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  • 301.
    Alfredsson, P. Henrik
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics.
    Segalini, Antonio
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics.
    Örlü, Ramis
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics.
    A new scaling for the streamwise turbulence intensity in wall-bounded turbulent flows and what it tells us about the "outer" peak2011In: Physics of fluids, ISSN 1070-6631, E-ISSN 1089-7666, Vol. 23, no 4, p. 041702-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    One recent focus of experimental studies of turbulence in high Reynolds number wall-bounded flows has been the scaling of the root mean square of the fluctuating streamwise velocity, but progress has largely been impaired by spatial resolution effects of hot-wire sensors. For the near-wall peak, recent results seem to have clarified the controversy; however, one of the remaining issues in this respect is the emergence of a second (so-called outer) peak at high Reynolds numbers. The present letter introduces a new scaling of the local turbulence intensity profile, based on the diagnostic plot by Alfredsson and Orlu [Eur. J. Mech. B/Fluids 42, 403 (2010)], which predicts the location and amplitude of the "outer" peak and suggests its presence as a question of sufficiently large scale separation.

  • 302.
    Alfredsson, P. Henrik
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics.
    Tillmark, Nils
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics.
    Instability, transition and turbulence in plane Couette flow with system rotation2005In: IUTAM Symposium on Laminar-Turbulent Transition and Finite Amplitude Solutions / [ed] Mullin, T; Kerswell, R, Springer Netherlands, 2005, Vol. 77, p. 173-193Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    System rotation may have either stabilizing or destabilizing effects on shear flows depending on the direction of rotation vector as compared to the vorticity vector of mean flow. This study describes experimental results of laminar, transitional and turbulent plane Couette flow with both stabilizing and destabilizing system rotation. For laminar flow with destabilizing rotation roll cells appear in the flow which may undergo several different types of secondary instabilities, especially interesting is a repeating pattern of wavy structures followed by breakdown, thereafter roll cells reappear in a cyclic pattern. For higher Reynolds number roll cells appear also in a turbulent environment. It is also shown how stabilizing rotation may quench the turbulence completely.

  • 303.
    Alfredsson, P. Henrik
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW. KTH Mech, Linne FLOW Ctr, SE-10044 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Örlü, Ramis
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Large-Eddy BreakUp Devices - a 40 Years Perspective from a Stockholm Horizon2018In: Flow Turbulence and Combustion, ISSN 1386-6184, E-ISSN 1573-1987, Vol. 100, no 4, p. 877-888Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the beginning of the 1980's Large Eddy BreakUp (LEBU) devices, thin plates or airfoils mounted in the outer part of turbulent boundary layers, were shown to be able to change the turbulent structure and intermittency as well as reduce turbulent skin friction. In some wind-tunnel studies it was also claimed that a net drag reduction was obtained, i.e. the reduction in skin-friction drag was larger than the drag on the devices. However, towing-tank experiments with a flat plate at high Reynolds numbers as well as with an axisymmetric body showed no net reduction, but instead an increase in total drag. Recent large-eddy simulations have explored the effect of LEBUs on the turbulent boundary layer and evaluations of the total drag show similar results as in the towing tank experiments. Despite these negative results in terms of net drag reduction, LEBUs manipulate the boundary layer in an interesting way which explains why they still attract some interest. The reason for the positive results in the wind-tunnel studies as compared to drag measurements are discussed here, although no definite answer for the differences can be given.

  • 304.
    Alfredsson, P. Henrik
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Fluid Physics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Örlü, Ramis
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Fluid Physics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    The diagnostic plot - a litmus test for wall bounded turbulence data2010In: European journal of mechanics. B, Fluids, ISSN 0997-7546, E-ISSN 1873-7390, Vol. 29, no 6, p. 403-406Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A diagnostic plot is suggested that can be used to judge wall bounded turbulence data of the mean and the rms of the streamwise velocity in terms of reliability both near the wall, around the maximum in the rms as well as in the outer region. The important feature of the diagnostic plot is that neither the wall position nor the friction velocity needs to be known, since it shows the rms value as a function of the streamwise mean velocity, both normalized with the free stream velocity. One must remember, however, that passing the test is a necessary, but not sufficient condition to prove good data quality.

  • 305.
    Alfredsson, P. Henrik
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Fluid Physics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Örlü, Ramis
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Fluid Physics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Kurian, Thomas
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Fransson, Jens H. M.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Segalini, A.
    Rüedi, Jean-Daniel
    Talamelli, Alessandro
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    The diagnostic plot: a new way to appraise turbulent boundary-layer data2009In: ADVANCES IN TURBULENCE XII: PROCEEDINGS OF THE 12TH EUROMECH EUROPEAN TURBULENCE CONFERENCE / [ed] Eckhardt, B., 2009, Vol. 132, p. 609-612Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 306.
    Alfredsson, P. Henrik
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Örlü, Ramis
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Schlatter, Philipp
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    The viscous sublayer revisited-exploiting self-similarity to determine the wall position and friction velocity2011In: Experiments in Fluids, ISSN 0723-4864, E-ISSN 1432-1114, Vol. 51, no 1, p. 271-280Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In experiments using hot wires near the wall, it is well known that wall interference effects between the hot wire and the wall give rise to errors, and mean velocity data from the viscous sublayer can usually not be used to determine the wall position, nor the friction velocity from the linear velocity distribution. Here, we introduce a new method that takes advantage of the similarity of the probability density distributions (PDF) or rather the cumulative distribution functions (CDF) in the near-wall region. By using the velocity data in the CDF in a novel way, it is possible to circumvent the problem associated with heat transfer to the wall and to accurately determine both the wall position and the friction velocity. Prior to its exploitation, the self-similarity of the distribution functions of the streamwise velocity fluctuations within the viscous sublayer is established, and it is shown that they can accurately be described by a lognormal distribution.

  • 307.
    Alfredsson, P. Henrik
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Örlü, Ramis
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Segalini, Antonio
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    A new formulation for the streamwise turbulence intensity distribution2011In: 13th European Turbulence Conference (ETC13): Wall-Bounded Flows And Control Of Turbulence, Institute of Physics Publishing (IOPP), 2011, p. 022002-Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Numerical and experimental data from zero pressure-gradient turbulent boundary layers over smooth walls have been analyzed by means of the so called diagnostic plot introduced by Alfredsson & Orlu [Eur. J. Fluid Mech. B/Fluids, 4 2, 403 (2010)]. In the diagnostic plot the local turbulence intensity is shown as a function of the local mean velocity normalized with a reference velocity scale. In the outer region of the boundary layer a universal linear decay of the turbulence intensity is observed independent of Reynolds number. The deviation from this linear region appears in the buffer region and seems to be universal when normalized with the friction velocity. Therefore, a new empirical fit for the streamwise velocity turbulence intensity distribution is proposed and the results are compared with up to date reliable high-Reynolds number experiments and extrapolated towards Reynolds numbers relevant to atmospherical boundary layers.

