127 Trieste, Italy..
    Baring, M. G.
    Rice Univ, Dept Phys & Astron, MS 108,POB 1892, Houston, TX 77251 USA..
    Bastieri, D.
    Ist Nazl Fis Nucl, Sez Padova, I-35131 Padua, Italy.;Univ Padua, Dipartimento Fis Astron G Galilei, I-35131 Padua, Italy..
    Bellazzini, R.
    Ist Nazl Fis Nucl, Sez Pisa, I-56127 Pisa, Italy..
    Berenji, B.
    Univ Calif Los Angeles, Dept Phys & Astron, Los Angeles, CA 90032 USA..
    Bissaldi, E.
    M Merlin Universita, Dipartimento Fis, I-70126 Bari, Italy.;Politecn Bari, I-70126 Bari, Italy.;Ist Nazl Fis Nucl, Sez Bari, I-70126 Bari, Italy..
    Blandford, R. D.
    Stanford Univ, WW Hansen Expt Phys Lab, Kavli Inst Particle Astrophys & Cosmol, Dept Phys, Stanford, CA 94305 USA.;Stanford Univ, SLAC Natl Accelerator Lab, Stanford, CA 94305 USA..
    Bloom, E. D.
    Stanford Univ, WW Hansen Expt Phys Lab, Kavli Inst Particle Astrophys & Cosmol, Dept Phys, Stanford, CA 94305 USA.;Stanford Univ, SLAC Natl Accelerator Lab, Stanford, CA 94305 USA..
    Bonino, R.
    Ist Nazl Fis Nucl, Sez Torino, I-10125 Turin, Italy.;Univ Torino, Dipartimento Fis, I-10125 Turin, Italy..
    Bottacini, E.
    Stanford Univ, WW Hansen Expt Phys Lab, Kavli Inst Particle Astrophys & Cosmol, Dept Phys, Stanford, CA 94305 USA.;Stanford Univ, SLAC Natl Accelerator Lab, Stanford, CA 94305 USA..
    Brandt, T. J.
    NASA, Goddard Space Flight Ctr, Greenbelt, MD 20771 USA..
    Bregeon, J.
    Univ Montpellier, Lab Univers & Particules Montpellier, CNRS IN2P3, F-34095 Montpellier, France..
    Bruel, P.
    CNRS IN2P3, Lab Leprince Ringuet, Ecole Polytech, F-91128 Palaiseau, France..
    Buehler, R.
    Deutsch Elektronen Synchrotron DESY, D-15738 Zeuthen, Germany..
    Burnett, T. H.
    Univ Washington, Dept Phys, Seattle, WA 98195 USA..
    Buson, S.
    NASA, Goddard Space Flight Ctr, Greenbelt, MD 20771 USA..
    Cameron, R. A.
    Stanford Univ, WW Hansen Expt Phys Lab, Kavli Inst Particle Astrophys & Cosmol, Dept Phys, Stanford, CA 94305 USA.;Stanford Univ, SLAC Natl Accelerator Lab, Stanford, CA 94305 USA..
    Caputo, R.
    CRESST, Greenbelt, MD 20771 USA.;NASA, Goddard Space Flight Ctr, Greenbelt, MD 20771 USA..
    Caraveo, P. A.
    INAF, Ist Astrofis Spaziale & Fis Cosm Milano, Via E Bassini 15, I-20133 Milan, Italy..
    Casandjian, J. M.
    Univ Paris Diderot, Laboratoire AIM, CEA IRFU, CNRS,Serv Astrophys,CEA Saclay, F-91191 Gif Sur Yvette, France..
    Cavazzuti, E.
    Italian Space Agcy, Via Politecn Snc, I-00133 Rome, Italy..
    Chekhtman, A.
    Ist Nazl Fis Nucl, Sez Torino, I-10125 Turin, Italy.;George Mason Univ, Coll Sci, Fairfax, VA 22030 USA.;Naval Res Lab, Washington, DC 20375 USA..
    Cheung, C. C.
    Naval Res Lab, Space Sci Div, Washington, DC 20375 USA..
    Chiang, J.
    Stanford Univ, WW Hansen Expt Phys Lab, Kavli Inst Particle Astrophys & Cosmol, Dept Phys, Stanford, CA 94305 USA.;Stanford Univ, SLAC Natl Accelerator Lab, Stanford, CA 94305 USA..
    Chiaro, G.
    INAF, Ist Astrofis Spaziale & Fis Cosm Milano, Via E Bassini 15, I-20133 Milan, Italy..
    Ciprini, S.
    Space Sci Data Ctr Agenzia Spaziale Italiana, Via Politecnico,Snc, I-00133 Rome, Italy.;Ist Nazl Fis Nucl, Sez Perugia, I-06123 Perugia, Italy..
    Cohen-Tanugi, J.
    Univ Montpellier, Lab Univers & Particules Montpellier, CNRS IN2P3, F-34095 Montpellier, France..
    Cominsky, L. R.
    Sonoma State Univ, Dept Phys & Astron, Rohnert Pk, CA 94928 USA..
    Costantin, D.
    Univ Padua, Dipartimento Fis Astron G Galilei, I-35131 Padua, Italy..
    Cuoco, A.
    Ist Nazl Fis Nucl, Sez Torino, I-10125 Turin, Italy.;Rhein Westfal TH Aachen, Inst Theoret Particle Phys & Cosmol TTK, D-52056 Aachen, Germany..
    Cutini, S.
    Space Sci Data Ctr Agenzia Spaziale Italiana, Via Politecnico,Snc, I-00133 Rome, Italy.;Ist Nazl Fis Nucl, Sez Perugia, I-06123 Perugia, Italy..
    D'Ammando, F.
    INAF, Ist Radioastron, I-40129 Bologna, Italy.;Univ Bologna, Dipartimento Astron, I-40127 Bologna, Italy..
    de Palma, F.
    Ist Nazl Fis Nucl, Sez Bari, I-70126 Bari, Italy.;Univ Telemat Pegaso, Piazza Trieste & Trento,48, I-80132 Naples, Italy..
    Di Lalla, N.
    Univ Pisa, I-56127 Pisa, Italy.;Ist Nazl Fis Nucl, Sez Pisa, I-56127 Pisa, Italy..
    Di Mauro, M.
    Stanford Univ, WW Hansen Expt Phys Lab, Kavli Inst Particle Astrophys & Cosmol, Dept Phys, Stanford, CA 94305 USA.;Stanford Univ, SLAC Natl Accelerator Lab, Stanford, CA 94305 USA..
    Di Venere, L.
    M Merlin Universita, Dipartimento Fis, I-70126 Bari, Italy.;Politecn Bari, I-70126 Bari, Italy.;Ist Nazl Fis Nucl, Sez Bari, I-70126 Bari, Italy..
    Dubois, R.
    Stanford Univ, WW Hansen Expt Phys Lab, Kavli Inst Particle Astrophys & Cosmol, Dept Phys, Stanford, CA 94305 USA.;Stanford Univ, SLAC Natl Accelerator Lab, Stanford, CA 94305 USA..
    Dumora, D.
    Univ Bordeaux 1, Ctr Etud Nucl Bordeaux Gradignan, IN2P3 CNRS, BP120, F-33175 Gradignan, France..
    Favuzzi, C.
    M Merlin Universita, Dipartimento Fis, I-70126 Bari, Italy.;Politecn Bari, I-70126 Bari, Italy.;Ist Nazl Fis Nucl, Sez Bari, I-70126 Bari, Italy..
    Ferrara, E. C.
    NASA, Goddard Space Flight Ctr, Greenbelt, MD 20771 USA..
    Franckowiak, A.
    Deutsch Elektronen Synchrotron DESY, D-15738 Zeuthen, Germany..
    Fukazawa, Y.
    Hiroshima Univ, Dept Phys Sci, Higashihiroshima, Hiroshima 7398526, Japan..
    Funk, S.
    Friedrich Alexander Univ Erlangen Nurnberg, Erlangen Ctr Astroparticle Phys, Erwin Rommel Str 1, D-91058 Erlangen, Germany..
    Fusco, P.
    M Merlin Universita, Dipartimento Fis, I-70126 Bari, Italy.;Politecn Bari, I-70126 Bari, Italy.;Ist Nazl Fis Nucl, Sez Bari, I-70126 Bari, Italy..
    Gargano, F.
    Ist Nazl Fis Nucl, Sez Bari, I-70126 Bari, Italy..
    Gasparrini, D.
    Space Sci Data Ctr Agenzia Spaziale Italiana, Via Politecnico,Snc, I-00133 Rome, Italy.;Ist Nazl Fis Nucl, Sez Perugia, I-06123 Perugia, Italy..
    Giglietto, N.
    M Merlin Universita, Dipartimento Fis, I-70126 Bari, Italy.;Politecn Bari, I-70126 Bari, Italy.;Ist Nazl Fis Nucl, Sez Bari, I-70126 Bari, Italy..
    Gill, R.
    Open Univ Israel, Dept Nat Sci, 1 Univ Rd,POB 808, IL-43537 Raanana, Israel..
    Giordano, F.
    M Merlin Universita, Dipartimento Fis, I-70126 Bari, Italy.;Politecn Bari, I-70126 Bari, Italy.;Ist Nazl Fis Nucl, Sez Bari, I-70126 Bari, Italy..
    Giroletti, M.
    INAF, Ist Radioastron, I-40129 Bologna, Italy..
    Glanzman, T.
    Stanford Univ, WW Hansen Expt Phys Lab, Kavli Inst Particle Astrophys & Cosmol, Dept Phys, Stanford, CA 94305 USA.;Stanford Univ, SLAC Natl Accelerator Lab, Stanford, CA 94305 USA..
    Granot, J.
    Open Univ Israel, Dept Nat Sci, 1 Univ Rd,POB 808, IL-43537 Raanana, Israel..
    Green, D.
    NASA, Goddard Space Flight Ctr, Greenbelt, MD 20771 USA.;Univ Maryland, Dept Phys, College Pk, MD 20742 USA.;Univ Maryland, Dept Astron, College Pk, MD 20742 USA..
    Grenier, I. A.
    Univ Paris Diderot, Laboratoire AIM, CEA IRFU, CNRS,Serv Astrophys,CEA Saclay, F-91191 Gif Sur Yvette, France..
    Grondin, M. -H
    Guillemot, L.
    Univ Orleans, Lab Phys & Chim Environm & Espace, CNRS, F-45071 Orleans 02, France.;CNRS INSU, Stn Radioastron Nancay, Observ Paris, F-18330 Nancay, France..
    Guiriec, S.
    NASA, Goddard Space Flight Ctr, Greenbelt, MD 20771 USA.;George Washington Univ, Dept Phys, 725 21st St NW, Washington, DC 20052 USA..
    Harding, A. K.
    NASA, Goddard Space Flight Ctr, Greenbelt, MD 20771 USA..
    Hays, E.
    NASA, Goddard Space Flight Ctr, Greenbelt, MD 20771 USA..
    Horan, D.
    CNRS IN2P3, Lab Leprince Ringuet, Ecole Polytech, F-91128 Palaiseau, France..
    Imazato, F.
    Hiroshima Univ, Dept Phys Sci, Higashihiroshima, Hiroshima 7398526, Japan..
    Johannesson, G.
    Univ Iceland, Sci Inst, IS-107 Reykjavik, Iceland.;NORDITA, Roslagstullsbacken 23, SE-10691 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Kamae, T.
    Univ Tokyo, Dept Phys, Grad Sch Sci, Bunkyo Ku, 7-3-1 Hongo, Tokyo 1130033, Japan..
    Kensei, S.
    Hiroshima Univ, Dept Phys Sci, Higashihiroshima, Hiroshima 7398526, Japan..
    Kocevski, D.
    Ist Nazl Fis Nucl, Sez Torino, I-10125 Turin, Italy.;NASA, Goddard Space Flight Ctr, Greenbelt, MD 20771 USA..
    Kuss, M.
    Ist Nazl Fis Nucl, Sez Pisa, I-56127 Pisa, Italy..
    La Mura, G.
    Univ Padua, Dipartimento Fis Astron G Galilei, I-35131 Padua, Italy..
    Larsson, S.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics.
    Latronico, L.
    Ist Nazl Fis Nucl, Sez Torino, I-10125 Turin, Italy..
    Li, J.
    Inst Space Sci CSICIEEC, Campus UAB,Carrer Magrans S-N, E-08193 Barcelona, Spain..
    Longo, F.
    Ist Nazl Fis Nucl, Sez Trieste, I-34127 Trieste, Italy.;Univ Trieste, Dipartimento Fis, I-34127 Trieste, Italy..
    Loparco, F.
    M Merlin Universita, Dipartimento Fis, I-70126 Bari, Italy.;Politecn Bari, I-70126 Bari, Italy.;Ist Nazl Fis Nucl, Sez Bari, I-70126 Bari, Italy..
    Lovellette, M. N.
    Naval Res Lab, Space Sci Div, Washington, DC 20375 USA..
    Lubrano, P.
    Ist Nazl Fis Nucl, Sez Perugia, I-06123 Perugia, Italy..
    Magill, J. D.
    Univ Maryland, Dept Phys, College Pk, MD 20742 USA.;Univ Maryland, Dept Astron, College Pk, MD 20742 USA..
    Maldera, S.
    Ist Nazl Fis Nucl, Sez Torino, I-10125 Turin, Italy..
    Manfreda, A.
    Univ Pisa, I-56127 Pisa, Italy.;Ist Nazl Fis Nucl, Sez Pisa, I-56127 Pisa, Italy..
    Mazziotta, M. N.
    Ist Nazl Fis Nucl, Sez Bari, I-70126 Bari, Italy..
    Michelson, P. F.
    Stanford Univ, WW Hansen Expt Phys Lab, Kavli Inst Particle Astrophys & Cosmol, Dept Phys, Stanford, CA 94305 USA.;Stanford Univ, SLAC Natl Accelerator Lab, Stanford, CA 94305 USA..
