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  • 301.
    Pargman, Daniel
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Ahlsén, Edvard
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC).
    Engelbert, Cecilia
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC).
    Designing for sustainability: Breakthrough or suboptimisation?2016In: PROCEEDINGS OF ICT FOR SUSTAINABILITY 2016 / [ed] Grosso, P Lago, P Osseyran, A, ATLANTIS PRESS , 2016, p. 52-59Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Technological developments in screen technologies pitches the thinner, brighter and energy-stingy OLED screen as a possible replacement for today's television, computer and smartphone LCD screens. An OLED screen does not consume any energy at all when it displays the color black, but the potentially large energy savings can unfortunately evaporate and instead turn to losses when white is displayed. There is thus a mismatch between on the one hand the energy profiles of OLED screens and on the other hand user habits and current webpage design practices. This example thus raises important questions about system boundaries and about how to evaluate sustainable (or "sustainable") technologies. We conducted a pilot study of user acceptance of alternative, OLED-adapted color schemes for webpages. We briefly discuss the results of the study, but primarily use it as a starting point for discussing the underlying questions of where, or indeed even if it makes sense to work towards realising the OLED screens' potential for energy savings. Moving from LED to OLED screens is not only a matter of choosing between competing screen technologies, but would rather have implications for hardware and software design as well as for the practices of web designers, end users and content providers.

  • 302.
    Pargman, Daniel
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Raghavan, B.
    Introduction to LIMITS ’15: First workshop on computing within limits2015In: First Monday, ISSN 1396-0466, E-ISSN 1396-0466, Vol. 20, no 8, p. 1-1Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 303.
    Pargman, Daniel
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Raghavan, B.
    Rethinking sustainability in computing: From buzzword to non-negotiable limits2014In: Proceedings of the NordiCHI 2014: The 8th Nordic Conference on Human-Computer Interaction: Fun, Fast, Foundational, 2014, p. 638-647Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recent years have seen a flurry of work on sustainable computing and sustainable HCI, but it is unclear whether this body of work adheres to a meaningful definition of sustainability. In this paper, we review four interlocking frameworks that together provide a rigorous foundation for what constitutes sustainability. Each consecutive framework both builds upon and can loosely be seen as a refinement of the previous framework. More specifically, we leverage prominent ecological thinking from outside of computer science to inform what sustainability means in the context of computing. To this end, we re-evaluate some recent results from the field of sustainable HCI and offer thoughts on further research in the field.

  • 304.
    Paschen, Jeannette
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM).
    Pitt, Leyland
    Kietzmann, Jan
    Dabirian, Amir
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Marketing and Entrepreneurship.
    Farshid, Mana
    The brand personalities of brand communities: an analysis of online communication2017In: Online information review (Print), ISSN 1468-4527, E-ISSN 1468-4535, Vol. 41, no 7, p. 1064-1075Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose - Online brand communities provide a wealth of insights about how consumers perceive and talk about a brand, rather than what the firm communicates about the brand. The purpose of this paper is to understand whether the brand personality of an online brand community, rather than of the brand itself, can be deduced from the online communication within that brand community. Design/methodology/approach - The paper is empirical in nature. The authors use community- generated content from eight online brand communities and perform content analysis using the text analysis software Diction. The authors employ the five brand personality dictionaries (competence, excitement, ruggedness, sincerity and sophistication) from the Pitt et al. (2007) dictionary source as the basis for the authors' analysis. Findings - The paper offers two main contributions. First, it identifies two types of communities: those focusing on solving functional problems that consumers might encounter with a firm's offering and those focusing on broader engagement with the brand. Second, the study serves as a blueprint that marketers can adopt to analyze online brand communities using a computerized approach. Such a blueprint is beneficial not only to analyze a firm's own online brand community but also that of competitors, thus providing insights into how their brand stacks up against competitor brands. Originality/value - This is the first paper examining the nature of online brand communities by means of computerized content analysis. The authors outline a number of areas that marketing scholars could explore further based on the authors analysis. The paper also highlights implications for marketers when establishing, managing, monitoring and analyzing online brand communities.

  • 305.
    Paschen, Jeannette
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Wilson, Matthew
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Nehajowich, J.
    Prpić, J.
    Fine wine through time: a review of the Journal of Wine Research2016In: Journal of Wine Research, ISSN 0957-1264, E-ISSN 1469-9672, Vol. 27, no 2, p. 91-104Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    ABSTRACT: What are the characteristics of the literature published in the Journal of Wine Research? This article examines all 317 research articles published in the Journal of Wine Research from 1990 to 2015 along five key dimensions; authorship, author institutions, manuscript characteristics, research themes, and citation impact. Our analysis shows a trend towards co-authorship and increased collaboration among multiple institutions. We also conclude that academics are responsible for the majority of articles and that European authors lead the way in publishing productivity. Other findings include a trend towards longer articles that cite more references. Articles focussing on the business of wine have increased over time and are most prevalent. Using citation analysis, we find that the large majority of publications in the Journal of Wine Research have been cited. Altogether, our investigation depicts the history, evolution, and trajectory of the Journal of Wine Research to date, therein giving scholars in the field the only research that provides detailed insight into the contours of this important journal.

