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  • 301.
    Atari Jabarzadeh, Sevil
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Polymeric Materials.
    Mendoza Álvarez, Ana Isabel
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Polymeric Materials.
    Hillborg, Henrik
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Polymeric Materials. ABB, Corporated Resarch, Sweden.
    Karlsson, Sigbritt
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Polymeric Materials. Univ Skovde, S-54128 Skovde, Sweden.
    Strömberg, Emma
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Polymeric Materials.
    Design of nanocomposite surfaces with antibiofouling properties for outdoor insulation applicationsManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 302.
    Atari Jabarzadeh, Sevil
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Polymeric Materials.
    Nilsson, Fritjof
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Polymeric Materials. ABB, Corp Res, S-72178 Vasteras, Sweden.
    Hillborg, Henrik
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Polymeric Materials. ABB, Corp Res, S-72178 Vasteras, Sweden.
    Karlsson, Sigbritt
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Polymeric Materials. Univ Skovde, S-54128 Skovde, Sweden.
    Strömberg, Emma
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Polymeric Materials.
    Image Analysis Determination of the Influence of Surface Structure of Silicone Rubbers on Biofouling2015In: International Journal of Polymer Science, ISSN 1687-9422, E-ISSN 1687-9430, article id 390292Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study focuses on how the texture of the silicone rubber material affects the distribution of microbial growth on the surface of materials used for high voltage insulation. The analysis of surface wetting properties showed that the textured surfaces provide higher receding contact angles and therefore lower contact angle hysteresis. The textured surfaces decrease the risk for dry band formation and thus preserve the electrical properties of the material due to a more homogeneous distribution of water on the surface, which, however, promotes the formation of more extensive biofilms. The samples were inoculated with fungal suspension and incubated in a microenvironment chamber simulating authentic conditions in the field. The extent and distribution of microbial growth on the textured and plane surface samples representing the different parts of the insulator housing that is shank and shed were determined by visual inspection and image analysis methods. The results showed that the microbial growth was evenly distributed on the surface of the textured samples but restricted to limited areas on the plane samples. More intensive microbial growth was determined on the textured samples representing sheds. It would therefore be preferable to use the textured surface silicone rubber for the shank of the insulator.

  • 303.
    Atari Jabarzadeh, Sevil
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Polymeric Materials.
    Salas Lacamprett, Carla
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Polymeric Materials.
    Karlsson, Sigbritt
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Polymeric Materials. Univ Skovde, S-54128 Skovde, Sweden.
    Strömberg, Emma
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Polymeric Materials.
    Use of essential oils for the prevention of biofilm formation on silicone rubber high voltage insulators2015In: Polymers from Renewable Resources, ISSN 2041-2479, Vol. 6, no 4, p. 119-136Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The prevention of biofilm formation on high voltage insulators is important to avoid changes in the surface properties of the material and the subsequent failure of the application. Antimicrobial silicone rubber samples were prepared by the addition of thymol and eugenol to Sylgard 184 to determine the possibility of using natural antimicrobial agents present in essential oils in materials used for high voltage insulators. The antimicrobial effects of thymol and eugenol were studied for different fungal strains and for green algae identified in the biofilms formed on insulators in Tanzania, Sri Lanka and Sweden. It was successfully demonstrated that samples containing high amount of eugenol and different concentrations of thymol could inhibit the fungal growth of strains from Sri Lanka and Tanzania and the growth of green algae. The growth of strains from Sweden was also suppressed. The addition of eugenol to the material resulted in a noncrosslinked system and therefore, the antimicrobial effect of the additive in the material could not be assessed. The addition of thymol did not significantly influence the thermal and mechanical properties of Sylgard184. Although thermal analysis revealed that a large amount of the antimicrobial agent was lost during sample preparation, the materials were effective against microbial growth, even at low thymol concentrations.

  • 304.
    Atarijabarzadeh, Sevil
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Strömberg, Emma
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Karlsson, Sigbritt
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Design of antimicrobial silicone nanocomposites for high voltage insulationManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 305. Athavale, Rohini
    et al.
    Kokorite, Ilga
    Dinkel, Christian
    Bakker, Eric
    Wehrli, Bernhard
    Crespo, Gaston A.
    Brand, Andreas
    In Situ Ammonium Profiling Using Solid-Contact Ion-Selective Electrodes in Eutrophic Lakes2015In: Analytical Chemistry, ISSN 0003-2700, E-ISSN 1520-6882, Vol. 87, no 24, p. 11990-11997Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 306. Atkin, Rob
    et al.
    Li, Hua
    Sweeney, James
    Elbourne, Aaron
    Webber, Grant
    Rutland, Mark
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Warr, Gregory Goodman
    Effect of surface nanostructure and ion structure on the nanotribology of the graphite: Ionic liquid interface2014In: Abstract of Papers of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0065-7727, Vol. 248Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 307.
    Atwa, Mohamed M.
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Integrated Devices and Circuits.
    Alaskalany, Ahmed
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Integrated Devices and Circuits.
    Elgammal, Karim
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Materials- and Nano Physics. KTH, Centres, SeRC - Swedish e-Science Research Centre.
    Smith, Anderson D.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Integrated Devices and Circuits.
    Hammar, Mattias
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Integrated Devices and Circuits.
    Östling, Mikael
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Integrated Devices and Circuits.
    Trilayer Graphene as a Candidate Material for Phase-Change Memory Applications2016In: MRS Advances, ISSN 2316-7858, E-ISSN 1610-191X, Vol. 1, no 20, p. 1487-1494Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is pressing need in computation of a universal phase change memory consolidating the speed of RAM with the permanency of hard disk storage. A potentiated scanning tunneling microscope tip traversing the soliton separating a metallic, ABA-stacked phase and a semiconducting ABC-stacked phase in trilayer graphene has been shown to permanently transform ABA-stacked regions to ABC-stacked regions. In this study, we used density functional theory (DFT) calculations to assess the energetics of this phase-change and explore the possibility of organic functionalization using s-triazine to facilitate a reverse phase-change from rhombohedral back to Bernal in graphene trilayers. A significant deviation in the energy per simulated atom arises when s-triazine is adsorbed, favoring the transformation of the ABC phase to the ABA phase once more. A phase change memory device utilizing rapid, energy-efficient, reversible, field-induced phase-change in graphene trilayers could potentially revolutionize digital memory industry.