    Mizuno, T.
    Hiroshima Univ, Hiroshima Astrophys Sci Ctr, Higashihiroshima, Hiroshima 7398526, Japan..
    Moiseev, A. A.
    CRESST, Greenbelt, MD 20771 USA.;NASA, Goddard Space Flight Ctr, Greenbelt, MD 20771 USA.;Univ Maryland, Dept Phys, College Pk, MD 20742 USA.;Univ Maryland, Dept Astron, College Pk, MD 20742 USA..
    Monzani, M. E.
    Stanford Univ, WW Hansen Expt Phys Lab, Kavli Inst Particle Astrophys & Cosmol, Dept Phys, Stanford, CA 94305 USA.;Stanford Univ, SLAC Natl Accelerator Lab, Stanford, CA 94305 USA..
    Moretti, E.
    Max Planck Inst Phys & Astrophys, D-80805 Munich, Germany..
    Morselli, A.
    Ist Nazl Fis Nucl, Sez Roma Tor Vergata, I-00133 Rome, Italy..
    Moskalenko, I. V.
    Stanford Univ, WW Hansen Expt Phys Lab, Kavli Inst Particle Astrophys & Cosmol, Dept Phys, Stanford, CA 94305 USA.;Stanford Univ, SLAC Natl Accelerator Lab, Stanford, CA 94305 USA..
    Negro, M.
    Ist Nazl Fis Nucl, Sez Torino, I-10125 Turin, Italy.;Univ Torino, Dipartimento Fis, I-10125 Turin, Italy..
    Nuss, E.
    Univ Montpellier, Lab Univers & Particules Montpellier, CNRS IN2P3, F-34095 Montpellier, France..
    Ojha, R.
    NASA, Goddard Space Flight Ctr, Greenbelt, MD 20771 USA..
    Omodei, N.
    Stanford Univ, WW Hansen Expt Phys Lab, Kavli Inst Particle Astrophys & Cosmol, Dept Phys, Stanford, CA 94305 USA.;Stanford Univ, SLAC Natl Accelerator Lab, Stanford, CA 94305 USA..
    Orlando, E.
    Stanford Univ, WW Hansen Expt Phys Lab, Kavli Inst Particle Astrophys & Cosmol, Dept Phys, Stanford, CA 94305 USA.;Stanford Univ, SLAC Natl Accelerator Lab, Stanford, CA 94305 USA..
    Ormes, J. F.
    Stanford Univ, WW Hansen Expt Phys Lab, Kavli Inst Particle Astrophys & Cosmol, Dept Phys, Stanford, CA 94305 USA.;Univ Denver, Dept Phys & Astron, Denver, CO 80208 USA..
    Palatiello, M.
    Ist Nazl Fis Nucl, Sez Trieste, I-34127 Trieste, Italy.;Univ Trieste, Dipartimento Fis, I-34127 Trieste, Italy..
    Paliya, V. S.
    Clemson Univ, Dept Phys & Astron, Kinard Lab Phys, Clemson, SC 29634 USA..
    Paneque, D.
    Max Planck Inst Phys & Astrophys, D-80805 Munich, Germany..
    Persic, M.
    Ist Nazl Fis Nucl, Sez Trieste, I-34127 Trieste, Italy.;Ist Nazl Astrofis, Osservatorio Astron Trieste, I-34143 Trieste, Italy..
    Pesce-Rollins, M.
    Ist Nazl Fis Nucl, Sez Pisa, I-56127 Pisa, Italy..
    Petrosian, V.
    Stanford Univ, WW Hansen Expt Phys Lab, Kavli Inst Particle Astrophys & Cosmol, Dept Phys, Stanford, CA 94305 USA.;Stanford Univ, SLAC Natl Accelerator Lab, Stanford, CA 94305 USA..
    Piron, F.
    Univ Montpellier, Lab Univers & Particules Montpellier, CNRS IN2P3, F-34095 Montpellier, France..
    Porter, T. A.
    Stanford Univ, WW Hansen Expt Phys Lab, Kavli Inst Particle Astrophys & Cosmol, Dept Phys, Stanford, CA 94305 USA.;Stanford Univ, SLAC Natl Accelerator Lab, Stanford, CA 94305 USA..
    Principe, G.
    Friedrich Alexander Univ Erlangen Nurnberg, Erlangen Ctr Astroparticle Phys, Erwin Rommel Str 1, D-91058 Erlangen, Germany..
    Racusin, J. L.
    NASA, Goddard Space Flight Ctr, Greenbelt, MD 20771 USA..
    Raino, S.
    M Merlin Universita, Dipartimento Fis, I-70126 Bari, Italy.;Politecn Bari, I-70126 Bari, Italy.;Ist Nazl Fis Nucl, Sez Bari, I-70126 Bari, Italy..
    Rando, R.
    Ist Nazl Fis Nucl, Sez Padova, I-35131 Padua, Italy.;Univ Padua, Dipartimento Fis Astron G Galilei, I-35131 Padua, Italy..
    Razzano, M.
    Ist Nazl Fis Nucl, Sez Pisa, I-56127 Pisa, Italy..
    Razzaque, S.
    Univ Johannesburg, Dept Phys, POB 524, ZA-2006 Auckland Pk, South Africa..
    Reimer, A.
    Stanford Univ, WW Hansen Expt Phys Lab, Kavli Inst Particle Astrophys & Cosmol, Dept Phys, Stanford, CA 94305 USA.;Stanford Univ, SLAC Natl Accelerator Lab, Stanford, CA 94305 USA.;Leopold Franzens Univ Innsbruck, Inst Astro & Teilchenphys, A-6020 Innsbruck, Austria.;Leopold Franzens Univ Innsbruck, Inst Theoret Phys, A-6020 Innsbruck, Austria..
    Reimer, O.
    Stanford Univ, WW Hansen Expt Phys Lab, Kavli Inst Particle Astrophys & Cosmol, Dept Phys, Stanford, CA 94305 USA.;Stanford Univ, SLAC Natl Accelerator Lab, Stanford, CA 94305 USA.;Leopold Franzens Univ Innsbruck, Inst Astro & Teilchenphys, A-6020 Innsbruck, Austria.;Leopold Franzens Univ Innsbruck, Inst Theoret Phys, A-6020 Innsbruck, Austria..
    Ritz, S.
    Univ Calif Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz Inst Particle Phys, Dept Phys, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 USA.;Univ Calif Santa Cruz, Dept Astron & Astrophys, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 USA..
    Rochester, L. S.
    Stanford Univ, WW Hansen Expt Phys Lab, Kavli Inst Particle Astrophys & Cosmol, Dept Phys, Stanford, CA 94305 USA.;Stanford Univ, SLAC Natl Accelerator Lab, Stanford, CA 94305 USA..
    Ryde, Felix
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics.
    Parkinson, P. M. Saz
    Univ Calif Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz Inst Particle Phys, Dept Phys, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 USA.;Univ Calif Santa Cruz, Dept Astron & Astrophys, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 USA.;Univ Hong Kong, Dept Phys, Pokfulam Rd, Hong Kong, Hong Kong, Peoples R China.;Univ Hong Kong, Lab Space Res, Hong Kong, Hong Kong, Peoples R China..
    Sgro, C.
    Ist Nazl Fis Nucl, Sez Pisa, I-56127 Pisa, Italy..
    Siskind, E. J.
    NYCB Real Time Comp Inc, Lattingtown, NY 11560 USA..
    Spada, F.
    Ist Nazl Fis Nucl, Sez Pisa, I-56127 Pisa, Italy..
    Spandre, G.
    Ist Nazl Fis Nucl, Sez Pisa, I-56127 Pisa, Italy..
    Spinelli, P.
    M Merlin Universita, Dipartimento Fis, I-70126 Bari, Italy.;Politecn Bari, I-70126 Bari, Italy.;Ist Nazl Fis Nucl, Sez Bari, I-70126 Bari, Italy..
    Suson, D. J.
    Purdue Univ Northwset, Hammond, IN 46323 USA..
    Tajima, H.
    Stanford Univ, WW Hansen Expt Phys Lab, Kavli Inst Particle Astrophys & Cosmol, Dept Phys, Stanford, CA 94305 USA.;Stanford Univ, SLAC Natl Accelerator Lab, Stanford, CA 94305 USA.;Nagoya Univ, Solar Terr Environm Lab, Nagoya, Aichi 4648601, Japan..
    Takahashi, M.
    Max Planck Inst Phys & Astrophys, D-80805 Munich, Germany..
    Tak, D.
    NASA, Goddard Space Flight Ctr, Greenbelt, MD 20771 USA.;Univ Maryland, Dept Phys, College Pk, MD 20742 USA.;Univ Maryland, Dept Astron, College Pk, MD 20742 USA..
    Thayer, J. G.
    Stanford Univ, WW Hansen Expt Phys Lab, Kavli Inst Particle Astrophys & Cosmol, Dept Phys, Stanford, CA 94305 USA.;Stanford Univ, SLAC Natl Accelerator Lab, Stanford, CA 94305 USA..
    Thayer, J. B.
    Stanford Univ, WW Hansen Expt Phys Lab, Kavli Inst Particle Astrophys & Cosmol, Dept Phys, Stanford, CA 94305 USA.;Stanford Univ, SLAC Natl Accelerator Lab, Stanford, CA 94305 USA..
    Torres, D. F.
    Inst Space Sci CSICIEEC, Campus UAB,Carrer Magrans S-N, E-08193 Barcelona, Spain.;ICREA, E-08010 Barcelona, Spain..
    Torresi, E.
    INAF, Ist Astrofis Spaziale & Fis Cosm Bologna, Via P Gobetti 101, I-40129 Bologna, Italy..
    Tosti, G.
    Ist Nazl Fis Nucl, Sez Perugia, I-06123 Perugia, Italy.;Univ Perugia, Dipartimento Fis, I-06123 Perugia, Italy..
    Troja, E.
    NASA, Goddard Space Flight Ctr, Greenbelt, MD 20771 USA.;Univ Maryland, Dept Phys, College Pk, MD 20742 USA.;Univ Maryland, Dept Astron, College Pk, MD 20742 USA..
    Valverde, J.
    CNRS IN2P3, Lab Leprince Ringuet, Ecole Polytech, F-91128 Palaiseau, France..
    Venters, T. M.
    NASA, Goddard Space Flight Ctr, Greenbelt, MD 20771 USA..
    Vianello, G.
    Stanford Univ, WW Hansen Expt Phys Lab, Kavli Inst Particle Astrophys & Cosmol, Dept Phys, Stanford, CA 94305 USA.;Stanford Univ, SLAC Natl Accelerator Lab, Stanford, CA 94305 USA..
    Wood, K.
    Naval Res Lab, Washington, DC 20375 USA.;Praxis Inc, Alexandria, VA 22303 USA..
    Yang, C.
    Hiroshima Univ, Dept Phys Sci, Higashihiroshima, Hiroshima 7398526, Japan..
    Zaharijas, G.
    Ist Nazl Fis Nucl, Sez Trieste, I-34127 Trieste, Italy.;Univ Trieste, I-34127 Trieste, Italy.;Univ Nova Gor, Ctr Astrophys & Cosmol, Nova Gorica, Slovenia..
    Fermi-LAT Observations of LIGO/Virgo Event GW1708172018In: Astrophysical Journal, ISSN 0004-637X, E-ISSN 1538-4357, Vol. 861, no 2, article id 88Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) observations of the binary neutron star merger event GW170817 and the associated short gamma-ray burst (SGRB) GRB 170817A detected by the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor. The LAT was entering the South Atlantic Anomaly at the time of the LIGO/Virgo trigger (t(GW)) and therefore cannot place constraints on the existence of high-energy (E > 100 MeV) emission associated with the moment of binary coalescence. We focus instead on constraining high-energy emission on longer timescales. No candidate electromagnetic counterpart was detected by the LAT on timescales of minutes, hours, or days after the LIGO/Virgo detection. The resulting flux upper bound (at 95% C. L.) from the LAT is 4.5. x. 10(-10) erg cm(-2) s(-1) in the 0.1-1 GeV range covering a period from tGW. +. 1153 s to t(GW). +. 2027 s. At the distance of GRB 170817A, this flux upper bound corresponds to a luminosity upper bound of 9.7. x. 10(43) erg s(-1), which is five orders of magnitude less luminous than the only other LAT SGRB with known redshift, GRB 090510. We also discuss the prospects for LAT detection of electromagnetic counterparts to future gravitational-wave events from Advanced LIGO/Virgo in the context of GW170817/GRB 170817A.