  • 308.
    Alfredsson, P. Henrik
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Örlü, Ramis
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Segalini, Antonio
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    A new formulation for the streamwise turbulence intensity distribution in wall-bounded turbulent flows2012In: European journal of mechanics. B, Fluids, ISSN 0997-7546, E-ISSN 1873-7390, Vol. 36, p. 167-175Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The distribution of the streamwise velocity turbulence intensity has recently been discussed in several papers both from the viewpoint of new experimental results as well as attempts to model its behavior. In the present paper numerical and experimental data from zero pressure-gradient turbulent boundary layers, channel and pipe flows over smooth walls have been analyzed by means of the so called diagnostic plot introduced by Alfredsson & ÖrlÌ [P.H. Alfredsson, R. ÖrlÌ, The diagnostic plot-a litmus test for wall bounded turbulence data, Eur. J. Mech. B Fluids 29 (2010) 403-406]. In the diagnostic plot the local turbulence intensity is plotted as function of the local mean velocity normalized with a reference velocity scale. Alfredsson et al. [P.H. Alfredsson, A. Segalini, R. ÖrlÌ, A new scaling for the streamwise turbulence intensity in wall-bounded turbulent flows and what it tells us about the outer peak, Phys. Fluids 23 (2011) 041702] observed that in the outer region of the boundary layer a universal linear decay of the turbulence intensity independent of the Reynolds number exists. This approach has been generalized for channel and pipe flows as well, and it has been found that the deviation from the previously established linear region appears at a given wall distance in viscous units (around 120) for all three canonical flows. Based on these results, new empirical fits for the streamwise velocity turbulence intensity distribution of each canonical flow are proposed. Coupled with a mean streamwise velocity profile description the model provides a composite profile for the streamwise variance profile that agrees nicely with existing numerical and experimental data. Extrapolation of the proposed scaling to high Reynolds numbers predicts the emergence of a second peak of the streamwise variance profile that at even higher Reynolds numbers overtakes the inner one.

  • 309. Alfthan, J.
    et al.
    Gudmundson, Peter
    Östlund, S.
    Micro-mechanical model for mechanosorptive creep2000Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 310.
    Alfthan, Johan
    et al.
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Solid Mechanics.
    Gudmundson, Peter
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Solid Mechanics.
    Linear constitutive model for mechano-sorptive creep in paper2004Report (Other academic)
  • 311.
    Alfthan, Johan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Solid Mechanics (Dept.).
    Gudmundson, Peter
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Solid Mechanics (Dept.).
    Linear constitutive model for mechano-sorptive creep in paper2005In: International Journal of Solids and Structures, ISSN 0020-7683, E-ISSN 1879-2146, Vol. 42, no 24-25, p. 6261-6276Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The creep of paper is accelerated by moisture cycling. This effect is known as mechano-sorptive creep. It is assumed that this is an effect of transient stresses produced during moisture content changes in combination with non-linear creep behaviour of the fibres. The stresses produced by the moisture content changes are often much larger than the applied mechanical loads. If this is the case, the mechanical loads are only a perturbation to the internal stress state, and it will appear as if the mechano-sorptive creep is linear in stress. It is possible to take advantage of this feature. In the present report the pure moisture problem is first solved. The mechanical load is then treated as a perturbation of the solution to the moisture problem. Using this strategy, it is possible to linearize a non-linear network model for mechano-sorptive creep and to formulate a continuum model. As a result, the number of variables in the model is reduced. This is a significant improvement as it will be possible to use the linearized model to describe the material in a finite element program and solve problems with complicated geometries.

  • 312.
    Alfthan, Johan
    et al.
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Solid Mechanics.
    Gudmundson, Peter
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Solid Mechanics.
    Östlund, Sören
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Solid Mechanics.
    A micromechanical model for mechanosorptive creep in paper2002In: Journal of Pulp and Paper Science (JPPS), ISSN 0826-6220, Vol. 28, no 3, p. 98-104Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The creep of paper is accelerated by moisture cycling, a phenomenon known as mechanosorptive creep or accelerated creep. In this paper stress created at bonds due to anisotropic swelling during absorption and desorption of moisture, in combination with nonlinear creep, are proposed to be the cause for mechanosorptive creep. Two simplifled models are first discussed in order to demonstrate the suggested mechanism. A three-dimensional fibre network model composed of elastic fibres and inelastic bonds is then studied by finite element calculations. The relative sliding in the bonds is described by a nonlinear creep model which, in combination with anisotropic hygroexpansion of the fibres results in accelerated creep of the network.

  • 313. Ali, A.
    et al.
    Raza, Rizwan
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology.
    Kaleem Ullah, M.
    Rafique, A.
    Wang, B.
    Zhu, Bin
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology. Hubei University, China.
    Alkaline earth metal and samarium co-doped ceria as efficient electrolytes2018In: Applied Physics Letters, ISSN 0003-6951, E-ISSN 1077-3118, Vol. 112, no 4, article id 043902Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Co-doped ceramic electrolytes M0.1Sm0.1Ce0.8O2-δ (M = Ba, Ca, Mg, and Sr) were synthesized via co-precipitation. The focus of this study was to highlight the effects of alkaline earth metals in doped ceria on the microstructure, densification, conductivity, and performance. The ionic conductivity comparisons of prepared electrolytes in the air atmosphere were studied. It has been observed that Ca0.1Sm0.1Ce0.8O2-δ shows the highest conductivity of 0.124 Scm-1 at 650 °C and a lower activation energy of 0.48 eV. The cell shows a maximum power density of 630 mW cm-2 at 650 °C using hydrogen fuel. The enhancement in conductivity and performance was due to increasing the oxygen vacancies in the ceria lattice with the increasing dopant concentration. The bandgap was calculated from UV-Vis data, which shows a red shift when compared with pure ceria. The average crystallite size is in the range of 37-49 nm. DFT was used to analyze the co-doping structure, and the calculated lattice parameter was compared with the experimental lattice parameter.

  • 314. Ali, R.
    et al.
    Noora, A.
    Fareed, M. M.
    Faraz, Z. -U.-A.A.
    Siyal, Shahid Hussain
    KTH.
    Computational analysis of PT/CT contact behavior for a heavy water reactor at high temperature and pressure2018In: Proceedings of 2018 15th International Bhurban Conference on Applied Sciences and Technology, IBCAST 2018, Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE), 2018, p. 645-650Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A computational model has been developed for a heavy water reactor (HWR) reactor to analyze the temperature distribution of the moderator and pressure tube and to determine the thermal stress analysis of pressure tube (PT) using the non linear elastic model for thermal expansion. For an IAEA ICSP problem, the experimental set up and model were developed by the Fuel Channel High Temperature Heat Transfer (FCHTHT) laboratory in Canada. In case of LOCA or primary heat transfer failure, PT experiences a significant heat flux that results in ballooning of PT. Following the PT deformation, PT/CT contact may occur and thus there is spike in heat flux at calandria tube (CT) resulting in the local dryout of CT. The study was divided into two parts, pre-contact phase and contact phase. The analysis is made by using the COMSOL multiphysics software. The results reveal the effect of buoyancy and support the validation of experimental set up where the graphite heater is offset below the centre to account for the buoyancy effects. The PT was deformed at higher temperature and came in contact at 74.4 seconds.

  • 315.
    Ali, Rashid
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Applied Thermodynamics and Refrigeration.
    Phase Change Phenomena During Fluid Flow in Microchannels2010Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Phase change phenomena of a fluid flowing in a micro channel may be exploited to make the heat exchangers more compact and energy efficient. Compact heat exchangers offer several advantages such as light weight, low cost, energy efficiency, capability of removing high heat fluxes and charge reduction are a few to mention. Phase change phenomena in macro or conventional channels have been investigated since long but in case of micro channels, fewer studies of phase change have been conducted and underlying phenomena during two-phase flow in micro channels are not yet fully understood. It is clear from the literature that the two-phase flow models developed for conventional channels do not perform well when extrapolated to micro scale.

    In the current thesis, the experimental flow boiling results for micro channels are reported. Experiments were conducted in circular, stainless steel and quartz tubes in both horizontal and vertical orientations. The internal diameters of steel tubes tested were 1.70 mm, 1.224 mm and the diameter of quartz tube tested was 0.781 mm. The quartz tube was coated with a thin, electrically conductive, transparent layer of Indium-Tin-Oxide (ITO) making simultaneous heating and visualization possible. Test tubes were heated electrically using DC power supply. Two refrigerants R134a and R245fa were used as working fluids during the tests. Experiments were conducted at a wide variety of operating conditions.