  • 306.
    Peterson, Jesse
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Are dead zones dead?: Environmental collapse in popular media about eutrophication in sea-based systems.2018In: The Discourses of Environmental Collapse: Imagining the End / [ed] Alison E. Vogelaar, Brack W. Hale, Alexandra Peat, Routledge, 2018Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 307.
    Picha Edwardsson, Malin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Pargman, Daniel
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Explorative scenarios of emerging media trends2014In: Journal of Print and Media Technology Research, ISSN 2223-8905, Vol. 3, no 3, p. 195-206Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Dealing with the on-going structural changes in the media landscape is one of the most urgent challenges in today's society, both for people working in the media industry and for consumers trying to adapt to a large and increasing number of new media technologies and services. In this article, we present and discuss a number of current media trends, outline possible future scenarios and evaluate and discuss these scenarios in terms of future media consumption, mainly focusing on the Nordic media market. The research questions are: What are the main media consumption trends today, and what could be the most important characteristics of media consumption in different future scenarios? We have used a combination of a future studies approach, semi-structured expert interviews and design fiction methodology. We have organized two reference group workshops and then interviewed 11 media experts, both from the media industry and the academic world, and combined the results of these interviews and workshops with the significant media trends generated through design fiction methodology in the project course "The Future of Media" at the KTH Royal Institute of Technology in Stockholm.

    One of the conclusions drawn is that the mobile phone (smartphone) and other mobile devices such as tablets, etc., are playing an increasingly important role in current media consumption trends. We can see this through an increased number of mobile devices, an increased use of multiple devices (often used simultaneously) and in the fact that users tend to be "always connected and always synchronized". Another conclusion drawn is that there is an increased focus on personalized and individualized news with more co-creation and sharing of media content. The amount of non-text formats for news, e.g., video, is increasing, as well as the need for a high-speed, high-quality infrastructure/network. The news consumers are increasingly time-pressed, and commute more, which creates new and different demands on the media content, such as being easily accessible at all times and places. Finally, more data is collected by media companies about the consumption habits of media users and more surveillance is performed on citizens by governments and corporations. When interviewed about the scenarios and trends in this study, the experts considered the most desirable future society to have a balanced mix of governmental control and commercial powers. As an example, public service media was considered an important counterbalance to commercially oriented media companies. According to the experts that were interviewed, aspects of all four proposed scenarios could however become true in the future, depending on choices made both on an individual level and on a societal level.

  • 308.
    Politis, Anastasios
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Numerical Analysis and Computer Science, NADA.
    Human resources management for small and medium sized enterprises and independent workers within the graphic arts and media sector2000In: International Conference Innovative Management Tecnique and NetworkingArticle in journal (Refereed)
  • 309.
    Ruhe, Axel
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Numerical Analysis, NA.
    Introduction to the contents of issue 52:22012In: BIT Numerical Mathematics, ISSN 0006-3835, E-ISSN 1572-9125, Vol. 52, no 2, p. 271-272Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 310.
    Räsänen, Minna
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Human - Computer Interaction, MDI.
    Om möten i Distansen: uppfattningar om möten på distans mellan arbetssökande och handläggare2006Report (Other academic)
  • 311.
    Räsänen, Minna
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Human - Computer Interaction, MDI (closed 20111231).
    Lindquist, Sinna
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Human - Computer Interaction, MDI (closed 20111231).
    "Och du ska göra lite etno": Gestaltningar av etnografi inom MDI2005In: Kulturstudier i Sverige: nationell forskarkonferens, 13-15 juni, 2005, Norrköping, Sweden / [ed] Bodil Axelsson, Johan Fornäs, 2005, p. 871-879Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Antropologi och etnologi har under de senaste åren fått stor uppmärksamhet inom människadatorinteraktion, MDI. MDI är ett multidisciplinärt forskningsområde där bland annat antropologier, industridesigners, ingenjörer, systemutvecklare, psykologer och grafiker möts. Forskningen är design- och problemorienterad och syftar till att på olika sätt bidra till mer användbara tekniska system och artefakter. För att förstå människors förutsättningar för teknikanvändning i vardagen, både agerandet och kontexten som helhet, har de etnografiska metoderna fått stor genomslagskraft inom MDI. I den här artikeln för vi en problematiserande diskussion om hur etnografi gestaltas inom MDI. Vilka konsekvenser får dessa gestaltningar inom de etnografiska vetenskapernas identitet och legitimitet inom MDI? Vilken kunskapssyn blir rådande? Är antropologi och etnologi endast reducerat till beskrivningar av fältstudier? Som exempel har vi i projektet CoPLand som syftar till att utveckla teknik för kunskapsutbyte inom nomadiserande lärargrupper, exempelvis modersmålslärare och svensklärare utomlands. Inom MDI-relaterade forskningsprojekt blir reflektionen som måste till vid varje fältstudie, där det skrivande subjektet ofta saknas, summan av projektdeltagarnas alla reflektioner och blir till den data som ska föras in i designen och i utvecklingsprojektet. Den djupa subjektiva reflektionen, som kanske för med sig en stark känsla av något som inte berör teknikutveckling, lämnas därhän. I CoPLand blev det annorlunda och en rapport som berör den studerade lärargruppens arbetsvillkor, men fokus på social betydelse och maktaspekter ska snart publiceras.