  • 2963. Ajello, M.
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    Blandford, R. D.
    Bloom, E. D.
    Bonino, R.
    Bregeon, J.
    Britto, R. J.
    Bruel, P.
    Buehler, R.
    Buson, S.
    Cameron, R. A.
    Caputo, R.
    Caragiulo, M.
    Caraveo, P. A.
    Cavazzuti, E.
    Cecchi, C.
    Charles, E.
    Chekhtman, A.
    Cheung, C. C.
    Chiaro, G.
    Ciprini, S.
    Cohen, J. M.
    Costantin, D.
    Costanza, F.
    Cuoco, A.
    Cutini, S.
    D'Ammando, F.
    de Palma, F.
    Desiante, R.
    Digel, S. W.
    Di Lalla, N.
    Di Mauro, M.
    Di Venere, L.
    Dominguez, A.
    Drell, P. S.
    Dumora, D.
    Favuzzi, C.
    Fegan, S. J.
    Ferrara, E. C.
    Fortin, P.
    Franckowiak, A.
    Fukazawa, Y.
    Funk, S.
    Fusco, P.
    Gargano, F.
    Gasparrini, D.
    Giglietto, N.
    Giommi, P.
    Giordano, F.
    Giroletti, M.
    Glanzman, T.
    Green, D.
    Grenier, I. A.
    Grondin, M. -H
    Grove, J. E.
    Guillemot, L.
    Guiriec, S.
    Harding, A. K.
    Hays, E.
    Hewitt, J. W.
    Horan, D.
    Jóhannesson, Gudlaugur
    KTH, Centres, Nordic Institute for Theoretical Physics NORDITA.
    Kensei, S.
    Kuss, M.
    La Mura, G.
    Larsson, Stefan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics, Particle and Astroparticle Physics.
    Latronico, L.
    Lemoine-Goumard, M.
    Li, J.
    Longo, F.
    Loparco, F.
    Lott, B.
    Lubrano, P.
    Magill, J. D.
    Maldera, S.
    Manfreda, A.
    Mazziotta, M. N.
    McEnery, J. E.
    Meyer, M.
    Michelson, P. F.
    Mirabal, N.
    Mitthumsiri, W.
    Mizuno, T.
    Moiseev, A. A.
    Monzani, M. E.
    Morselli, A.
    Moskalenko, I. V.
    Negro, M.
    Nuss, E.
    Ohsugi, T.
    Omodei, N.
    Orienti, M.
    Orlando, E.
    Palatiello, M.
    Paliya, V. S.
    Paneque, D.
    Perkins, J. S.
    Persic, M.
    Pesce-Rollins, M.
    Piron, F.
    Porter, T. A.
    Principe, G.
    Raino, S.
    Rando, R.
    Razzano, M.
    Razzaque, S.
    Reimer, A.
    Reimer, O.
    Reposeur, T.
    Parkinson, P. M. Saz
    Sgro, C.
    Simone, D.
    Siskind, E. J.
    Spada, F.
    Spandre, G.
    Spinelli, P.
    Stawarz, L.
    Suson, D. J.
    Takahashi, M.
    Tak, D.
    Thayer, J. G.
    Thayer, J. B.
    Thompson, D. J.
    Torres, D. F.
    Torresi, E.
    Troja, E.
    Vianello, G.
    Wood, K.
    Wood, M.
    3FHL: The Third Catalog of Hard Fermi-LAT Sources2017In: Astrophysical Journal Supplement Series, ISSN 0067-0049, E-ISSN 1538-4365, Vol. 232, no 2, article id 18Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 2964.
    Ajello, M.
    et al.
    Clemson Univ, Kinard Lab Phys, Dept Phys & Astron, Clemson, SC 29634 USA..
    Baldini, L.
    Univ Pisa, I-56127 Pisa, Italy.;Ist Nazl Fis Nucl, Sez Pisa, I-56127 Pisa, Italy..
    Barbiellini, G.
    Ist Nazl Fis Nucl, Sez Trieste, I-34127 Trieste, Italy.;Univ Trieste, Dipartimento Fis, I-34127 Trieste, Italy..
    Bastieri, D.
    Ist Nazl Fis Nucl, Sez Padova, I-35131 Padua, Italy.;Univ Padua, Dipartimento Fis & Astron G Galilei, I-35131 Padua, Italy..
    Bellazzini, R.
    Ist Nazl Fis Nucl, Sez Pisa, I-56127 Pisa, Italy..
    Bissaldi, E.
    Univ Politecn Bari, Dipartimento Fis M Merlin, I-70126 Bari, Italy.;Ist Nazl Fis Nucl, Sez Bari, I-70126 Bari, Italy..
    Blandford, R. D.
    Stanford Univ, Kavli Inst Particle Astrophys & Cosmol, WW Hansen Expt Phys Lab, Dept Phys, Stanford, CA 94305 USA.;Stanford Univ, SLAC Natl Accelerator Lab, Stanford, CA 94305 USA..
    Bonino, R.
    Ist Nazl Fis Nucl, Sez Torino, I-10125 Turin, Italy.;Univ Turin, Dipartimento Fis, I-10125 Turin, Italy..
    Bottacini, E.
    Stanford Univ, Kavli Inst Particle Astrophys & Cosmol, WW Hansen Expt Phys Lab, Dept Phys, Stanford, CA 94305 USA.;Stanford Univ, SLAC Natl Accelerator Lab, Stanford, CA 94305 USA..
    Bregeon, J.
    Univ Montpellier, CNRS IN2P3, Lab Univers & Particules Montpellier, F-34095 Montpellier, France..
    Bruel, P.
    CNRS IN2P3, Ecole Polytech, Lab Leprince Ringuet, F-91128 Palaiseau, France..
    Buehler, R.
    DESY, D-15738 Zeuthen, Germany..
    Cameron, R. A.
    Stanford Univ, Kavli Inst Particle Astrophys & Cosmol, WW Hansen Expt Phys Lab, Dept Phys, Stanford, CA 94305 USA..
    Caputo, R.
    CRESST, Greenbelt, MD 20771 USA.;NASA, Goddard Space Flight Ctr, Greenbelt, MD 20771 USA..
    Caraveo, P. A.
    INAF Ist Astrofis Spaziale & Fis Cosm Milano, Via E Bassini 15, I-20133 Milan, Italy..
    Chiaro, G.
    INAF Ist Astrofis Spaziale & Fis Cosm Milano, Via E Bassini 15, I-20133 Milan, Italy..
    Ciprini, S.
    Agenzia Spaziale Italiana, Space Sci Data Ctr, Via Politecn, I-00133 Rome, Italy..
    Cohen-Tanugi, J.
    Univ Montpellier, CNRS IN2P3, Lab Univers & Particules Montpellier, F-34095 Montpellier, France..
    Costantin, D.
    Univ Padua, Dipartimento Fis & Astron G Galilei, I-35131 Padua, Italy..
    D'Ammando, F.
    INAF Ist Radioastron, I-40129 Bologna, Italy.;Univ Bologna, Dipartimento Astron, I-40127 Bologna, Italy..
    de Palma, F.
    Ist Nazl Fis Nucl, Sez Bari, I-70126 Bari, Italy.;Univ Telemat Pegaso, Piazza Trieste & Trento 48, I-80132 Naples, Italy..
    Di Lalla, N.
    Univ Pisa, I-56127 Pisa, Italy.;Ist Nazl Fis Nucl, Sez Pisa, I-56127 Pisa, Italy..
    Di Mauro, M.
    Stanford Univ, Kavli Inst Particle Astrophys & Cosmol, WW Hansen Expt Phys Lab, Dept Phys, Stanford, CA 94305 USA..
    Di Venere, L.
    Univ Politecn Bari, Dipartimento Fis M Merlin, I-70126 Bari, Italy.;Ist Nazl Fis Nucl, Sez Bari, I-70126 Bari, Italy..
    Dominguez, A.
    Univ Complutense Madrid, Grp Altas Energias, E-28040 Madrid, Spain..
    Favuzzi, C.
    Univ Politecn Bari, Dipartimento Fis M Merlin, I-70126 Bari, Italy.;Ist Nazl Fis Nucl, Sez Bari, I-70126 Bari, Italy..
    Franckowiak, A.
    DESY, D-15738 Zeuthen, Germany..
    Fukazawa, Y.
    Hiroshima Univ, Dept Phys Sci, Higashihiroshima, Hiroshima 7398526, Japan..
    Funk, S.
    Friedrich Alexander Univ Erlangen Nurnberg, Erlangen Ctr Astroparticle Phys, Erwin Rommel Str 1, D-91058 Erlangen, Germany..
    Fusco, P.
    Univ Politecn Bari, Dipartimento Fis M Merlin, I-70126 Bari, Italy.;Ist Nazl Fis Nucl, Sez Bari, I-70126 Bari, Italy..
    Gargano, F.
    Ist Nazl Fis Nucl, Sez Bari, I-70126 Bari, Italy..
    Gasparrini, D.
    Agenzia Spaziale Italiana, Space Sci Data Ctr, Via Politecn, I-00133 Rome, Italy.;Ist Nazl Fis Nucl, Sez Perugia, I-06123 Perugia, Italy..
    Giglietto, N.
    Univ Politecn Bari, Dipartimento Fis M Merlin, I-70126 Bari, Italy.;Ist Nazl Fis Nucl, Sez Bari, I-70126 Bari, Italy..
    Giordano, F.
    Univ Politecn Bari, Dipartimento Fis M Merlin, I-70126 Bari, Italy.;Ist Nazl Fis Nucl, Sez Bari, I-70126 Bari, Italy..
    Giroletti, M.
    INAF Ist Radioastron, I-40129 Bologna, Italy..
    Green, D.
    Univ Maryland, Dept Astron, College Pk, MD 20742 USA.;NASA, Goddard Space Flight Ctr, Greenbelt, MD 20771 USA..
    Grenier, I. A.
    Univ Paris Diderot, Lab AIM, CEA IRFU, CNRS,Serv Astrophys,CEA Saclay, F-91191 Gif Sur Yvette, France..
    Guiriec, S.
    NASA, Goddard Space Flight Ctr, Greenbelt, MD 20771 USA.;George Washington Univ, Dept Phys, 725 21st St NW, Washington, DC 20052 USA..
    Holt, C.
    Univ Maryland Baltimore Cty, Dept Phys, Baltimore, MD 21250 USA.;Univ Maryland Baltimore Cty, Ctr Space Sci & Technol, Baltimore, MD 21250 USA..
    Horan, D.
    CNRS IN2P3, Ecole Polytech, Lab Leprince Ringuet, F-91128 Palaiseau, France..
    Johannesson, G.
    Univ Iceland, Sci Inst, IS-107 Reykjavik, Iceland.;NORDITA, Roslagstullsbacken 23, SE-10691 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Kocevski, D.
    NASA, Goddard Space Flight Ctr, Greenbelt, MD 20771 USA..
    Kuss, M.
    Ist Nazl Fis Nucl, Sez Pisa, I-56127 Pisa, Italy..
    La Mura, G.
    Univ Padua, Dipartimento Fis & Astron G Galilei, I-35131 Padua, Italy..
    Larsson, Stefan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics, Particle and Astroparticle Physics.
    Li, J.
    Inst Space Sci CSICIEEC, Campus UAB,Carrer Magrans S-N, E-08193 Barcelona, Spain..
    Longo, F.
    Ist Nazl Fis Nucl, Sez Trieste, I-34127 Trieste, Italy.;Univ Trieste, Dipartimento Fis, I-34127 Trieste, Italy..
    Loparco, F.
    Univ Politecn Bari, Dipartimento Fis M Merlin, I-70126 Bari, Italy.;Ist Nazl Fis Nucl, Sez Bari, I-70126 Bari, Italy..
    Lubrano, P.
    Ist Nazl Fis Nucl, Sez Perugia, I-06123 Perugia, Italy..
    Magill, J. D.
    Univ Maryland, Dept Astron, College Pk, MD 20742 USA..
    Maldera, S.
    Stanford Univ, SLAC Natl Accelerator Lab, Stanford, CA 94305 USA..
    Manfreda, A.
    Univ Pisa, I-56127 Pisa, Italy..
    Mazziotta, M. N.
    Ist Nazl Fis Nucl, Sez Bari, I-70126 Bari, Italy..
    Michelson, P. F.
    Stanford Univ, Kavli Inst Particle Astrophys & Cosmol, WW Hansen Expt Phys Lab, Dept Phys, Stanford, CA 94305 USA..
    Mizuno, T.
    Hiroshima Univ, Hiroshima Astrophys Sci Ctr, Higashihiroshima, Hiroshima 7398526, Japan..
    Monzani, M. E.
    Stanford Univ, Kavli Inst Particle Astrophys & Cosmol, WW Hansen Expt Phys Lab, Dept Phys, Stanford, CA 94305 USA..
    Morselli, A.
    Ist Nazl Fis Nucl, Sez Roma Tor Vergata, I-00133 Rome, Italy..
    Negro, M.
    Ist Nazl Fis Nucl, Sez Torino, I-10125 Turin, Italy.;Univ Turin, Dipartimento Fis, I-10125 Turin, Italy..
    Nuss, E.
    Univ Montpellier, CNRS IN2P3, Lab Univers & Particules Montpellier, F-34095 Montpellier, France..
    Omodei, N.
    Stanford Univ, Kavli Inst Particle Astrophys & Cosmol, WW Hansen Expt Phys Lab, Dept Phys, Stanford, CA 94305 USA..
    Orienti, M.
    INAF Ist Radioastron, I-40129 Bologna, Italy..
    Orlando, E.
    Stanford Univ, Kavli Inst Particle Astrophys & Cosmol, WW Hansen Expt Phys Lab, Dept Phys, Stanford, CA 94305 USA..
    Paliya, V. S.
    Clemson Univ, Kinard Lab Phys, Dept Phys & Astron, Clemson, SC 29634 USA..
    Perkins, J. S.
    NASA, Goddard Space Flight Ctr, Greenbelt, MD 20771 USA..
    Persic, M.
    Ist Nazl Fis Nucl, Sez Trieste, I-34127 Trieste, Italy.;Ist Nazl Astrofis, Osservatorio Astron Trieste, I-34143 Trieste, Italy..
    Pesce-Rollins, M.
    Ist Nazl Fis Nucl, Sez Pisa, I-56127 Pisa, Italy..
    Piron, F.
    Univ Montpellier, CNRS IN2P3, Lab Univers & Particules Montpellier, F-34095 Montpellier, France..
    Principe, G.
    Friedrich Alexander Univ Erlangen Nurnberg, Erlangen Ctr Astroparticle Phys, Erwin Rommel Str 1, D-91058 Erlangen, Germany..
    Racusin, J. L.
    NASA, Goddard Space Flight Ctr, Greenbelt, MD 20771 USA..
    Raino, S.
    Univ Politecn Bari, Dipartimento Fis M Merlin, I-70126 Bari, Italy.;Ist Nazl Fis Nucl, Sez Bari, I-70126 Bari, Italy..
    Rando, R.
    Ist Nazl Fis Nucl, Sez Padova, I-35131 Padua, Italy.;Univ Padua, Dipartimento Fis & Astron G Galilei, I-35131 Padua, Italy..
    Razzano, M.
    Ist Nazl Fis Nucl, Sez Pisa, I-56127 Pisa, Italy..
    Razzaque, S.
    Univ Johannesburg, Dept Phys, POB 524, ZA-2006 Auckland Pk, South Africa..
    Reimer, A.
    Stanford Univ, Kavli Inst Particle Astrophys & Cosmol, WW Hansen Expt Phys Lab, Dept Phys, Stanford, CA 94305 USA.;Leopold Franzens Univ Innsbruck, Inst Astro & Teilchenphys, A-6020 Innsbruck, Austria.;Leopold Franzens Univ Innsbruck, Inst Theoret Phys, A-6020 Innsbruck, Austria..
    Reimer, O.
    Stanford Univ, Kavli Inst Particle Astrophys & Cosmol, WW Hansen Expt Phys Lab, Dept Phys, Stanford, CA 94305 USA.;Leopold Franzens Univ Innsbruck, Inst Astro & Teilchenphys, A-6020 Innsbruck, Austria.;Leopold Franzens Univ Innsbruck, Inst Theoret Phys, A-6020 Innsbruck, Austria..
    Sgro, C.
    Siskind, E. J.
    NYCB Real Time Comp Inc, Lattingtown, NY 11560 USA..
    Spandre, G.
    Ist Nazl Fis Nucl, Sez Pisa, I-56127 Pisa, Italy..
    Spinelli, P.
    Univ Politecn Bari, Dipartimento Fis M Merlin, I-70126 Bari, Italy.;Ist Nazl Fis Nucl, Sez Bari, I-70126 Bari, Italy..
    Tak, D.
    Univ Maryland, Dept Astron, College Pk, MD 20742 USA..
    Thayer, J. B.
    Stanford Univ, Kavli Inst Particle Astrophys & Cosmol, WW Hansen Expt Phys Lab, Dept Phys, Stanford, CA 94305 USA..
    Torres, D. F.
    ICREA, E-08010 Barcelona, Spain..
    Tosti, G.
    Univ Perugia, Dipartimento Fis, I-06123 Perugia, Italy..
    Valverde, J.
    CNRS IN2P3, Ecole Polytech, Lab Leprince Ringuet, F-91128 Palaiseau, France..
    Vogel, M.
    Calif State Univ Los Angeles, Dept Phys & Astron, Los Angeles, CA 90032 USA..
    Wood, K.
    Praxis Inc, Alexandria, VA 22303 USA.;Naval Res Lab, Washington, DC 20375 USA..
    Investigating the Nature of Late-time High-energy GRB Emission through Joint Fermi/Swift Observations2018In: Astrophysical Journal, ISSN 0004-637X, E-ISSN 1538-4357, Vol. 863, no 2, article id 138Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We use joint observations by the Swift X-ray Telescope (XRT) and the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) of gamma-ray burst (GRB) afterglows to investigate the nature of the long-lived high-energy emission observed by Fermi LAT. Joint broadband spectral modeling of XRT and LAT data reveals that LAT nondetections of bright X-ray afterglows are consistent with a cooling break in the inferred electron synchrotron spectrum below the LAT and/or XRT energy ranges. Such a break is sufficient to suppress the high-energy emission so as to be below the LAT detection threshold. By contrast, LAT-detected bursts are best fit by a synchrotron spectrum with a cooling break that lies either between or above the XRT and LAT energy ranges. We speculate that the primary difference between GRBs with LAT afterglow detections and the nondetected population may be in the type of circumstellar environment in which these bursts occur, with late-time LAT detections preferentially selecting GRBs that occur in low wind-like circumburst density profiles. Furthermore, we find no evidence of high-energy emission in the LAT-detected population significantly in excess of the flux expected from the electron synchrotron spectrum fit to the observed X-ray emission. The lack of excess emission at high energies could be due to a shocked external medium in which the energy density in the magnetic field is stronger than or comparable to that of the relativistic electrons behind the shock, precluding the production of a dominant synchrotron self-Compton (SSC) component in the LAT energy range. Alternatively, the peak of the SSC emission could be beyond the 0.1-100 GeV energy range considered for this analysis.