    Flow visualization results obtained with quartz tube clearly showed the presence of confinement effects and consequently an early transition to annular flow for micro channels. Several flow pattern images were captured during flow boiling of R134a in quartz tube. Flow patterns recorded during the experiments were presented in the form of Reynolds number versus vapour quality and superficial liquid velocity versus superficial gas velocity plots. Experimental flow pattern maps so obtained were also compared with the other flow pattern maps available in the literature showing a poor agreement. Flow boiling heat transfer results for quartz and steel tubes indicate that the heat transfer coefficient increases with heat flux and system pressure but is independent on mass flux and vapour quality. Experimental flow boiling heat transfer coefficient results were compared with those obtained using different correlations from the literature. Heat transfer experiments with steel tubes were continued up to dryout condition and it was observed that dryout conditions always started close to the exit of the tube. The dryout heat flux increased with mass flux and decreased with exit vapour quality. The dryout data were compared with some well known CHF correlations available in the literature. Two-phase frictional pressure drop for the quartz tube was also obtained under different operating conditions. As expected, two-phase frictional pressure drop increased with mass flux and exit vapour quality.

  • 316.
    Ali, Rashid
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Applied Thermodynamics and Refrigeration.
    Palm, Björn E.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Applied Thermodynamics and Refrigeration.
    Dryout Characteristics During Flow Boiling of R134a in Vertical Circular Minichannels2011In: International Journal of Heat and Mass Transfer, ISSN 0017-9310, E-ISSN 1879-2189, Vol. 54, no 11-12, p. 2434-2445Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, the experimental results of dryout during flow boiling in minichannels are reported and analysed. Experiments were carried out in vertical circular minichannels with internal diameters of 1.22 mm and 1.70 mm and a fixed heated length of 220 mm. R134a was used as working fluid. Mass flux was varied from 50 kg/m(2) s to 600 kg/m(2) s and experiments were performed at two different system pressures corresponding to saturation temperatures of 27 degrees C and 32 degrees C. Experimental results show that the dryout heat flux increases with mass flux and decreases with tube diameter while system pressure has no clear effect for the range of experimental conditions covered. Finally, the prediction capabilities of the well known critical heat flux (CHF) correlations are also tested.

  • 317.
    Ali, Rashid
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Applied Thermodynamics and Refrigeration.
    Palm, Björn E.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Applied Thermodynamics and Refrigeration.
    Claudi, Martin-Callizo
    Maqbool, Mohammad H.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Applied Thermodynamics and Refrigeration.
    Flow Patterns and Flow Pattern Maps for Microchannels2010In: 2010 3rd International Conference on Thermal Issues in Emerging Technologies, Theory and Applications - Proceedings, ThETA3 2010, 2010, p. 33-42Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Dense packaging of electronic components generates very high heat fluxes and therefore results in challenges for proper thermal management of such components. Microchannel based evaporators with phase changing liquids are regarded as a promising solution for such high heat flux cooling applications. Due to confinement of flow and differences in the relative importance of governing phenomena, the two-phase flow and heat transfer characteristics of microchannels have been shown to be different from those of conventional sized channels. The fact that microchannel is an attractive cooling option but at the same time there is a clear lack of understanding of related hydrodynamic and thermal transport phenomena which provides an impetus for microchannel research. This paper presents the flow patterns and flow pattern maps obtained for an experimental study of R134a during flow boiling in a horizontal microchannel. The microchannel was a fused silica tube, the outer surface of which was coated with thin, transparent and electrically conductive layer of Indium-Tin-Oxide (ITO). The microchannel was 781 m in internal diameter and 191 mm in heated length. Operating parameters during the experiments were: mass flux 100-400 kg/m2 s, heat flux 5-45 kW/m2, saturation temperature 25 and 30 °C. A High speed camera was used with a close up lens to capture the flow patterns evolved along the channel. Flow pattern maps are presented in terms of superficial gas and liquid velocity and in terms of Reynolds number and vapor quality plots. The results are compared with some flow pattern maps for conventional and micro scale channels available in literature.

  • 318.
    Ali, Rashid
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Applied Thermodynamics and Refrigeration.
    Palm, Björn E.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Applied Thermodynamics and Refrigeration.
    Maqbool, Mohammad H.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Applied Thermodynamics and Refrigeration.
    Experimental Investigation of Two-phase Pressure Drop in a Microchannel2011In: Heat Transfer Engineering, ISSN 0145-7632, E-ISSN 1521-0537, Vol. 32, no 13/14, p. 1126-1138Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Experimental results of two-phase pressure drop in a horizontal circular microchannel are reported in this paper. A test tube was made of fused silica having an internal diameter of 781 mu m with a total length of 261 mm and a heated length of 191 mm. The outer surface of the test tube was coated with an electrically conductive thin layer of ITO (indium tin oxide) for direct heating of the test section. Refrigerants R134a and R245fa were used as the working fluids, and mass flux during the experiments was varied between 100 and 650 kg/m(2)-s. Experiments were performed at two different system pressures corresponding to saturation temperatures of 25 degrees C and 30 degrees C for R134a and at three different system pressures corresponding to saturation temperatures of 30 degrees C, 35 degrees C, and 40 degrees C for R245fa. Two-phase frictional pressure drop characteristics with variation of mass flux, vapor fraction, saturation temperature, and heat flux were explored in detail. Finally, the prediction capability of some well-known correlations available in the literature, some developed for macrochannels and others especially developed for microchannels, was assessed.

  • 319.
    Ali, Rashid
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Applied Thermodynamics and Refrigeration.
    Palm, Björn E.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Applied Thermodynamics and Refrigeration.
    Maqbool, Mohammad H.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Applied Thermodynamics and Refrigeration.
    Flow Boiling Heat Transfer Characteristics of a Minichannel up to Dryout Condition2010In: MNHMT2009, VOL 2, New York: AMER SOC MECHANICAL ENGINEERS , 2010, p. 25-34Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper the experimental flow boiling heat transfer results of a minichannel are presented. A series of experiments was conducted to measure the heat transfer coefficients in a minichannel made of stainless steel (AISI 316) having an internal diameter of 1.7mm and a uniformly heated length of 220mm. R134a was used as working fluid and experiments were performed at two different system pressures corresponding to saturation temperatures of 27 degrees C and 32 degrees C. Mass flux was varied from 50 kg/m(2) s to 600 kg/m(2) s and heat flux ranged from 2kW/m(2) to 156 kW/m(2). The test section was heated directly using a DC power supply. The direct heating of the channel ensured uniform heating and heating was continued until dry out was reached. The experimental results show that the heat transfer coefficient increases with imposed wall heat flux while mass flux and vapour quality have no considerable effect. Increasing the system pressure slightly enhances the heat transfer coefficient. The heat transfer coefficient is reduced as dryout is reached. It is observed that dryout phenomenon is accompanied with fluctuations and a larger standard deviation in outer wall temperatures.

  • 320.
    Ali, Rashid
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Applied Thermodynamics and Refrigeration.
    Palm, Björn E.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Applied Thermodynamics and Refrigeration.
    Maqbool, Mohammad H.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Applied Thermodynamics and Refrigeration.
    Flow Boiling Heat Transfer Characteristics of a Minichannel up to Dryout Condition2011In: Journal of heat transfer, ISSN 0022-1481, E-ISSN 1528-8943, Vol. 133, no 8, p. 081501-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, the experimental flow boiling heat transfer results of a minichannel are presented. A series of experiments was conducted to measure the heat transfer coefficients in a minichannel made of stainless steel (AISI 316) having an internal diameter of 1.70 mm and a uniformly heated length of 220 mm. R134a was used as a working fluid, and experiments were performed at two different system pressures corresponding to saturation temperatures of 27 degrees C and 32 degrees C. Mass flux was varied from 50 kg/m(2) s to 600 kg/m(2) s, and heat flux ranged from 2 kW/m(2) to 156 kW/m(2). The test section was heated directly using a dc power supply. The direct heating of the channel ensured uniform heating, which was continued until dryout was reached. The experimental results show that the heat transfer coefficient increases with imposed wall heat flux, while mass flux and vapor quality have no considerable effect. Increasing the system pressure slightly enhances the heat transfer coefficient. The heat transfer coefficient is reduced as dryout is reached. It is observed that the dryout phenomenon is accompanied with fluctuations and a larger standard deviation in outer wall temperatures.