  • 308.
    Augusto, Ohara
    et al.
    Univ Sao Paulo, Inst Quim, Dept Bioquim, BR-5508000 Sao Paulo, Brazil..
    Goldstein, Sara
    Hebrew Univ Jerusalem, Chem Inst, IL-91904 Jerusalem, Israel..
    Hurst, James K.
    Oregon State Univ, Dept Biochem & Biophys, Corvallis, OR 97331 USA..
    Lind, Johan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH).
    Lymar, Sergei, V
    Brookhaven Natl Lab, Dept Chem, Upton, NY 11973 USA..
    Merényi, Gabor
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Applied Physical Chemistry.
    Radi, Rafael
    Univ Republica, Dept Bioquim, Fac Med, Montevideo 11800, Uruguay.;Univ Republica, Ctr Free Rad & Biomed Res, Fac Med, Montevideo 11800, Uruguay..
    Carbon dioxide-catalyzed peroxynitrite reactivity - The resilience of the radical mechanism after two decades of research2019In: Free Radical Biology & Medicine, ISSN 0891-5849, Vol. 135, p. 210-215Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Peroxynitrite, ONOO-, formed in tissues that are simultaneously generating NO center dot and O-2(center dot-), is widely regarded as a major contributor to oxidative stress. Many of the reactions involved are catalyzed by CO2 via formation of an unstable adduct, ONOOC(O)O-, that undergoes O-O bond homolysis to produce NO2 center dot and CO3 center dot- radicals, whose yields are equal at about 0.33 with respect to the ONOO- reactant. Since its inception two decades ago, this radical-based mechanism has been frequently but unsuccessfully challenged. The most recent among these [Serrano-Luginbuehl et al. Chem. Res. Toxicol. 31: 721-730; 2018] claims that ONOOC(O)O- is stable, predicts a yield of NO2 center dot/CO3 center dot- of less than 0.01 under physiological conditions and, contrary to widely accepted viewpoints, suggests that radical generation is inconsequential to peroxynitrite-induced oxidative damage. Here we review the experimental and theoretical evidence that support the radical model and show this recently proposed alternative mechanism to be incorrect.

  • 309. Augustsson, A.
    et al.
    Kashtanov, Stepan
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Biotechnology.
    Luo, Yi
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Biotechnology.
    Chang, C.L.
    Ågren, Hans
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Biotechnology.
    Rubensson, J.-E.
    Nordgren, J.
    Conformations and core-excitation dynamics liquid water.Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 310.
    Aulin, Christian
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. Innventia AB, Sweden.
    Johansson, Erik
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Structure and Properties of Layer-by-Layer Films from Combinations of Cellulose Nanofibers, Polyelectrolytes and Colloids2014In: HANDBOOK OF GREEN MATERIALS, VOL 3: SELF - AND DIRECT - ASSEMBLING OF BIONANOMATERIALS, World Scientific, 2014, p. 57-77Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The formation of nanometer-thin films of cellulose nanofibers (CNFs), polyelectrolytes, and/or nanoparticles has opened up new possibilities of manufacturing interactive devices with controlled mechanical properties. By controlling the charge of the CNF and the charge and 3D structure of the polyelectrolytes, it is possible to control the buildup, i.e., the thickness, the adsorbed amount, and the immobilized water of layer-by-layer (LbL) films of these materials. The charge balance between the components is not the only factor controlling the LbL formation. The structure of these adsorbed layers in combination with the properties of the constituent components will in turn control how these layers interact with, for example moist air. The mechanical properties of the LbLs can be tuned by combining the high-modulus CNF with different components. This has been shown by using a microbuckling technique where the mechanical properties of ultra-thin films can be measured. In combination with, for example, moisture-sensitive poly(ethylene imine) (PEI), the Young's modulus of CNF/PEI films can be changed by one order of magnitude when the humidity is increased from 0% RH to 50% RH. The incorporation of high-modulus nanoparticles such as SiO2 particles can also be used to prepare LbLs with a higher modulus. Examples are also given where it is shown that the color of an LbL film can be used as a non-contact moisture sensor since the thickness is related to the amount of adsorbed moisture. By chemical modification of the CNF, it is also possible to tailor the interaction between the CNF and multivalent metal ions, enabling a specific interaction between multivalent for example metal surfaces in water and modified CNF.

  • 311.
    Aulin, Christian
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Johansson, Erik
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Lindström, Tom
    Self-Organized Films from Cellulose I Nanofibrils Using the Layer-by-Layer Technique2010In: Biomacromolecules, ISSN 1525-7797, E-ISSN 1526-4602, Vol. 11, no 4, p. 872-882Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The possibility of forming self-organized films using only charge-stabilized dispersions of cellulose I nanofibrils with opposite charges is presented, that is, the multilayers were composed solely of anionically and cationically modified microfibrillated cellulose (MFC) with a low degree of substitution. The build-up behavior and the properties of the layer-by-layer (LbL)-constructed films were studied using a quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D) and stagnation point adsorption reflectometry (SPAR). The adsorption behavior of cationic/anionic MFC was compared with that of polyethyleneimine (PEI)/anionic MFC. The water contents of five bilayers of cationic/anionic MFC and PEI/anionic MFC were approximately 70 and 50%, respectively. The MFC surface coverage was studied by atomic force microscopy (AFM) measurements, which clearly showed a more dense fibrillar structure in the five bilayer PEI/anionic MFC than in the five bilayer cationic/anionic MFC. The forces between the cellulose-based multilayers were examined using the AFM colloidal probe technique. The forces on approach were characterized by a combination of electrostatic and steric repulsion. The wet adhesive forces were very long-range and were characterized by multiple adhesive events. Surfaces covered by PEU/anionic MFC multilayers required more energy to be separated than surfaces covered by cationic/anionic MFC multilayers.

  • 312.
    Aulin, Christian
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Karabulut, Erdem
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Tran, Amy
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Lindström, Tom
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Transparent Nanocellulosic Multilayer Thin Films on Polylactic Acid with Tunable Gas Barrier Properties2013In: ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces, ISSN 1944-8244, E-ISSN 1944-8252, Vol. 5, no 15, p. 7352-7359Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The layer-by-layer (LbL) deposition method was used for the build-up of alternating layers of nanofibrillated cellulose (NFC) or carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) with a branched, cationic polyelectrolyte, polyethyleneimine (PEI) on flexible poly (lactic acid) (PLA) substrates. With this procedure, optically transparent nanocellulosic films with tunable gas barrier properties were formed. 50 layer pairs of PEI/NFC and PEI/CMC deposited on PLA have oxygen permeabilities of 0.34 and 0.71 cm(3).mu m/m(2).day.kPa at 23 degrees C and 50% relative humidity, respectively, which is in the same range as polyvinyl alcohol and ethylene vinyl alcohol. The oxygen permeability of these multilayer nanocomposites outperforms those of pure NFC films prepared by solvent-casting. The nanocellulosic LbL assemblies on PLA substrates was in detailed characterized using a quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D). Atomic force microscopy (AFM) reveals large structural differences between the PEI/NFC and the PEI/CMC assemblies, with the PEI/NFC assembly showing a highly entangled network of nanofibrils, whereas the PEI/CMC surfaces lacked structural features. Scanning electron microscopy images showed a nearly perfect uniformity of the nanocellulosic coatings on PLA, and light transmittance results revealed remarkable transparency of the LbL-coated PLA films. The present work demonstrates the first ever LbL films based on high aspect ratio, water-dispersible nanofibrillated cellulose, and water-soluble carboxymethyl cellulose polymers that can be used as multifunctional films and coatings with tailorable properties, such as gas barriers and transparency. Owing to its flexibility, transparency and high-performance gas barrier properties, these thin film assemblies are promising candidates for several large-scale applications, including flexible electronics and renewable packaging.