  • 2965. Ajello, M
    et al.
    Larsson, Stefan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics, Particle and Astroparticle Physics. AlbaNova, Sweden.
    Li, L.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics. AlbaNova, Sweden.
    Yassine, M.
    et al.,
    DEEP MORPHOLOGICAL AND SPECTRAL STUDY OF THE SNR RCW 86 WITH FERMI-LAT2016In: Astrophysical Journal, ISSN 0004-637X, E-ISSN 1538-4357, Vol. 819, no 2, article id 98Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    RCW 86 is a young supernova remnant (SNR) showing a shell-type structure at several wavelengths and is thought to be an efficient cosmic-ray (CR) accelerator. Earlier Fermi Large Area Telescope results reported the detection of.-ray emission coincident with the position of RCW 86 but its origin (leptonic or hadronic) remained unclear due to the poor statistics. Thanks to 6.5 years of data acquired by the Fermi-LAT and the new event reconstruction Pass 8, we report the significant detection of spatially extended emission coming from RCW 86. The spectrum is described by a power-law function with a very hard photon index (Gamma= 1.42 +/- 0.1(stat) +/- 0.06(syst)) in the 0.1-500 GeV range and an energy flux above 100 MeV of (2.91. 0.8(stat). 0.12(syst)) 10-11 erg cm(-2) s(-1). Gathering all the available multiwavelength (MWL) data, we perform a broadband modeling of the nonthermal emission of RCW 86 to constrain parameters of the nearby medium and bring new hints about the origin of the gamma-ray emission. For the whole SNR, the modeling favors a leptonic scenario in the framework of a two-zone model with an average magnetic field of 10.2 +/- 0.7 mu G and a limit on the maximum energy injected into protons of 2. x. 10(49) erg for a density of 1 cm(-3). In addition, parameter values are derived for the north-east and south-west (SW) regions of RCW 86, providing the first indication of a higher magnetic field in the SW region.