  • 321.
    Ali, Rashid
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Applied Thermodynamics and Refrigeration.
    Palm, Björn E.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Applied Thermodynamics and Refrigeration.
    Maqbool, Mohammad H.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Applied Thermodynamics and Refrigeration.
    Flow Boiling Heat Transfer of Refrigerants R134a and R245fa in a Horizontal Microchannel2010In: Proceedings of 2nd European Conference on Microfluidics, 2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 322.
    Ali, Rashid
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Applied Thermodynamics and Refrigeration.
    Palm, Björn E.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Applied Thermodynamics and Refrigeration.
    Maqbool, Mohammad H.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Applied Thermodynamics and Refrigeration.
    Flow Boiling Heat Transfer Of Refrigerants R134a And R245fa In A Horizontal Micro-Channel2012In: Experimental heat transfer, ISSN 0891-6152, E-ISSN 1521-0480, Vol. 25, no 3, p. 181-196Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Micro-channel-based evaporators are a promising option for high heat flux cooling applications. Micro-channels offer several advantages, including a smaller coolant inventory, superior heat transfer performance, compactness, lightness of weigh. Despite being attractive, the governing phenomena in micro-channels, especially during phase change, are less understood. This article reports the experimental flow boiling heat transfer results of refrigerants R134a and R245fa in a horizontal micro-channel. A series of experiments was conducted to measure the heat transfer coefficients in a circular micro-channel made of fused silica having an internal diameter of 781 mu m and a uniformly heated length of 191 mm. The outer surface of the test tube was coated with a thin, electrically conductive layer of indium-tin-oxide. The surface coating with the electrically conductive layer of indium-tin-oxide made it possible to visualize the flow boiling process simultaneously with uniform heating of the test section. R134a and R245fa were used as working fluids and experiments were performed at a system pressure of 7.7 bar for R134a and at 1.8 bar for R245fa, corresponding to saturation temperature of 30 degrees C. Mass flux was varied from 175 kg/m(2)s to 500 kg/m(2)s, and heat flux ranged from 5 kW/m(2) to 60 kW/m(2). A high-speed camera was used to capture the images in the case of flow boiling of R134a. The experimental results indicated that the heat transfer coefficient increased with heat flux while the mass flux proved to have a negligible effect on heat transfer coefficient.

  • 323.
    Ali, Rashid
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Applied Thermodynamics and Refrigeration.
    Palm, Björn
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Applied Thermodynamics and Refrigeration.
    Maqbool, Mohammad H.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Applied Thermodynamics and Refrigeration.
    Experimental investigation of two phase pressure drop in a microchannel2009In: Proceedings of 2nd Micro & Nano flows Conference, Academic Conferences Publishing, 2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 324.
    Ali, Rashid
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology.
    Palm, Björn
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Applied Thermodynamics and Refrigeration.
    Martin-Callizo, C.
    Maqbool, Muhammad Hamayun
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Applied Thermodynamics and Refrigeration.
    Study of flow boiling characteristics of a microchannel using high speed visualization2013In: Journal of heat transfer, ISSN 0022-1481, E-ISSN 1528-8943, Vol. 135, no 8, p. 081501-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents the visualization results obtained for an experimental study of R134a during flow boiling in a horizontal microchannel. The microchannel used was a fused silica tube having an internal diameter of 781 lm, a heated length of 191mm, and was coated with a thin, transparent, and electrically conductive layer of indium-tin-oxide (ITO) on the outer surface. The operating parameters during the experiments were: mass flux 100-400 kg/m2 s, heat flux 5-45 kW/m2, saturation temperatures 25 and 30 °C, corresponding to saturation pressures of 6.65 bar and 7.70 bar and reduced pressures of 0.163 and 0.189, respectively. A high speed camera with a close up lens was used to capture the flow patterns that evolved along the channel. Flow pattern maps are presented in terms of the superficial gas and liquid velocity and in terms of the Reynolds number and vapor quality plots. The results are compared with some flow pattern maps for conventional and micro scale channels available in the literature. Rigorous boiling and increased coalescence rates were observed with an increase in the heat flux.

  • 325.
    Alimadadi, Majid
    et al.
    Mid Sweden Univ, Dept Nat Sci NAT, Sundsvall, Sweden..
    Lindström, Stefan B.
    Linköping Univ, Dept Management & Engn, Div Solid Mech, Linkoping, Sweden..
    Kulachenko, Artem
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Solid Mechanics (Dept.), Solid Mechanics (Div.).
    Role of microstructures in the compression response of three-dimensional foam-formed wood fiber networks2018In: Soft Matter, ISSN 1744-683X, E-ISSN 1744-6848, Vol. 14, no 44, p. 8945-8955Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    High-porosity, three-dimensional wood fiber networks made by foam forming present experimentally accessible instances of hierarchically structured, athermal fiber networks. We investigate the large deformation compression behavior of these networks using fiber-resolved finite element analyses to elucidate the role of microstructures in the mechanical response to compression. Three-dimensional network structures are acquired using micro-computed tomography and subsequent skeletonization into a Euclidean graph representation. By using a fitting procedure to the geometrical graph data, we are able to identify nine independent statistical parameters needed for the regeneration of artificial networks with the observed statistics. The compression response of these artificially generated networks and the physical network is then investigated using implicit finite element analysis. A direct comparison of the simulation results from the reconstructed and artificial network reveals remarkable differences already in the elastic region. These can neither be fully explained by density scaling, the size effect nor the boundary conditions. The only factor which provides the consistent explanation of the observed difference is the density and fiber orientation nonuniformities; these contribute to strain-localization so that the network becomes more compliant than expected for statistically uniform microstructures. We also demonstrate that the experimentally manifested strain-stiffening of such networks is due to development of new inter-fiber contacts during compression.

  • 326.
    ALIN, SIMON
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Product and Service Design.
    RYBO, FRIDA
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Product and Service Design.
    Naturtoalett2018Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Manure and human urine has a similar mixture of NPK, short for nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium, but only a small fraction of the urine in the toilets is utilized today. A problem is the nitrogen that is released when urine is drying, which creates ammonia that leads to bad smells.The Swedish Agriculture University has found a solution to this, a chemical process where the nitrogen is tied.

    In almost every toilet, urine and faeces are mixed and in many toilets waste is transported with huge amounts of water which needs an energy-consuming treatment plant. Harvest Moon has taken use of the chemical process of the Swedish Agriculture University and developed a dehydration unit that transforms urine to manure. The company has given the task to use their dehydration unit and develop an independent public toilet that does not need electricity or a water supply and has a small environmental impact.

    To define the market needs, renters of portable toilets and their customers were interviewed. This gave the insight that transportation of the portable toilets is an issue for technically advanced products. However, national parks and other natural sites usually has permanent installations without electricity or water supply, which suits the project better. Today, national parks often use composting toilets which are not able to compost the waste when there is a big amount of visitors. That leads to bad smells and the need of frequent service. A white space was found on the market for a toilet that is capable of handling many visitors but which does not rely on a well developed infrastructure and has a small environmental impact.