  • 313.
    Aulin, Christian
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Lindström, Tom
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Biopolymer Coatings for Paper and Paperboard2011In: Biopolymers: New Materials for Sustainable Films and Coatings / [ed] David Plackett, Chichester: John Wiley & Sons, 2011, p. 255-276Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 314.
    Aulin, Christian
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Netrval, Julia
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Lindström, Tom
    Aerogels from nanofibrillated cellulose with tunable oleophobicity2010In: SOFT MATTER, ISSN 1744-683X, Vol. 6, no 14, p. 3298-3305Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The formation of structured porous aerogels of nanofibrillated cellulose (NFC) by freeze-drying has been demonstrated. The aerogels have a high porosity, as shown by FE-SEM and nitrogen adsorption/desorption measurements, and a very low density ( < 0.03 g cm(-3)). The density and surface texture of the aerogels can be tuned by selecting the concentration of the NFC dispersions before freeze-drying. Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of 1H, 1H, 2H, 2H-perfluorodecyltrichlorosilane (PFOTS) was used to uniformly coat the aerogel to tune their wetting properties towards non-polar liquids. An XPS analysis of the chemical composition of the PFOTS-modified aerogels demonstrated the reproducibility of the PFOTS-coating and the high atomic fluorine concentration (ca. 51%) in the surfaces. The modified aerogels formed a robust composite interface with high apparent contact angles (theta* >> 90 degrees) for castor oil (gamma(1v) = 35.8 mN m(-1)) and hexadecane (gamma(1v) = 27.5 mN m(-1)).

  • 315.
    Aulin, Christian
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Salazar-Alvarez, German
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Lindström, Tom
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    High strength, flexible and transparent nanofibrillated cellulose-nanoclay biohybrid films with tunable oxygen and water vapor permeability2012In: Nanoscale, ISSN 2040-3364, Vol. 4, no 20, p. 6622-6628Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A novel, technically and economically benign procedure to combine vermiculite nanoplatelets with nanocellulose fibre dispersions into functional biohybrid films is presented. Nanocellulose fibres of 20 nm diameters and several micrometers in length are mixed with high aspect ratio exfoliated vermiculite nanoplatelets through high-pressure homogenization. The resulting hybrid films obtained after solvent evaporation are stiff (tensile modulus of 17.3 GPa), strong (strength up to 257 MPa), and transparent. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) shows that the hybrid films consist of stratified nacre-like layers with a homogenous distribution of nanoplatelets within the nanocellulose matrix. The oxygen barrier properties of the biohybrid films outperform commercial packaging materials and pure nanocellulose films showing an oxygen permeability of 0.07 cm(3) mu m m(-2) d(-1) kPa(-1) at 50% relative humidity. The oxygen permeability of the hybrid films can be tuned by adjusting the composition of the films. Furthermore, the water vapor barrier properties of the biohybrid films were also significantly improved by the addition of nanoclay. The unique combination of excellent oxygen barrier behavior and optical transparency suggests the potential of these biohybrid materials as an alternative in flexible packaging of oxygen sensitive devices such as thin-film transistors or organic light-emitting diode displays, gas storage applications and as barrier coatings/laminations in large volume packaging applications.

  • 316.
    Aulin, Christian
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Ström, Göran
    Multilayered Alkyd Resin/Nanocellulose Coatings for Use in Renewable Packaging Solutions with a High Level of Moisture Resistance2013In: Industrial & Engineering Chemistry Research, ISSN 0888-5885, E-ISSN 1520-5045, Vol. 52, no 7, p. 2582-2589Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A surprisingly simple and rapid methodology for large-area, lightweight, and thin laminate coatings with remarkable moisture barrier properties is introduced. Commercially available paperboards are coated with thin layers of nanocellulose. The nanocellulose coating induces a surface smoothening effect on the coated sheets as characterized by environmental scanning electron microscopy and white light interferometry. A moisture-protective layer of renewable alkyd resins is deposited on the nanocellulose precoated sheets using a water-borne dispersion coating process or lithographic printing. Through an auto-oxidation process, the applied alkyd resins are transformed into moisture sealant layers. The moisture barrier properties are characterized in detail by water vapor permeability measurements at different levels of relative humidity. The water vapor barrier properties of the nanocellulose precoated substrates were significantly improved by thin layers of renewable alkyd resins. The effect of the alkyd resin properties, coating technologies, and base paper substrates on the final barrier performance of the sheets were studied. It was found that the nanocellulose coating had a notable effect on the homogeneity and barrier performance of the alkyd resin layers and in particular those alkyd resin layers that were applied by printing. The concept is environmentally friendly, energy-efficient, and economic and is ready for scaling-up via continuous roll-to-roll processes. Large-scale renewable coatings applicable for sustainable packaging solutions are foreseen.

  • 317.
    Aulin, Christian
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Varga, Imre
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Claesson, Per
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Lindström, Tom
    STFI-Packforsk AB.
    Buildup of Polyelectrolyte Multilayers of Polyethyleneimine and Microfibrillated Cellulose Studied by in situ Dual Polarization Interferometry and Quartz Crystal Microbalance with Dissipation2008In: Langmuir, ISSN 0743-7463, E-ISSN 1520-5827, Vol. 24, no 6, p. 2509-2518Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Polyethyleneimine (PEI) and Microfibrillated cellulose (MFC) have been used to buildup polyelectrolyte multilayers (PEM) on silicone oxide and silicone oxynitride surfaces at different pH values and with different electrolyte and polyelectrolyte/colloid concns. of the components.  Consecutive adsorption on these surfaces was studied by in situ dual-polarization interferometry (DPI) and quartz crystal microbalance measurements.  The adsorption data obtained from both the techniques showed a steady buildup of multilayers.  High pH and electrolyte concn. of the PEI soln. was found to be beneficial for achieving a high adsorbed amt. of PEI, and hence of MFC, during the buildup of the multilayer.  On the other hand, an increase in the electrolyte concn. of the MFC dispersion was found to inhibit the adsorption of MFC onto PEI.  The adsorbed amt. of MFC was independent of the bulk MFC concn. in the investigated concn. range (15-250 mg/L).  At. force microscopy measurements were used to image a MFC-treated silicone oxynitride chip from DPI measurements.  The surface was found to be almost fully covered by randomly oriented microfibrils after the adsorption of only one bilayer of PEI/MFC.  The surface roughness expressed as the rms-roughness over 1 μm2 was calcd. to be 4.6 nm (1 bilayer).  The adsorbed amt. of PEI and MFC and the amt. of water entrapped by the individual layers in the multilayer structures were estd. by combining results from the two anal. techniques using the de Feijter formula.  These results indicate a total water content of ca. 41% in the PEM.