  • 2966. Ajello, M.
    et al.
    Larsson, Stefan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics, Particle and Astroparticle Physics. Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmoparticle Physics, Sweden.
    Li, L.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics, Particle and Astroparticle Physics. Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmoparticle Physics, Sweden.
    Zimmer, S.
    et al.,
    Search for Spectral Irregularities due to Photon-Axionlike-Particle Oscillations with the Fermi Large Area Telescope2016In: Physical Review Letters, ISSN 0031-9007, E-ISSN 1079-7114, Vol. 116, no 16, article id 161101Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We report on the search for spectral irregularities induced by oscillations between photons and axionlike-particles (ALPs) in the γ-ray spectrum of NGC 1275, the central galaxy of the Perseus cluster. Using 6 years of Fermi Large Area Telescope data, we find no evidence for ALPs and exclude couplings above 5×10-12 GeV-1 for ALP masses 0.5ma5 neV at 95% confidence. The limits are competitive with the sensitivity of planned laboratory experiments, and, together with other bounds, strongly constrain the possibility that ALPs can reduce the γ-ray opacity of the Universe.

  • 2967.
    Ajmal Khan, Muhammad
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology.
    Raza, Rizwan
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology.
    Bohn Lima, Raquel
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Chaudhry, M. Asharf
    Ahmed, E.
    Abbas, Ghazanfar
    Comparative study of the nano-composite electrolytes based on samaria-doped ceria for low temperature solid oxide fuel cells (LT-SOFCs)2013In: International journal of hydrogen energy, ISSN 0360-3199, E-ISSN 1879-3487, Vol. 38, no 36, p. 16524-16531Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ceria-based electrolyte materials have great potential in low and intermediate temperature solid oxide fuel cell applications. In the present study, three types of ceria-based nanocomposite electrolytes (LNK-SDC, LN-SDC and NK-SDC) were synthesized. One-step co-precipitation method was adopted and different techniques were applied to characterize the obtained ceria-based nano-composite electrolyte materials. TGA, XRD and SEM were used to analyze the thermal effect, crystal structure and morphology of the materials. Cubic fluorite structures have been observed in all composite electrolytes. Furthermore, the crystallite sizes of the LN-SDC, NK-SDC, LNK-SDC were calculated by Scherrer formula and found to be in the range 20 nm, 21 nm and 19 nm, respectively. These values emphasize a good agreement with the SEM results. The ionic conductivities were measured using EIS (Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy) with two-probe method and the activation energies were also calculated using Arrhenius plot. The maximum power density was achieved 484 mW/cm(2) of LNK-SDC electrolyte at 570 degrees C using the LiCuZnNi oxide electrodes.

  • 2968.
    Ajne, Joel
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Real Estate and Construction Management.
    Peterhoff, Marcus
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Real Estate and Construction Management.
    Digitalisering inom den Svenska Fastighetsmarknaden2018Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    PropTech has become a worldwide phenomenon in the real estate market. The attribute of digitization benefit the entire range of owners, investors and tenants. Cost-efficiency, time optimization and the renewal of stereotypes are some of the reasons for this. In Sweden, interest has risen sharply over the past three years, but the real estate industry is slow moving and it is only until now that real estate companies begin to realize the value of applying the new technology. The purpose of the report is to get a market view of how the Swedish real estate industry defines PropTech and digitization, as well as investigate how companies look at the future of the subject. The problem is answered using expert interviews that also form the basis for the analysis. The perception of the significance of digitization varies depending on ownership and yield, while it is clear that the mission of a property owner will change in the future.

  • 2969. Aka, Menny
    et al.
    Breuillard, Emmanuel
    Rosenzweig, Lior
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mathematics (Dept.).
    de Saxce, Nicolas
    Diophantine properties of nilpotent Lie groups2015In: Compositio Mathematica, ISSN 0010-437X, E-ISSN 1570-5846, Vol. 151, no 6, p. 1157-1188Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A finitely generated subgroup F of a real Lie group G is said to be Diophantine if there is beta > 0 such that non-trivial elements in the word ball B-Gamma(n) centered at 1 is an element of F never approach the identity of G closer than broken vertical bar Br(n)broken vertical bar(-beta). A Lie group G is said to be Diophantine if for every k >= 1 a random k-tuple in G generates a Diophantine subgroup. Semi-simple Lie groups are conjectured to be Diophantine but very little is proven in this direction. We give a characterization of Diophantine nilpotent Lie groups in terms of the ideal of laws of their Lie algebra. In particular we show that nilpotent Lie groups of class at most 5, or derived length at most 2, as well as rational nilpotent Lie groups are Diophantine. We also find that there are non-Diophantine nilpotent and solvable (non-nilpotent) Lie groups.

  • 2970. Aka, Menny
    et al.
    Breuillard, Emmanuel
    Rosenzweig, Lior
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mathematics (Dept.), Mathematics (Div.).
    de Saxce, Nicolas
    On metric Diophantine approximation in matrices and Lie groups2015In: Comptes rendus. Mathematique, ISSN 1631-073X, E-ISSN 1778-3569, Vol. 353, no 3, p. 185-189Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We study the Diophantine exponent of analytic submanifolds of m x n real matrices, answering questions of Beresnevich, Kleinbock, and Margulis. We identify a family of algebraic obstructions to the extremality of such a submanifold, and give a formula for the exponent when the submanifold is algebraic and defined over Q. We then apply these results to the determination of the Diophantine exponent of rational nilpotent Lie groups.

  • 2971. Akabori, M.
    et al.
    Hidaka, S.
    Iwase, H.
    Yamada, S.
    Ekenberg, Ulf
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Optics and Photonics.
    Realization of In0.75Ga0.25As two-dimensional electron gas bilayer system for spintronics devices based on Rashba spin-orbit interaction2012In: Journal of Applied Physics, ISSN 0021-8979, E-ISSN 1089-7550, Vol. 112, no 11, p. 113711-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Narrow gap InGaAs two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) bilayer samples are fabricated and confirmed to have good electronic qualities as well as strong Rashba-type spin-orbit interactions (SOIs). The 2DEG systems are realized by molecular beam epitaxy in the form of wide quantum wells (QWs) with thicknesses tQW∼40-120nm modulation doped in both the upper and lower InAlAs barriers. From the Hall measurements, the overall mobility values of μe ∼15 m2/V s are found for the total sheet electron density of ns ∼8 × 1011/cm2, although the ns is distributed asymmetrically as about 1:3 in the upper and lower 2DEGs, respectively. Careful low temperature magneto-resistance analysis gives large SO coupling constants of α ∼20 × 10 -12eV m as well as expected electron effective masses of m*/m0 ∼0.033-0.042 for each bilayer 2DEG spin sub-band. Moreover, the enhancement of α with decrease of tQW is found. The corresponding self-consistent calculation, which suggests the interaction between the bilayer 2DEGs, is carried out and the origin of α enhancement is discussed.

  • 2972.
    Akan, Pelin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Gene Technology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Alexeyenko, Andrey
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Gene Technology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Costea, Paul Igor
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Gene Technology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Hedberg, Lilia
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Gene Technology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Werne Solnestam, Beata
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Gene Technology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Lundin, Sverker
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Gene Technology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Hallman, Jimmie
    Lundberg, Emma
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Gene Technology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Uhlén, Mathias
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics (closed 20130101). KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Lundeberg, Joakim
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Gene Technology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Comprehensive analysis of the genome transcriptome and proteome landscapes of three tumor cell lines2012In: Genome Medicine, ISSN 1756-994X, E-ISSN 1756-994X, Vol. 4, p. 86-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We here present a comparative genome, transcriptome and functional network analysis of three human cancer cell lines (A431, U251MG and U2OS), and investigate their relation to protein expression. Gene copy numbers significantly influenced corresponding transcript levels; their effect on protein levels was less pronounced. We focused on genes with altered mRNA and/or protein levels to identify those active in tumor maintenance. We provide comprehensive information for the three genomes and demonstrate the advantage of integrative analysis for identifying tumor-related genes amidst numerous background mutations by relating genomic variation to expression/protein abundance data and use gene networks to reveal implicated pathways.