  • 312.
    Räsänen, Minna
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Human - Computer Interaction, MDI (closed 20111231). KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Moberg, Åsa
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies (moved 20130630). KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Picha, Malin
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Graphic Arts, Media (closed 20111231). KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Borggren, Clara
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies (moved 20130630). KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Meeting at a distance: Experiences of media companies in Sweden2010In: Technology in society, ISSN 0160-791X, E-ISSN 1879-3274, Vol. 32, no 4, p. 264-273Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Solutions based on information and communication technology (ICT) have been put forward as a possible means to decrease greenhouse gases, e.g. through replacing travel. However, their success depends on how the ICT solutions are implemented and put into practice. This study sought to identify and discuss conditions for business meetings at a distance. Practices that facilitate and those that prevent meeting at a distance were examined in four Swedish media companies. Time and financial savings were identified as the main forces driving companies and individuals to consider meeting at a distance. Appropriate technology, infrastructure and confidence in using and handling the equipment were also necessary for meeting at a distance. Environmental considerations within the companies appeared to be a side-effect rather than a direct driver. Understanding such conditions is crucial in striving for change. It is suggested that companies consider the everyday practices their employees are engaged in and reflect on the broader context within which these practices take place.

  • 313.
    Räsänen, Minna
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Human - Computer Interaction, MDI.
    Nyce, J M
    Ball State University, USA.
    Rewriting Context and Analysis: Bringing Anthropology into HCI Research2008In: Advances in human-computer interaction / [ed] Shane Pinder, I-Tech Education and Publishing KG, 2008, p. 397-414Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 314.
    Räsänen, Minna
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Human - Computer Interaction, MDI.
    Nyce, James M.
    Ball State University, USA.
    A new role for anthropology?: rewriting "context" and "analysis" in HCI research2006In: NordiCHI 2006: 4th Nordic Conference on Human-Computer Interaction - Changing Roles, 2006, p. 175-184Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we want to reconsider the role anthropology(both its theory and methods) can play within HCI research. One of the areas anthropologists can contribute to here is torethink the notion of social context where technology isused. Context is usually equated with the immediateactivities such as work tasks, when and by whom the task isperformed. This tends to under represent some fundamentalaspects of social life, like culture and history. In this paper,we want to open up a discussion about what context meansin HCI and to emphasize socio-structural and historicalaspects of the term. We will suggest a more inclusiveanalytic way that able the HCI community to make “better”sense of use situation. An example of technology use in aworkplace will be given to demonstrate the yields this kindof theoretical framework can bring into HCI.

  • 315.
    Räsänen, Minna
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Human - Computer Interaction, MDI (closed 20111231).
    Severinsson Eklundh, Kerstin
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Human - Computer Interaction, MDI (closed 20111231).
    Bogdan, Cristian
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Human - Computer Interaction, MDI (closed 20111231).
    Green, Anders
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Human - Computer Interaction, MDI (closed 20111231).
    Hüttenrauch, Helge
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Human - Computer Interaction, MDI (closed 20111231).
    Report on User and Stakeholder Requirements: CommRob Project : Deliverable D7.12008Report (Other academic)
  • 316.
    Räsänen, Minna
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Human - Computer Interaction, MDI.
    Thuresson, Björn
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Human - Computer Interaction, MDI.
    Wiberg, Anders
    Arbetstagarkonsult. AB.
    Samhörighet på distans: slutrapport från ett forskningsprojekt om videomedierad kommunikation på en distribuerad arbetsplats2005Report (Other academic)
  • 317.
    Salomão, Gláucia Laís
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH.
    Sundberg, Johan
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH.
    Emotional Coloring in Singing: An in-depth spectral analysis if a tenor's voice2015In: IV International Conference on Music and Emotion ICME IV Book of Abstracts: Emotion in the Singing Voice: Convergent approaches from phonetics, psychology, and computer sciences / [ed] University of Geneva, Geneva University of Music, 2015, p. 65-Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 318.
    Salomão, Gláucia Laís
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH.
    Sundberg, Johan
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Music Acoustics. Swiss Centre for Affective Sciences, University of Geneva .
    Emotional Coloring of the Singing Voice2015In: PEVOC 11th PAN-EUROPEAN VOICE CONFERENCE, Firenze, 2015, p. 80-Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 319.
    Sampaio, José
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Ergonomics (Closed 20130701).
    LIGHT URBAN DESIGN STRATEGIES: THE CITIES' USERS AND URBAN SENSES: A QUALITATIVE APPROACH TO OUTDOOR URBAN PUBLIC SPACE LIGHTING2011In: “Proceedings of the 27th Session of the CIE”  / [ed] CIE, Vienna: CIE Central Bureau. 1201-1207, 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 320.
    Sandewall, Erik
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Department for Library services, Language and ARC, Publication Infrastructure. Department of Computer and Information Science, Linköping University, Sweden.
    Artificial intelligence needs open-access knowledgebase contents2008In: Proc Natl Conf Artif Intell, 2008, p. 1602-1605Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 321.
    Sandewall, Erik
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Department for Library services, Language and ARC, Publication Infrastructure. Linköping University, Sweden.
    Experience of two-stage peer review in the ETAI, 1997 - 20012009In: WMSCI 2009 - The 13th World Multi-Conference on Systemics, Cybernetics and Informatics, Jointly with the 15th International Conference on Information Systems Analysis and Synthesis, ISAS 2009 - Proc., 2009, p. 285-290Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We describe the two-stage peer review model that, was used by the Electronic Transact ions on Artificial Intelligence (ETAI) from 1997 to 2001. In the first review stage, which in principle lasted for three months, submitted articles were openly discussed using a web-based forum and communication by email. This provided feedback to the authors for revising the article. In the second review stage, anonymous reviewers judged the revised submission on a pass-fail basis. We discuss the initial reactions to this model, the experience from using it, and the ramifications of (his model for the concept of publication and for priority of results.