  • 318.
    Aulin, Christian
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, Superseded Departments (pre-2005), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Lindstrom, Tom
    STFI Packforsk, KTH STFI, SE-11486 Stockholm, Sweden..
    CELL 206-Preparation, characterization and wetting of fluorinated cellulose surfaces2008In: Abstract of Papers of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0065-7727, Vol. 235Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 319. Aung, S. H.
    et al.
    Zhao, L.
    Nonomura, K.
    Oo, T. Z.
    Zakeeruddin, S. M.
    Vlachopoulos, N.
    Sloboda, Tamara
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Applied Physical Chemistry.
    Svanström, S.
    Cappel, Ute B.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Applied Physical Chemistry.
    Hagfeldt, A.
    Grätzel, M.
    Toward an alternative approach for the preparation of low-temperature titanium dioxide blocking underlayers for perovskite solar cells2019In: Journal of Materials Chemistry A, ISSN 2050-7488, Vol. 7, no 17, p. 10729-10738Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The anodic electrodeposition method is investigated as an alternative technique for the preparation of a titanium oxide (TiO 2 ) blocking underlayer (UL) for perovskite solar cells (PSCs). Extremely thin Ti IV -based films are grown from aqueous acidic titanium(iii) chloride in an electrochemical cell at room temperature. This precursor layer is converted to the UL (ED-UL), in a suitable state for PSC applications, by undertaking a sintering step at 450 °C for half an hour. PSCs with the composition of the light-absorbing material FA 0.85 MA 0.10 Cs 0.05 Pb(I 0.87 Br 0.13 ) 3 (FA and MA denote the formamidinium and methylammonium cations, respectively) based on the ED-UL are compared with PSCs with the UL of a standard type prepared by the spray-pyrolysis method at 450 °C from titanium diisopropoxide bis(acetylacetonate) (SP-UL). We obtain power conversion efficiencies (PCEs) of over 20% for mesoscopic perovskite devices employing both ED-ULs and SP-ULs. Slightly higher fill factor values are observed for ED-UL-based devices. In addition, ED-ULs prepared by the same method have also been applied in planar PSCs, resulting in a PCE exceeding 17%, which is comparable to that for similar PSCs with an SP-UL. The preparation of ED-ULs with a lower sintering temperature, 150 °C, has also been examined. The efficiency of a planar PSC incorporating this underlayer was 14%. These results point out to the possibility of applying ED-ULs in flexible planar PSCs in the future.

  • 320. Auty, Sam E. R.
    et al.
    Andrén, Oliver C. J.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Hern, Faye Y.
    Malkoch, Michael
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    Rannard, Steven P.
    One-pot' sequential deprotection/functionalisation of linear-dendritic hybrid polymers using a xanthate mediated thiol/Michael addition2015In: Polymer Chemistry, ISSN 1759-9954, E-ISSN 1759-9962, Vol. 6, no 4, p. 573-582Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Thiol-Michael addition chemistry is a powerful tool for the preparation of functional materials. In this first report of xanthate-functional linear-dendritic polymer hybrids, the preparation of four generations of xanthate-functionalised dendron atom transfer radical polymerisation macroinitiators is described using an orthogonal chemical strategy. The controlled polymerisation of tertiary butyl methacrylate is demonstrated to high conversion and without interference from the xanthate surface groups. Modification of the peripheral xanthate groups of dendrons at the hybrid polymer chain-end has been studied using a one-pot deprotection/functionalisation strategy and a range of commercially available and bespoke acrylate monomers to form complex polymer architectures from feedstock polymers, differing in the number of modified end groups and the surface chemistry of the dendron chain end.

  • 321. Auty, Sam E. R.
    et al.
    Andrén, Oliver
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    Malkoch, Michael
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    Rannard, Steven P.
    The first peripherally masked thiol dendrimers: a facile and highly efficient functionalization strategy of polyester dendrimers via one-pot xanthate deprotection/thiol-acrylate Michael addition reactions2014In: Chemical Communications, ISSN 1359-7345, E-ISSN 1364-548X, Vol. 50, no 50, p. 6574-6577Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introducing multiple reactive functional groups at the periphery of dendrimer materials presents considerable challenges if the functionality is able to self-react. An efficient and facile approach to introducing masked thiols at the surface of polyester dendrimers is presented. One-pot, deprotection/thiol-acrylate Michael addition from the xanthate-functional dendritic substrates (generation zero to two) has been achieved for the first time, with high efficiency demonstrated using three acrylates of varying chemistry and avoiding disulfide formation.

  • 322.
    Avalos, Arturo Salazar
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Hakkarainen, Minna
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Odelius, Karin
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Superiorly Plasticized PVC/PBSA Blends through Crotonic and Acrylic Acid Functionalization of PVC2017In: Polymers, ISSN 2073-4360, E-ISSN 2073-4360, Vol. 9, no 3, article id 84Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Superior plasticization efficiency was achieved by a grafting from functionalization of the PVC backbone. This was deduced to a synergistic effect of internal plasticization and improved intermolecular interactions between PVC and an oligomeric poly(butylene succinate-co-adipate) ( PBSA) plasticizer. A mild grafting process for functionalization of the PVC chain by crotonic acid ( CA) or acrylic acid ( AA) was used. The formation of PVC-g-CA and PVC-g-AA was confirmed by FTIR and H-1 NMR. Grafting with the seemingly similar monomers, CA and AA, resulted in different macromolecular structures. AA is easily homopolymerized and long hydrophilic poly( acrylic acid) grafts are formed resulting in branched materials. Crotonic acid does not easily homopolymerize; instead, single crotonic acid units are located along the PVC chain, leading to basically linear PVC chains with pendant crotonic acid groups. The elongation of PVC-g-CA and PVC-g-AA in comparison to pure PVC were greatly increased from 6% to 128% and 167%, respectively, by the grafting reactions. Blending 20% ( w/w) PBSA with PVC, PVC-AA or PVC-CA further increased the elongation at break to 150%, 240% and 320%, respectively, clearly showing a significant synergistic effect in the blends with functionalized PVC. This is a clearly promising milestone towards environmentally friendly flexible PVC materials.

  • 323. Axegard, Peter
    et al.
    Bergnor, Elisabeth
    Ek, Monica
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Wood Chemistry and Pulp Technology.
    Ekholm, Ulrika
    Bleaching of softwood kraft pulps with H2O2, O3, and ClO21996In: TAPPI Journal, ISSN 0734-1415, Vol. 79, no 1, p. 113-119Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ozone or chlorine dioxide bleaching prior to hydrogen peroxide bleaching greatly improves the performance of the hydrogen peroxide stage. The efficiency is further improved by a chelating treatment immediately after the ozone or chlorine dioxide stage. With an optimal metal ion profile, laboratory bleached (OAZQP) softwood kraft pulps can reach brightness levels above 90% ISO, with 5-10% lower pulp strength properties and bleaching costs comparable to ECF bleaching. It also is possible to obtain full brightness with only hydrogen peroxide provided the metal ion profile is optimal, e.g., by using multiple QP treatments. The chemical consumptions, expressed as oxidation equivalents per decreased kappa number are the same as for sequences including ozone or chlorine dioxide. Ozone and chlorine dioxide are comparable as far as delignification and brightness efficiency go.