  • 2973.
    Akan, Pelin
    et al.
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Stranneheim, Henrik
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Lexow, Preben
    LingVitae, Oslo.
    Lundeberg, Joakim
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Design and assessment of binary DNA for nanopore sequencing2010In: Genome biology, ISSN 1474-760X, Vol. 11, p. P4-Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 2974.
    Akan, Rabia
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE).
    Oorganiska-organiska nanopartikelbaserade supramolekylära strukturer för biomedicinska applikationer2015Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The possibility to create a multifunctional nanoparticle system via supramolecular chemistry approach with ability to simultaneously target, deliver and diagnose was investigated. Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles were synthesized by co-precipitation method and surface modified with the cyclic oligosaccharide carboxymethyl-β-cyclodextrin by three different routes. The different routes involved one, two or three reaction steps in order to reach to the final oligosaccharide functionalized nanoparticles. Esterification was performed using the intrinsic hydroxyl functionality of the nanoparticle surfaces or amine functionality was introduced prior to amidization. Further, a polymeric coating was created by incorporation of folic acid functionalized Pluronic® L-35 into carboxymethyl-β-cyclodextrin. The resulting nanoparticle based supramolecular systems were characterized by TEM, TGA, FT-IR, DLS and zeta potential techniques.

     

    The colloidal stabilities of the supramolecular nanoparticle systems were investigated in phosphate buffered saline with pH 7.4 representing body conditions. It was found that a three-step functionalization of iron oxide nanoparticles with citric acid, hexamethylenediamine and finally carboxymethyl-β-cyclodextrin resulted in the most stable ferrofluids. The average size of the resulting carboxymethyl-β-cyclodextrin functionalized nanoparticles was 25 nm prior to, and 50 nm after inclusion of folic acid functionalized Pluronic. The amount of grafted carboxymethyl-β-cyclodextrin on the nanoparticles surfaces was 25 weight %. Thus, the resulting stable ferrofluid creates an efficient platform with potential of multiple uses in biomedicine. This nanoparticle based supramolecular system combines the properties of magnetic targeting and MRI contrast enhancement due to the superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle core, drug delivery of hydrophobic drugs due to the polymer capsule and selective targeting towards tumour cells due to the folic acid.

  • 2975.
    Akan, Rabia
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Biomedical and X-ray Physics.
    Parfeniukas, Karolis
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Biomedical and X-ray Physics.
    Vogt, Carmen
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Biomedical and X-ray Physics.
    Toprak, M. S.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Biomedical and X-ray Physics.
    Vogt, Ulrich
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Biomedical and X-ray Physics.
    Reaction control of metal-assisted chemical etching for silicon-based zone plate nanostructures2018In: RSC Advances, ISSN 2046-2069, E-ISSN 2046-2069, Vol. 8, no 23, p. 12628-12634Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Metal-assisted chemical etching (MACE) reaction parameters were investigated for the fabrication of specially designed silicon-based X-ray zone plate nanostructures using a gold catalyst pattern and etching solutions composed of HF and H2O2. Etching depth, zone verticality and zone roughness were studied as a function of etching solution composition, temperature and processing time. Homogeneous, vertical etching with increasing depth is observed at increasing H2O2 concentrations and elevated processing temperatures, implying a balance in the hole injection and silica dissolution kinetics at the gold-silicon interface. The etching depth decreases and zone roughness increases at the highest investigated H2O2 concentration and temperature. Possible reasons for these observations are discussed based on reaction chemistry and zone plate design. Optimum MACE conditions are found at HFH2O2 concentrations of 4.7 M:0.68 M and room temperature with an etching rate of ≈0.7 μm min-1, which is about an order of magnitude higher than previous reports. Moreover, our results show that a grid catalyst design is important for successful fabrication of vertical high aspect ratio silicon nanostructures. 

  • 2976.
    Akan, Rabia
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Biomedical and X-ray Physics.
    Parfeniukas, Karolis
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Biomedical and X-ray Physics. KTH Royal Institute of Technology.
    Vogt, Carmen
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Biomedical and X-ray Physics.
    Toprak, Muhammet S.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Biomedical and X-ray Physics.
    Vogt, Ulrich
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Biomedical and X-ray Physics.
    Reaction control of metal-assisted chemical etching for silicon-based zone plate nanostructuresManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Metal-assisted chemical etching (MACE) reaction parameters were investigated for the fabrication of specially designed silicon-based x-ray zone plate nanostructures using a gold catalyst pattern and etching solutions composed of HF and H2O2. Etching depth, zone verticality and zone roughness were studied as a function of etching solution composition, temperature and processing time. Homogeneous, vertical etching with increasing depth is observed at increasing H2O2 concentrations and elevated processing temperatures, implying a balance in the hole injection and silica dissolution kinetics at the gold-silicon interface. The etching depth decreases and zone roughness increases at the highest investigated H2O2 concentration and temperature. Possible reasons for these observations are discussed based on reaction chemistry and zone plate design. Optimum MACE conditions are found at HF:H2O2 concentrations of 4.7 M:0.68 M and room temperature with an etching rate of 0.7 micrometers per minute, which is about an order of magnitude higher than previous reports. Moreover, our results show that a grid catalyst design is important for successful fabrication of vertical high aspect ratio silicon nanostructures.

  • 2977.
    Akander, Amanda
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Development and Evaluation of a Lateral Flow Immunoassay for on-site Diagnosisof Contagious Bovine Pleuropneumonia2014Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study was to develop and evaluate a lateral flow immunoassay, as a point-of-care prototype for diagnosis of contagious bovine pleuropneumonia (CBPP). The assay was based on a panel of recombinant proteins spotted on a nitrocellulose membrane. The study included optimization of assay components, such as running buffer and protein microarray layout. The purpose was to obtain a clear discriminatory capacity between CBPP positive and CBPP negative sera, by developing and evaluating a lateral flow immunoassay that could be used on-site.

    The discriminatory capacity between CBPP positive sera and CBPP negative sera in the lateral flow assay was statistically significant with p-values ≤0.05 for recombinant proteins to be printed in microarray spots both individually as well as proteins printed as mixtures. The sensitivity of the assay was 64% and the specificity 100%, which was comparable to current diagnostic methods for CBPP. From these rsults, four combinations of recombinant proteins were selected to print as a microarray, which was based on p-valuesas well as sera coverage. As the purpose of this study was to develop a prototype for on-site usage, a fieldtrip to Nairobi, Kenya, facilitated by the Swedish International Development Cooperation Agency, SIDA, was made to test the prototpyes as well as obtain deeper knowledge of user area. However, the lateral flow immunoassay did not deliver reproducible and stable results during the field trip to Kenya.

  • 2978.
    Akander, Amanda
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Massive parallell DNA-sequencing - future methods to obtain a human genome in 15 minutes2014Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 2979.
    Akander, Jan
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Building Sciences and Engineering.
    The ORC method2000Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other scientific)
    Abstract [en]

    The ORC Method (Optimised RC-networks) provides a means ofmodelling one- or multidimensional heat transfer in buildingcomponents, in this context within building simulationenvironments. The methodology is shown, primarily applied toheat transfer in multilayer building components. For multilayerbuilding components, the analytical thermal performance isknown, given layer thickness and material properties. The aimof the ORC Method is to optimise the values of the thermalresistances and heat capacities of an RC-model such as to givemodel performance a good agreement with the analyticalperformance, for a wide range of frequencies. The optimisationprocedure is made in the frequency domain, where the over-alldeviation between model and analytical frequency response, interms of admittance and dynamic transmittance, is minimised. Itis shown that ORC's are effective in terms of accuracy andcomputational time in comparison to finite difference modelswhen used in building simulations, in this case with IDA/ICE.An ORC configuration of five mass nodes has been found to modelbuilding components in Nordic countries well, within theapplication of thermal comfort and energy requirementsimulations.

    Simple RC-networks, such as the surface heat capacity andthe simple R-C-configuration are not appropriate for detailedbuilding simulation. However, these can be used as basis fordefining the effective heat capacity of a building component.An approximate method is suggested on how to determine theeffective heat capacity without the use of complex numbers.This entity can be calculated on basis of layer thickness andmaterial properties with the help of two time constants. Theapproximate method can give inaccuracies corresponding to20%.

    In-situ measurements have been carried out in anexperimental building with the purpose of establishing theeffective heat capacity of external building components thatare subjected to normal thermal conditions. The auxiliary wallmethod was practised and the building was subjected toexcitation with radiators. In a comparison, there werediscrepancies between analytical and measured effective heatcapacities. It was found that high-frequency discrepancies wereto a large extent caused by the heat flux sensors.Low-frequency discrepancies are explained by the fact that theexterior climate contained other frequencies than those assumedin the interior climate.

    Key words: Building component, building simulation, heattransfer, thermal performance, frequency response, RC-network,finite difference model.

  • 2980.
    Akander, Jan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering.
    Alvarez, S
    Jóhannesson, Gundi
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering.
    Energy normalization techniques2004In: Energy Performance of Residential Buildings: A Practical Guide for Energy Rating and Efficiency, James & James/Earthscan , 2004, p. 57-70Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 2981.
    Akander, Jan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering.
    Jóhnnesson, Gudini
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering.
    Experimental methods for the energy characterization of buildings2004In: Energy Performance of Residential Buildings: A Practical Guide for Energy Rating and Efficiency, James & James/Earthscan , 2004, p. 26-56Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 2982.
    Akay, Altug
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Systems Safety and Management.
    A Novel Method to Intelligently Mine Social Media to Assess Consumer Sentiment of Pharmaceutical Drugs2017Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis focuses on the development of novel data mining techniques that convert user interactions in social media networks into readable data that would benefit users, companies, and governments. The readable data can either warn of dangerous side effects of pharmaceutical drugs or improve intervention strategies. A weighted model enabled us to represent user activity in the network, that allowed us to reflect user sentiment of a pharmaceutical drug and/or service. The result is an accurate representation of user sentiment. This approach, when modified for specific diseases, drugs, and services, can enable rapid user feedback that can be converted into rapid responses from consumers to industry and government to withdraw possibly dangerous drugs and services from the market or improve said drugs and services.

    Our approach monitors social media networks in real-time, enabling government and industry to rapidly respond to consumer sentiment of pharmaceutical drugs and services.