    To make use of the nutrition, urine and faeces needs to be separated. On existing toilets, this is solved by letting the toilet have an urine bowl in the front of the toilet. Interviews with toilet operators at National Parks showed that the existing urine separating devices rarely works in public toilets because paper and other litter is placed in the urine bowl, which prevents the urine flow and the bowl overflows. In addition to this problem, other options regarding flushing, containers for faeces, preventing urine in the faeces container and leading urine were investigated.

    To divide the urine, a vertical grid underneath the front of the toilet seat is used. It works as a splash protector and collects urine. Neither paper or faeces hits the grid thanks to its position. To prevent visitors to stand up and pee into the faeces, a gap that moves when the visitors are sitting down was discussed. That idea was rejected and instead a urinal was placed on the back of the house and signs that explains the positive environmental effects of using the toilet the proper way were placed on the wall. How this will be work out in reality have not been tried out, but considering that many visitors want to take care of the nature, which has been been confirmed by national park managers, it is considered a reasonable solution.

    The dehydration is driven by solar panels and the urine is dehydrated in scalable filter cassettes.The environmental impact of the product has not been quantified but the fact that the product is able to work without electricity or water supply and that NPK is circulated are good prerequisites for a small environmental impact.

  • 327.
    Alipanah, Ario
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.).
    Gother, Axel
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.).
    Exploring Methods for Further Development of Projects in a Cluster Initiative Context: Bridging the commercial handover gap2018Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    With the growing concern about resource overconsumption and its consequences, the need for sustainable development is becoming more and more crucial. Sustainability brings about some challenges that are simply too great for any organization to tackle alone and this calls for higher degree of stakeholder engagement in sustainable innovation efforts. A way to achieve this is through clusters, which are geographic concentrations of companies that benefit from being located in the same area. The advantages with clustering are often mediated by so called cluster initiatives which are responsible for developing activities and services for the cluster members. Cluster initiatives usually apply a Triple Helix approach to mediate between private organizations, educational institutions and the government, and one important task with this is to assist technologies in the transition from governmental funding to private sector financing, commonly referred to as the Valley of Death.This thesis is a case study at an organization located in Sweden, similar to a cluster initiative, with the primary objective of bridging the so-called Valley of Death. The goal of the study was (1) to explore the preconditions for further development of (partly) publicly funded projects, after governmental grands have been terminated, in a cluster initiative coordinator context, and (2) to develop a new project model that could be implemented at the case organization to increase the rate of which the case organization’s projects are commercialized. Several studies have made extensive quantitative research on cluster initiatives. Quantitative measures must however be combined with operationally-based qualitative indicators which is why this study focused on qualitative interviews, analyses of project documentation and workshops, as a means of conducting the research.Within the Valley of Death, two gaps were discovered, which occurred when projects where handed over between organizations. By drawing upon goal setting theory, impact evidence, Technology Readiness Levels and Commercial Readiness index, the thesis developed a project model and a project classification system that served the case organization both intra-organizationally and with the potential of improving inter-organizational cooperation and project handover.

  • 328.
    Alipanah, Ario
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    Gother, Axel
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    Kundorderstyrd tillverkning av butiksproducerat bröd: Möjligheter och hinder2016Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    A major source of resource inefficiency is all the food wasted every day, around the world. The product category bread is a great source of this food waste, with the largest losses occurring in trade. Due to the short time the bread must be sold within, it becomes difficult to use forecast based manufacturing without resulting in overproduction or shortage. The option to forecast based manufacturing is order-driven manufacturing. Implementation of order-driven manufacturing could streamline production and increase the productivity of the entire department of the in-store-produced bread. The aim of this work was to investigate the requirements for this implementation. Through interviews with store managers and bakers, as well as visits to four grocery stores, empirical data have been gathered. This empirical data has been compiled and four obstacles with four solutions for the implementation of orders-driven manufacturing of in-store produced bread have been formulated.

    These obstacles are:

    • the financial risks associated with implementation

    • that the investment costs for implementation are high

    • the perception of increased workload

    • that the production process and existing equipment on the market are not adapted

    These obstacles are resolved by:

    • applying a balanced combination of breads made to order, with an under-produced basic selection of bread made to stock, or alternatively by using a visual presentation of the store’s selection of breads available for order-driven production

    • examine whether implementation gives the bread a greater customer value and the store a greater flow of goods, as well as taking store size into account when assessing the suitability of the implementation• managing the perception of increased workload by communicating the benefits of the implementation of order-driven manufacturing of in-store-produced bread

    • placing the Customer Order Decoupling Point in the production facility’s freezer to shorten the order-driven production time for bread, as well as requesting ovens that allow parallel batches to be prepared

  • 329. Alizad Banaei, Arash
    et al.
    Shahmardi, Armin
    Brandt, Luca
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics.
    Nucleated capsules at finite inertiaManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 330.
    Alizadeh, Amir
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Solid Mechanics (Dept.).
    Fracture Simulation of Electrofusion Joining.2015Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This Master thesis investigates mechanical failures of electrofusion joints. This type of joints are used for weld high density polyethylene pipe systems where tting and pipe will be welded together by the heat caused by the resistance of the copper cables to electric current. There have been some failures where a brittle crack has grown through the fusion zone. Polyethylene as a material has a ductile character but brittle behavior occurs due to an unsuccessful welding by a poor fusion interface. In this study, we have chosen to investigate the plausible load cases that can cause the failure and studied the e ect of the geometry of the tting on the fracture toughness of the welded structure. We used the nite element method numerical analysis. We have approached unsuccessful welding (brittle) with a linear model and non-linear (CZM) model and successful welding (ductile) with a non-linear XFEM model. The material parameters needed for these models are gathered by series of experiments. The results shows that the inside pressure is the critical load case. The linear model and CZM model are consistent in terms of predicted responses to the geometrical parameters for the unsuccessful welding. Decreasing the inner cold zone length, increasing the fusion length and the thickness of the tting will improve the fracture toughness of the welded structure.

  • 331.
    Alkan, Deniz
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Energy Technology. KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Heat and Power Technology.
    Investigating CVT as a Transmission System Option for Wind Turbines2013Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 80 credits / 120 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    In this study, an innovative solution is examined for transmission problems and frequency control for wind Turbines. Power electronics and the gear boxes are the parts which are responsible of a significant amount of failures and they are increasing the operation and maintenance cost of wind turbines. Continuously transmission (CVT) systems are investigated as an alternative for conventional gear box technologies for wind turbines in terms of frequency control and power production efficiency. Even though, it has being used in the car industry and is proven to be efficient, there are very limited amount of studies on the CVT implementation on wind turbines. Therefore, this study has also an assertion on being a useful mechanical analyse on that topic. After observing several different types of possibly suitable CVT systems for wind turbines; a blade element momentum code is written in order to calculate the torque, rotational speed and power production values of a wind turbine by using aerodynamic blade properties. Following to this, a dynamic model is created by using the values founded by the help of the blade element momentum theory code, for the wind turbine drive train both including and excluding the CVT system. Comparison of these two dynamic models is done, and possible advantages and disadvantages of using CVT systems for wind turbines are highlighted. The wind speed values, which are simulated according to measured wind speed data, are used in order to create the dynamic models, and Matlab is chosen as the software environment for modelling and calculation processes. Promising results are taken out of the simulations for both in terms of energy efficiency and frequency control. The wind turbine model, which is using the CVT system, is observed to have slightly higher energy production and more importantly, no need for power electronics for frequency control. As an outcome of this study, it is possible to say that the CVT system is a candidate of being a research topic for future developments of the wind turbine technology.