  • 324. Axegård, Peter
    et al.
    Bergnor, Elisabeth
    Ek, Monica
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Wood Chemistry and Pulp Technology.
    Ekholm, Ulrika
    The role of metal ions in TCF-bleaching of softwood kraft pulps.: Vol.31994In: Proceedings Tappi Pulping conf., 1994, p. 1161-1167Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 325.
    Axelsson, Karolin
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Organic Chemistry.
    Chemical signals in interactions between Hylobius abietis and associated bacteria2016Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The pine weevil (Hylobius abietis L.) is one of the two topmost economically important insect pests in Swedish conifer forests. The damage increase in areas were the silvicultural practice is to use clear cuttings were the insects gather and breed. During egglaying the female protects her offspring by creating a cave in roots and stumps were she puts her egg and covers it with frass, a mixture of weevil feces and chewed bark. Adult pine weevils have been observed to feed on the other side of the egg laying site and antifeedant substance has been discovered in the feces of the pine weevil. We think it is possible that microorganisms present in the frass contribute with antifeedant/repellent substances. Little is known about the pine weevils associated bacteria community and their symbiotic functions. In this thesis the bacterial community is characterized in gut and frass both from pine weevils in different populations across Europe as well as after a 28 day long diet regime on Scots pine, silver birch or bilberry. Volatile substances produced by isolated bacteria as well as from a consortium of microorganisms were collected with solid phase micro extraction (SPME) and analyzed with GC-MS. The main volatiles were tested against pine weevils using a two-choice test. Wolbachia, Rahnella aquatilis, Serratia and Pseudomonas syringae was commonly associated with the pine weevil. 2-Methoxyphenol, 2-phenylethanol, 3-methyl-1-butanol were found in the headspace from Rahnella aquatilis when grown in substrate containing pine bark. 2-Methoxyphenol and 3-methyl-1-butanol, phenol and methyl salicylate were found in pine feces. Birch and bilberry feces emitted mainly linalool oxides and bilberry emitted also small amounts of 2-phenylethanol.

    A second part of the thesis discusses the role of fungi in forest insect interactions and the production of oxygenated monoterpenes as possible antifeedants. Spruce bark beetles (Ips typhographus L.) aggregate with the help of pheromones and with collected forces they kill weakened adult trees as a result of associated fungi growth and larval development. A fungi associated with the bark beetle, Grosmannia europhoides, was shown to produce de novo 2-methyl-3-buten-2-ol, the major component of the spruce bark beetle aggregation pheromone. Chemical defense responses against Endoconidiophora polonica and Heterobasidion parviporum were investigated using four clones of Norway spruce with different susceptibility to Heterobasidion sp. Clone specific differences were found in induced mono-, sesqui and diterpenes. A number of oxygenated monoterpenes which are known antifeedants for the pine weevil were produced in the infested areas.

  • 326.
    Axelsson, Karolin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Organic Chemistry.
    Konstanzer, Vera
    Kuttuva Rajarao, Guna
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Industrial Biotechnology.
    Terenius, Olle
    Dep of Ecology, SLU.
    Seriot, Lisa
    Nordenhem, Henrik
    Dep. of Ecology, SLU.
    Nordlander, Göran
    Dep. of Ecology, SLU.
    Borg-Karlson, Anna-Karin
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Organic Chemistry.
    Antifeedants produced by bacteria associated to the gut of the pine weevil (Hylobius abietis)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 327.
    Axelsson, Karolin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Organic Chemistry.
    Nilsson, Louise
    Nordlander, Göran
    Dep. of Ecology, SLU.
    Borg-Karlson, Anna-Karin
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Organic Chemistry.
    Terenius, Olle
    Dep of Ecology, SLU.
    Do pine weevil microbiota and corresponding volatiles change due to selective feeding?Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 328.
    Axelsson, Karolin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Organic Chemistry.
    Zendegi-Shiraz, Amene
    Swedjemark, Gunilla
    Borg-Karlson, Anna-Karin
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Organic Chemistry.
    Zhao, Tao
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry.
    Clone specific chemical defense responses in Norway spruce to infestations by two pathogenic fungi2016In: Forest Pathology, ISSN 1437-4781, E-ISSN 1439-0329Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Heterobasidion parviporum (Hp) were investigated using four clones of Norway spruce (Picea abies) with different susceptibility to Heterobasidion sp. Eight year old trees were inoculated with Ep and Hp to minimize the variation due to environment. After three weeks the bark tissue at the upper border of the inoculation hole were extracted with hexane and analyzed by GC-MS. Both treatment and clonal differences were found based on induced mono-, sesqui- and diterpenes. In addition, the Hp produced toxin, fomanoxin, was identified in lowest amount in the most Hp susceptible clone. The clonal trees seem to use different defense strategies towards the two fungi. One of the clones was able to induce strong chemical defense against both fungi, one clone induced chemical defense only against Ep and the most susceptible clone exhibited the least capacity to produce an effective defense against Ep and Hp. Two diterpenes were found to be distinctly different between clones with different susceptibilities, which can be used as chemical indication of Norway spruce resistance against fungi.

  • 329. Axelsson, Patrik
    et al.
    Ek, Monica
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Wood Chemistry and Pulp Technology.
    Teder, Ants
    Bleachability of Alkaline Birch Pulps.2000In: Proceedings 6th European Workshop on Lignocellulosics and Pulp., 2000Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 330. Axelsson, Patrik
    et al.
    Ek, Monica
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Wood Chemistry and Pulp Technology.
    Teder, Ants
    Influence of alkali profile in the kraft cook on the bleachability of birch.2001In: : Book:Vol I, 2001, p. 41-44Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 331.
    Axelsson, Patrik
    et al.
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Lindström, Mikael
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Influence of the conditions during birch kraft cooking on unbleached brightness, and on ECF- and TCF-bleachability2004In: Nordic Pulp & Paper Research Journal, ISSN 0283-2631, E-ISSN 2000-0669, Vol. 19, no 3, p. 309-317Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The influences on ECF and TCF bleachability of the hydroxide ion, hydrogen sulphide ion and sodium ion concentrations as well as of the amount of dissolved wood components (DWC) in a birch kraft cook were investigated. The pulping was carried out using a so-called constant composition cooking technique, where a high liquor-to-wood ratio enables an almost constant concentration of the cooking chemicals during the entire cook. This cooking method also renders possible to vary each cooking variable separately. The pulps were oxygen-delignified and bleached in a D(EOP)DD and a Q(OP)Q(PO) sequence. The presence of DWC caused a significant rate increasing effect on the delignification. An increase in hydroxide ion concentration, an increase in hydrogen sulphide ion concentration or a decrease in sodium ion concentration improved both the ECF and the TCF bleachability, but the DWC had no significant effect on the bleachability. Further a correlation was found between the bleachability and the brightness of the oxygen-delignified pulp.