  • 2983.
    Akay, Altug
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Systems Safety and Management.
    Dragomir, A.
    Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Houston, Houston, TX, US.
    Erlandsson, Björn-Erik
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Systems Safety and Management.
    A novel data-mining approach leveraging social media to monitor and respond to outcomes of diabetes drugs and treatment2013In: 2013 IEEE Point-of-Care Healthcare Technologies (PHT), New York: IEEE , 2013, p. 264-266Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A novel data-mining method was developed to gauge the experiences of medical devices and drugs by patients with diabetes mellitus. Self-organizing maps were used to analyze forum posts numerically to better understand user opinion of medical devices and drugs. The end-result is a word list compilation that correlates certain positive and negative word cluster groups with medical drugs and devices. The implication of this novel data-mining method could open new avenues of research into rapid data collection, feedback, and analysis that would enable improved outcomes and solutions for public health.

  • 2984.
    Akay, Altug
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Systems Safety and Management.
    Dragomir, A
    Erlandsson, Björn-Erik
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Systems Safety and Management.
    A Novel Data-Mining Approach Leveraging Social Media to Monitor Consumer Opinion of Sitagliptin2015In: IEEE journal of biomedical and health informatics, ISSN 2168-2194, E-ISSN 2168-2208, Vol. 19, no 1, p. 389-396Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A novel data mining method was developed to gauge the experience of the drug Sitagliptin (trade name Januvia) by patients with diabetes mellitus type 2. To this goal, we devised a two-step analysis framework. Initial exploratory analysis using self-organizing maps was performed to determine structures based on user opinions among the forum posts. The results were a compilation of user's clusters and their correlated (positive or negative) opinion of the drug. Subsequent modeling using network analysis methods was used to determine influential users among the forum members. These findings can open new avenues of research into rapid data collection, feedback, and analysis that can enable improved outcomes and solutions for public health and important feedback for the manufacturer.

  • 2985.
    Akay, Altug
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Systems Safety and Management.
    Dragomir, A.
    Erlandsson, Björn-Erik
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Systems Safety and Management.
    A novel data-mining platform leveraging social media to monitor outcomes of Januvia2013In: Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society (EMBC), 2013 35th Annual International Conference of the IEEE, IEEE conference proceedings, 2013, p. 7484-7487Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A novel data-mining method was developed to gauge the experiences of the diabetes mellitus drug Januvia. Self-organizing maps were used to analyze forum posts numerically to infer user opinion of drug Januvia. Graph theory was used to discover influential users. The result is a word list compilation correlating positive and negative word cluster groups and a web of influential users on Januvia. The implications could open new research avenues into rapid data collection, feedback, and analysis that would enable improved solutions for public health.

  • 2986.
    Akay, Altug
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Systems Safety and Management.
    Dragomir, A
    Erlandsson, Björn-Erik
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Systems Safety and Management.
    Network-Based Modeling and Intelligent Data Mining of Social Media for Improving Care2015In: IEEE journal of biomedical and health informatics, ISSN 2168-2194, E-ISSN 2168-2208, Vol. 19, no 1, p. 210-218Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Intelligently extracting knowledge from social media has recently attracted great interest from the Biomedical and Health Informatics community to simultaneously improve healthcare outcomes and reduce costs using consumer-generated opinion. We propose a two-step analysis framework that focuses on positive and negative sentiment, as well as the side effects of treatment, in users' forum posts, and identifies user communities (modules) and influential users for the purpose of ascertaining user opinion of cancer treatment. We used a self-organizing map to analyze word frequency data derived from users' forum posts. We then introduced a novel network-based approach for modeling users' forum interactions and employed a network partitioning method based on optimizing a stability quality measure. This allowed us to determine consumer opinion and identify influential users within the retrieved modules using information derived from both word-frequency data and network-based properties. Our approach can expand research into intelligently mining social media data for consumer opinion of various treatments to provide rapid, up-to-date information for the pharmaceutical industry, hospitals, and medical staff, on the effectiveness (or ineffectiveness) of future treatments.

  • 2987.
    Akay, Altug
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Systems Safety and Management.
    Dragomir, Andrei
    Erlandsson, Björn-Erik
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Systems Safety and Management.
    A Novel-Data Mining Platform to Monitor the Outcomes of Erlontinib (Tarceva) using Social Media2014In: XIII Mediterranean Conference on Medical and Biological Engineering and Computing 2013, Springer, 2014, p. 1394-1397Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A novel data-mining method was developed to gauge the experiences of the oncology drug Tarceva. Self-organizing maps were used to analyze forum posts numerically to infer user opinion of drug Tarceva. The result is a word list compilation correlating positive and negative word cluster groups and a web of influential users on Tarceva. The implica-tions could open new research avenues into rapid data collec-tion, feedback, and analysis that would enable improved solu-tions for public health.

  • 2988.
    Akay, Altug
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Systems Safety and Management.
    Dragomir, Andrei
    Erlandsson, Björn-Erik
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Systems Safety and Management.
    Assessing Antidepressants Using Intelligent Data Monitoring and Mining of Online Fora2016In: IEEE journal of biomedical and health informatics, ISSN 2168-2194, E-ISSN 2168-2208, Vol. 20, no 4, p. 977-986Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Depression is a global health concern. Social networks allow the affected population to share their experiences. These experiences, when mined, extracted, and analyzed, can be converted into either warnings to recall drugs (dangerous side effects), or service improvement (interventions, treatment options) based on observations derived from user behavior in depression-related social networks. Our aim was to develop a weighted network model to represent user activity on social health networks. This enabled us to accurately represent user interactions by relying on the data's semantic content. Our three-step method uses the weighted network model to represent user's activity, and network clustering and module analysis to characterize user interactions and extract further knowledge from user's posts. The network's topological properties reflect user activity such as posts' general topic as well as timing, while weighted edges reflect the posts semantic content and similarities among posts. The result, a synthesis from word data frequency, statistical analysis of module content, and the modeled health network's properties, has allowed us to gain insight into consumer sentiment of antidepressants. This approach will allow all parties to participate in improving future health solutions of patients suffering from depression.

  • 2989.
    Akay, Altug
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Systems Safety and Management.
    Dragomir, Andrei
    University of Houston, Biomedical Engineering.
    Erlandsson, Björn-Erik
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering.
    Mining Social Media Big Data for Health2015In: IEEE PulseArticle, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Advances in information technology (IT) and big data are affecting nearly every facet of the public and private sectors. Social media platforms are one example of such advances: its nature allows users to connect, collaborate, and debate on any topic with comparative ease. The result is a hefty volume of user-generated content that, if properly mined and analyzed, could help the public and private health care sectors improve the quality of their products and services while reducing costs. The users of these platforms are the key to these improvements, as their valuable feedback will help improve health solutions.

  • 2990. Akbar, F.
    et al.
    Kolahdouz, M.
    Larimian, Sh.
    Radfar, B.
    Radamson, Henry
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Integrated Devices and Circuits.
    Graphene synthesis, characterization and its applications in nanophotonics, nanoelectronics, and nanosensing2015In: Journal of materials science. Materials in electronics, ISSN 0957-4522, E-ISSN 1573-482X, Vol. 26, no 7, p. 4347-4379Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the last decade, as semiconductor industry was approaching the end of the exponential Moore's roadmap for device downscaling, the necessity of finding new candidate materials has forced many research groups to explore many different types of non-conventional materials. Among them, graphene, CNTs and organic conductors are the most successful alternatives. Finding a material with metallic properties combined with field effect characteristics on nanoscale level has been always a dream to continue the ever-shrinking road of the nanoelectronics. Due to its fantastic features such as high mobility, optical transparency, room temperature quantum Hall effect, mechanical stiffness, etc. the atomically thin carbon layer, graphene, has attracted the industry's attention not only in the micro-, nano-, and opto-electronics but also in biotechnology. This paper reviews the basics and previous works on graphene technology and its developments. Compatibility of this material with Si processing technology is its crucial characteristic for mass production. This study also reviews the physical and electrical properties of graphene as a building block for other carbon allotropes. Different growth methods and a wide range of graphene's applications will be discussed and compared. A brief comparison on the performance result of different types of devices has also been presented. Until now, the main focus of research has been on the background physics and its application in electronic devices. But, according to the recent works on its applications in photonics and optoelectronics, where it benefits from the combination of its unique optical and electronic properties, even without a bandgap, this material enables ultrawide-band tunability. Here in this article we review different applications and graphene's advantages and drawbacks will be mentioned to conclude at the end.

  • 2991.
    AKBARI KHALIL ABAD, HANNANE
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE).
    ARONSSON, JENS
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE).
    PERSSON, ALEXANDER
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE).
    REINECK POPA, ERIK
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE).
    Heterogen katalys för produktion av biodiesel från rester av matolja2015Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Energikonsumtionen inom transportsektor består till störst del av konsumtion av fossila bränslen. Transportsektorn själv står för ca 30 % av världens totala energikonsumtion. Att växla till ett grönt drivmedel skulle bidra till en mer ekologiskt hållbar verksamhet.

    Biodiesel kan vara svaret på transportsektorns problem och kan dessutom framställas av vad man idag anser är avfall. Restmatolja kan med hjälp av katalysatorer transesterifieras till biodiesel som efter inblandning av konventionell diesel kan köras i dagens dieselmotorer.

    För att spara resurser är en process med heterogen katalysator bättre än en homogen process. I rapporten undersöks om MgO, CaO och Li2O kan användas som katalysator för att framställa biodieseln från restmatoljan. Studien undersöker också om SnO eller SnO2 kan tillsättas till katalysatorn för att öka utbytet.

    Försök genomfördes i labbmiljö med restolja från en lokal restaurang. Olika parametrar testades för att optimera utbytet. Parametrarna som ändrades var temperatur, mängd katalysator och molförhållandet mellan alkohol och olja. Varje parameter varierades mellan två värden.

    Resultaten visade att CaO var den enda av de undersökta katalysatorerna som fungerade och gav ett tillräckligt bra utbyte. SnO som användes tillsammans med CaO visade en liten effekt av att öka utbytet, men antalet försök var för få för att kunna dra några säkra slutsatser.

    Resultaten från undersökningen av optimala parametrar visar att utbytet minskar med ökande temperatur. Större andel alkohol jämfört med olja ger ett högre utbyte. Med ökande mängd katalysator finns ett optimalt värde och när det överskrids minskar utbytet igen.

    Vidare studier krävs för att optimera de heterogena katalysatorerna i biodieselframställningen.

  • 2992. Akbari, N.
    et al.
    Modarressi, M.
    Daneshtalab, Masoud
    KTH.
    Loni, Efisio
    KTH.
    A Customized Processing-in-Memory Architecture for Biological Sequence Alignment2018In: Proceedings of the International Conference on Application-Specific Systems, Architectures and Processors, Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc. , 2018, Vol. 2018, article id 8445124Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sequence alignment is the most widely used operation in bioinformatics. With the exponential growth of the biological sequence databases, searching a database to find the optimal alignment for a query sequence (that can be at the order of hundreds of millions of characters long) would require excessive processing power and memory bandwidth. Sequence alignment algorithms can potentially benefit from the processing power of massive parallel processors due their simple arithmetic operations, coupled with the inherent fine-grained and coarse-grained parallelism that they exhibit. However, the limited memory bandwidth in conventional computing systems prevents exploiting the maximum achievable speedup. In this paper, we propose a processing-in-memory architecture as a viable solution for the excessive memory bandwidth demand of bioinformatics applications. The design is composed of a set of simple and lightweight processing elements, customized to the sequence alignment algorithm, integrated at the logic layer of an emerging 3D DRAM architecture. Experimental results show that the proposed architecture results in up to 2.4x speedup and 41% reduction in power consumption, compared to a processor-side parallel implementation.