  • 332.
    Al-Karkhi, Saif
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.).
    Petrén, Simon
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.).
    Kritiska Framgångsfaktorer i Tjänsteinnovativa Företag2015Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Innovation is considered as a key activity within companies for achieving and maintaining a competitive advantage. Innovation can be defined as “The practical implementation of an idea into a new device or process”. Previous research in this subject has mainly focused on productandprocess innovation in manufacturing firms and ignoring the inherent opportunities that service innovation provides. Because of a changing economy towards more service-based companies, which is a central driver for economic growth, we see an increasing amount of studies regarding the opportunities that service innovation provides. Another interesting topic is critical success factors, which are essential for creating growth and success within a company. A majority of earlier studies of the subject, is mainly product-centric based and examines the industrial product market. Although service innovation shows an increasing significance for the economic growth, there is a relatively small amount of research papers examining the role of critical success factors in service innovation firms, which creates further incentives for future research. The purpose of this study emerged from a previous partnership with Innu-Science and KTH, which resulted in a new service-based and innovative cleaning concept, where the goal of the project is to help realizing the business plan into an operational service company. Furthermore, there is a need to identify and analyze the underlying reasons behind critical success factors in service innovation companies, where the result and analyses acts as basis for further recommendations to Innu-Science. Based on the theoretical framework a specific method of "Temporal/ Intuitive factors”, was used to identify the critical success factors. Four Swedish service innovation companies have been investigated and analyzed as a part of an inductive approach for a qualitative research, where the identification of different critical success factors have been made through observation and analysis. Moreover, the different identified factors were compared against each other to find potential patterns and similarities. Results from the study show that all four companies have the following factors in common; Sales, Service dynamic (customization and flexibility) and References. Finally, the results and analysis provide insight regarding important aspects for the established companies, where the recommendations will serve as support for future decisions ofthe establishment of the service at Innu-Science.

  • 333. Alkhagen, M.
    et al.
    Toll, Staffan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Lightweight Structures.
    A triaxial rheometer for soft compressible solids2002In: Journal of Rheology, ISSN 0148-6055, Vol. 46, no 1, p. 31-47Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The compression and the shear of soft compressible solids were studied using the triaxial rheometer. The sample was fixed between two parallel plates and the deformation was controlled by an x, y, z displacement on one plate while the stress was measured on the other. The triaxial stress transducer eliminates the edge effects by only measuring the stress on an interior region of the plate. The edge effects and the associated measurement errors were analyzed by the simple isotropic elastic theory and were compared to the measurements done on the chloroprene rubber foam.

  • 334. Alkhagen, M.
    et al.
    Toll, Staffan
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Micromechanics of a compressed fiber mass2007In: Journal of applied mechanics, ISSN 0021-8936, E-ISSN 1528-9036, Vol. 74, no 4, p. 723-731Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A theory is presented for the rate modeling of flexible granular solids based on affine average motion of interparticle contacts. We allow contacts to form and break continually but assume the existence of a finite friction coefficient rendering contacts force free as they form or break. The resulting constitutive equations are of the hypoelastic type. A specific model for the deformation of a fiber mass is then developed. The model improves on previous theories for fiber masses in at least two respects: First, it is more general in that it is not restricted to uniaxial compression, although it is restricted to predominantly compressive deformations histories, due to neglect of frictional dissipation. Second, by allowing torsion as well as bending of fibers, this theory covers a larger deformation range. Compression experiments are performed on carded slivers of PA6 fibers under various conditions. The measured response is found to be in close agreement with that predicted by the model.

  • 335. Alkhagen, M.
    et al.
    Toll, Staffan
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    The effect of fiber diameter distribution on the elasticity of a fiber mass2009In: Journal of applied mechanics, ISSN 0021-8936, E-ISSN 1528-9036, Vol. 76, no 4, article id 041014Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A random mass of loose fibers interacting by fiber-fiber contact is considered. As proposed in a previous paper, the elastic response is modeled based on the statistical mechanics of bending and torsion of fiber segments between fiber-fiber contact points. Presently we show how the statistical approach can be used to account for a distribution of fiber diameters rather than just a single diameter. The resulting expression has the same form and the same set of parameters as its single-diameter counterpart, except for two dimensionless reduction factors, which depend on the fiber diameter distribution only and reduce to unity for monodisperse fibers. Uniaxial compressibility experiments are performed on several materials with different bimodal fiber diameter distributions and are compared to model predictions. Even though no additional parameters were introduced to model the effect of mixed fiber diameters, the behavior is accurately predicted. Notably, the effect of the nonuniform fiber diameter is strong: A mixture of two fiber diameters differing by a factor of 2 can reduce the response by an order of magnitude, compared to the case of uniform diameter.

  • 336. Alkmim, M. H.
    et al.
    Cuenca, J.
    De Ryck, L.
    Göransson, Peter
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Marcus Wallenberg Laboratory MWL. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center for ECO2 Vehicle design.
    Model-based acoustic characterisation of muffler components and extrapolation to inhomogeneous thermal conditions2018In: Proceedings of ISMA 2018 - International Conference on Noise and Vibration Engineering and USD 2018 - International Conference on Uncertainty in Structural Dynamics, KU Leuven - Departement Werktuigkunde , 2018, p. 3009-3020Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A methodology for evaluating the acoustic behaviour of two-port inhomogeneous media in experimentally unavailable thermal conditions is proposed. The method consists of an inverse estimation of the geometrical and material properties of the object at room temperature followed by a forced thermal input. The properties of interest for the inverse estimation are the spatially-varying cross-section and/or bulk properties. The underlying model relies on a transfer matrix approach, allowing for a representation of spatially inhomogeneous objects as piece-wise equivalent homogeneous fluids, while ensuring continuity conditions between successive elements. A model of non-stationary thermal conduction is used as a first approximation, where an integral formulation accounts for the cumulative effect of multiple homogeneous elements. In order to evaluate the validity of the extrapolation, a validation against a fully numerical simulation is presented in two cases, namely a simple expansion chamber and a complex muffler. 

  • 337. Alku, Paavo
    et al.
    Airas, Matti
    Björkner, Eva
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH.
    Sundberg, Johan
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH.
    An amplitude quotient based method to analyze changes in the shape of the glottal pulse in the regulation of vocal intensity2006In: Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, ISSN 0001-4966, E-ISSN 1520-8524, Vol. 120, no 2, p. 1052-1062Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study presents an approach to visualizing intensity regulation in speech. The method expresses a voice sample in a two-dimensional space using amplitude-domain values extracted from the glottal flow estimated by inverse filtering. The two-dimensional presentation is obtained by expressing a time-domainmeasure of the glottal pulse, the amplitude quotient (AQ), as a function of the negative peak amplitude of the flow derivative (d(peak)). The regulation of vocal intensity was analyzed with the proposed method from voices varying from extremely soft to very loud with a SPL range of approximately 55 dB. When vocal intensity was increased, the speech samples first showed a rapidly decreasing trend as expressed on the proposed AQ-d(peak) graph. When intensity was further raised, the location of the samples converged toward a horizontal line, the asymptote of a hypothetical hyperbola. This behavior of the AQ-d(peak) graph indicates that the intensity regulation strategy changes from laryngeal to respiratory mechanisms and the method chosen makes it possible to quantify how control mechanisms underlying the regulation of vocal intensity change gradually between the two means. The proposed presentation constitutes an easy-to-implement method to visualize the function of voice production in intensity regulation because the only information needed is the glottal flow wave form estimated by inverse filtering the acoustic speech pressure signal.