  • 332. Aydin, M.
    et al.
    Durmus, Z.
    Kavas, H.
    Esat, B.
    Sozeri, H.
    Baykal, A.
    Yilmaz, F.
    Toprak, Muhammat S.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Material Physics, Functional Materials, FNM.
    Synthesis and characterization of poly(3-thiophene acetic acid)/Fe3O4 nanocomposite2011In: Polyhedron, ISSN 0277-5387, E-ISSN 1873-3719, Vol. 30, no 6, p. 1120-1126Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Poly(3-thiophene acetic acid)/Fe3O4 nanocomposite is synthesized by the precipitation of Fe3O4 in the presence of poly(3-thiophene acetic acid) (P3TAA). Structural, surface, morphological, thermal properties and conductivity characterization/evaluation of the nanocomposite were performed by XRD, FT-IR, TEM, TGA. and conductivity measurements, respectively. The capping of P3TAA around Fe3O4 nanoparticles was confirmed by FT-IR spectroscopy, the interaction being via bridging oxygens of the carboxylate and the nanoparticle surface through bidentate binding. The crystallite and particle size were obtained as 9 +/- 2 nm and 11 +/- 1 nm from XRD line profile fitting and TEM image analysis, respectively, which reveal nearly single crystalline nature of Fe3O4 nanoparticles. Magnetization measurements reveal that P3TAA coated magnetite particles do not saturate at higher fields. There is no coercivity and remanence revealing superparamagnetic character. Magnetic particle size calculated from the theoretical fitting as 9.1 nm which coincides the values determined from TEM micrographs and XRD line profile fitting. The comparison to the TEM particle size reveals slightly modified magnetically dead nanoparticle surface.

  • 333. Aydin, M.
    et al.
    Unal, B.
    Esat, B.
    Baykal, A.
    Karaoglu, E.
    Toprak, Muhammet Sadaka
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Material Physics, Functional Materials, FNM.
    Sozeri, H.
    Synthesis, magnetic and electrical characteristics of poly(2-thiophen-3-yl-malonic acid)/Fe(3)O(4) nanocomposite2012In: Journal of Alloys and Compounds, ISSN 0925-8388, E-ISSN 1873-4669, Vol. 514, p. 45-53Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Poly(2-thiophen-3-yl-malonic acid)/Fe(3)O(4) nanocomposite was synthesized by the precipitation of Fe(3)O(4) in the presence of poly(2-thiophen-3-yl-malonic acid) (PT3MA). Characterizations of the nanocomposite were performed by XRD, FT-IR, TEM, TGA, AC/DC conductivity and dielectric measurements. The capping of PT3MA around Fe(3)O(4) nanoparticles was confirmed by FTIR spectroscopy, the interaction being between bridging oxygen of the carboxylate and the nanoparticle surface through bidentate binding. The crystallite particle sizes of 6 +/- 3 nm and 7 +/- 3 nm were obtained from XRD line profile fitting and from TEM image analysis respectively, and they are in good agreement with each other. Magnetization measurements revealed that PT3MA coated magnetite particles do not saturate at higher fields. The material showed superparamagnetic character as revealed by the absence of coercivity and remnant magnetization. Magnetic particle size was calculated as 7.3 +/- 1.0 nm from the mean magnetization term in the Langevin function which is also in conformity with the values determined from TEM micrographs and XRD line profile fitting. The TEM particle size analysis of the nanoparticles revealed the presence of a slightly modified magnetically dead nanoparticle surface. AC and DC conductivity measurements were performed to elucidate the electrical conduction characteristics of the product.

  • 334. Ayedh, H. M.
    et al.
    Bathen, M. E.
    Galeckas, A.
    Hassan, J. U.
    Bergman, J. P.
    Nipoti, R.
    Hallén, Anders
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Electronics, Integrated devices and circuits.
    Svensson, B. G.
    Controlling the carbon vacancy in 4H-SiC by thermal processing2018In: ECS Transactions, Electrochemical Society Inc. , 2018, no 12, p. 91-97Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The carbon vacancy (Vc) is perhaps the most prominent point defect in silicon carbide (SiC) and it is an efficient charge carrier lifetime killer in high-purity epitaxial layers of 4H-SÌC. The Vc concentration needs to be controlled and minimized for optimum materials and device performance, and an approach based on post-growth thermal processing under C-rich ambient conditions is presented. It utilizes thermodynamic equilibration and after heat treatment at 1500 °C for 1 h, the Vc concentration is shown to be reduced by a factor-25 relative to that in as-grown state-of-the-art epi-layers. Concurrently, a considerable enhancement of the carrier lifetime occurs throughout the whole of >40 urn thick epi-layers. 

  • 335.
    Azarian, Hamid Reza
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Polymer Technology.
    MAE for Quantitative Determination of Antioxidant Irganox 1010 in Polypropylene Film2002Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 180 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 336.
    Azeem, Muhammad
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Organic Chemistry.
    Microbes Associated with Hylobius abietis: A Chemical and Behavioral Study2013Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis is based on three inter-related studies: the first part deals with the microbial consortium, the identification of microbes and their volatiles, the second part deals with the study of bio-chemical control methods of two conifer pests; the pine weevil Hylobius abietis (L.) and the root rot fungi Heterobasidion spp., and the third part describes the production of styrene by a fungus using forest waste.The large pine weevil (Hylobius abietis L.) is an economically important pest insect of conifers in reforestation areas of Europe and Asia. The female weevils protect their eggs from feeding conspecifics by adding frass (mixture of weevil feces and chewed bark) along with the eggs. In order to understand the mechanism behind frass deposition at the egg laying site and to find repellents/antifeedants for pine weevils, microbes were isolated from the aseptically collected pine weevil frass. Microbial produced volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were collected by solid phase micro extraction and analyzed by GC-MS after cultivating them on weevil frass broth. The major VOCs were tested against pine weevils using a multi-choice olfactometer. Ewingella sp., Mucor racemosus, Penicillium solitum, P. expansum, Ophiostoma piceae, O. pluriannulatum, Debaryomyces hansenii and Candida sequanensis were identified as abundant microbes. Styrene, 6-protoilludene, 1-octene-3-ol, 3-methylanisole, methyl salicylate, 2-methoxyphenol and 2-methoxy-4-vinylphenol were the VOCs of persistently isolated microbes. In behavioral bioassay, methyl salicylate, 3-methylanisole and styrene significantly reduced the attraction of pine weevils to their host plant volatiles. Heterobasidion spp. are severe pathogenic fungi of conifers that cause root and butt rot in plants. Bacterial isolates were tested for the antagonistic activity against fungi on potato dextrose agar. Bacillus subtilis strains significantly inhibited the growth of H. annosum and H. parviporum. Styrene is an industrial chemical used for making polymeric products, currently produced from fossil fuel. A strain of Penicillium expansum isolated from pine weevil frass was investigated for the production of styrene using forest waste. Grated pine stem bark and mature oak bark supplemented with yeast extract produced greater amounts of styrene compared to potato dextrose broth.