  • 322.
    Sandström, Ulf
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Sustainability and Industrial Dynamics.
    van den Besselaar, Peter
    Quantity and/or Quality?: The Importance of Publishing Many Papers2016In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, article id e0166149Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Do highly productive researchers have significantly higher probability to produce top cited papers? Or do high productive researchers mainly produce a sea of irrelevant papers—in other words do we find a diminishing marginal result from productivity? The answer on these questions is important, as it may help to answer the question of whether the increased competition and increased use of indicators for research evaluation and accountability focus has perverse effects or not. We use a Swedish author disambiguated dataset consisting of 48.000 researchers and their WoS-publications during the period of 2008–2011 with citations until 2014 to investigate the relation between productivity and production of highly cited papers. As the analysis shows, quantity does make a difference.

  • 323.
    Simonsson, Mårten
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Industrial Information and Control Systems.
    Johnson, Pontus
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Industrial Information and Control Systems.
    Ekstedt, Mathias
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Industrial Information and Control Systems.
    Rocha Flores, Waldo
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Industrial Information and Control Systems.
    It governance decision support using the it organization modeling and assesment tool2011In: International Journal of Innovation and Technology Management (IJITM), ISSN 0219-8770, Vol. 8, no 2, p. 167-189Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper describes the information technology (IT) organization modeling and assessment tool (ITOMAT) and how it can be used for IT governance decision making. The ITOMAT consists of an enterprise architecture metamodel that describes IT organizations. Further, ITOMAT contains a Bayesian network for making predictions on how changes to IT organization models will affect the IT governance performance as perceived by business stakeholders. Thorough case studies at 20 different companies have been conducted in order to calibrate the network. Finally, the paper describes a case study where ITOMAT was used to analyze the future impact of two IT organization change scenarios in a medium-sized engineering company.

  • 324. Sjögårde, P.
    et al.
    Ahlgren, Per
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Department for Library services, Language and ARC, Library, Publication Infrastructure.
    Granularity of algorithmically constructed publication-level classifications of research publications: Identification of topics2018In: Journal of Informetrics, ISSN 1751-1577, E-ISSN 1875-5879, Vol. 12, no 1, p. 133-152Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study is to find a theoretically grounded, practically applicable and useful granularity level of an algorithmically constructed publication-level classification of research publications (ACPLC). The level addressed is the level of research topics. The methodology we propose uses synthesis papers and their reference articles to construct a baseline classification. A dataset of about 31 million publications, and their mutual citations relations, is used to obtain several ACPLCs of different granularity. Each ACPLC is compared to the baseline classification and the best performing ACPLC is identified. The results of two case studies show that the topics of the cases are closely associated with different classes of the identified ACPLC, and that these classes tend to treat only one topic. Further, the class size variation is moderate, and only a small proportion of the publications belong to very small classes. For these reasons, we conclude that the proposed methodology is suitable to determine the topic granularity level of an ACPLC and that the ACPLC identified by this methodology is useful for bibliometric analyses. 

  • 325.
    Smedberg, Åsa
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Double-loop learning conversations in an online community on overweight2005In: IADIS International Conference on Cognition and Exploratory Learning in Digital Age, 2005, p. 383-386Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The members of online health-communities are growing in number. One type of health-community is the one for people who suffer from overweight, who want to change behavior to lose weight. Learning a new behavior calls for investigating patterns of events, to question the way events are presented, and to create new mental models. This paper presents the results from a study of learning conversations held in an online community on overweight. In the conversations on learning, the most frequently used type of response was the one sympathizing with the ideas and beliefs of the sender, while the least used type of response was the one that rejected the ideas presented by the sender. Furthermore, there were more examples of members who presented counter-ideas in the conversations on obstacles and incentives than in the conversations on personal setbacks.

  • 326.
    Soliman, Amira
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Communication Networks.
    Bahri, Leila
    Carminati, Barbara
    Ferrari, Elena
    Girdzijauskas, Sarunas
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Communication Networks.
    DIVa: Decentralized Identity Validation for Social Networks2015In: PROCEEDINGS OF THE 2015 IEEE/ACM INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON ADVANCES IN SOCIAL NETWORKS ANALYSIS AND MINING (ASONAM 2015), Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2015, p. 383-391Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Online Social Networks exploit a lightweight process to identify their users so as to facilitate their fast adoption. However, such convenience comes at the price of making legitimate users subject to different threats created by fake accounts. Therefore, there is a crucial need to empower users with tools helping them in assigning a level of trust to whomever they interact with. To cope with this issue, in this paper we introduce a novel model, DIVa, that leverages on mining techniques to find correlations among user profile attributes. These correlations are discovered not from user population as a whole, but from individual communities, where the correlations are more pronounced. DIVa exploits a decentralized learning approach and ensures privacy preservation as each node in the OSN independently processes its local data and is required to know only its direct neighbors. Extensive experiments using real-world OSN datasets show that DIVa is able to extract fine-grained community-aware correlations among profile attributes with average improvements up to 50% than the global approach.