  • 338.
    Allam, S.
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Marcus Wallenberg Laboratory MWL. KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Centres, Competence Center for Gas Exchange (CCGEx).
    Åbom, Mats
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Marcus Wallenberg Laboratory MWL. KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Centres, Competence Center for Gas Exchange (CCGEx).
    Cooling fan noise control using micro-perforates2012In: Int. Congr. Expos. Noise Control Eng., INTER-NOISE, 2012, p. 10434-10445Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Baffle or split silencers are commonly used, e.g., in HVAC systems and as inlet/outlet silencers on gas turbines. Another application is to reduce noise from the cooling fan inlet for large IC-engines. A baffle silencer can be seen as a periodic arrangement of parallel rectangular absorbers which can be placed in a rectangular duct. The noise reduction afforded by parallel baffles depends not only on the physical properties of the lining, but also upon the angle of incidence of the sound waves impinging and the baffle length. In this paper the potential of using baffles made of Micro-Perforated Panels is investigated in particular with the cooling fan inlet application in mind. Theoretical models for the damping is derived and used to design optimum configurations. The models are based on the wave propagation in a periodic array of baffles so that only one period can be investigated in order to find the different modes. In particular the least attenuated mode is important to find in order to optimize the behavior. An important aspect is the inner structure of the MPP baffle, i.e., can it just be an empty air volume or to what extent must internal waves be prevented by putting in walls. From a stiffness point of view some inner walls might also be needed to avoid vibration problems. Due to these complexities the theoretical models are only presented for the simplest cases. In order to validate the models and to get a more complete test of different designs experiments were also carried out. During these experiments the effect of flow was also tested.

  • 339. Allam, S.
    et al.
    Åbom, Mats
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Marcus Wallenberg Laboratory MWL.
    Noise reduction for automotive radiator cooling fans2015In: FAN 2015 - International Conference on Fan Noise, Technology and Numerical Methods, Institution of Mechanical Engineers , 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Engine cooling fans have long been recognized as one of the major noise sources in a vehicle. As the engine and other vehicle components are made quieter, the need to reduce fan noise has become more and more urgent. To reduce fan noise in a cost-effective manner, it is necessary to incorporate the component of noise reduction into an early design stage. In this paper a detailed experimental study on an automotive vehicle cooling system is presented. The aim is to investigate the flow generated noise, characterize the heat exchanger damping properties and investigate the use of near-field noise control by micro-perforated (MPP) shrouds and tuned MPP dampers. For the tested standard automotive cooling fan system the MPP shroud gave a reduction in the range 1.5 to 4.5 dB(A) depending on the fan speed. Also the absorption on the back-side is significantly increased which can reduce the noise further. The near-field tuned MPP damper concept is also promising and gives a reduction around 3 dB(A) at the operating points. 

  • 340.
    Allam, Sabry
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Marcus Wallenberg Laboratory MWL. Helwan University, Egypt.
    Bodén, Hans
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, MWL Flow acoustics.
    Methods for Accurate Determination of Acoustic Two-Port Data in Flow Ducts2005In: 12th International Congress on Sound and Vibration 2005: ICSV 2005, 2005Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Measurement of plane wave acoustic transmission properties, so called two-port data, of flow duct components is important in many applications. It is an important tool for instance in the development of mufflers for IC-engines. Accurate measurement of the acoustic two port data can be used not only to determine the transmission loss but also to determine physical properties like flow resistivty as well as speed of sound and impedance. Measurement of two-port data is difficult when the flow velocity in the measurement duct is high because of the flow noise contamination of the measured pressure signals. Techniques to improve the acoustic two-port determination have been tested in this paper. A number of possible configurations for connecting loudspeakers to the flow duct have been investigated. It was found that using a perforate pipe section with about 50% porosity between the loudspeaker side branch and the duct gave the best signal-to-noise ratio out of the studied configurations. Different signal processing techniques have been tested for reducing the adverse effects of flow noise at the microphones. The most successful techniques require a reference signal which can be either the electric signal being input to the loudspeakers or one of the microphone signals. As a reference technique stepped sine excitation with cross-spectrum based frequency domain averaging was used. This technique could give good results for most cases. Using a periodic signal (saw-tooth) and synchronised time domain averaging good results could be obtained if a sufficient number of averages was used. At flow velocities higher than M=0.2 about 10000 averages were needed. Random excitation together with cross-spectrum based frequency domain averaging also gave good result if the same number of averages was used. Ordinary frequency domain averaging is not sufficient at high flow velocities. It was also shown that using cross-spectrum based frequency domain averaging an improvement could be obtained if the microphone with the highest signal-to-noise ratio at each frequency was used as the reference microphone rather than a fixed microphone.

  • 341.
    Allam, Sabry
    et al.
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering.
    Bodén, Hans
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering.
    Signal to noise ratio enhancement methods in acoustic flow duct measurements2004In: ICSV12-St Petersburg, 2004Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 342.
    Allam, Sabry
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, MWL Flow acoustics.
    Bodén, Hans
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, MWL Flow acoustics.
    Åbom, Mats
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, MWL Flow acoustics.
    Over-determination in acoustic two-port data measurement2006In: ICSV13-Vienna / [ed] J. Eberhardsteiner, H.A. Mang, H. Waubke, 2006Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Measurement of plane wave acoustic transmission properties, so called two-port data, of flow duct components is important in many applications. It is an important tool for instance in the development of mufflers for IC-engines. Measurement of two-port data is difficult when the flow velocity in the measurement duct is high because of the flow noise contamination of the measured pressure signals. The plane wave acoustic two-port is a 2x2 matrix containing 4 complex quantities at each frequency. To experimentally determine these unknowns the acoustic state variables on the inlet and outlet side must be measured for two independent test cases. The two independent test cases can be created by: changing the acoustic load on the outlet side leading to the so-called two-load technique or by using one acoustic source on the inlet side and one acoustic source on the outlet side leading to the so-called two-source technique. In the latter case the independent test cases are created by first using the source on the inlet side and then the source on the outlet side. As pointed out by Åbom it is also possible to run both sources simultaneously to create more than two independent test cases. This over-determination could be used to improve the measurement results for instance if the data is contaminated by flow-noise. In this paper over-determination is tested by applying up to 5 different test cases. This procedure has been applied to a single orifice test object.

  • 343. Allam, Sabry
    et al.
    Åbom, Mats
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, MWL Flow acoustics.
    A New Type of Muffler Based on Microperforated Tubes2011In: Journal of Vibration and Acoustics-Transactions of the ASME, ISSN 1048-9002, E-ISSN 1528-8927, Vol. 133, no 3, p. 031005-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Microperforated plate (MPP) absorbers are perforated plates with holes typically in the submillimeter range and perforation ratios around 1%. The values are typical for applications in air at standard temperature and pressure (STP). The underlying acoustic principle is simple: It is to create a surface with a built in damping, which effectively absorbs sound waves. To achieve this, the specific acoustic impedance of a MPP absorber is normally tuned to be of the order of the characteristic wave impedance in the medium (similar to 400 Pa s/m in air at STP). The traditional application for MPP absorbers has been building acoustics often combined with a so called panel absorber to create an absorption peak at a selected frequency. However, MPP absorbers made of metal could also be used for noise control close to or at the source for noise control in ducts. In this paper, the possibility to build dissipative silencers, e. g., for use in automotive exhaust or ventilation systems, is investigated.

  • 344.
    Allam, Sabry
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Marcus Wallenberg Laboratory MWL.
    Åbom, Mats
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Marcus Wallenberg Laboratory MWL.
    Acoustic modeling and testing of a complex car muffler2006In: International Congress on Sound and Vibration 2006, 2006, p. 1119-1126Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Perforated mufflers are used by exhaust system manufacturers to improve the broadband attenuation at low frequencies, with the drawback that this normally also implies an increased pressure drop. The detailed modelling of this type of muffler depends on knowledge of the perforate impedance which is influenced by hole geometry as well as the details of the flow distribution. The existing formulas for calculation of perforate impedance are semi-empirical and a number of alternatives have been published. One motivation behind this work was to review the existing formulas for perforate impedance using accurate measured data for perforated mufflers. A modified model presented by Bauer 1977 was found to be the best. A second motivation was to show that for a detailed analysis, using 3D acoustic FEM, the mean flow can be neglected except for calculating the perforate impedances.