  • 337.
    Azeem, Muhammad
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry. Department of Chemistry, COMSATS University Islamabad, Abbottabad Campus, Abbottabad 22060, Pakistan.
    Barba Aliaga, Marina
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Industrial Biotechnology.
    Borg-Karlson, Anna-Karin
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Organic chemistry. Division of Organic Chemistry, Institute of Technology, Tartu University, Tartu 50411, Estonia.
    Terenius, O.
    Broberg, A.
    Rajarao, Gunaratna Kuttuva
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Industrial Biotechnology.
    Heterobasidion-growth inhibiting Bacillus subtilis A18 exhibits medium- and age-dependent production of lipopeptides2019In: Microbiology Research, ISSN 0944-5013, E-ISSN 1618-0623, Vol. 223-225, p. 129-136Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Heterobasidion annosum s.s. and H. parviporum are severe pathogens of conifers causing butt rot and root rot thus reducing the economic value of timber. Here, the antifungal activity of Bacillus subtilis isolate A18 against these two Heterobasidion species was investigated. Five different culture media with different culture age were investigated to study the effect of substrate composition and culture age for metabolite production. Bacterial cultures and cell-free culture filtrates were tested for antifungal activity. Inhibition of fungal growth was analysed using the agar disc-diffusion method. MALDI-TOF and LC-HRMS analyses were used to identify the antifungal metabolites. Substrate composition and age of culture were found to be active variables with direct effect on the antifungal activity of bacterial culture extracts. High anti-fungal activity was observed when B. subtilis was cultured in PDB, SGB and LB media for four days. Mass-spectrometry analysis showed the presence of lipopeptides in culture filtrates identified as members of the surfactins, polymixins, kurstakins and fengycins. A culture filtrate containing fengycin-type lipopeptides showed the highest bioactivity against Heterobasidion species. Bacterial cultures had higher bioactivity compared to their respective cell free culture filtrates. The results of the present study suggest that B. subtilis A18 is a powerful biocontrol agent against Heterobasidion infections of tree wounds and stumps.

  • 338.
    Azeem, Muhammad
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Organic Chemistry.
    Borg-Karlson, Anna Karin
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Organic Chemistry.
    Kuttuva Rajarao, Gunaratna
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Environmental Microbiology.
    Antagonistic activity of Bacillus subtilis A18 – A19 against Heterobasidion speciesArticle in journal (Other academic)
  • 339.
    Azeem, Muhammad
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Organic Chemistry.
    Borg-Karlson, Anna Karin
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Organic Chemistry.
    Kuttuva Rajarao, Gunaratna
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Industrial Biotechnology.
    Sustainable bio-production of styrene from forest waste2013In: Bioresource Technology, ISSN 0960-8524, E-ISSN 1873-2976, Vol. 144, p. 684-688Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A strain of Penicillium expansum was studied for the production of styrene using forest waste biomass as a feeding substrate. The fungal strain was cultivated on bark of various trees supplemented with yeast extract and the volatiles produced were collected on Tenax TA and analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Fungus cultured on grated soft bark of pine (Pinus sylvestris) stems (GPB) and mature bark of oak (Quercus robur) supplemented with yeast extract produced relatively the highest amounts of styrene. The maximum styrene production rate was 52.5 mu g/h, 41 mu g/h and 27 mu g/h from fungus cultivated on 50 mL liquid media with 10 g GPB or mature bark of oak and potato dextrose broth respectively. These promising results suggest that the fungal strain could be used to produce "green" styrene plastics using renewable forest waste biomass.

  • 340.
    Azeem, Muhammad
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Organic Chemistry.
    Kuttuva Rajarao, Gunaratna
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Environmental Microbiology.
    Nagahama, Kazuhiro
    Terenius, Olle
    Dept of genetics microbiology and toxicology, Stockholm University.
    Nordenhem, Henrik
    SLU, Uppsala.
    Nordlander, Göran
    SLU, Uppsala.
    Borg-Karlson, Anna Karin
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Organic Chemistry.
    Chemo- and biodiversity of microbes associated with pine weevil (Hylobius abietis)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 341.
    Azeem, Muhammad
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Organic Chemistry.
    Norin, Emil
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Organic Chemistry.
    Terenius, Olle
    Dept of genetics microbiology and toxicology, Stockholm University.
    Kuttuva Rajarao, Gunaratna
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Environmental Microbiology.
    Nordlander, Göran
    SLU, Uppsala.
    Nordenhem, Henrik
    SLU, Uppsala.
    Borg-Karlson, Anna Karin
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Organic Chemistry.
    Fungal metabolite mask the host plant odor of the pine weevil (Hylobius abietis)Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 342.
    Azhar, Shoaib
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Wang, Yan
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Lawoko, Martin
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Henriksson, Gunnar
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Lindström, Mikael E.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Enhanced extraction of high-molecular-weight wood polymers with chemoenzymatic treatment2012In: Abstract of Papers of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0065-7727, Vol. 243Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 343.
    Azhdar, Bruska
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Polymer Technology.
    Improved high velocity cold copaction processing: polymer powder to high performance parts2005Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other scientific)
    Abstract [en]

    A uniaxial High-Velocity Compaction (HVC) process for polymer powder using a cylindrical, hardened steel die and a new technique with relaxation assist was tested with a focus on the compactibility characteristics and surface morphology of the compacted materials using various heights of relaxation assist device with different compacting profiles.

    Relaxation assist device was presented as a new technique to reduce springback, pull-out phenomenon and to improve the compaction process.

    The basic phenomena associated with HVC are explained and the general energy principle is introduced to explain pull-out phenomenon during the decompacting stage. In this study, polyamide-11 powders with different particle size distributions have been compacted with the application of different compaction profiles, e.g. different energies and velocities. It was found that the relative green density is influenced more by the pre-compacting (primary compaction step) than by the post-compacting (secondary compaction step).

    Experimental results for different compaction profiles were presented showing the effect of varying the opposite velocity during the decompacting stage and how to improve the homogeneous densification between the upper and lower surface and the evenness of the upper surface of the compacted powder bed by using relaxation assists, and the influences of the relaxation assist device on the process characteristics. It was found that the relaxation assist improves the compaction of the polymer powder by locking the powder bed in the compacted form. In addition, the relative times of the compacting stage, decompacting stage and the reorganisation of the particles can be controlled by altering the height of the relaxation assist. It was found that the high-velocity compaction process is an interruption process and that the delay times between the pressure waves can be reduced by increasing the height of the relaxation assist device. Furthermore, the first gross instantaneous springback and the total elastic springback are reduced.

    Two bonding strain gauges and a high-speed video camera system were used to investigate the springback phenomenon during the compaction process. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and image computer board Camera (IC-PCI Imaging Technology) were used to the study the morphological characteristics, the limit of plastic deformation and particle bonding by plastic flow at contact points, and pull-out phenomena.

  • 344.
    Azhdar, Bruska
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Stenberg, Bengt
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Kari, Leif
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, MWL Structural and vibroacoustics.
    Determination of springback gradient in the die on compacted polymer powders during high-velocity compaction2006In: Polymer testing, ISSN 0142-9418, E-ISSN 1873-2348, Vol. 25, no 1, p. 114-123Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A uniaxial high-velocity compaction process for polymer powder using a cylindrical, hardened steel die and a new technique with relaxation assist was tested with various heights. The influences of the relaxation assist device on the process characteristics are discussed. Two bonded strain gauges and a high-speed video camera system were used to investigate the springback phenomenon during the compaction process. It was found that the relaxation assist improves the compaction of the polymer powder by locking the powder bed in the compacted form. It is shown that the high-velocity compaction process is an interruption process and that the delay times between the pressure waves can be reduced by increasing the height of the relaxation assist device. The delay times between the pressure waves are also strongly dependent on the strain rate. If the height of the relaxation assist device is increased, the first gross instantaneous springback, and the total elastic springback, are reduced. In addition, the density of the powder bed is increased. The relative times of the compacting stage, decompacting stage and the reorganisation of the particles can be also controlled by altering the height of the relaxation assist.