  • 327. Song, W. W.
    et al.
    Andersson, Mats
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Numerical Analysis and Computer Science, NADA.
    A Component-based Framework for Description and Management of Learning Objects1999In: Proceedings of WebNet World Conference on the WWW and Internet 1999, 1999, p. 1424-1425Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The growth of the Internet and the World Wide Web is transforming teaching and learning at all levels of education in the workplace and at home [IMS]. The information pieces or resources for purposes of learning and education construct a new type of web resources. This new kind of web resources with quite distinct features is evolving on the Internet, called Learning Domain. An important characteristic of these resources (asynchronous systems) is that it can be used as a teaching medium as well as a source of knowledge about a subject area [MBA1, MBA2]. Two major parts, closely related to a learning domain, are learning resource providers and consumers. The information providers supply learning resources and the information consumers use the learning resources. Usually, learning information, such as courses, is stored and managed in an information system or a local web site. The supplier may give a sort of description of the structure of the information. This description is termed as metadata. A means for the information suppliers to describe metadata is called metadata model. From the point of view of the resource consumers, they expect to easily find the exact learning knowledge they need. The requirements and goals express what sort of learning materials they are seeking. The consumers may also provide their profiles as support. Indeed, profiles are sometime quite helpful. However, these requirements and goals can be vague, ambiguous, and even in conflicts. The profiles provided by the end users are very likely incomplete and bias-prone. In the next section, we describe several concepts used in the paper. In section 3, we propose a metadata model for learning objects through defining possible components within a learning domain. Then in section 4, we discuss an implementation issue for learning system based on a metadata tool. In the final section we conclude the paper with some discussions of our future work.

  • 328. Spyridonis, F.
    et al.
    Taylor, S. J. E.
    Abbott, P.
    Barbera, R.
    Nungu, A.
    Gustafsson, L. L.
    Pehrson, Björn
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT).
    Oaiya, O.
    Banda, T.
    A study on the state-of-the-art of e-infrastructures uptake in Africa2015In: Palgrave Communications, ISSN 2055-1045, Vol. 1, article id 14007Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    e-Science is a pioneering method that uses integrated collections of Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs), or e-Infrastructures, to enable scientists across the world to collaboratively work on more and more ambitious projects. Have advances and access to ICTs enabled African e-Infrastructure development? This paper aims to understand the current state of e-Infrastructure uptake in Africa and present some of these initiatives across the African continent by exploring the current landscape emerging from a survey of early consumers. These initiatives are discussed in terms of key projects and user communities that they are addressing. In line with wider perceptions that e-Infrastructures will re-shape the ways research is performed, this study yielded 34 current or planned e-Infrastructure projects across 13 African countries addressing a range of research domains, and identified 7 user communities across these disciplines. Our findings suggest that the African research community is increasingly interested and involved in e-Infrastructure development activities in response to the issue of limited access to dedicated global research and education resources. The study can contribute to the ongoing discussion on how e-Infrastructures can positively promote the research, technological development and innovation potential of developing countries. 

  • 329. Stahl, Anna
    et al.
    Lowgren, Jonas
    Höök, Kristina
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Evocative Balance: Designing for Interactional Empowerment2014In: International Journal of Design, ISSN 1991-3761, E-ISSN 1994-036X, Vol. 8, no 1, p. 43-57Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We propose an experiential quality called evocative balance as key in designing for affective interaction that aims to empower users in and through the interaction. Evocative balance draws on the dual meaning of the word "evoke" in characterizing the user's sense that data and actions evoke familiar recollections of lived experience, yet are still open enough to evoke multiple interpretations in an ongoing process of co-constructive making of meaning. Our aim is to capture those experiences that resonate with our lived, everyday, social and bodily experiences; those experiences that we can recognise in ourselves and, through empathy, in others. We elaborate on and substantiate the meaning of this quality by means of retrospective reflection on three of our own design projects. This account provides detailed insights on how to find the balance between openness and familiarity through design.

  • 330. Strangert, E.
    et al.
    Gustafson, Joakim
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH.
    What makes a good speaker?: Subject ratings, acoustic measurements and perceptual evaluations2008In: Proc. Annu. Conf. Int. Speech. Commun. Assoc., INTERSPEECH, 2008, p. 1688-1691Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper deals with subjective qualities and acoustic-prosodic features contributing to the impression of a good speaker. Subjects rated a variety of samples of political speech on a number of subjective qualities and acoustic features were extracted from the speech samples. A perceptual evaluation was also conducted with manipulations of F0 dynamics, fluency and speech rate with the sample of the lowest rated speaker as a basis. Subjects' ranking revealed a clear preference for modified versions over the original with F0 dynamics - a wider range - being the most powerful cue.

  • 331.
    Strålin, Per
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Machine Design.
    CFD modeling of mixture formation in direct injected HCCI engines2004Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other scientific)
  • 332. Suh, D.
    et al.
    Hwang, J.
    Oh, Donghyun
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre of Excellence for Science and Innovation Studies, CESIS (closed 20110701).
    Do software intellectual property rights affect the performance of firms?: Case study of South Korea2008In: Proc. - Int. Conf. Softw. Eng. Adv., ICSEA, Inlucdes ENTISY: Int. Workshop Enterp. Inf. Sys., 2008, p. 307-312Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study is to find the relationship between software intellectual property rights (IPRs) and the performance of software firms in South Korea. In order to measure the performance of software firms, we employed the concept of efficiency of Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA). With measured efficiency, we use tobit regression to investigate which IPR has a stronger effect on efficiency. The empirical results show an obvious tendency: the average efficiency of software firms having any kind of software IPR is higher than that of firms not having them. Moreover, the results of tobit analysis show that both software copyrights and patents have a positive effect on the performance of software firms, and that the effect of patents is higher than that of copyrights.