  • 345.
    Allam, Sabry
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Marcus Wallenberg Laboratory MWL.
    Åbom, Mats
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Marcus Wallenberg Laboratory MWL.
    Advanced experimental procedure for in-duct aero-acoustics2006In: 13th International Congress on Sound and Vibration 2006, ICSV 2006, 2006, p. 1185-1192Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this paper is to present a method for characterization of in-duct aero-acoustic sources that can be described as active acoustic two-ports. The method is applied to investigate the sound produced from an orifice plate. The motivation is to obtain better data for the development of improved prediction methods for noise from flow singularities, e.g., in HVAC systems on aircrafts. Most of the earlier works fall into two categories; papers modeling the scattering of acoustic waves and papers modeling the sound generation. Concerning the scattering it is possible to obtain estimates of the low frequency behavior from linear perturbations of the steady state equations for the flow. Concerning the sound generation most of the presented work is experimental and follows a paper by Nelson&Morfey, which present a scaling law procedure for the in-duct sound power based on a dipole model of the source. One limitation with the earlier works is that the sound power only was measured on the downstream side. Also data was only obtained in 1/3-octave bands, by measuring the sound radiated from an open duct termination. Assuming plane waves and linear acoustics the flow duct singularity can be completely modeled as an active 2-port. The experimental determination of its properties is done in a two steps procedure. In the first step the passive data, i.e., the scattering matrix S, is determined using external (independent) sources. In the second step the S matrix is used and the source vector is determined by testing the system with known acoustic terminations.

  • 346.
    Allam, Sabry
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Marcus Wallenberg Laboratory MWL.
    Åbom, Mats
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Marcus Wallenberg Laboratory MWL.
    Aeroacoustic investigation of diaphragm orifices in ducts2007In: Turkish Acoustical Society - 36th International Congress and Exhibition on Noise Control Engineering, INTER-NOISE 2007 ISTANBUL, 2007, p. 292-301Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Diaphragm orifices are used in duct systems to control or measure the flow rate. Such components generate complex flows and aeroacoustic phenomena, e.g., dissipation via forced vortex shedding, sound generation from eddy structures (broadband noise) and non-linear whistling. In this paper the acoustic properties (passive and active) of single and double diaphragm orifices are investigated experimentally for small Mach-numbers and low frequencies (plane waves). Using microphone arrays and wave decomposition the induct sound fields are resolved and used as input to determine the active acoustic 2-port. The work represents one of the first efforts to apply 2-port methods to characterize flow generated noise in-ducts. The motivation of this work is to obtain better understanding for noise from flow singularities in ducts, e.g., in HVAC systems on vehicles, develop and improve prediction methods and produce data for validation of CFD and other models. First the single orifice case is investigated and the 2-port data is obtained. The active (source) strength part represents a dipole type of source for which a scaling law is derived. For the passive part (the scattering matrix) a simple quasi-stationary model is tested and works well up to a few hundred Hz. Secondly the double orifice configuration is investigated and again the 2-port data is measured. To investigate the presence of orifice interaction and non-linear aeroacoustic effects, such as whistling, the double orifice data is reduced to two identical single orifices. The equivalent source data for this reduced case is then compared with the single orifice scaling law. It is found that if the separation is larger than 10 orifice diameters then orifice interaction can be neglected. Non-linear effects and tendencies for whistling were found for separations less than 3-4 duct diameters.

  • 347.
    Allam, Sabry
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Marcus Wallenberg Laboratory MWL.
    Åbom, Mats
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Marcus Wallenberg Laboratory MWL.
    Diesel engines after treatment devices: Acoustic modeling2005In: 12th International Congress on Sound and Vibration 2005: ICSV 2005, 2005, p. 2358-2365Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To reduce exhaust pollutants from diesel engines a Diesel Particulate Filter (DPF) is normally fixed after a Catalytic Converter (CC) in an expansion chamber to create a complete After-Treatment Device (ATD). As part of the work in the EC-project ARTEMIS the authors have published a series of papers on the modeling of DPF units. Here the final and complete DPF model is presented. The model calculates the acoustic 2-port by solving the convective acoustic wave equations for two neighboring cells simplified in the manner of the Zwikker and Kosten theory. A segmentation approach has been employed to handle the actual flow, density, pressure, and temperature distribution inside the monoliths at each frequency. The theoretical results were compared with measured transmission loss data at different flow speeds and the agreement is excellent. The new complete model has also been compared with the 1-D model earlier suggested by the authors. It turns out that by using a wave number based on the Kirchhoff solution for plane waves in narrow pipes, the simple 1-D model works almost as well as the complete model. Another conclusion is that the effect of mean flow on the sound transmission through a filter is very small. Using the new model and existing models for standard pipe elements and the CC, the acoustic 2-port for a car ATD unit has been calculated and used to predict the transmission loss. The agreement between the predictions and the measured data for various flow speeds is good.

  • 348.
    Allam, Sabry
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Marcus Wallenberg Laboratory MWL. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW. Hellwan University, Egypt .
    Åbom, Mats
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Marcus Wallenberg Laboratory MWL. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Experimental characterization of acoustic liners with extended reaction2008In: 14th AIAA/CEAS Aeroacoustics Conference (29th AIAA Aeroacoustics Conference), 2008Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Suppressing of jet engine noise by inlet and exhaust duct liners and internal combustion engine (ICE) noise by intake and exhaust systems is an important part of developing environmentally acceptable vehicles. The acoustic liner is designed to provide an impedance boundary condition in the engine duct that reduces the propagation of engine noise through the duct. An accurate impedance boundary condition is necessary to optimally suppress the noise at different conditions. The goal of the research presented in this paper is to present a new technique to Educe and characterize the acoustic liner impedance for cases with extended reaction. This technique is depending on comparing both the measured and predicted 2-port transfer matrices. The measurement of the transfer matrix is performed using the two microphone technique, while the prediction of the transfer matrix is obtained assuming plane waves in the inner pipe and outer chamber coupled by a perforated wall impedance. By using a regression process the unknown wall impedance is then educed. The method is applied to investigate the effect of flow on the impedance of so called Micro-perforated panels (MPP). A MPP consists of a panel (here a plate made of Al or steel) with small perforations distributed over its surface. When these perforations are of sub-millimeter size they provide by themselves enough acoustic resistance and low acoustic mass reactance necessary for a wideband absorber.

  • 349.
    Allam, Sabry
    et al.
    Helwan University, Cairo, Egypt.
    Åbom, Mats
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Marcus Wallenberg Laboratory MWL. KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Centres, Competence Center for Gas Exchange (CCGEx).
    Fan Noise Control Using Microperforated Splitter Silencers2014In: Journal of Vibration and Acoustics-Transactions of the ASME, ISSN 1048-9002, E-ISSN 1528-8927, Vol. 136, no 3, p. 031017-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Splitter or baffle silencers are commonly used, for example, in heating ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) systems and as inlet/outlet silencers on gas turbines. Another application is to reduce noise from the cooling fan inlet for large IC-engines. A splitter silencer can be seen as a periodic arrangement of parallel rectangular absorbers, which can be placed in a rectangular duct. The noise reduction afforded by parallel splitters depends not only on the physical properties of the lining but also upon the angle of incidence of the impinging sound waves, and the splitter and duct dimensions. In this paper, the potential of using splitters made of microperforated plates (MPPs) is investigated, with a particular focus on cooling fan inlet/outlet applications.

  • 350. Allegret-Bourdon, D
    et al.
    Vogt, Damian
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM).
    Fransson, Torsten
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM).
    A New test facility for investigating fluid-structure interactions using a generic model2002Conference paper (Other academic)
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