  • 345.
    Azhdar, Bruska
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Stenberg, Bengt
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Kari, Leif
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, MWL Structural and vibroacoustics.
    Development of a High-Velocity Compaction process for polymer powders2005In: Polymer testing, ISSN 0142-9418, E-ISSN 1873-2348, Vol. 24, no 7, p. 909-919Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The High-Velocity Compaction (HVC) process for powder polymers has been studied, with a focus on the compactibility characteristics and surface morphology of the compacted materials, with and without relaxation assists, by increasing compacting quantity and direction. The basic phenomena associated with HVC are explained and the general energy principle is introduced to explain pull-out phenomena during the decompacting stage. Polyamide-11 powders with different particle size distributions have been compacted with the application of different compaction profiles, e.g. different energies and velocities. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and image computer board camera, (IC-PCI Imaging Technology) have been used to the study the morphological characteristics, the limit of plastic deformation and particle bonding by plastic flow at contact points, and pull-out phenomena. The relative green density is influenced more by the pre-compacting (primary compaction step) than by the post-compacting (secondary compaction step). The pressure and density distribution differences between the upper and lower surface are not uniform. Projectile supports or 'relaxation assists' are presented as a new technique to reduce pull-out phenomenon. Experimental results for different compaction profiles are presented showing the effect of varying the opposite velocity during the decompacting stage, and how to improve the homogeneous densification between the upper and lower surface and the evenness of the upper surface of the compacted powder bed by using relaxation assists.

  • 346.
    Azhdar, Bruska
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Yu, Wenbin
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Reitberger, Torbjörn
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Nuclear Chemistry.
    Gedde, Ulf
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    A new method for assessing the efficiency of stabilizers in polyolefins exposed to chlorinated water media2009In: Polymer testing, ISSN 0142-9418, E-ISSN 1873-2348, Vol. 28, no 6, p. 661-667Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The chlorine used as disinfectant in tap water degrades most materials, including polyethylene. The most adequate (functional) test method, the pressure test, is complicated and expensive because the chlorinated aqueous media (Cl-2 or ClO2 in water) are unstable and they undergo reactions that are dependent on the pH. A new method which assesses the protection efficiency of phenolic antioxidants in polyolefins was developed. The method uses a liquid hydrocarbon analogue, squalane, in which antioxidants are dissolved. The organic phase was dispersed in the aqueous chlorinated phase (containing 10 ppm of either Cl-2 or ClO2; pH=6.8) at 70 degrees C by intense stirring. The depletion of antioxidant (Irganox 1010) was monitored by standard DSC determination of the oxidation induction time. It was shown that 300 min of exposure was sufficient to obtain useful data.

  • 347.
    Azuara, Cyril
    et al.
    Institut Pasteur, Paris France.
    Lindahl, Erik
    Stockholm University.
    Koehl, Patrice
    University of California, Davis.
    Orland, Henri
    Institut Pasteur, Paris, France.
    Delarue, Marc
    Institut Pasteur, Paris, France.
    PDB_Hydro: incorporating dipolar solvents with variable density in the Poisson-Boltzmann treatment of macromolecule electrostatics.2006In: Nucleic Acids Research, ISSN 0305-1048, E-ISSN 1362-4962, Vol. 34, no Web Server issue, p. W38-42Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We describe a new way to calculate the electrostatic properties of macromolecules which eliminates the assumption of a constant dielectric value in the solvent region, resulting in a Generalized Poisson-Boltzmann-Langevin equation (GPBLE). We have implemented a web server (http://lorentz.immstr.pasteur.fr/pdb_hydro.php) that both numerically solves this equation and uses the resulting water density profiles to place water molecules at preferred sites of hydration. Surface atoms with high or low hydration preference can be easily displayed using a simple PyMol script, allowing for the tentative prediction of the dimerization interface in homodimeric proteins, or lipid binding regions in membrane proteins. The web site includes options that permit mutations in the sequence as well as reconstruction of missing side chain and/or main chain atoms. These tools are accessible independently from the electrostatics calculation, and can be used for other modeling purposes. We expect this web server to be useful to structural biologists, as the knowledge of solvent density should prove useful to get better fits at low resolution for X-ray diffraction data and to computational biologists, for whom these profiles could improve the calculation of interaction energies in water between ligands and receptors in docking simulations.

  • 348.
    Azwar, Edwin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Polymer Technology.
    Hakkarainen, Minna
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Polymer Technology.
    Liquefied Wood Flour and Rice Bran as Polylactide AdditivesArticle in journal (Other academic)
  • 349.
    Azwar, Edwin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Polymer Technology.
    Hakkarainen, Minna
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Polymer Technology.
    Tuning the mechanical properties of tapioca starch by plasticizers, inorganic and agro-waste derived fillers2012In: Polymer science, ISSN 0965-545X, Vol. 2012, no Article ID 463298Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mechanical properties of tapioca starch-based films were tuned by different additives and additive combinations. The additives included plasticizers (glycerol, sorbitol, and citric acid), inorganic fillers (halloysite and kaolin), and agrowaste-based fillers (milled wood flour and rice bran). In addition, new biobased additives were prepared from wood flour and rice bran through liquefaction reaction. Through different additive combinations, starch-based materials with significant differences in tensile properties were designed. Addition of halloysite nanoclay resulted in materials with improved tensile strength at break and rather low strain at break. The effect of kaolin on tensile strength was highly dependent on the used plasticizer. However, in most combinations the addition of kaolin resulted in materials with intermediate tensile strength and strain at break values. The addition of milled wood flour and rice bran improved the tensile strength, while the addition of liquefied fillers especially liquefied rice bran increased the strain at break indicating that liquefied rice bran could have potential as a plasticizer for starch blends.

  • 350.
    Azwar, Edwin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Polymer Technology.
    Vuorinen, Eino
    Hakkarainen, Minna
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Polymer Technology.
    Pyrolysis-GC-MS reveals important differences in hydrolytic degradation process of wood flour and rice bran filled polylactide composites2012In: Polymer degradation and stability, ISSN 0141-3910, E-ISSN 1873-2321, Vol. 97, no 3, p. 281-287Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Pyrolysis-GC-MS of polylactide (PLA) biocomposites before and after hydrolytic degradation revealed prominent differences in the hydrolytic degradation process of rice bran and wood flour filled biocomposites. The water uptake and mass loss for polylactide/wood flour composites were similar to that of plain PLA. Pyrolysis-GC-MS, however, showed that on prolonged ageing the hydrolysis of PLA led to increased wood flour concentration in the remaining biocomposite matrices. In contrast, the polylactide/rice bran composites exhibited larger water uptake and higher mass loss. Pyrolysis-GC-MS and FTIR analysis proved that the higher mass loss was caused by migration of rice bran from the composites. The type of natural filler could thus greatly influence the degradation process and/or the stability of the materials in aqueous or humid environments.

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