  • 333. Sun, Fei
    et al.
    Zheng, Bin
    Chen, Hongsheng
    Jiang, Wei
    Guo, Shuwei
    Liu, Yichao
    Ma, Yungui
    He, Sailing
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Electromagnetic Engineering. KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Centres, Zhejiang-KTH Joint Research Center of Photonics, JORCEP.
    Transformation Optics: From Classic Theory and Applications to its New Branches2017In: Laser & Photonics reviews, ISSN 1863-8880, E-ISSN 1863-8899, Vol. 11, no 6, article id 1700034Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the modern world, the ability to manipulate and control electromagnetic waves has greatly changed people's lives. Novel optical and electromagnetic phenomena and devices will lead to new scientific trends and techniques in the future. The exploration of new theories of optical design and new materials for optical engineering has attracted great attention in recent years. Transformation optics (TO) provides a new way to design optical devices with extraordinary predesigned functions such as invisibility cloaks and electromagnetic wormholes. As the development of artificial electromagnetic media (e.g. metamaterials and metasurfaces) progresses, many of these novel optical devices designed by TO have been experimentally demonstrated and used in specific applications. Starting from the basic theory of transformation optics, we review its applications, extensions, new branches and recent developments in this paper.

  • 334.
    Swartling, Anna
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Human - Computer Interaction, MDI.
    The Good Person in Information Systems Development: A Reflexive Investigation of HCI in the Acquisition Process2008Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other scientific)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis is an exploration of why the development of ICT (Information and Communication Technology) systems (IS) does not include more humanistic issues. I argue that this exclusion is one reason for the annoying situation of users and organizations: we are forced to deal with poorly designed systems that cause major frustration. In this reflexive investigation I present theories, data, analysis and arguments in the form of a theatrical script. With the theatre metaphor I aim to make visible the ideological elements not only within IS acquisition but also within research, in particular HCI research. The thesis includes three studies performed during 2003-2005: two interview studies with a total of 47 interviews, and one field study with extensive observations and 22 interviews. The material was analyzed with a focus on power structures and the ways common sense is constructed within the discourses of Information Systems Development (ISD). The theoretical perspective is inspired by discourse theory, social constructionism, and reflexivity. The main argument is that ISD is pervaded by a truth construct in which rationality and logic constitutes the norm and everything else, including humans, becomes subordinate. In my analysis of the research material I see that user participation through informal “methods” and user representation does not lead to meaningful involvement; instead it adds to the power structures in which ICT expertise and technology determination are hegemonic. I distinguish several significant subjects within the discourses of ISD and argue that the ways they are construed and positioned relate to certain functions; for example ICT experts as authority and users as trouble makers both function to exclude users from ISD. HCI has an important role as a resistive discourse but to increase its impact we must refocus our attention on systems development, directing our efforts towards the procurers of ICT systems instead of trying to integrate human perspectives into the functional paradigm.

  • 335.
    Szekely, Eva
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH.
    Mendelson, Joseph
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH.
    Gustafson, Joakim
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH.
    Synthesising uncertainty: The interplay of vocal effort and hesitation disfluencies2017In: Proceedings of the Annual Conference of the International Speech Communication Association, INTERSPEECH, International Speech Communication Association , 2017, Vol. 2017, p. 804-808Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As synthetic voices become more flexible, and conversational systems gain more potential to adapt to the environmental and social situation, the question needs to be examined, how different modifications to the synthetic speech interact with each other and how their specific combinations influence perception. This work investigates how the vocal effort of the synthetic speech together with added disfluencies affect listeners' perception of the degree of uncertainty in an utterance. We introduce a DNN voice built entirely from spontaneous conversational speech data and capable of producing a continuum of vocal efforts, prolongations and filled pauses with a corpus-based method. Results of a listener evaluation indicate that decreased vocal effort, filled pauses and prolongation of function words increase the degree of perceived uncertainty of conversational utterances expressing the speaker's beliefs. We demonstrate that the effect of these three cues are not merely additive, but that interaction effects, in particular between the two types of disfluencies and between vocal effort and prolongations need to be considered when aiming to communicate a specific level of uncertainty. The implications of these findings are relevant for adaptive and incremental conversational systems using expressive speech synthesis and aspiring to communicate the attitude of uncertainty.

  • 336.
    Sörlin, Sverker
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science and Technology.
    Body and Soul: Notes on Challenges to Freedom2010In: Nordicom Information, ISSN 0349-5949, Vol. 32, no 2-3, p. 29-37Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 337.
    Sörlin, Sverker
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science and Technology.
    Offentlighetens upprätthållande2010In: Journalistisk kvalitet: En antologi om hot och möjligheter när medievärlden förändras / [ed] Torbjörn von Krogh, Stockholm: Sim(o) mediestudier.se , 2010, p. 209-222Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 338.
    Sörlin, Sverker
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science and Technology (name changed 20120201).
    Johnsson, Philip
    Edbergstiftelsen.
    Messelt, Julia
    SVT.
    Det har ljusnat för miljöjournalistiken2008In: Journalisten, ISSN 0022-5592, Vol. 19Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 339.
    Teljas, Cecilia
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Graphic Arts, Media.
    Jonsson, Alex
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Graphic Arts, Media.
    Enlund, Nils
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Graphic Arts, Media.
    Consumer expectations as drivers of media change2007In: ADVANCES IN PRINTING AND MEDIA TECHNOLOGY, VOL XXXIV / [ed] Enlund, N, Lovrecek, M, Zagreb: ACTA GRAPHICA PUBL , 2007, Vol. 34, p. 345-354Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Media development is not only driven by new technological innovations, but to a great extent by changes in consumer habits, attitudes, and expectations oil what media should offer and ill what ways. This report identifies a key set of trends that define and characterize the consumers' conceptions of media today and their expectations on the media of the future. Among the main drivers of change in this respect are consumer generated content, a prevalent view of media as social amplifiers, content aggregation and search as a Substitute for editorial packaging, the ubiquity and mobility of media, the trend toward context aware media, ail increasing commoditization of media, a reduced willingness to pay for content,the effects of globalization, ail increasing focus oil environmental sustainability, and the intertwined forces of convergence and divergence in different aspects of the media landscape. Media companies should closely follow the changing trends and attitudes ill society when developing strategies for expansion and survival.