  • 2993.
    Akbaripour Sheijnai, Solmaz
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics.
    Numerical studies on receptivity and control of a three-dimensional boundary layer2012Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Receptivity in three-dimensional boundary layer ow to localized roughness elements over a at plate is studied by means of direct numerical simulations (DNS). The surface roughness is modeled by applying nonhomogeneous boundary conditions along the wall as well as considering as a surface deformation by inserting the bump shape into the numerical mesh. Under the assumption of the small amplitudes of the roughness, although dierent disturbances amplitudes are observed in the vicinity of the bump for the meshed and modeled case, the boundary layer response downstream of the roughness is independent if the way of the bump implementation. Dierent roughness heights are considered in order to compare the boundary layer response of two approaches. Also, the boundary layer is excited by random distributed surface roughness and the receptivity results are studied. Moreover, a simple model for natural roughness excites steady multi wavenumber crossow instabilities. A localised surface roughness i.e. control roughness is applied to stabilise the latter. The control mode which is subcritical with respect to transition aects the most steady unstable mode. Suppression of the most dangerous mode is observed through nonlinear interactions with the control mode.

  • 2994.
    Akbarnejad, Shahin
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering, Applied Process Metallurgy.
    Experimental and Mathematical Study of Incompressible Fluid Flow through Ceramic Foam Filters2016Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Ceramic Foam Filters (CFFs) are widely used to filter solid particles and inclusions from molten metal in metal production, particularly in the aluminum industry. In general, the molten metal is poured on the top of a ceramic foam filter until it reaches a certain height, also known as metal head or gravity head. This is done to build the required pressure to prime the filter media and to initiate filtration. To predict the required metal head, it is necessary to obtain the Darcy and non-Darcy permeability coefficients of the filter. The coefficients vary upon filter type. Here, it is common to classify CFFs based on grades or pore per inches (PPI). These CFFs range from10 to100 PPI and their properties vary in everything from cell and window size to strut size. The 80-100 PPI CFFs are generally not practical for use by industry, since the priming of the filters by a gravitational force requires an excessive metal head. However, recently a new method has been developed to prime such filters by using electromagnetic Lorentz forces. This allows the filters to be primed at a low metal head.

    To continue the research work, it was deemed necessary to measure the pressure gradients of single and stack of commercial alumina ceramic foam filters and to obtain the permeability characteristics. Therefore, efforts have been made to validate the previously obtained results, to improve the permeametry experimental setup, and to obtain Darcy and non-Darcy permeability coefficients of single 30, 50, and 80 PPI filters and stacks of filters. Furthermore, the experimentally obtained pressure gradients were analyzed and compered to the mathematically and analytically estimated pressure gradients.

    The studies showed that, in permeametry experiments, the sample sealing procedure plays an important role for an accurate estimation of the permeability constants. An inadequate sealing or an un-sealed sample results in an underestimation of the pressure drop, which causes a considerable error in the obtained Darcy and non-Darcy permeability coefficients. Meanwhile, the results from the single filter experiments showed that the permeability values of the similar PPI filters are not identical. However, the stacks of three identical filters gave substantially the same measured pressure drop values and roughly the same Darcy and non-Darcy coefficients as for the single filters.

    The permeability coefficients of the filters are believed to be best defined and calculated by using the Forchheimer equation. The well-known and widely used Ergun and Dietrich equations cannot correctly predict the pressure drop unless a correction factor is introduced. The accuracy of the mathematically estimated pressure drop, using COMSOL Multiphysics® 5.1, found to be dependent on the drag term used in the Brinkman-Forchheimer equation.  Unacceptable error, as high as 84 to 89 percent for the 30, 50 and 80 PPI single filters, compared to the experimentally obtained pressure gradient values were observed when the literature defined Brinkman-Forchheimer drag term was used. However, when the same second order drag term (containing the non-Darcy coefficient) as defined in the Forchheimer equation was used, the predicted pressure gradient profiles satisfactorily agreed with the experiment data with as little as 0.3 to 5.5 percent deviations for the 30, 50 and 80 PPI single filters.

  • 2995.
    Akbarnejad, Shahin
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering.
    Investigation on static strength of welded joints2012Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Although high strength steels represent yield strength up to 1300 MPa, welded structures reveal lowerstrength values. The strongest commercially available electrode provides the yield strength of about900 MPa. Therefore, in welded steels with strength above this type of filler metal, achieving anacceptable global strength is a crucial issue.

    In this master thesis, affects of different welding procedures on static strength of welded jointsof Weldox 960 and Weldox 1100 steels, were studied. These steels are produced by SSAB inOxelösund. Meanwhile, finite element method analyses were applied in order to investigatethe static strength behavior of such weldments under uniaxial tension.

    The welding parameters which were selected as variables are:

    •  Heat input
    • Weld joint geometry
    • Filler metal

    When weld metal is undermatching in strength levels than the base material, by applyingtension the soft weld metal begins to deform before parent metal. At that point thedeformation of resulted soft zone, including the weld metal and the heat affected zone, ishindered by high strength parent metal. Thus, uniaxial stress caused by uniaxial load isconverted to multiaxial stress. This conversion in tension results in increase in the staticstrength of weldment. The increase in strength is emphasized by increase in the width of thewelded joint while the thickness of the plate is kept as constant.

    After experiments and performing FEM studies, it was revealed that the static strength ofWeldox 960 welded joints approaches towards the tensile strength of parent metal by increasein the width of the weldment. In Weldox 1100 joints; a slight increase in tensile properties ofthe weldments, when the width of the sample increases, was observed.

  • 2996.
    Akbarnejad, Shahin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering, Applied Process Metallurgy.
    Jonsson, Lage
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering, Applied Process Metallurgy.
    Kennedy, M. W.
    Aune, R. E.
    Jönsson, Pär
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering, Applied Process Metallurgy.
    Analysis on Experimental Investigation and Mathematical Modelling of Incompressible Flow through Ceramic Foam FiltersManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 2997.
    Akbarnejad, Shahin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering.
    Jonsson, Lage Tord Ingemar
    Kennedy, Mark William
    Aune, Ragnhild Elizabeth
    Jönsson, Pär
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering, Applied Process Metallurgy.
    Analysis on Experimental Investigation and Mathematical Modeling of Incompressible Flow Through Ceramic Foam Filters2016In: Metallurgical and materials transactions. B, process metallurgy and materials processing science, ISSN 1073-5615, E-ISSN 1543-1916, Vol. 47, no 4, p. 2229-2243Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents experimental results of pressure drop measurements on 30, 50, and 80 pores per inch (PPI) commercial alumina ceramic foam filters (CFF) and compares the obtained pressure drop profiles to numerically modeled values. In addition, it is aimed at investigating the adequacy of the mathematical correlations used in the analytical and the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations. It is shown that the widely used correlations for predicting pressure drop in porous media continuously under-predict the experimentally obtained pressure drop profiles. For analytical predictions, the negative deviations from the experimentally obtained pressure drop using the unmodified Ergun and Dietrich equations could be as high as 95 and 74 pct, respectively. For the CFD predictions, the deviation to experimental results is in the range of 84.3 to 88.5 pct depending on filter PPI. Better results can be achieved by applying the Forchheimer second-order drag term instead of the Brinkman-Forchheimer drag term. Thus, the final deviation of the CFD model estimates lie in the range of 0.3 to 5.5 pct compared to the measured values.

  • 2998.
    Akbarnejad, Shahin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering, Applied Process Metallurgy.
    Kennedy, M. W.
    Fritzsch, R.
    Aune, R. E.
    An investigation on permeability of ceramic foam filters (CFF)2015In: TMS Light Metals, 2015, p. 949-954Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    CFFs are used to filter liquid metal in the aluminum industry. CFFs are classified in grades or pores per inch (PPI), ranging from 10-100 PPI. Their properties vary in everything from pore and strut size to window size. CFFs of 80-100 PPI are generally not practical for use by industry, as priming of the filters by gravitational forces requires an excessive metal head. Recently, co-authors have invented a method to prime such filters using electromagnetic Lorentz forces, thus allowing filters to be primed with a low metal head. In the continuation of this research work, an improved experimental setup was developed in the present study to validate previous results and to measure the permeability of different filters, as well as a stack of filters. The study of permeability facilitates estimation of the required pressure drop to prime the filters and the head required to generate a given casting rate.

  • 2999.
    Akbarnejad, Shahin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering, Applied Process Metallurgy.
    Saffari Pour, Mohsen
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering, Applied Process Metallurgy.
    Jonsson, Lage
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering, Applied Process Metallurgy.
    Jönsson, Pär
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering, Applied Process Metallurgy.
    Significance of Fluid Bypassing Effect on Darcy and Non-Darcy Permeability Parameters of Ceramic Foam FiltersManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 3000.
    Akbarnejad, Shahin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering.
    Saffari Pour, Mohsen
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering.
    Jonsson, Lage Tord Ingemar
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering.
    Jönsson, Pӓr Göran
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering.
    Effect of Fluid Bypassing on the Experimentally Obtained Darcy and Non-Darcy Permeability Parameters of Ceramic Foam Filters2017In: Metallurgical and materials transactions. B, process metallurgy and materials processing science, ISSN 1073-5615, E-ISSN 1543-1916, Vol. 48, no 1, p. 197-207Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ceramic foam filters (CFFs) are used to remove solid particles and inclusions from molten metal. In general, molten metal which is poured on the top of a CFF needs to reach a certain height to build the required pressure (metal head) to prime the filter. To estimate the required metal head, it is necessary to obtain permeability coefficients using permeametry experiments. It has been mentioned in the literature that to avoid fluid bypassing, during permeametry, samples need to be sealed. However, the effect of fluid bypassing on the experimentally obtained pressure gradients seems not to be explored. Therefore, in this research, the focus was on studying the effect of fluid bypassing on the experimentally obtained pressure gradients as well as the empirically obtained Darcy and non-Darcy permeability coefficients. Specifically, the aim of the research was to investigate the effect of fluid bypassing on the liquid permeability of 30, 50, and 80 pores per inch (PPI) commercial alumina CFFs. In addition, the experimental data were compared to the numerically modeled findings. Both studies showed that no sealing results in extremely poor estimates of the pressure gradients and Darcy and non-Darcy permeability coefficients for all studied filters. The average deviations between the pressure gradients of the sealed and unsealed 30, 50, and 80 PPI samples were calculated to be 57.2, 56.8, and 61.3 pct. The deviations between the Darcy coefficients of the sealed and unsealed 30, 50, and 80 PPI samples found to be 9, 20, and 31 pct. The deviations between the non-Darcy coefficients of the sealed and unsealed 30, 50, and 80 PPI samples were calculated to be 59, 58, and 63 pct.

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