  • 340.
    Tobiasson, Helena
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Traces of Movement: Exploring physical activity in societal settings2015Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    How are we moving, or how much physical activities are present in societal settingssuch as eldercare units, schools, universities and offices? This general question was explored using different design-oriented approaches in four cases, with children,elderly, students and office workers. The results unveil a complexity of the problemarea that initially seemed quite straightforward. In many of the explored settings and situations, and for many of the participants, the activities they are engaged with do not include or encourage their abilities for physical movements to any great extent and this is not in line with the extent of movement that they actually desire. Physical activity can be defined as an activity performed through movement that expends energy. Research results from the public health domains and related areas show a major concern for the negative effects related to low levels of physical activity and prolonged sedentary postures found in many of the above-mentioned settings. In general, physical activities of today seem mainly related to sports, and specific activities designed for improving health and well-being. The participants in the four explorative case studies in this thesis demonstrated how they would like their physical activities to be integrated in the everyday activities of the different settings explored and not mainly as a separate activity specifically dedicated for health and well-being. How can knowledge of physical activity inform the design and development of interactive products and systems in these settings? New insights were gained through design-oriented explorations together with the participants inthe different field settings and through analysis of these observations. The results are not only the insights gained through the analysed empirical observations but also include a physical activity-oriented design method called Physical Movement Sketching as well as experiences from using Movement Probes. The experiences from using these two design methods led me to formulate a proposal for a new approach called Movement Acumen Design. This approach applies a socioecological perspective on physical activities. It provides methods and concepts to support the integration of physical activities into everyday activities performed with the support of interactive technology and it argues that physical activity should reclaim a more central role in these situations. Let us design for it to happen!

  • 341.
    Tollmar, Konrad
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Communication Systems, CoS. KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Centres, Center for Wireless Systems, Wireless@kth.
    Design by Use2005In: Lund on Informatics, Liber , 2005Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 342.
    Tollmar, Konrad
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Communication Systems, CoS.
    Huang, Chengcheng
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Communication Systems, CoS.
    Boosting mobile experience sampling with social media2015In: MobileHCI 2015: Proceedings of the 17th International Conference on Human-Computer Interaction with Mobile Devices and Services, ACM Press, 2015, p. 525-530Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper describes a study of how social media could be integrated and used in Mobile Experience Sampling. As addressed in previous studies, Experience Sampling Method relies on high response frequency. However participants may experience it as a burden which may cause delay or even suspension of data collection. We have developed a system that allows participants in Mobile Experience Sampling studies to share their questions and answers on social media. We tested our system in a group of 40 participants. The study shows that enabled sharing of ESM questions significantly increased response and participation rates, in our test by +43%, which also indicates its influence on participants’ compliance and motivation levels. This paper presents the study and discusses some further use and influence of social media in Experience Sampling.

  • 343.
    Tollmar, Konrad
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Communication Systems, CoS. KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Centres, Center for Wireless Systems, Wireless@kth.
    Ramberg, Robert
    Harling, Linus
    On Derive for Mobile Experience2010In: Observing the mobileuser experience: Proceedings of the 1st International Workshop, 2010, p. 21-24Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this workshop note we describe a new approach we used fordoing mobile user experience research. The method is build uponsituationist theory and the Dérive method, and is used for inspiremobile storytelling. We outline some of the challenges we facedand the lessons learned based on these experiences and highlightwhat we see as the key areas to focus on, in terms of carrying outmobile user experience research on real use of mobile services inthe future.

  • 344.
    Tollmar, Konrad
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Communication Systems, CoS. KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Centres, Center for Wireless Systems, Wireless@kth.
    Ramberg, Robert
    Harling, Linus
    On The Derive for Mobile Experience2011In: Wi: Journal of Mobile Media, ISSN 1918-2104Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 345.
    Uddin, Misbah
    et al.
    KTH.
    Monir, M. I.
    Iqbal, S.Md.A.
    A QoS aware route selection mechanism using analytic hierarchy process for mobile Ad Hoc network2009In: ICCIT 2009 - Proceedings of 2009 12th International Conference on Computer and Information Technology, 2009, p. 552-557Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To truly realize potential of MANET, multimedia services must be provisioned with a minimum level of QoS. To meet the QoS requirement of such services, many attributes need to be considered. To keep the routing process lightweight, standard QoS aware routing protocol in MANET works with one or two such parameters. In this paper, we have proposed an on-demand source routing protocol for MANET that works with six important QoS attributes by varying priority for different category of traffic flow. We have reflected this variation by incorporating Analytic Hierarchy Process in the proposal.

  • 346. Ur Rehman, S.
    et al.
    Khan, M. S. L.
    Li, L.
    Li, Haibo
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Vibrotactile TV for immersive experience2014In: 2014 Asia-Pacific Signal and Information Processing Association Annual Summit and Conference, APSIPA 2014, IEEE conference proceedings, 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Audio and video are two powerful media forms to shorten the distance between audience/viewer and actors or players in the TV and films. The recent research shows that today people are using more and more multimedia contents on mobile devices, such as tablets and smartphones. Therefore, an important question emerges - how can we render high-quality, personal immersive experiences to consumers on these systems? To give audience an immersive engagement that differs from 'watching a play', we have designed a study to render complete immersive media which include the 'emotional information' based on augmented vibrotactile-coding on the back of the user along with audio-video signal. The reported emotional responses to videos viewed with and without haptic enhancement, show that participants exhibited an increased emotional response to media with haptic enhancement. Overall, these studies suggest that the effectiveness of our approach and using a multisensory approach increase immersion and user satisfaction.

  • 347. Van Den Besselaar, Peter
    et al.
    Heyman, Ulf
    Sandström, Ulf
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Sustainability and Industrial Dynamics.
    Perverse effects of output-based research funding? Butler's Australian case revisited2017In: Journal of Informetrics, ISSN 1751-1577, E-ISSN 1875-5879, Vol. 11, no 3, p. 905-918Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    More than ten years ago, Linda Butler (2003a) published a well-cited article claiming that the Australian science policy in the early 1990s made a mistake by introducing output based funding. According to Butler, the policy stimulated researchers to publish more but at the same time less good papers, resulting in lower total impact of Australian research compared to other countries. We redo and extend the analysis using longer time series, and show that Butlers’ main conclusions are not correct. We conclude in this paper (i) that the currently available data reject Butler’s claim that “journal publication productivity has increased significantly… but its impact has declined”, and (ii) that it is hard to find such evidence also with a reconstruction of her data. On the contrary, after implementing evaluation systems and performance based funding, Australia not only improved its share of research output but also increased research quality, implying that total impact was greatly increased. Our findings show that if output based research funding has an effect on research quality, it is positive and not negative. This finding has implications for the discussions about research evaluation and about assumed perverse effects of incentives, as in those debates the Australian case plays a major role.

  • 348. van den Besselaar, Peter
    et al.
    Sandström, Ulf
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Counterintuitive effects of incentives?2017In: Research Evaluation, ISSN 0958-2029, E-ISSN 1471-5449, Vol. 26, no 4, p. 349-351Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    A recent paper in this journal compares the Norwegian model of using publications counts for university funding with a similar intervention in Australia in the mid-1990 s. The authors argue that the Norwegian model (taking into account the quality of publications) performs better than the Australian (which did neglect paper quality other than being peer reviewed). We argue that these conclusions are in contrast to the evidence provided in the article, and therefore should be considered incorrect.

  • 349.
    van den Besselaar, Peter
    et al.
    Vrije Univ Amsterdam, Network Inst, Amsterdam, Netherlands.;Vrije Univ Amsterdam, Dept Org Sci, Amsterdam, Netherlands..
    Sandström, Ulf
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Measuring researcher independence using bibliometric data: A proposal for a new performance indicator2019In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 14, no 3, article id e0202712Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Bibliometric indicators are increasingly used to evaluate individual scientists-as is exemplified by the popularity of the many other publication and citation-based indicators used in evaluation. These indicators, however, cover at best some of the quality dimensions relevant for assessing a researcher: productivity and impact. At the same time, research quality has more dimensions than productivity and impact alone. As current bibliometric indicators are not covering various important quality dimensions, we here contribute to developing better indicators for those quality dimensions not yet addressed. One of the quality dimensions lacking valid indicators is an individual researcher's independence. We propose indicators to measure different aspects of independence: two assessing whether a researcher has developed an own collaboration network and two others assessing the level of thematic independence. Taken together they form an independence indicator. We illustrate how these indicators distinguish between researchers that are equally productive and have a considerable impact. The independence indicator is a step forward in evaluating individual scholarly quality.

  • 350. Van Sinderen, M.
    et al.
    Johnson, Pontus
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Industrial Information and Control Systems.
    Doumeingts, G.
    Computer in industry special issue on "interoperability and future internet for next-generation enterprises" editorial and state of the art2013In: Computers in industry (Print), ISSN 0166-3615, E-ISSN 1872-6194, Vol. 64, no 8, p. 881-886Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The 2013 Special Issue of Computers in Industry Journal describes papers on 'Interoperability and Future Internet for Next-Generation Enterprises' from the 3rd International IFIP Working Conference on Enterprise Interoperability. The first article, 'Towards a business model reference for interoperability services' by Otto, Ebner, Baghi, and Bittmann, addresses the lack of business models for enterprise interoperability. The next article, 'Structural elements of coordination mechanisms in collaborative planning process and their assessment through maturity models' by Cuenca, Boza, and Alemany, considers the maturity assessment of a specific kind of business-level enterprise interoperability, namely collaborative planning processes. An article by Coutinho, Cretan, and Jardim-Goncalves, titled 'Sustainable Interoperability on Space Mission Feasibility Studies,' proposes a framework for achieving sustainable interoperability covering both businesspeople aspects and technology aspects.

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